BHO

America and West Indies: July 1681

Pages 80-98

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 11, 1681-1685. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1898.

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Citation:

July 1681

July 1.
Thanet
House.
154. Minutes of Proceedings of Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Agreed that a commission be issued to [blank] empowering them to enquire into the King's business for the recovery of arrears (see previous Vol. Nos. 1343, 1606). Sir R. Temple to furnish the names. Agreed that whatever Act of oblivion be passed the duty due to the King and the damages to his collectors and deputies be excepted. [This refers to the rebellion of 1677, for which see previous volume, Index, sub voce, Carolina.] Captain Henry Wilkinson to be cacique on account of lands, and registrar of births and burials. Letter to be written to Ashley river about the whale fishery, excepting whales cast up dead. The boundaries to be adjusted. Lord Culpeper to sign Governor Wilkinson's Patent. Wilkinson's instructions to include a clause directing him to send home an amended map. ½ p. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., p. 173.]
July 1. 155. Proceedings of the Court of Assizes of New York at the trial of Captain Dyre as a false traitor to the King; the treason consisting of establishing and imposing unlawful Customs on goods, compelling people to pay them and using soldiers to maintain him therein. 2 pp. Copy, certified by Robert Vicars. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 21.]
July 1. 156. John West, Clerk of Assizes, to [Sir Leoline Jenkins]. Reporting that William Dyre was brought up for trial on that day, and questioned the authority of the Court to try him. Whereupon the Court decided to send him home to be tried there. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 22.] This and foregoing document are printed in New York Documents, Vol. III., pp. 287–9.
July 1.
Barbados.
157. The Clerk of the Assembly of Barbados to Lords of Trade and Plantations. His long silence has been due to the fact that there was no Assembly for five months. Sends account of transaction since Sir Richard Dutton's arrival. Signed, John Higinbotham. Endorsed and inscribed, "Recd. 13 Sept. 1681." ½ p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 23, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol, VII., p. 66.]
July 2.
St. Jago de la
Vega.
158. Sir Henry Morgan to Lords of Trade and Plantations. The frigate Norwich happening to be in harbour, the provisions sent by Knapman and Lockwood for her supply were received by her Commander, Captain Heywood, who I doubt not has acknowledged their receipt. We have used the sloop captured from Everson to accompany the Norwich in cruising after pirates (see No. 16). She saves the great charge, which we before were at, of a pilot, sounds the dangerous places and is able to pursue pirates where the frigate cannot go; she is useful besides to give information of such accidents as happen. I lately had some pirates brought in. One according to his demerits was executed, and one Thomas, a most notorious villian, who recently took a valuable vessel of this Island, is taken and under trial. I have sent the frigate to cruise and have given Captain Heywood particular charge to look out for one Laurence, a great and mischievous pirate, who commands a ship of twenty-eight guns and had two hundred men aboard. And that the frigate might be the better able to deal with him and to free him from danger of being worsted or taken, I have put forty good men with commanders aboard of her, twenty out of the Earl of Carlisle's company and twenty out of mine own, and have ordered Captain Heywood to enter them upon his book. I doubt not but your Honours will allow of this charge, it being necessary for the king's service and the preservation of the frigate. She has lately been careencd. I will send an account of the charge by next ship. There are some boatswain's stores here which were formerly sent for the use of the Success. I beg instructions how they are to be employed, 2 pp. Copy. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 24.]
July 2.
St. Jago de la
Vega.
159. Sir Henry Morgan to [Sir Leoline Jenkins?]. The ship that bears this sails so suddenly after the former fleet that I have little news. I must, however, acquaint you that I continue with all my might to repress the insolencies of the privateers and pirates, who grow numerous and desperate even to the assaulting and taking to His Majesty's own subjects, ships, and goods. I have sent the frigate with a sloop to attend her [recapitulates details in previous abstract]. When any of the pirates are brought to me I use the utmost severity of the law against them. I have already caused one to be executed and am about the trial of another. I am like-wise careful to hinder interlopers for the protection of the Royal African Company. They have, in pursuance of the royal commands, sold the negroes of their last ship as 18l. a head, which proves a great help and ease to the country. I send for the Lords of Trade and Plantations the naval officer's account of goods exported and imported from 29th September to 25th March last. They should have been sent before had not my late Secretary, Mr. Powell, mislaid or lost them. 1½ pp. Signed. Endorsed. Recd. 1 Sept. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 25.]
160. Acts of Jamaica passed on the 2nd July 1681:—
Act appointing the number of the Assembly (three members each for St. Catharine's and Port Royal, two for each of the other parishes). [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLIII., p. 1.]
Act for regulating servants. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol., XLIII., p. 1.]
Act appointing the price of meat. (Fresh beef or goat fourpence, mutton sixpence of pound.) [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLIII., p. 6.]
Act for highways. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLIII., p. 7.]
Act against blasphemy and for preventing disorders in alehouses, taverns, and victualling houses. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLIII., p. 9.]
Act empowering Justices of the Peace to decide differences, not exceeding forty shillings. [Col Entry Bk, Vol., XLIII. p. 11.]
Act for rating liquors sold by retail. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLIII., p. 13.]
Act for compensation of Mr. Nicholas Scarlett. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLIII., p. 13.]
Act for restraining and punishing privateers and pirates. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLIII., p. 14.]
Act for the better ordering of slaves. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLIII., p. 18.] [This contains a provision that if any slave, by punishment from the owner for running away shall suffer in life or limb, no person shall be liable to any law for the same, but if any through wantonness or cruelty shall kill a slave he or she shall forfeit twenty pounds to the King and forty pounds to the owner].
July 5.
Council
Chamber.
161. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Several papers concerning New England read, and referred to the Commissioners of Customs and to the Attorney-General for report.
Several laws passed in Virginia read. Their Lordships take exception to the style of enacting laws as not agreeable to the commission whereby the Governor passed them. Agreed that the same power for making laws that has been given to other Governors be conferred on Lord Culpeper. The title of the Acts to be altered in future from "By the King with the consent of the General Assembly" to "By the Governor, Council, and Assembly." The Cohabitation Act referred to the Commissioners of Customs. The Orders of Assembly read, wherein their Lordships observe that the Assembly has made laws to appoint the power of sheriffs and direct the settling of a parish without the Governor and Council, and has disposed of moneys which are not in its power.
Sir Thomas Lynch attended. Debate concerning his title. Sir Thomas saying that he will expect no allowance from the Exchequer by reason of the title, it was agreed that he be called Captain General and Governor in Chief. Their Lordships very much disapprove of certain grants, lately passed under the Great Seal, of the places of Clerk of the Crown and Peace, and Clerk of the Market. Sir Thomas Lynch to examine how the offices in Jamaica are executed, and to report. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CVI., pp. 268–271.]
July 5. 162. William Blathwayt to Lord Vaughan. Transmitting Article 36 of Lord Carlisle's Instructions, and desiring an account of what passed in relation thereto during his government of Jamaica, and his opinion as to what should be done therein. ½ p.
Memorandum that a letter to the same effect was sent to Lord Carlisle.
[Article 36 of the Instructions of 1678 forbids the Governor to take advantage of any penalties or forfeitures incurred by planters for not manuring or planting their lands, without the royal sanction.] [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXIX., p. 482.]
July 5. 163. Minutes of Council of Barbados. The Assembly brought up two bills to revive expiring Acts.
July 6. These Bills were passed. Habcas Corpus Bill read a second time and referred to a committee, consisting of Henry Walrond, John Witham, Richard Howell, and Edwyn Stede. The Assembly desiring a conference, the above-named were appointed conferrers for the Council. The Assembly having brought proposals for commutation of the four-and-a-half per cent. duty, the same members were appointed to meet the Committee of the Assembly on the subject.
July 7. The Assembly brought up sundry Bills and orders for concurrence, whereof two Bills were laid by for consideration. Adjourned to 19th July. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XI., pp. 411–16.]
July 5. 164. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. The Assembly having sat three times by adjournment, proceeded according to rule to elect a Speaker. General Christopher Codrington elected. Bills to revive and continue expired Acts passed.
July 6. Bills to revive and continue certain Acts sent down by the Governor and Council, containing alterations from the like Bills sent up by the House at last sitting. Edward Littleton, Samuel Husbands, Richard Seawell, James Walwyn, John Davies, and John Codrington appointed to confer with the Council thereon, who, returning, informed the House of the amendments desired by the Council.
July 7. Bills to revive and continue expiring Acts passed. Edward Littleton, Richard Guy, William Sharp, Richard Seawell, John Davies, and Samuel Husbands appointed a committee to confer with the Council about proceeding with the proposals for the commutation of the four-and-a-half per cent. duty. Ordered by the Governor, Council, and Assembly, That the magazines of powder be dispersed into various gentlemen's houses for the better distribution of the same, and that the gentlemen transport the said powder with all convenient speed, and that they be reimbursed for their charge therein. Petition of Charles Binckes recommended to the Governor (see next abstract). Ordered that John Codrington be added to the Committee to examine petitions. Adjourned to 19th July. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIII., pp. 440–2.]
[July 7.] 165. Petition of Charles Binckes to the Assembly of Barbados. Your petitioner was deputed by John Byndloss and Simon Winslow to fill the places of Chief Clerk, Register and Examiner of the Chancery Court, they holding the King's patent for the same. The Governor on receiving the said patent promised to admit petitioner to the office, but he has since charged your petitioner with raising discourse that if the excise of the Island were raised it should be seized by Patent, and therefore excluded him from the office and declared he should answer the charge in England. Now your petitioner utterly denies that he said such a thing, but admits that he heard it and can produce his author. He therefore begs the Assembly to take his unfavourable position into their consideration, and to intercede with the Governor to allow him to hold the office, or, if not, to appoint his deputy thereto, and to allow the charge against him to be answered here instead of in England. He lastly, begs the Assembly to signify to the Governor whether or not in their not raising the excise they were governed by the discourse attributed to petitioner. 1 p. Endorsed, "The Assembly out of a sense of the Petitioner's sad condition do humbly recommend him to your Excellency's favour; and they do firmly believe that the late Assemblies (of which most persons of this Assembly were members were not any way induced by the petitioner to the letting fall and non-continuance of the excise." Read and passed the Assembly nem. con. 7th July 1681. Copy. Attested by John Higinbotham, Clerk of Assembly. Attestation sworn to before Edward Littleton, 10th August 1681. Recorded in Secretary's office, 15th August. Signed, Edwyn Stede. Endorsed. Recd. 31 Oct. 1681. [Col. Papers Vol. XLVII., No. 26.]
July 10.
Patuxen.
166. Nicholas Badcock to the Commissioners of Customs. Since my letter by Captain Groome, I wrote you a second by Captain Joseph Eaton, giving you an account of the arrival of four ships (see ante, No. 120). [Recapitulates the story briefly.] On leaving the Council I said that I thought the law so absolutely on my side that I was resolved to seize the tobacco, until I was deterred by their threats, for I was afraid that they would go nigh to hang me or do some violent act to me. I therefore desisted and was resolved to speed for England in Captain Thomas Rogers's ship, which was the last bound for London, but matters were so ordered by Lord Baltimore and his Council (as I plainly saw) that Rogers absolutely refused to carry me, though I had shipped fourteen hogsheads of tobacco with him to pay my expenses. Being thus absolutely prevented I beg you to send such speedy orders as will settle this and all other matters that I have complained of, for everything is out of order. For the good management of this affair, your directions must be very high and authoritative, for I perceive that Lord Baltimore and his Council almost think themselves outside the King's sovereignty. Nay, I plainly see that nothing is so evil in their eyes as this little matter of the King's interest, and nothing sounds so ill in their ears as the bare naming of the King's authority. some high proceedings to "fix up the public peace" may admonish and convince them. You will perceive how matters stand by the list of ships now sent. There appears hardly a certificate of bond given, and with all my endeavours I could not get sight above twelve or sixteen this year among all these ships. The ship St. George is omitted from the list, but we are fain to get the list as they will give it, so that I see she is absolutely bound and designed for Ireland. She is a ship of nine hundred or a thousand hogsheads. The cocquets that come to my sight are as few in proportion; Lord Baltimore returns them to the masters and openly avows it, so I suppose that they make them serve for many times. He refuses or neglects to send lists of shipping and makes light of it as if it were no concern of his, though I have solicited it according to your instructions. So that as things now stand I cannot tell how much the King may not be wronged. I doubt not that if all ships were obliged to clear with us inwarde before Lord Baltimore cleared them and permitted them to trade, I should find good cause to seize many cargoes if not many ships. But owing to my Lord's cajoling and encouraging masters and captains against us, this is evaded. If they fawn upon his Lordship, he so prompts them against us that I can hardly ask them a question but they are ready to fly in my face. I hope you will find some means of checking the damage and loss caused by these ships bound to Ireland. 3½ pp. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LII., pp. 61–65.]
July 11.
Carlisle.
167. Earl of Carlisle to Sir Robert Southwell. I have got yours of the 5th, wherein my opinion is desired concerning the four hundred thousand acres of land once intended to be reserved as a royal demesne. When I went to Jamaica my thoughts were much bent on putting that in practice, but I quickly found that it would prove costly to the King and mischievous to the Island, for it would cause a great deal of improvable land to be waste. The King would make no profit except by the same methods as the planters, by laying out first a great deal of money for servants, negroes, cattle, horses, buildings, and other necessaries. The ordinary computation is to lay out about 5,000l. to raise a plantation that may yield 1,0001. per annum, and thousand acres is a competent proportion of land to accommodate such an estate. No one man has yet enclosed, much less improved, such a proportion, though several have taken up great quantities in the most convenient parts of the Island, which is a damage for the King and the public and no good to themselves at present. If a thousand acres were allotted for the use of the Governor it might be convenient for him and honourable for the Government. It might be improved in time by succeeding Governors and cost the King nothing. But for anything more it will not turn to account. The King has now about a tenth of the profits of all sugar works and will never make so much by being a planter himself. There is no such thing as farming of land as in England nor cannot be expected in several ages. Pray acquaint the Lords of the Committee with this. Holograph. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 27, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXIX., pp. 482, 483.]
July 12. 168. [William Blathwayt] to Henry Guy. Transmitting the Act, with the directions followed in the next abstract. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., p. 403.]
July 12.
Treasury
Chamber.
169. Henry Guy to the Commissioners of Customs. By order of the Lords Commissioners I enclose an Act of Virginia for your report to the Lords of Trade and Plantations. Your attention is called in particular to the two clauses concerning the time wherein the Act is to take place for the landing of goods and the shipping of tobacco. Some of you will attend the Lords on the 20th instant. Signed. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 28.]
July 13.
London.
170. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor and Council of the North part of Carolina. Hearing that there are many whales on the coast of Carolina, we direct that, although those fish are by our constitution reserved to us, the inhabitants of the Province shall have liberty for seven years from hereof, or from Christmas next, to take what whales they can for their own use, excepting only such as are thrown up dead on the coast. Signed, Craven, Albemarle, Shaftesbury, Bath (for Lord Carteret), P. Colleton, J. Archdall. ½ p. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., p. 173, and re-copied, p. 174.]
July 13.
St. Jago de la
Vega.
171. Sir Henry Morgan to Lords of Trade and Plantations. Recapitulating previous reports as to the temper of the Assembly, the transmission of the returns of exports and imports, and the dismissal of Rowland Powell, 1¼ pp. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXX., p. 41.]
July 14.
St. Jago de la
Vega.
172. Sir Henry Morgan to Lords of Trade and Plantations. I enclose the naval officer's accounts [not forthcoming] of imports and exports from 29th September to 25th March last. The abstracts of the former half year were lost by my secretary's negligence, but shall be sent without fail by next ship, together with the answers to your Lordships' queries. We are much infested by pirates who, under the name of privateers, presume even to plunder and take vessels belonging to this Island. They took one commanded by Captain Chandeler, who, strangely, afterwards brought him to this Island in a long boat. [Repeats his measures for suppressing them, and other particulars of his letter of 2nd July, No. 158]. Since writing the original, of which this is a copy, the frigate which I sent to convoy Captain John Crocker's ship and negroes to Carthagena is returned. He found the fleet there. The Admiral sent me a packet for the King which I have committed to the care of Mr. Blathwayt. The pirate whom Captain Chandeler brought in is found guilty and executed. The frigate is going out within a few days to cruise and free the coast from several vagabonds that infest it. Our Assembly still sits and business goes on currently and without heat. I have gratified them with some useful Acts for this country in the hope that they may more readily consent to the King's desires in passing the revenue. The suddenness of the ship's departure prevents my sending copies of the Acts at present; I shall not fail to send them by first opportunity. 2 pp. Signed. Endorsed. Recd. 2 October 1681. [Col Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 29, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXX., p. 42.]
July 14.
St Jago de la
Vega.
173. Sir Henry Morgan to Sir Leoline Jenkins. A duplicate of his letter of 2nd July (No. 159), with a postscript adding particulars as to the frigates return from Carthagena (see preceding abstract). The frigate demanded prisoners but found none; such as were there before his arrival had been sent to Havanna. The Spanish fleet is at Carthagena. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 30, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXX., pp. 44–46.]
July 15.
Council
Chamber.
174. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Ordered, That Sir John Werden be apprised of the Commission preparing for Sir Thomas Lynch as Governor of Jamaica that he may receive a Commission of Vice-Admiralty from the Duke of York. Recommended that Sir Thomas transmit a journal of his proceedings in the Government, and take care that the Secretary and Clerk of Council transmit there quarterly returns. The Lords also think that the Assembly may be allowed to pass a law devoting the Governor's salary during his absence to any other public uses. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CVI., pp. 271, 272.]
July 15.
Council
Chamber.
175. [William Blathwayt] to Sir John Werden. The King has commanded a commission to be issued to Sir, Thomas Lynch as Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Jamaica. I am instructed to ask you to move the Duke of York to issue to him a Commission of Vice-Admiralty. ½ p. [Col. Entry Bk. Vol. XXIX., p. 483.]
July 16.
St. Jago de la
Vega.
176. Sir Henry Morgan to [Sir Leoline Jenkins]. Yours of 26th April received by John Sheffield, master of the ship Guanaboa, together with a letter from the King and two procurations directing me to pay a sum of money recovered here for the proprietor of the ship Prince William of Flushing (see ante, No. 76). The procurations specify a greater sum than was effectually recovered, but whatever it is I will take care that Mr. Hazell, who is appointed Attorney here for the proprietors, shall have due and speedy justice. I have sent the naval officer's accounts to 25th March, and shall send thein, in future, quarterly. The Receiver-General has now brought me his accounts to 18th January last, and I have appointed one to inspect them. I cannot send them by this opportunity, but shall send them without fail by the next, with the accounts brought down to 18th instant, and carefully sworn to by the Receivers to avoid all suspicion or complaint. I will send such Acts as have been passed at the same time. I wonder that notwithstanding my diligence and care I should have been evilly represented to the King by people who are causelessly prejudiced against me, but I hope you have too good an opinion of me to believe them. 1½ pp. Signed. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 31.]
July 16.
Nevis.
177. Account of goods imported into Nevis from 16th July 1680 to 16th July 1681. A list of seventy ships with their masters, and a very brief summary of the cargo of each. 5 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 32.]
July 16.
Edinburgh.
178. Sir J. Werden to Sir E. Andros. I send you a letter to Mr. Penn, open, to be read, sealed and delivered by you (see next abstract), [Col, Entry Bk., Vol LXX., p. 36.]
July 16.
Edinburgh.
179. Sir John Werden to William Penn. The Duke showed me your letter of 30th June and desires me to reply. You complain that you had no answer from me, but I really did write all that seemed necessary for your satisfaction, and had already informed the Governor of New York of your patent. As to your renewed proposal for a conference with him respecting the islands on the Delaware and Newcastle, the Duke has not yet come to a decision. The letter for which you ask to the Governor of New york is already granted. But when you speak of islands in the Delaware, I must point out that this is quite a new proposal, and that I have no instructions respecting it. I have always thought that the river was your eastern boundary, and if words respecting islands have been added I can say nothing respecting it, nor can I see how such mention of particulars can include more than the general boundaries. Printed in New York Documents Vol. III., p. 290. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXX., pp. 35–36.]
July 19.
[Maryland.]
180. Lord Baltimore to the Earl of Anglesey. I write to apprise you of the present condition of Maryland and Virginia, in relation to some Northern Indians that have lately come down into both Colonies and committed outrages and murders in both Governments. These Northern Indians pretend no design of mischief towards the English but tell us they are resolved to destroy all our neighbouring Indians, whom they have subdued, conquered, and destroyed. I believe their next design will be against the inhabitants of both these Colonies, whose stocks of cattle and hogs they have already made bold with, especially in Virginia, where they destroy hogs and cattle before the owners' faces. If the English make any opposition they are immediately fired on by these villains, and in this way five men and a woman were killed in Maryland a month since. Upon these disturbances from these heathen rogues some evil-disposed spirits here have been tampering to stir up the inhabitants of Maryland and of the north part of Virginia to mutiny. Having notice of this, and being certainly informed who were the chief contrivers, I immediately sent orders for the arrest of one Josias Fendall and John Coode, two rank Baconists (see, for Bacon's Rebellion, preface of two previous volumes). The first of these was some twenty years ago my father's Lieutenant-Governor here, but upon a breach of trust and beginning a rebellion narrowly escaped the gallows. Since then and during the time of Bacon's rebellion it was expected every day that he would have fallen in with him. Indeed, but for the vigilance and care of one of my lieutenants, Thomas Notley, now deceased, in suppressing the rebellion here in Bacon's time, this Fendall had certainly joined with Bacon, and then Maryland had been embroiled and ruined as Virginia was. The encouragement that he had to lay the present design was the hope that on His Majesty meeting his Parliament there would be such differences as would lead to a civil war; and then there would be no established laws in England, and thus he and his crew might possess themselves of what estates they pleased here and in Virginia. Fendall has a great influence on and interest in most of the rascals in the northern parts of Virginia, where he lived for some time when he was forced to absent himself from Maryland. At that time I gave notice to Sir Henry Chicheley to set eyes over him, and I gave the like notice to Colonel Nicholas Spencer of Virginia, but I fear that the latter, through want either of resolution or of loyalty, did not prevent the seditious practices of this rebel as he might. I may the more boldly affirm this, since formerly, and but a few days before my apprehending this fellow, he had openly entertained and cherished the rascal in his house. This gives me cause to be confident that he has encouraged Fendall in his designs against Maryland, forgetting, or it may be not considering, that a defection in my government may raise another Bacon in Virginia, the people there being as ripe and ready for another rebellion as ever they were; and I know not but that one of the two that I have arrested might have served their turn. If the King send not some loyal active person to command under Sir Henry Chicheley, who is now superannuated, very speedily, the Government of Virginia will be in danger. I pray God that Secretary Spencer be of so much loyalty as to deserve the trust and dignity now conferred on him. Could I be but one hour with you I could satisfy you as to certain matters relating to the King's service which I dare not commit to paper at this juncture. I beg your pardon for giving you this fresh trouble before expiating the rudeness of my former addresses. My own and my wife's service to the Countess of Anglesey. Holograph. 2 pp. Endorsed. Rec. Oct. 1, 1681. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 33, and Col. Entry Book, Vol. LII., pp. 49–53.]
July 19. 181. Minutes of Council of Barbados. The Bill for declaring when the laws of England shall take effect referred to the Committee (see No. 163) on the Habeas Corpus Act. The Assembly brought up the Bill for commuting arrears into money payments, which was read thrice and passed. Bill for reviving sundry Acts amended and returned to the Assembly. Bill for securing possession of negroes sent to Committee.
July 20. Bill for reviving sundry Acts brought up by the Assembly with amendments, read thrice and passed. His Excellency reminded the Speaker of the necessity of doing somewhat for the holding of General Sessions before the adjournment of the Assembly. The Assembly brought an order for the payment of 3,000 Ibs. of sugar to Jane Baynes. Report of the Committee appointed for the commutation of the four-and-a-half per cent. duty, viz—The country will give 5,000l. for the four-and-a-half per cent. duty for thirty-one years. They will advance two years' rent without defalcation of interest, in case the King requires his resident Governor for the time being to impose such customs on imported liquors as the Council and Assembly shall from time to time desire; the produce of such Excise to be collected by the officers of the Island and to be paid in the first place to discharge the rent and reimburse the advance and (if any overplus remain) to such other uses as the Government shall appoint; and if the lease [of the farm] cannot be gained without comprehending the Leeward Islands, then they will advance 1,000l., and, more, will lay down 12,000l. The third and fourth proposals in the Governor's speech referred to a committee consisting of Henry Walrond, Samuel Newton, and John Witham for report (see ante No. 59). The ninth proposal referred to Richard Howell, Edwyn Stede, Thomas Walrond, and Francis Bond for their report. The Assembly desiring further conference with the Council about the commutation of the four-and-a-half per cent. the original committee were appointed conferrers. The conference led to no result. His Excellency, considering the miserable condition of the prisoners, propounded a method for holding a General Sessions with all possible speed. Reserved for consideration to-morrow. The Assembly being come, the Speaker acquainted the Governor that the Assembly can think of no expedient at present for defraying the cost of a General Sessions.
July 21. The Council considered the settling of the Court of Exchequer. Ordered, That the publication for holding Grand Sessions on 16th August do issue on the 30th inst. Ordered, That Mr. Hannay view the old Session House at Mr. Wilson's and treat with him about the use of it; and that he buy wherewith to hang the Sessions House and fit it up. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XI., pp. 417–27.]
July. 19. 182. Journal of Assembly of Barbados. Bill for commuting the arrears of levies into money passed with the amendments of the Governor and Council. Bill to revive expiring Acts, with like amendments, passed.
July. 20. On petition of Jane Baynes, widow of Richard Baynes, late gunner of Hole Fort, ordered that John Hallett pay to her 3,000 lbs. of muscovado sugar for her maintenance for the year 1680. Ordered, That James Carter and James Walwyn be added to the Committee to confer with the Council on the commutation of the four-and-a-half per cent. duty. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIII., pp. 442–4.]
July. 21.
Hampton Court.
183. Order of the King in Council. Referring the Petition of William Fisher, merchant of Tercera, to Lords of Trade and Plantations for report. Signed, Phi. Lloyd. 1 p. Annexed,
183 I. The petition referred to. About July 1675 Edmond Gould, petitioner's factor at Rochelle, shipped in the ship Phoenix, of London, Leonard Haynes, master, a cargo worth 12,000l., consigned to Francisco Pinhero at Lisbon, and Gaspers Ferrary of Madeira, where she was to take in such goods as she could and return to Rochelle. Haynes, instead of sailing where he was bid, proceeded straight to Newfoundland, but being unable there to accomplish his design of robbing petitioner told the ship's company that he would take the cargo first to Virginia and then to Barbados. Arrived at Cherrystone Creek, Virginia, he conspired with two men to unlade the ship as if consigned to one of them, and, failing that, wrecked the ship and conveyed the cargo away under pretence of saving it. Much of it thus fell into their hands and into the hands of Colonel Stringer, Colonel Kendall, Colonel Waters, Major Spencer, Captain Thomas Ball, and others. Some time after, Sir William Berkeley, the Governor, gave his warrant for seizing the ship and goods for the proprietors, seeing she was no wreck; and about four thousand pounds' worth of goods was thus secured. Petitioner sent over an agent in 1676 to see to the matter, who found the goods so dispersed and among such powerful hands that he could get no satisfaction and recovered nothing. Prays that Lord Culpeper may be ordered to examine the matter and report. Copy. Certified by Philip Lloyd. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., Nos. 34–34 I., and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXII., pp. 62, 63.]
July. 22.
Virginia.
184. Extract of a letter from Virginia. Thanks for your full and free advice in your last letter. Your apprehensions of these people as able to inflict on us unspeakable injuries are just. Your proposal of contributing to our neighbor Indians whereby to purchase a peace were well worth considering, could one place any faith in such people; but they have shewn so much treachery on treaties and so openly violated all articles of peace made with Indians as soon as resolved on—nay, even before all the ceremonies thereof could be performed,—that our neighbor Indians will put no trust in such treaties. They will say that to treat with those northern Indians is either to offer themselves as sacrifices or at least to become their vassals, which they have lately manifested in Maryland, a place no less infested with them this. They daily expect a blow from these Indians, as, indeed, it is feared that even the extreme parts of this Colony may this fall. A fortnight since they shewed their insolence by leaving the upper parts of the river, entering the people's houses and carrying off what they wanted, killing hogs and cattle, and letting them lie without using any part of them. By some Indian prisoners lately escaped I am informed from Maryland that the Indians who commit these spoils and injuries are some Susquehannas amongst the Senecas, who daily provoke them to ill acts and are the occasion of the war between Senecas and other Indians, which the Senecas never used to do. They used always to march northward and still would, but for the incitement of the Susquehannas. A Mattawoman Indian, lately escaped, proposed to the Government of Maryland that for a small satisfaction the Senecas would deliver up all the Susquehannas to the English, which would be a ready way to effect their quiet. The only hazard would be the difficulty of treating with those Indians, so that the Susquehannas may not know of it and endeavour a flight and then become fiercer enemies. All the hope is that if the Senecas will be hired to deliver them up, they will also be hired to destroy them, for so long as one of that nation lives we cannot expect peace. About a fortnight hence I intend to wait on Lord Baltimore and encourage this without charge or hazard of managing the same. In Maryland Lord Baltimore has apprehensions of troubles from his people. Captain Fendall and Captain Coode are under restraint, and several other protestant gentlemen under bail. The reports of the people are various. Some apprehend ill things without ground. The protestants are dissatisfied that all the arms of the province should be placed in the hands of catholics, as also all the commands. Some seem to hint that restraint was laid on several gentlemen to prevent their being elected by the people to the next Assembly, which is to be held in August. If that be the design, it is ill grounded; for it so heightens the people's intentions of electing them, they say they will force the prison doors, take out their elected members, and place them in the Assembly house. If a man may judge the hearts of people by their language, they are set against the Government with much bitterness. My opinion is that the Assembly will meet or not according as Lord Baltimore is well or ill satisfied with the elections. If he proceeds with rigour he will provoke the people too highly, but with moderation all may pass over. Otherwise, there will be ill consequences. There is a troop of horse on the upper Potomac in constant motion to protect the frontier inhabitants against the Indians. Last week it refused to march under their captain, because he was a papist. I have not heard what is come of it. Thank you for the intimation of the report Grice(?) should bring from Maryland, that the Nanjatticoe Indians, to whom I gave a pass to trade in Maryland, as they have done annually, should be the murderers of the people killed in Maryland under Point Look-out. It is altogether impossible. These Indians delivered up the boat they hired seventy miles from the place on the day before the murder was committed, of which Lord Baltimore is well satisfied. It seems very doubtful whether the murder was committed by Indians, being in a part unfrequented by Indians. All the murdered persons throats were cut and their bodies stabbed, a way of killing unknown to our Indians. It has caused many discourses and affords matter for ungoverned tongues to move over. One very closely written page. Endorsed, "Extract of letters from Virginia." Read in Council, 12 July 1681 (sic). Recd. from Colonel Ludwell. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 35.]
July. 25.
Virginia.
185. Extracts from letters to Lord Culpeper from Virginia, 18th June 1681.—My chief news to your Lordship is our anxiety for Maryland, owing to a recent outbreak of the Indians on the Potomac and Patuxent rivers. Several people were killed on the 15th, by what nation or nations is not known. It is supposed to be the work of the Nanticokes from the eastern shore across the bay. The inhabitants in their discontent irrationally attributed the massacre to the Seneca Indians by the instigation of the jesuits in Canada, and by the procurement of Lord Baltimore in order to cut off most of the protestants of Maryland. They have afflicted themselves with these wild and gross apprehensions for some time. Virginia is naturally disturbed, being separated from danger only by the breadth of the Potomac. Several Indians were lately seen in this country and Northumberland under the disguise of paint. Most parts of the country are not without fear of the Indians, who have lately made unusual preparations for marches, but whether against the Senecas or English I cannot say; but I have reason to apprehend that they will attack the English while occupied on all sides with the Senecas. These last have lately taken the Occonogee Island, with the King and many of his Indians. All their neighbours expect an attack from them.
26th July 1681.—The present condition of your Lordship's Government is peaceable, but the inhabitants of the extreme parts are in great fear of the Senecas who have inflicted many insolencies and injuries, robbed the houses, frightened the people, and wantonly and maliciously killed the stock. Either they wish to provoke the inhabitants against them or they wish to show by sheer mischief how little they regard us. The consequences will in either case be bad. The Senecas are so remote a people that we cannot hope to reach them at home, while it is equally difficult to find them abroad. The hazard, too, is great. It is a stout, numerous, rapacious people, composed of many nations, receiving all sorts of outlying Indians, and therefore an ungoverned people, with whom no treaty can be depended on. The old men say that they cannot restrain their young men. The Susquehannas who escaped the siege of the Susquehanna fort have joined the Senecas and become their people. These same Susquehannas are implacable against the English; and other neighbouring Indians moved the Senecas to their late raid to the South. We shall be infested with these so long as the Susquehannas live among them. The Senecas can be hired to do anything, and the only expedient that I can suggest is to bribe them to give up their Susquehannas to a neighbouring tribe to be dealt with after their manner, or to the English to be transported. There has been the same trouble with these Indians in Maryland, as well as intestine dissension. Several of the leading protestants have been in custody on suspicion of insurrection which they denounce as a feigned accusation, designed as an excuse to put the papists in arms. The Assembly meets 17th August, and Lord Baltimore intends to submit the accusations to them. The protestants are doubtful if the Assembly will meet. If it does, they mean to bring forward their grievances, one of which is the arrest of some gentlemen in their own houses at dead of night in time of peace with force of arms and without warrant shewn. Directly after they were seized, they were hurried to prison where they still remain. It is supposed that Lord Baltimore has been too readily persuaded to these harsh proceedings. I cannot discover the charges. The general pretext of an insurrection was put forward, but there was little appearance thereof. No arms or ammunition were found sufficient to defend the families of the arrested from an attack of Indians. Copies. 2 pp. Endorsed, "Recd. from my Lord Culpeper, 12 Oct. 1681." Read in Council same day. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 36.]
[July 26.]
Virginia.
186. The Council and Burgesses of Virginia to the King. The great quantities of tobacco grown in Maryland and other of your Majesty's plantations has brought the price so low that without speedy remedy we cannot much longer subsist. After considering all ways and means of relief we find none more probable than a total cessation of planting tobacco in this country, Maryland, and Carolina during this year. We have entreated Lord Culpeper to present this address and to represent our distress for want of an order from you for cessation, and to present you a Bill, not doubting that you will encourage us to cohabitation by some immunities, though to the diminution of your own royal treasure. We beg you therefore to remit the one penny in the pound to all genuine inhabitants of the towns mentioned, and one halfpenny a pound to such inhabitants as ship tobacco to England and Wales, which immunities, granted for seven years, will restore us. And to the better advance of trade and cohabitation we beg that it may be lawful for us to enhance twenty-five per cent. upon your Majesty's and all foreign corn imported hither over and above its current value, with a prohibition for the exportation thereof. Sheet. Signed, Nich. Spencer, Secretary of Council, Tho. Ballard, Speaker. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 37.]
July 26.
Nevis.
187. Governor Sir William Stapleton to [Sir Leoline Jenkins?]. My best thanks for some lines from you, and for the King's declaration concerning Statia. I have sad news to tell you of a massacre by Indians in Barbuda and an intended design of theirs on Antigua (see No. 190). If I write no more it is because I presume that writing to the Lords of the Committee is the same as writing to your Honour. Holograph. ½ p. Endorsed, Rec. 23 Sept. 1681. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 38.]
July 26.
Nevis.
188. Governor Sir William Stapleton to Lords of Trade and Plantations. The last orders that I received from you were of 12th March. Although the fault is not mine, I must beg your pardon for not sending the Acts according to orders. I made two voyages to Antigua and Montserrat for no other purpose than to effect that part of my duty, and found the Acts and accounts transcribing. I ordered them to be sent after me and they were promised, but I had to threaten to send some of the officers to Whitehall to answer their neglect or I should not even now have obeyed your orders. It is a great trouble to me and to the Patentee, who cannot be in each of the Islands to act. I have received the report concerning the Treaty of Neutrality. If it takes effect in nothing more, can your Lordships oblige the merchants and planters? I have put some instruments to sound the thoughts of the French as to the exchange which I ventured to suggest of Montserrat for St. Christophers. It being but a project of my own brain I cannot promise it success, only the interest that governs most men that have not true principles of loyalty may bring them to exchange and live under the English Government which is so sweet and easy. The French pay 120 lbs. of sugar, capital rent, to their King per annum for themselves, servants and slaves, and 4 lbs. in France for every 100 lbs. weight of the produce of their plantations there transported, and we only pay the 4½ per cent. here and eighteenpence at home. The complaint made against the ministers is without any cause. Mr. Mollinax [Molineux] is he that is appointed for Montserrat, who was called before myself, Deputy Governor, and Council of that Island. He delivered to us there that he was well used, and if they are not also it must be their own faults for not making application to me or the Deputy Governors for redress. Colonel Cotter, who is the Deputy Governor in that Island, will make it so to appear. Each minister has sixteen thousand [pounds of sugar] per annum and two thousand for a clerk, besides the perquisites for marriages, funeral sermons, and other church dues, and all without any charge for receiving the same. Because Mr. Heylyn goes home to recover his health and others are wanting, I have now prayed my Lord of London to send over four able ministers and not young graduates. There is an absolute necessity of having a man of parts in St. Christophers, for that there are not any parish clergy, but French and Dutch Calvinists and Lutherans, which I suppose to be no less adversaries to the Church of England, as it is orthodox, than each is to the other. Whoever goes to St. Christophers may have two hundred pounds per annum, for we will add two parishes together that they may live comfortably. I beg your Lordships to consider the condition of the two companies at St. Christophers, which on the 7th July last are three years in arrears, as am I also myself for the salary the King is pleased to allow me and for my arrears in Sir Tobias Bridge's regiment. I cannot keep red coats upon their backs longer nor can they live without victuals. To disband them, with a revocation of my own commission, would be more pleasing to me than to see English soldiers starving and naked and the French ones well accoutred and fed on the opposite frontier. My credit will not long support them. He that was my deputy on the Island being dead, I have given the command of one of the companies to Colonel James Cotter, who has a furlough for ten months and presents this, the Acts and other papers to you. One thing more I offer for consideration, to have all the Acts for the Leeward Islands alike, there being no difference in nature or constitution. The only exceptions are two Acts, viz., the Acts for forfeiting and reinvesting the then present proprietors, by reason of the French conquest with their cannibal and heathen assistants, which may extend to this Island only. All others, in my humble judgment, should be the same in the same Government. The Act for extent of lands and slaves in Antigua has been and ever will be a hindrance to the thorough settlement of that Island. It was passed before my time. If there be anything illegal or contrary to the royal prerogative in these Acts, pray excuse my ignorance. Postscript.—I beg your direction in one matter, whether I may not apply the 1,500l. granted for the erection of forts in the Leeward Islands to the building of one fort in our island. Divided in four it will not pay the labourers' wages for building the face of the bastion and digging the foundation. Holograph. 2 pp. Endorsed and inscribed, "Recd. 19 Sept. Read 11 Oct. 1681." [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 39, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVII., pp. 16–20.]
July 27.
Nevis.
189. Sir William Stapleton to Lords of Trade and Plantations. Since my letter of yesterday, I have a sad accident to report in the often reiterated cruelties of the Indians of St. Vincent and Dominica, who have murdered the people living in Barbuda. Colonel Cotter has the original letter written by a French gentleman who gave the information (see next abstract). I understand it to be true in all but the number of murdered, which is but eight out of twenty. I have no particulars yet from them, but have sent a boat to procure them. I do not question the fifty periagos from the main, St. Vincent and Dominica, which with forty bowmen apiece makes two thousand men. But I hope it will not be thought an infringement on the Government of Barbados, if I take every opportunities to avenge the blood of my fellow subjects upon those heathens, as it was thought in Sir Jonathan Atkins's time, who might easily have prevented this by embracing a proposition that I made him to join in destroying the Indians of St. Vincent, which is near Barbados, and those of Dominica also. I have often writ concerning these bloodhounds, as Mons. La Barre called them when he made use of them in the conquest of Antigua and Montserrat. The hurricane time hinders my design against them now, but I will first give notice to Sir Richard Dutton of the massacre and robberies, though they are no more at his subjection [under his control] than those of Orinoco, notwithstanding the two Islands are in his Commission. I have received the King's orders sent through Sir Leoline Jenkins for unarming Statia and Saba, also a mandamus sent by the Commissioners of the Treasury inhibiting the remission of fines and forfeitures. They shall be obeyed, though the latter may be hard. If for instance a poor fellow transgresses the Acts of Trade, goes, he and another, in a canoe, and brings in anything by law forbidden, he has nothing but his boat to support his wife and children. Or if he is fined for anything else to the value of fifty or a hundred pounds of sugar and has nothing but his skin, he must remain in durance till the King's pleasure is known. All other fines and impositions by Acts have always been applied to the maintenance of warders and gunners for erecting and supporting platforms, or to purposes of Government. Holograph. 2 pp. Inscribed, "Recd. Oct. 17, 1681." [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 40, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XLVII., pp. 20–23.]
July 27.
Guadeloupe.
190. Mons. B. Lapoterie to Sir William Stapleton. I beg to inform you that there is a party of fifty Carib periagos from the Main, St. Vincent and Dominica which has a design for a descent on Antigua, and that in two months. I know it from themselves, for I saw them on their return from Barbuda from which they came loaded with plunder, and where they say they have made a great massacre. They assured me that their rendezvous was at Dominica. It is a week since I saw and spoke with them, and I seize this opportunity, through the good offices of M. de Vigne, to entrust him with this letter to you. I swear to you as a man of honour that if I could have found no better conveyance I should have embarked in a canoe with four negroes, and gone to Antigua myself to give this warning to M. Jem Roussel [James Russell], your brother-in-law. The invariable courtesy and civility that I have received from you leave me still under obligations to you, and when the opportunity presents itself to me to give you proof of my humble service, you will find none more zealous than mine. Pray let me recommend to you my son, to whom I have no time to write. French. Holograph. 2 pp. Endorsed, "A letter from a French gentleman to Sir W. Stapleton." [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 41.]
July 27. 191. Journal of Lords of Trade and Plantations. Petition of Royal African Company eonsidered, for permission to export five thousand weight of crewel to Guinea. It being the Attorney-General's opinion that it may be exportedas a perfect manufacture, like thread and therefore not yarn within the meaning of the Acts of Parliament, and the opinion of the Commissioners of Customs that the manufactures of England will not be prejudiced thereby, agreed to report that leave may be given.
On the unwillingness of the Jamaica Assembly to raise a public revenue, the Lords will recommend that the offices of Lieutenant and Major-General be discontinued and the expense saved. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CVI., pp. 272, 273.]
July 27.
Council Chamber.
192. Lords of Trade and Plantations to the King. Forwarding Sir Thomas Lynch's commission and instructions for execution, also the revocation of Sir Henry Morgan's and Sir Francis Watson's commissions as Lieutenant-General and Major-General. Signed, Anglesey, Clarendon, Radnor, L. Jenkins. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXX., p. 40.]
July 27. 193. [William Blathwayt] to Lord Craven. I am directed to enclose you an extract (see letter of Lords Proprietors of Carolina post, 20 Dec. 1681) concerning the boundaries of Virginia and South Carolina, of which province you are Palatine, and to request the Lords Proprietors to return their answer upon the matter in dispute to the Lords of Trade and Plantations. Draft. Endorsed, "To my Lord Craven about Carolina." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 42.]
July 28.
Whitehall.
194. Order of the King in Council. Recommended, by the Committee of Trade and Plantations that Sir Thomas Lynch's commission be transmitted to Mr. Secretary Jenkins to be despatched in the usual form, and that the commissions of Sir Henry Morgan and Sir Francis Watson be revoked. Report dated 27th July, and signed, Anglesey, Clarendon, Radnor, and Jenkins. Ordered accordingly. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXX., p. 40.]
July 30.
Virginia.
195. Extract from a letter from Virginia. I have little to add to my letter of 22nd instant (see ante, No. 184). At present, God be thanked, our affairs are peaceable. The Seneca Indians are drawn off, but we are not without apprehensions of their return, and if they return this fall it will be for mischief, though whether to this country or Maryland I cannot say. By escaped prisoners we learn that they are dissatisfied with both governments, and if they should attack we are in an ill condition for defence, and Maryland in a worse by reason of her intestine distractions. They are ready in Maryland to break forth into acts of violence, and I dare publicly say that they wait only to see if their grievances will be redressed in the Assembly, and that if not they will give ease to matters themselves. Fendall and Coode are still in custody; the charges against them are, I hear, of little weight, and it is said that they are only secured to prevent them from sitting in the Assembly. The people threaten to release them by force. ½ p. Endorsed, "Recd. from Colonel Ludwell and read in Council 12 Oct. 1681." [Col. Papers, Vol. XLVII., No. 43.]