BHO

Regesta 132: 1337

Pages 562-567

Calendar of Papal Registers Relating To Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 2, 1305-1342. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1895.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying and sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. All rights reserved.

Citation:

Table of contents

Regesta, Vol. CXXXII.

3 Benedict XII. (fn. 1)

5 Kal. Feb.
Avignon.
(f. 7.)
To Master Philip de Cambarlhaco, canon of St. Peter's, Rome, papal chaplain. The pope has received his letters touching the concord between the kings of France and England, and repeats his instructions to him to await king Edward's answer, which will teach him what he has further to do. The answer is to be sent to the pope.
8 Id. Feb.
Avignon.
(f. 9.)
To the same. The pope, having received his last letters, desires him to return, unless there has been any change made touching the answer he has received.
1337.
14 Kal. April.
Avignon.
(f. 19d.)
To Master Bernard Sistre, papal nuncio. Acquittance of 887l. 10s. collected by him from Peter's pence, the fruits of void benefices, and the residue of the four years’ tenth imposed by John XXII. and the fruits of other benefices during the said four years, and paid over on the 18th of December last to Robert de Enfangatis of the Bardi, Galeactius of the Alberti, John Baroncelli of the Perusii, and Lotus Corbutii of the Azayali, dwelling in London, in four parts, one to each of the said societies, and assigned by them in the sum of 6000 florins, that is, of 1500 apiece, to the papal camera, by Nicholas Ferrucii of the Bardi, Feresius Falconerii of the Alberti, Philip Villani of the Perusii, and Laurence Johannis of the Azayali, dwelling at the Roman court, to whom an acquittance for the same is given.
8 Kal. May.
Avignon.
(f. 26d.)
To the same. Acquittance of 128l. 16s. 2d. collected by him from the residue of the tenth, and fruits of void benefices, Holy Land legacies, and Peter's Pence, in England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, and assigned to the papal camera.
17 Kal. June.
Avignon.
(f. 49.)
To the king. Master Bernard Sistre, canon of St. Hilary's Poitiers, papal nuncio, has brought letters of credence from the king, and has explained the matters with which he was charged, to which the nuncio will bring the pope's answer by word of mouth.
Ibid. To John, archbishop of Canterbury. The pope has received his letters, and those of the king, sent by Master Bernard, and is sending answer by the same nuncio.
9 Kal. July.
Avignon.
(f. 49.)
To the archbishop of Sens. Requesting him to interpose in the interest of peace between the kings of France and England, touching which the pope is sending Peter, cardinal of St. Praxed's, and Bertrand, cardinal of St. Mary's in Aquiro. The pope desires the archbishop to persuade the king of France to desist from warlike manifestations, which will render the treating of peace more difficult.
Ibid.
(f. 49d.)
To the archbishop of Rouen. The like.
2 Id. June.
Avignon.
(f. 49d.)
To the same. Soliciting him to inform the pope of what he has done, as the pope desired him, when at Avignon, to mitigate or put a stop to the war between the kings of France and England.
Ibid.
(f. 50.)
To William, archbishop of Sens. The like.
8 Kal. July.
Avignon.
(f. 50.)
To Philip, king of France. Requesting him to turn his mind to peace, and to abstain from fresh warlike action, as the cardinals whom the pope is sending will direct. The pope requests him to receive the bearer of this letter, Master Peter Burgundionis de Romanis, treasurer of Laon, papal chaplain and auditor, who is going also to the king of England, and to listen to the message he bears from the pope.
Ibid.
(f. 50d.)
To the king of England. The like, mutatis mutundis.
3 Id. July.
Avignon.
(f. 50d.)
To the king of France. The pope learns that it has been suggested to the king that he should absolve the counts of Gueldre and Juliers from their oaths of fealty to the king; and that a certain English bishop found in Burgundy or Lorraine, bearer of papal letters to the king of England, insisted that they should not be opened until they reached their destination. Touching the oaths of the said counts, who have not petitioned to have them relaxed, the pope reminds the king that he can do nothing unless moved thereto by him. Touching the bishop, the pope has learned from his chancery that the bishop, who said he was molested by the king of England, obtained papal letters commending him to the king. The pope does not know whether forged letters were found on the bishop or others, but has often heard of forgers of papal letters, which, however can easily be detected, as all, whether open or close, are registered by the papal camera. The pope trusts that those who suggest false and mendacious things to the king, and strive to break the bond of charity between them, and disturb the king, may fail to attain their end. The pope asks the king to beware of evil tongues, and to shut his ears to such suggestions, assuring him that he will find no duplicity in the pope, who is writing to the king of England, to the count of Juliers and Lewis of Bavaria, the tenour of which letters will be shown to the king by his envoys now at the papal court.
13 Kal. Aug.
Avignon.
(f. 51.)
To the king of England. Recapitulating the matters touching the election of Lewis of Bavaria, king of the Romans, condemned for heresy, and that of the antipope, Peter de Corbaria [Nicholas V.] and requiring him to retract and abstain from all dealings with Lewis, about whose reconciliation treaties are still pending with the pope, who has received the king's envoys in regard thereof. He reminds the king of the confederation made by his ancestor king Edward with certain magnates of Almain, of whose faith and promises, and how they kept them, the truth may be learned from the annals of the past. Master Paul de Montefloro, the king's envoy, has laid before the pope the king's request for licence to make a confederation with Lewis, but considering the stain which this would bring on the king's glory and honour, it is refused for many reasons, which the said envoy will represent to the king.
Ibid.
(f. 52.)
To John, archbishop of Canterbury. Enjoining him to induce the king to acquiesce in the pope's prayers and exhortations contained in the above letter.
Ibid.
(f. 52d.)
To the bishops of Lincoln and Winchester, and to William earl of Salisbury The like.
1337.
7 Kal. Oct.
Avignon.
(f. 87.)
To Peter, cardinal of St. Praxed's, and Bertrand, cardinal of St. Mary's in Aquiro, papal nuncios. The pope is pleased to hear what they have done touching the peace between the kings of France and England; but is grieved to learn that commissaries of the king of France induce and compel prelates and other ecclesiastics of that realm to contribute a subsidy for the war. The nuncios are to represent to the king of France, of whose cognisance of such action the pope cannot believe, that this is done in derogation of ecclesiastical liberty, and contempt of the apostolic see, and to persuade the king not to permit it.
3 Kal. Oct.
Avignon.
(f. 87.)
To the same. The pope has this day received their letters, and he rejoices that the king of France is ready to make peace, and has ordered his men in Gascony to cease from the 3rd or 4th of October until Christmas from further execution of his ordinance touching the subjugation of Aquitaine, and for attacking the king of England and his men, unless that king invades either France or Scotland, with certain other conditions contained at length in the said letters and schedules. The pope desires the nuncios to continue their solicitude, and informs them that he is writing to the king of France on the above and other matters.
5 Non. Oct.
Avignon.
(f. 87d.)
To Philip, king of France. The pope has received two of his letters of the 17th, and one of the 24th of September. To the first two touching the matter of the king of England and Lewis of Bavaria, the absolution of the counts of Germany, and the letters addressed to the said king found on a bishop in Burgundy or Lorraine, the pope assures king Philip of the sincerity of his affection. To the third letter touching the envoys whom the king purposed to send to Lewis, and afterwards withheld, and touching the mission of the cardinals, Peter and Bertrand, the pope replies that he has heard of the suspension of hostilities until Christmas; he does not think it expedient that royal envoys should be sent to him in regard to the reconciliation of Lewis. He thanks the king for his reception of the cardinals and his acquiescence in their counsels regarding the peace.
3 Id. Oct.
Avignon.
(f. 89.)
To Peter, cardinal of St. Praxed's, and Bertrand, cardinal of St. Mary's in Aquiro, papal nuncios. It would be better that they should go to meet the king of England before he leaves his realm, and not await his coming to France; for once there, he cannot easily return, and the Teutons who want to get his pay would incite him to war. That the spark may not become a flame, the nuncios should dissuade the king from crossing the sea; but should access to him be only possible at evident risk to their persons, they are not to expose themselves to it.
8 Id. Nov.
Avignon.
(f. 89d.)
To Philip, king of France. Touching the affairs of Almain, and enclosing a schedule of provisions sent to the pope, namely, that if Lewis of Bavaria resigns, the king of England should be elected king of the Romans, and promoted to be emperor; or, that the king of England should be elevated to the empire and realm of Almain. Also, that if this cannot be done, he should be deputed for life vicar of the realm of Lower Almain, so as to be nearer to France, and so better able to attack it. To carry out this, a large deposit of money and precious things has been made, and hostages have been assigned. That almost all the secular princes of Germany, except the king of Bohemia, have united against France. Also, that to this end large forces by land and sea are to be collected, a share of the expense being borne by England. Also, that if anyone in Almain brings help to France the Almain princes shall seize his land, and that of the consenting lord under whom he holds. Also, that whoever withdraws from the Almain league shall be deprived of wife and children, and his goods destroyed. Also, that this confederation and league shall last during the life of Lewis and his sons, that of the king of England and his son and successor, and those of the Almain princes and their sons, so that, should the league be dissolved by the apostolic see, and others be relaxed, the confederates shall be bound by their promises and temporal penalties. Also that peace shall not be made with France, unless each and all consent to it. Also, that to more firmly bind them marriages should be made between English and Teutons.
To these are appended further informations, to which the pope draws the attention of the king of France, and points out that the way to defeat the object of the league would be to put an end to the difference between the kings of France and England touching the duchy of Aquitaine, for if they were united, the Teutons would be unable to injure France. The pope advises king Philip to take precautions, not only against invaders of his realm, but also against those who threaten his life and that of his eldest son.
8 Id. Nov.
Avignon.
(f. 91.)
To Edward, king of England. Warning him against the dangers of the Teutonic confederation, and pointing out that peace and union with France would be of more advantage to both kings and their subjects; and to this end the pope exhorts him to come to an agreement touching the duchy of Aquitaine.
Ibid.
(f. 91d.)
To the cardinal nuncios. Enclosing copies of the letters which the pope is writing to the kings of France and England.
2 Kal. Nov.
Avignon.
(f. 93.)
To the same. They will have received the pope's letters in reply to theirs informing him of their leaving Paris and going towards Amiens, touching the kings of France and England in regard to the regalia and the oppression of churches. If on receiving them they returned to the king of France to speak to him on their contents, their principal business would have been delayed; but as they committed the matter to the archbishop's of Sens and Rouen the pope commends their foresight, for it was not his intention to hinder the chief object of their mission, as by another closed letter he explained to them. As their letters informed the pope that the king of England was about to cross the sea, it is the more necessary that they should hasten to England as fast as they can without risk, so as to arrive before the king's departure.
Non. June.
Avignon.
(f. 117d.)
To members of the society of the Azayali of Florence. Acquittance for a fourth part of 887l. 10s., collected by Bernard Sistre in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland, and paid over by him on 18 December last to Robert de Enfangatis of the Bardi, Galeatius of the Alberti, John Baronchelli of the Perusii, and Lottus Carbucii of their society, dwelling in London, in four parts, one to each, in the sum of 6000 florins, at the rate of 35½d. a florin, and assigned to Nicholas Ferrucii of the Bardi, Feresius Falconerii of the Alberti, Philip Villani of the Perusii, and Laurence Johannis of their society, for the papal camera, for which sum a receipt was given addressed to Bernard Sistre on 14th April last.

Footnotes

  • 1. Rubricæ litterarum que transierunt per cameram.