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Lateran Regesta 116: 1404

Pages 604-611

Calendar of Papal Registers Relating To Great Britain and Ireland: Volume 5, 1398-1404. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1904.

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In this section

Lateran Regesta, Vol. CXVI.

15 Boniface IX.

De Officio Tabellionatus.

(ff. 1-12.) The office of notary is conferred or ordered to be conferred, or faculty is given to confer it, on the following. The Incipit is, as usual, Ne contractuum, and the letters are all dated at St. Peter's, Rome.
1404.
3 Non. July.
William Treueth, clerk, not married and not in holy orders, of the diocese of Exeter, under faculty to the archdeacon of Canterbury, who is to examine him.
Id. Jan. John Marum, priest, of the diocese of Lincoln, under faculty to the precentor of Lincoln, who is to examine him.
1404.
15 Kal. April.
John Bonde alias de Stalham, priest, of the diocese of Norwich, who has been examined by Master Bartholomew Francisci, provost of St. Stephen's, Prato, in the diocese of Pistoja, regent of the chancery of the holy Roman church.
Ibid. George Smyth, of Hyndelveston, priest, of the same diocese, who has been examined by the same.
1403.
6 Kal. Jan.
William (corrected in margin from John) Heyne, clerk, not married, etc., as above, under faculty to the abbot of St. Mary's, Combe (de Comba), in the diocese of Lichfield, who is to examine him.
1404.
3 Non. Apr. (sic.)
Richard Swetappull, priest, of the diocese of Chichester, under faculty to the dean of Chichester, who is to examine him. [See below.]
8 Kal. April. John ap Bleddyn, clerk, not married, etc., as above, of the diocese of St. Asaph, who has been examined by Turibius, bishop of Tuy.
6 Id. May. Ralph de Cleyns, priest, of the diocese of Lichfield, under faculty to the archdeacon of Chester, who is to examine him.
Ibid. Thomas Peyntour, married clerk, dwelling in the city of Dublin, under faculty to the bishop of Kildare, who is to examine him.
2 Id. June. Sampson Maycok of Hampton, married clerk, of the diocese of Lincoln, under faculty to the abbot of Lettele in the diocese of Winchester, who is to examine him.
3 Non. July. (sic.) Richard Swetappull, priest, of the diocese of Chichester, under faculty to the dean of Chichester, who is to examine him. [See above. Here registered in full.]
17 Kal. Aug. John Lorchan, clerk, not married, etc., as above, of the diocese of Cork (Conchagen.), under faculty to the abbot of St. Mary's Graces by the Tower of London, who is to examine him.
4 Id. June. William Bodeman, clerk, not married, etc., as above, of the diocese of Rochester, under faculty to the dean of St. Paul's, London, who is to examine him.
Ibid. John Smyth, priest, perpetual vicar of Testan in the diocese of Rochester, under mandate to the prior of Rochester, who is to examine him.

De Confessionalibus.

14 Kal. March.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 13.)
To John Wotton, rector of Stapulhurst in the diocese of Canterbury. Indult to hear the confessions of all parishioners of his churches of Stapulhurst and Maydeston in the said diocese, and to grant them absolution, even in cases reserved to bishops, enjoining a salutary penance; except in cases reserved to the apostolic see. Benigno sunt tibi.
14 Kal. March.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 13.)
To John Cateby, rector of Chelmesforde in the diocese of London, licentiate of civil law. The like for the parishioners of his churches of Chelmesforde and Kyngeslone in the dioceses of London and Hereford. Benigno etc. [This and the preceding are registered in full.]
(f. 13d.) Indults (fn. 1) to the following to choose their confessor who may hear their confessions and grant them absolution, except in cases reserved to the apostolic see. The letters are all dated at St. Peter's, Rome, and the Incipit is, as usual, Benigno etc.
Kal. March. John Hardepirie, Benedictine monk of St. Peter's, Gloucester.
Id. Richard Hertelaunde, monk of the same.
Id. John Marwent, monk of the same.
3 Non. April. John Tycheborne, Benedictine monk of Winchester.
4 Kal. May. Eleanor Becke, of the diocese of Winchester.
Non. July. John Morhay, priest, of the diocese of Exeter.

De Diversis Formis.

14 Kal. Aug.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 37.)
Confirmation, at the petition of the master, called warden, and canons of the college of minor canons in St. Paul's, London, of its institution and erection by bishop Robert Braybrok, within the close (clausuram) or immunity (emunitatem).
Exemplification is given of the public instrument which, drawn up as below and dated 1404, indiction 12, 15 Boniface IX, May 12, in the church of London, exemplifies (i), the sealed letters—Univ. sancte, etc. Pastoralis officii, of Robert Braybrok, bishop of London, dated in his palace of London, 1 July 1394, the 13th year of his consecration, stating that twelve chaplains, commonly called minor canons, wearing surplices with almuces (almuciis) of calaber and black cloaks (capis), two of them called cardinals, were of old established in the church of London, with separate habitations, alike within the close (clausum) and without, assigned by the chapter; that certain devout persons, considering that it would be more decent for them to be together at meal times, have built a hall and offices for their common entertainment hard by the cemetery of the said church; and that divers rents and possessions have been given to them by many of the faithful. The bishop, therefore, having regard to the honest conversation and the continual and fervent devotion of the said twelve minor canons, who diligently serve God day and night in the said church and in great measure bear the heat and burden of the day therein, and having deliberated with his chapter, to the end that they may perpetually pray for the good estate of [Richard], king of England and France and lord of Ireland, Thomas Arundell, archbishop of York, the said bishop himself, Robert Braybrok, and for the souls of the late Anne, queen of England, consort of the said king, of the king himself after death and his progenitors, of the said archbishop and bishop and of all faithful departed, ordains that they shall perpetually be, and shall be called and held, the college of twelve minor canons of St. Paul's, erects into a collegiate place the said hall and buildings inhabited by them within the close, and in token of such ordinance and erection appoints, elects (eligimus; erigimus in the corresponding place in the letters of king Richard, below), and nominates John Lynton, one of the twelve, to be their master and warden, committing to him the administration of the goods of the college, until he or other canon thereof be elected or appointed by the said canons in accordance with an ordinance to be made by them, for which election no licence or confirmation shall be required. They shall have a common seal, and a common chest for their seal and muniments. They are to remain immediately subject, as in times past, to the dean and chapter, to whom shall continue to belong the collations and investitures of their canonries. The confirmation by the dean and chapter, which follows, is dated in their chapter-house, 7 July, in the same year. [W. Sparrow Simpson. Reg. Stat. et Cons. Eccl. Cath. S. Pauli, p. 360.] (ii.) The letters patent of king Richard, sealed with his great round seal, recounting the circumstances related in the bishop's said letters; granting that the minor canons shall be and shall be called a college with a warden, to be elected by them in accordance with the above mentioned ordinance, without requiring royal licence or assent; ordaining that the patronage shall belong to the king, as founder and patron, and his heirs, and by his authority appointing, electing (erigimus) and nominating the above John de Lynton as warden until he or other canon shall be elected or appointed by the canons according to the said ordinance; adding that he has given and granted to the college in frankalmoin two messuages, four shops and ten shillingsworth of rents with their appurtenances in his city of London which he had by gift and enfeoffment of Robert Dokesworth, Richard Cotell, William Riffyn, William Rode, Thomas Hunte and Henry Asshe, chaplains, namely one messuage with appurtenances in the parish of St. Faith in the crypts of St. Paul's, London, situate in length between the tenement of the late Master William de Maldon on the west and that of the late Imania de Brancestre on the east, four shops with the solars built above them and their other appurtenances in the parish of St. Nicholas de Flesshamelis, London; ten shillingsworth of rents with appurtenances from the tenements which belonged to Lucy atte Stone, situate in the said parish of St. Nicholas in breadth between the tenement of the late Richard Sywarde on the west and that of the late Robert Manyfelde on the east; and one messuage with appurtenances in the said parish of St. Faith situate in breadth between the tenement of the late William Bokebyndere on the east and the lane called Dycers Lane on the west; the said grant being for their sustentation and for prayers for the good estate of the said king and for his soul after death and for the souls of queen Anne, his parents and ancestors and all faithful departed. Teste me ipso apud Westmonasterium, primo die Augusti anno regni nostri decimo octavo, per breve de privato sigillo, Faryngdon. [W. Sparrow Simpson. Op. cit. p. 326.] The witnesses to the present public instrument are Sir John Elys, chaplain, John Posyngworth, donsel, and many others [not here named], and the attestation that the copy agrees with the original letters is made by John Wiis de Alster, clerk, of the diocese of Cologne (Colonien.), papal and imperial public notary, who has caused the instrument to be drawn up and has published it at the request of Sir Robert Dokesworth, master or warden of the said college. The said notary has subscribed it, as well as Master John Whytyng, clerk, of the diocese of Salisbury, papal notary, who has also made the collation. Ad fut. rei mem. Hiis qui (for que) ecclesiarum. [5 pp.]
2 Non. April.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 42.)
To Thomas Haxey, canon of Lincoln. Mandate as below. The recent petition of Thomas Brake, rector of Oundell in the diocese of Lincoln, contained that a cause formerly arose between the abbot and convent of Peterborough and the late Richard de Treton, rector of the said church, of the patronage of the abbot and convent, about the rector's claim to cut coppice or under-wood (arbores silve cedue sive subbosci) in certain forests of the abbot and convent within the bounds of the said church, and, without licence, view (visu) and permission (liberacione) of the abbot and convent and of the keepers or bailiffs of the said forests, to carry away as often as he pleased, and as much as he thought sufficient for burning in his fires; the abbot and convent asserting that the rector had the right to so much only as he was notoriously known to need for the said fires and no more, and not otherwise, and this under view (ad visum) of the abbot and convent or of their servants, and that some of Richard's predecessors and Richard himself had done so to an immoderate extent, to the destruction of the said forests; that at length, on the intervention of the late John, bishop of Lincoln, an amicable concord was arrived at and confirmed by the said bishop, as is more fully contained in a certain public instrument. Seeing, however, as the said petition added, the concord is greatly prejudicial to the said church and the above Thomas, Richard's immediate successor as rector, the pope orders the above canon to summon the abbot and convent, and if he find the concord to be thus prejudicial, to annul it, and to restore Thomas and his successors to the rectors’ pristine liberty of cutting and carrying. Justis et honestis.
1404.
12 Kal. Aug.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 68.)
To the prior of Pylton in the diocese of Exeter. Mandate to grant that the inhabitants of the town of Heyzgwyk in the said diocese—which is within the parish of, and is distant about four English miles from, the town of Teyngton Regis, on whose parish church their chapel depends, and in which chapel they have been wont to hear masses and other divine offices and receive ecclesiastical sacraments; seeing that it is very difficult for them to carry their dead to Teyngton Regis, especially in wintry, rainy and cold weather—may erect a perpetual altar in the said chapel and have a cemetery constructed at the chapel, and have them consecrated by any catholic bishop of their choice; without prejudice to the said church and its rector. Humilibus et honestis.
2 Non. Aug.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 69d.)
To William Chestir, Augustinian canon of the priory of Newburgh (Novoburgo) in the diocese of York. Indult to him, a priest—seeing that by the customs and ancient observances of the priory each of the canons, being a priest, is bound in a certain order to say mass week by week throughout the year at the high altar in a a loud voice and with music (alta voce et ad notam), such canons being called Ebdomadarii; and seeing that he, on account of an impediment of his tongue, cannot conveniently do so—to be free for life from the said obligation. Sincere devocionis.
5 Id. Aug.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 91d.)
To the archbishop of York. Mandate to separate for a time, to absolve from excommunication incurred, enjoining a salutary penance, and to dispense to marry anew William de Wilighby, knight, and Joan duchess of York, who married not in ignorance that they were related in the third degree of affinity; offspring, past and future, being declared legitimate. The survivor of the marriage is to remain perpetually unwed. Oblate nobis.
14 Kal. Aug.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 121.)
To William Glym, rector of Dodyngton in the diocese of Ely. Dispensation to hold for life with the said church, value not exceeding 150 marks, one other benefice with cure or otherwise incompatible, even if a perpetual vicarage or a parish church, or an elective dignity with cure, major, or principal or unique, respectively, personatus, perpetual administration or office, in a metropolitan, cathedral or collegiate church, and to resign them for exchange or otherwise as often as he pleases, and hold instead two similar or dissimilar incompatible benefices. Vite ac morum.
Non. Sept.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 134.)
To the bishop of Lincoln. Mandate to dispense John, son of William de Roos lord of Hamelak, and Margery, daughter of Philip de Spenser alias Ledespenser, knights, of the diocese of Lincoln, to marry notwithstanding that they are related in the fourth degree of kindred. Oblate nobis.

De Regularibus.

1404.
7 Kal. Aug.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 182.)
To the bishops of Florence and Lincoln and the abbot of Roche (Rupe) in the diocese of York. Mandate as below. The petition of Thomas, Cistercian abbot, and the convent of Kirkestede in the diocese of Lincoln, contained that although he—upon the free resignation of the last abbot, Richard de Uppton, made in accordance with ancient custom and the institutes of the order to its father-abbot, Robert, abbot of Fountains—was elected abbot and had his election confirmed by the said fatherabbot, was instituted by the same and ruled Kirkestede for some time, William de Louthe, monk of Kirkestede, opposed the election, confirmation and institution, hindered Thomas's peaceable rule and intruded himself, taking the fruits; that the pope, at William's instance, committed the cause to Francis, cardinal priest of St. Susanna's, notwithstanding that it did not by its nature lawfully devolve to the Roman court, the proctors being Masters John de Scrivanis and Lewis Byfford jointly on behalf of Thomas, and Master James de Subinago on behalf of William; that the cardinal, upon the repeated contumacy of Master James, adjudged the abbey to Thomas, restored him and in so far as he could removed William, imposing perpetual silence on him and condemning him in fruits and costs; that upon William's appeal, the pope associated with Francis, Henry cardinal priest of St. Anastasia's, who, with consent of Francis, proceeded singly, with the same three proctors, and upon the continued contumacy of Master James confirmed the sentence of Francis and declared William's appeal to have been bad, condemning him in the further costs; that upon William's further appeal the pope associated with Henry, Christopher cardinal priest of St. Ciriac's, who, with consent of Henry, proceeded singly, with Masters John and James as proctors, and, upon the continued contumacy of Master James, confirmed the sentence of Henry and declared William's appeal to have been bad, condemning him in fruits received since Henry's sentence and in the further costs, which costs he afterwards taxed at 20 gold florins of the camera. Seeing however, as the said petition added, Thomas doubts whether others have not intruded or may not intrude themselves, the pope, confirming the proceedings of the above cardinals, orders the above bishops and abbot to proceed to execution alike against William and such intruders, proceeding by ecclesiastical censure and invoking if necessary the aid of the secular arm. Exhibita nobis. [6 pp.]
14 Kal. Aug.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 186.)
To the abbot and convent of St. Augustine's without the walls, Canterbury, immediately subject to the Roman church. Indult to the abbot and his successors to consecrate unconsecrated churches, oratories and chapels of the said monastery and others immediately subject thereto, and the altars therein, likewise vestments, chalices, patens and other ecclesiastical ornaments of the said monastery, churches, &c. and altars, and to reconcile the same and the cemeteries of the said churches. Exposcit vestre.
1404.
4 Kal. Aug.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 186.)
Declaration, as below, in favour of the Benedictine abbot and convent of Thorney in the diocese of Ely, to whom the pope lately [above, p. 164] appropriated the parish churches of Yakesle and Stangrond in the diocese of Lincoln, of their patronage and value together not exceeding 130 marks, that of the monastery not exceeding 600, so that on the resignation or death of the rectors they might take possession, but have them served by perpetual vicars, secular priests, to be instituted by the bishop of Lincoln. At their recent petition—containing that they have obtained possession by resignation, and have caused the churches to be served as above, and adding that they fear molestation on the ground of the pope's general annulment on 11 Kal. Jan. anno 14 [1402, above, p. 599] of appropriations—the pope declares that his intention was and is that his said appropriation shall hold good as though the said annulment had not been made, and hereby confirms the said resignations, their taking possession, and their assignment of portions for the said vicars. Ad fut. rei mem. Iis que statum.
14 Kal. Aug.
St. Peter's, Rome.
(f. 187.)
Declaration and confirmation, as in the preceding, and for the same reason, of the pope's late motu proprio appropriation [above, p. 152] to the mensa, distinct from the fruits, etc. of the convent, of William, abbot of St. Edmunds Bury, and of his successors, of the parish churches, of the monastery's patronage, of Herlawe and Thurston in the dioceses of London and Norwich, value not exceeding 120 marks, that of the said mensa not exceeding 2,000, so that on the resignation or death of the rectors the said abbot and his successor [s] might take possession but have them served by monks of the monastery or secular priests; the recent petition of abbot William containing that by the resignations of the rectors he has taken possession and has caused the churches to be served by secular priests as perpetual vicars, and adding that he fears, as in the preceding. Ad fut. rei mem. Ad ea per que.
Ibid.
(f. 188.)
Declaration and confirmation, as in the preceding, and for the same reason, of the appropriation made—in consideration of their impoverishment by the great resort of guests, by pestilences and other calamities and burdens—by the late bishop John, and confirmed, with exemplification [not here given], by Urban VI, to the Cistercian abbot and convent of Louth Park (de Parcolude), of the parish church of Ffoulestowe in the diocese of Lincoln, of their patronage and value not exceeding 100 marks, that of the monastery not exceeding 400. They have, upon the resignation of the rector, taken possession under the bishop's letters patent, and have, in accordance therewith, caused the church to be served by a perpetual vicar, a secular priest, instituted by the bishop. Ad fut. rei mem. Iis que statum.

Footnotes

  • 1. Registered briefly, as usual. See above, p. 47.