BHO

America and West Indies: July 1652

Pages 384-387

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies: Volume 1, 1574-1660. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1860.

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Citation:

July. 1652

July 1. 60. Petition of Capt. Wil. Digby to the Council of State. Was a planter in St. Christopher's about 24 years since, but was soon after taken by the Spaniards prisoner to Cadiz, where he remained six years. About 10 years since, Sir Thos. Warner, then Governor of St. Christopher's, assigned to him a plantation in Nevis formerly confirmed to Warner by Capt. John Kettleby, then Governor of Nevis. Notwithstanding which grant, and his peaceable enjoyment of the plantation for more than eight years, the present Governor of Nevis, Capt. Luke Stokes, has taken away about 280 acres of land for the use of John Jennings, who denies that he has any propriety therein. Prays that he may be re-established in the said land, and enjoy it according to his patent. Underwritten is a note referring this petition to the Committee for Plantations for their report; 1652, July 14. Annexed,
60. I.Order of the Council of State. Referring the above petition to the Committee for Plantations for their report. 1652, July 10, [mistake for 14th.]
60. II.Grant of Jas. Earl of Carlisle to Capt. Wil. Digby of240 geometrical paces of land in Nevis, beyond the fig tree plantations, betwixt the land of Capt. John Hudleston to the north-west, and that of Thos. Merriton to the south, in consideration of a sum of money paid to the Earl. [Copy.] 1648, Dec. 11.
60. III.Affidavit of Godfrey Havercamp, of Teddington, co. Middlesex, that he spake with Capt. John Jennings at the Royal Exchange and showed him a survey of Capt. Digby's lands in Nevis, and that Jennings utterly disclaimed any interest therein. 1652, Aug. 13.
60. IV.Affidavit of Maurice Gardiner to the same effect as the preceding. 1652, Aug 3. Underwritten is an acknowledgment by Jennings of the truth of the above. 1652, Nov. 3.
60. V."Notes concerning Digby's case." Ed. Mullerd certifies that the copy of the grant is true. Digby in possession six years before the date thereof, and until last April twelvemonth. Minutes of a conversation with the Governor. 1652, Sept. 13.
60. VI.Order of the Committee for Foreign Affairs. For Jennings to give in a written answer to Digby's petition on Wednesday the 15th Sept. 1652, Sept. 13.
60. VII.Answer of John Jennings to Digby's petition. Has a plantation in Nevis, entrusted to Capt. Luke Stokes, Governor, the propriety of which he owns and will defend. Knows nothing touching the allegation in the petition.
July 1. 61. Copy of the above petition.
July 2. Order of the Council of State. For a warrant to permit Capt. Geo. Pasfield, commander of the Barbadoes Merchant, to have 36 men aboard his ship free from imprest. [INTERREGNUM, Entry Bk., Vol. LVII., p. 70.]
July 7. Similar Order. For a licence to Thos. Blake to export 10 draught nags to Barbadoes. [Ibid., p. 91.]
July 14. Minute of a Committee for Foreign Affairs. Draft of a commission to Richard Holdip, for government of a plantation in America, to be reported to the Council of State. [INTERREGNUM, Entry Bk., Vol. CLIX., p. 10.]
July 19. Order of the Council of State. Referring petitions from the inhabitants of Virginia and New England to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, who are directed to consider also the proposals and letters concerning them, and report their opinion. [Ibid., Vol. LVIII., p. 48.]
July 19.
Salem.
62. John Endecott, Governor of Boston, to Ann Mason. Advises her to consult some good attorney on the subject of her claim against Richard Leader, which, for want of sufficient legal evidence, the General Court has been unable to determine.
July 21. Minute of a Committee for Foreign Affairs. Petition and papers of the inhabitants of Virginia and New England are referred to a subcommittee for their report. [INTERREGNUM, Entry Bk., Vol. CLIX., p. 12.]
July 25. 63. Petition of Isaac Cloake, of Barbadoes, to Parliament. Duplicate of inclosure II. of No. 53. abstracted at p. 380. Endorsed, "Desires a pardon for life."
July 28. Minute of a Committee for Foreign Affairs. Upon petition and proposals of Edward Winslow, Edward Hopkins, and Fras. Willoughby, to the Council of State. Recommend that liberty be given to them to send a ship with ammunition to New England to give notice to the colonies of the differences between the Commonwealth and the United Provinces; also 100 barrels of powder, shot, and 1,000 swords, for increase of their present store. That it be also declared by the Council of State that, as the colonies may expect all fitting encouragement and assistance from hence, so, they should demean themselves against the Dutch, as declared enemies to the Commonwealth. [INTERREGNUM, Entry Bk., Vol. CLIX., p. 15.]
July 28. Order of the Council of State. Referring petition of Thos. Harrison, on behalf of some well-affected inhabitants of Virginia and Maryland, to the Committee for Foreign Affairs, who are directed to confer with them, and report their opinion. [Ibid., Vol. LVIII., p. 86.]
July 29. Similar Order. For a licence for the John Adventure, of Boston, New England, to go there with 25 men free from imprest, and carry one ton of shot and 56 barrels of powder, provided she go in consortship with the other ships bound thither. Upon application by Edward Winslow, Edward Hopkins, and Francis Willoughby, on behalf of the United Colonies of New England, for directions in the present juncture of affairs between the Commonwealth and the United Provinces of the Netherlands, the Council of State declare that as those colonies expect encouragement, assist-ance, and protection, so it is expected that they will demean themselves against the Dutch, as against those who are enemies to the Commonwealth. [INTERREGNUM, Entry Bk., Vol. LVIII., p. 91.]
July 30. Minute of a Committee for Foreign Affairs. Petition of the inhabitants of Virginia, and the articles for the surrender and settling of that plantation, are ordered to be offered to Parliament for their resolution. [Ibid., Vol. CLIX., p. 16.]