BHO

America and West Indies: September 1704

Pages 245-267

Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 22, 1704-1705. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1916.

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Citation:

September 1704

Sept. 2.
St. John's Harbor.
546. Mr. Jackson to Commodore Bridge. I have weighed the resolve you with the rest of the Commanders came to yesterday in order to give Mr. Campbell possession of his house, wch. I am free to do, but it is impossible in so short a time, and I will never go down to the house he now lives in, but will move with my family to the Fort where my just residence is. As Chaplain I claim the second house in the Fort. Is Mr. Latham, who has no commission, and as Chief Mason ought to be preferred to a barrick, to be preferred in that place before me ?etc. etc. Signed, John Jackson. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 11, 1704/5. Presented to the Board by Commodore Bridge. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 29(A); and 195, 3. pp. 376–379.]
Sept. 5.
Whitehall.
547. Mr. St. John [s] to Mr. Secretary Harley. Prays for an immediate order with regard to the 3 Regiments in the West Indies, who have been in those parts above 3 years and have petitioned to be relieved pursuant to H.M. Declaration [1702]. The uncertainty makes it impossible to provide clothing; the miseries endured on this account by the companyes now in the West Indies are much greater than what the six companies, recently raised and ordered to be added to them, suffer here, who, being in an almost naked condition, I'le take care they shall do no duty, but be removed to warmer quarters, etc. Signed, St. Johns [sic]. 2 pp. Enclosed,
547. i. Captains of the Additional Companies to the Lords of the Privy Council. Ordered to garrison duty at Tilbury Fort, the new companies, not being as yet cloathed, lie under exceeding great hardship etc. Signed, Wm. Lyndall, Fisher Wentworth. 1½ pp. [C.O. 137, 6. Nos. 64, 64.i.]
Sept. 5.
Whitehall.
548. Mr. Secretary Harley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The Queen commands me to send you the enclosed Memorial of the Envoye of Denmark, for your opinion, with all speed. Signed, Ro. Harley. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 12th Sept., 1704. 1 p. Enclosed,
548. i. Envoy Extraordinary of Denmark to the Queen. Since the beginning of the war, the English privateers have seized or plundered several ships belonging to the subjects of the King of Denmark, inhabiting the Island of St. Thomas, which have been condemned on trivial pretences. Instances, the Schutburg and the St. Patrick belonging to Peter Smith, and the Jean et Mateuwes, belonging to Abraham Tessemaker, the Young Dorothea, belonging to Peter Ronnels, the Cosyns belonging to Jean Jeansen de Wint, a barque belonging to Hans Bockhout, and the Charles II. belonging to Manuel Gilligan. Demands that they be restored or compensation paid, and that the English privateers be severely punished. Windsor, Sept. 3, 1704. Signed, J. Rosenkrantz. French. 2½ pp. [C.O. 137, 6. Nos. 63, 63.i.; and 138, 11. pp. 320–323.]
Sept. 6.
St. James's.
549. Order of Queen in Council. Confirming Commission of Lt. Governor Johnson as recommended Aug. 25. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Sept. 12, 1704. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 5. No. 80; and 153, 9. pp. 37, 38.]
Sept. 6.
St. James's.
550. Order of Queen in Council. Referring petition of Jeronimy Clifford, complaining of the delay in the examination of his accounts [Feb. 10], to the Council of Trade and Plantations, who are to examine his complaint and recommend the hastening of the Report. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Sept. 12, 1704. ½ p. Enclosed,
550. i. Petition of Jeronimy Clifford to the Queen as above. Copy. 1½ pp.
550. ii. Copies of Mr. Clifford's letters to Messrs. Sheppard, Gardner and Oosterland, May 18 and June 7. 2½ pp.
550. iii. Copy of Mr. Clifford's accounts. My damages and all my interest in Holland and Surinam amounts to 354,162 guilders, 13s. Signed, Jer. Clifford. May 18, 1704. 7 pp. [C.O. 388, 75. Nos. 98, 98.i.–iii.; and (with enclosure i. only) 389, 36. pp. 202–208.]
Sept. 6.
St. James's.
551. Order of Queen in Council. Referring enclosed petition to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their opinion. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 3, 1704. ¾ p. Enclosed,
551. i. Petition of Edward Chilton to the Queen. Prays to be allowed to leave Barbados for a year, to repair his health and settle business, without prejudice to his patent for Attorney General of the said Island. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 7. Nos. 41, 41.i.; and 29, 9. pp. 50–52.]
Sept. 6.
St. James's.
552. Order of Queen in Council. Approving Representation of Aug. 25 upon the Bills of Virginia, "except that it is not thought requisite that Instructions be sent to the Governor instead of the Bill for the better securing the liberty of the subject." Otherwise, the Bills to be remitted to the Governor to be passed as proposed by the said Representation. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 14th Sept. 1704. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1314. No. 31; and 5, 1361. pp. 27, 28.]
Sept. 6.
St. James's.
553. Order of Queen in Council. Approving Representation (Aug. 25) for the restoring of Samuel Cox to the Council of Barbados, and ordering a warrant to be prepared accordingly. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 3, 1704. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 23; and 29, 9. pp. 48, 49; and 28, 7. No. 42.]
Sept. 8.
Whitehall.
554. Mr. St. John to Mr. Secretary Harley. I transmit a paper wherein is contained the chief grievances which H.M. forces in Jamaica complain of, for in the Leeward Islands their condition is tollerable enough. I do not see how it is possible at this time to relieve them, and have reason to think that they would be contented enough to stay longer in those parts, if some of these hardships, imposed lately on them by those people who properly they are sent thither to defend, might be removed. Signed, St. John. 1 p. Enclosed,
554. i. Grievances of the Regiments in Jamaica as to inadequate allowances and quarters etc. as supra passim. 1½ pp. [C.O. 137, 6. Nos. 65, 65.i.]
Sept. 9.
London.
555. E. Dummer to Wm. Popple. Gives account of the Prince Packet boat's sailings to the West Indies. Out and home 98 days. Signed, E. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read 13th Sept., 1704. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 5. No. 63.]
Sept. 12. 556. Royal African Company to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The Company have very great effects in H.M. Plantations in the West Indies, and are likely to encrease the same considerably by the ships now in their service designed thither with negroes from Guinea. The Company do from the said Islands load their effects upon freight on sundry ships as they offer from those parts, which ships they have not under their direction, and by the conduct of the owners this last year, ordering their ships to proceed without convoy, the Company as likewise themselves, and divers other traders, have been great sufferers besides the loss to the publick in the duties, the greater part having been taken by the French privateers. Propose, that your Honours would represent to H.R.H. the advantage it would be to the nation to send convoys to said Islands at two several seasons, vizt. two men of warr to depart England in all Dec., to be there the beginning of March, to come away with ships the first crop; two or more others to depart England in all March, to be there the beginning of June to convoy home the ships which will then bring off the whole remaining crop. In this method the convoys will not need to spend much time at the Island, the traders would have their effects with greater security, and at easier charge both in freight and insurance, which would consequently make the prizes of those commodities easier to the whole nation, and by bringing them safe home in proper seasons a great quantity would be exported and our neighbouring nations pay us for them, which would be a great help to preserve the ballance of trade in our favour. This is proposed only for Barbados, Antigua, Mountserrat, Nevis and St. Christophers, to all which places the same convoys will serve. Signed, John Pery, Secry. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 14th Sept. 1704. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 44; and 29, 8. pp. 470–472.]
Sept. 12.
Whitehall.
557. Mr. Secretary Harley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses papers relating to the grievances of the forces at Jamaica [Sept. 5 and 8]. H.M. would have you report what methods may be most proper to encourage them to continue more willingly in that service, and to redress their hardships, as to quarters. If barraques can be built or certain quarters assigned, it will tend more to the security of the countrey, the ease of the inhabitants and the health of the soldiers, and considering how far these poor men goe, and venture their lives to defend a very unhealthfull place, it wou'd be a considerable encouragement if any advantages or privileges could be thought of to be granted those poor men after so many years service in the Troops. Signed, Ro. Harley. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 14th Sept. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 137, 6. No. 66; and 138, 11. pp. 326, 327.]
Sept. 12.
Whitehall.
558. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Harley. In answer to your letter of Sep. 5 [q.v.], by a list of prizes taken and condemned at Jamaica and transmitted to us by Gov. Handasyd, we find that four of the sloops mentioned in the [Danish] Memorial, vizt. The St. Patrick, the Cosyns, the North Lyon belonging to Hans Bockhout, and the Young Dorothy were condemned at Jamaica for taking in goods at Curacoa, and vending them to the Spaniards on the coast of Carraccos, and that another sloop called the Schutburg was also condemned at Jamaica for going to Fort Louis with flower and contraband goods to trade with the French; but we have not the Proceedings upon the condemnation of the foresaid sloops, nor any further particulars relating thereunto, neither do we find any mention of the sloop called the Jean and Matewes mentioned in the said Memorial. As to the sloop Charles the Second owned by Manuel Manasses Gilligan, who is a natural born subject of H.M., but naturalized a Dane at the Island of St. Thomas, she was taken on the coast of Caraccos under Dutch colours, where she had been trading with the Spaniards in contraband goods, provisions and ammunition, for which she was condemned at Barbadoes, and upon her condemnation the persons concerned prayed an appeal to the Court of Admiralty in England, which was granted them upon their giving 200l. security, and 6 months were allowed them for prosecuting the same, and 3 months further to certifye the said prosecution; but we have not heard whether the said appeal be sent over hither or no. We humbly offer that a copy of the said Memorial be sent to the Governours of Jamaica and Barbadoes and that they be directed to transmit a particular account of the Proceedings had in each Island relating to the said sloops. And in the meantime that M. Rosencrantz be acquainted that the said vessells having been condemned in H.M. Courts of Admiralty in a judicial way, the persons who think themselves agrieved by the sentence may have recourse to the proper methods of law by appealing here in England. [C.O. 138, 11. pp. 324–326.]
Sept. 12.
From the Fleet.
559. Jeronimy Clifford to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Quotes his letter of July 28, "to which I have had no answer, nor is there anything further done in my business, which occasions my being detained so long a prisoner." Prays for relief. Signed, Jer. Clifford. 2 pp. [C.O. 388, 75. No. 96; and 389, 36. pp. 226, 227.]
Sept. 13.
Whitehall.
560. W. Popple, jr., to Mr. Clifford. In reply to preceding, encloses following. [C.O. 389, 36. p. 209.]
Sept. 13.
Whitehall.
561. Council of Trade and Plantations to Samuel Shepherd etc. Upon H.M. Order in Council, Sept. 6, we desire you to dispatch your report on Mr. Clifford's accounts. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 210, 211.]
Sept. 14. 562. Merchants and Planters of Barbados to the Council of Trade and Plantations. There hath been convoy allowed but for one fleet to that Island this year though the necessities of the Planters do require that there should be two fleets yearly to supply them with stores to subsist the people, and enable them to carry on their works and to bring home their cropps of sugar, ginger and cotton in such seasons as they may not be exposed to be destroyed by bad weather in winter, or be taken by the enemy, as many of their ships have lately been. The evills which H.M. subjects of that Island and that trade to it are liable to for want thereof are, (1) When provisions from England and other perishable goods (without which the inhabitants cannot subsist) go but once a year, they are oftentimes reduced to the utmost extremity before a supply comes to them, and then there comes so great quantities that part of it perishes before it can be used. (2) When there goes but one fleet, it comes thither so late that the utensills and stores for making sugar (which they cannot be without and must be constantly supplied with from hence) come so late that the damage the Planters sustain by the disappointment is often irrepairable. (3) Then some rich merchants make such advantages of the Planters by the exorbitant prices they make them pay for their commodities that many of them are thereby undone. (4) The one fleet is detained in the Island generally till the hurricane time, and often forc'd to come home in winter. (5) They have not near tunnage sufficient to bring home their sugars, etc. which occasions fraight to be excessive dear for what is brought home and great quantity of what is made is left in the Island, by which the Planter is disabled from having those provisions and stores which he stands in need of for the carrying on his works. The fleet which sailed last for Barbados having not carryed a sufficient proportion of provisions and stores for the use of the inhabitants untill Jan. next, and it being absolutely necessary that there should be a supply sent to be there before they break the canes of the next cropp which they begin to do in that month, Petitioners pray your Lordships to move H.M. to order, that there may be at least one ship of war ready by Oct. 1st next to convoy such of the merchant ships as shall be then laden with provisions and stores for the said Island. Signed, John Harwood, Tho. Waite, Jno. Taylor, Tho. Foulerton, J. Kendall, B. Middleton, Jno. Walter, Tho. Skutt, Mel. Holder, Christr. Fowler, Ricd. Carter, Tho. Corbett, Edwd. Alanson, John Gray, Franc. Eyles, Wm. Brooke, Silvans. Grove, Richd. Filden, Damt. Filden, Thomas Clarke, Rowld. Tryon, Robt. Chester, Tho. Stewart, Hen. Palmer, Wm. Tryon, David Creagh, Robt. Smith. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 14th Sept. 1704. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 43; and 29, 8. pp. 266–270.]
Sept. 15.
London.
563. Wm. Heysham and others to Sir Charles Hedges. The enclosed petition from several Members of the Assembly of Barbadoes, complaining against the Governor, which wee thought to have presented to H.M. in Councill on Thursday next, but hearing that there is an Address from several others of Barbados on his behalf to be delivered to H.M. on Sunday, and having waited upon my Lord President and Mr. Secretary Harley, we were advised to send this petition to your Honour to be laid before H.M. at the same time, least anything should be done in prejudice to Petitioners or the four Gentlemen suspended from the Council. Pray that the three new Councillors may not be confirmed, and [not] any order made till the enclosed petition be taken into consideration. Signed, Wm. Heysham, Rob. Heysham, Guy Ball. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 24.]
Sept. 15.
St. Mary Hill.
564. Mel. Holder to Mr. Popple. In reply to your enquiry how many ships are desired to go with supplyes of necessaries for the beginning of the next crop in Barbados, by what I can at present learn there may be about ten or twelve saile. That petition was designed to be presented severall weeks ago, but there being very seldome a Board was defered, so that the last of Oct. will be the soonest they can get ready to depart Gravesend in case they were now sure of a convoy which I am desired to acquaint you as will be requisite to be considered for the same length of time when a convoy shall be appointed. Signed, Mel. Holder. Endorsed, Recd. 16th, Read 19th Sept. 1704. Addressed. Postmark. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 45; and 29, 8. p. 473.]
Sept. 16.
Woolwich, St. John's Harbour.
565. J. Spann and S. Chamberlen [to Capt. Bridge]. Whereas on Sept. 1st we were summoned to a Court of Justice held by you and the Admirals of the Harbour of St. Johns, and the Court decided, in a case between John Jackson, Chaplain, and Colin Campbell, H.M. Agent for prizes, that Jackson should remove out of the house he then lived in, on the 10th, into a house assigned him by the Court, which he had formerly lived in, yet, in contempt thereof, he still lives there. And whereas you have directed a Court to be held on Munday for regulating several grievances of the inhabitants, by a complaint laid before you by Mr. Jackson, and that you have desired us to assist at the said Court, we cannot comply, until you have given us full assurance that you will send him to England to answer his contempt of the Order of the Court, together with his unmannerly letter of Sept. 2 (q.v.) etc. Signed, Jona. Spann, S. Chamberlen. Endorsed, Presented to the Board by Mr. Bridge. Recd. Read Jan. 11, 1704/5. 2 pp. [C.O. 194, 3. No. 29 (b); and 195, 3. pp. 372–375.]
Sept. 17.
Jamaica.
566. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I had the honour of two of your Lordships' of June 29. I have ordered a Proclamation to be issued out, expressing the words of your Lordships' letter, strictly charging all H.M. subjects to observe the same [relating to correspondence] as they shall answer the contrary at their perril. I likewise received H.M. Proclamations for the regulation of the foreign coins in these parts, all which shall be duly observed to the utmost of my power. Several of our trading sloops have already been trading with the Spaniards, and in case they had enough of the commodities the Spaniards wanted, which are very scarce in Jamaica, they might have had an extraordinary trade. I am obliged to put your Lordships in mind that I am very apprehensive there will be an absolute necessity of two or three more light friggotts, fourth, fifth and sixth rates, to protect our traders, I having received an account from a Master of a vessell, that was taken into Martinico and made his escape from thence, that the French there since we and the Dutch debar them of the Spanish trade, design to fit out several of their best privateers and send down upon the Spanish coast to cruize for the English and Dutch traders, so that unless some more light friggots are sent, I do fear it will be an impossibility with these that are here to prevent their design. I beg leave to recommend Capt. Charles Gandy as a very fit man to have the command of a friggate here, when one shall fall vacant, he having done very brave and singular actions against the enemy, while Captain of a Privateer, in taking two of their sloops in one day and disabling a third, so that she was glad to bear away, tho' all of them exceeded him in number both of men and gunns, which prevented a very ill consequence to this Island. He is a man of very good circumstances and I dare engage a faithfull servant to his Queen and country. I should not have offered to recommend him to your Lordships but that bravery may meet with a reward according to its deserts; he is very well acquainted with the Spanish coasts and speaks the language. I know it is my duty to recommend this to the Lord High Admiral, but I dare not presume, beleiving it might be ill taken by some other Flaggs, but I doubt not if your Lordships approve of it, you will soon find methods to get it done. As to the men of war here present I can give but a very slender account of them, several of their men being dead and sick, and I am afraid by lying in harbour, which is not in my power to prevent, the Captains still having one excuse or other. The Island is at present indifferent healthy. We have had two or three small earthquakes, but I do not hear of any damage they have done. As to my own particular, I have had the greatest shake I ever could have had, having lost one of the best of wifes, who has left a numerous family of little ones motherless, she departed this life here Sep. 13, etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. Read Nov. 13, 1704. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 6. No. 67; and 138, 11. pp. 343–347.]
Sept. 17.
Jamaica.
567. Governor Handasyd to Sir Charles Hedges. Repeats information given in preceding, etc. Several of our sloops have been trading with the Spaniards and find them very well inclined to trade with the English and Dutch, in case they could be protected from the insults of the French, etc. The French are prepareing some of their best privateers to come down to prevent the English and Dutch tradeing with the Spaniards. It would be very convenient to send 3 or 4 nimble cruizers here to prevent it, if their Commanders are such persons as will follow the information I can give them. It would be very much for our interest if I could have some of the King of Spain's proclamations in Spanish, etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, R. Feb. 10. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 5.]
Sept. 18.
Barbadoes.
568. Governor Sir B. Granville to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I enclose the Minutes both of the Councill and Assembly down to this time, I shall not need therefore trouble your Lordships with enlarging on the publick transactions here, all things relating to them being soe fully expressed therein. At my arrival I found the administration of this Government in the hands of a President and Councill, they divided into parties as well as the Assembly and rest of the people employed in quarreling and tearing one another to peices, leaving the fortifications to goe to ruin and a generall neglect of the publick interest. I spent a year in endeavouring to bring them to reason by fair means, but that failing I made use of the authority H.M. had put into my hands, and by making examples of the ringleaders, both in the Councill and Assembly, I have at last brought matters to a good settlement, with a prospect of having it every day grow better. The severall steps I have taken with the occasions of them, my reasons for so doing and the consequences they have had, your Lordships will find in the Minutes I now send, and though the present Assembly has not satt long enough to bring any material matters to perfection, by what they have done they show an inclination to do their duty, and I believe will continue to doe soe. I can't but observe that the rise of all divisions and factions in this country have been under the administration of the government by ye President and Councill, and that it has been then that the severall Acts have passed which have lessened the Queen's authority, and made the dependance upon that almost useless. This may recommend it to your Lordships' consideration, whether it may not be necessary that either H.M. appoint a Lieutenant Governour or give power to the Governour so to doe, in case of his absence or sickness. The Councill being by the death of Mr. Callow reduced under 7, I did according to my Instructions fill it up, by swearing in Col. James Colleton, a person in the first rank in this Island, that has for many years exercised the cheif posts, of known integrity and considerable fortune. I have great reason to complain of Capt. Samuel Martin, H.M.S. Blackwall, who has behaved himself with great ill manners as well as disobedience to me, contrary to ye express words of my Lord High Admiral's patent to me, the enclosed depositions show that he has prest men in Road here without having any authority from me so to doe, and as by the letter under his hand appears, has refused to deliver them back, notwithstanding I sent him an order in writing so to doe. His continual lying on shore when in harbour has occasioned great neglect, sickness and desertion in his ship. When I have told him of it, his answer was that he being Commander in Cheif of H.M. ships, he was thereby entitled to lye on shore, and not to be controuled by me in that matter. I did by a letter from my Lord Nottingham, in Oct. last, receive orders to keep the 3 French prisoners (condemned at a Court Martial) in custody during the war, or till farther orders. The French have at this time many English prisoners at Martinique, and I believe I could make good use of these men in exchange for them. 'Tis said they have there upwards of 250, but being restrained by that order, I can not make steps in this matter till I have leave so to doe. This Island has not for 12 years past been so healthy as it has been of late, and it continues to be still. The French privateers infest very much our latitude and make many prizes. They are nimble saylers and the Queen's ships not able to come up with them, besides two doe not suffice to keep one always in ye latitude. In the Minutes of the Councill your Lordships will find entred the particulars as they have appeared to me in relation to the not sending an advice-boat when Commodore Walker's fleet was here. It appears to have been a generall neglect in all ye parts of the then Government. I will take care none such shall happen during my time. Upwards of 50 sail of merchant men sail with this convoy for England, besides what are to joyn them at ye Leeward Islands. Signed, Bevill Granville. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 2, Read Feb. 5, 1704/5. 3 pp. Enclosed,
568. i. Governor Sir B. Granville to Capt. Martin. Capt. Wm. Ackland, of the Industry, and Capt. Wm. Cogan, merchant, having complained that you have pressed 7 men belonging to said ship, and that she will thereby be detained in her voyage etc., without my authority, I order that you immediately return them, as also his apprentice to Capt. Thomas Robinson, that you still detain contrary to my order. Sept. 9, 1704. Signed, Bevill Granville. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 2, 1704/5. Copy. 1 p.
568. ii. Capt. Martin to Governor Sir B. Granville. Seven is more by three than Capt. Ackland can have any pretence to etc. My Lord High Admiral's last orders makes me (I think) independant to any order from your Excellency . . . . I can't comply with your orders for discharging so many men when the service so much wants them and it does not correspond with H.R.H. orders etc. Sept. 11, 1704. Signed, Saml. Martin. Addressed. Same endorsement. 1 p.
568. iii. Duplicate of preceding.
568. iv. Deposition of Capt. Ackland, Sept. 13, 1704, as to Capt. Martin pressing his men and refusing to deliver them on the Governor's order. Signed, Wm. Ackland. Same endorsement. Copy. 1½ pp.
568. v. Duplicate of preceding.
568. vi. Deposition of Capt. Robinson, of the Friendship. Capt. Martin pressed two of his men, one of whom was an apprentice, and refused to deliver him up. Signed, Thomas Robinson. Same endorsement. 1 p.
568. vii. Duplicate of preceding.
568. viii. Deposition of A. Skene. On Sept. 18, 1704, Capt. Martin refused to deliver up to the Governor's Order, Thomas Maycock, Wm. Terrill and John Curle, who were fled from Justice. Capt. Martin said H.E. had no power to command him, and hoped that if ever he came to Barbados again, it would be to carry the Governor home prisoner etc. Signed, Alexander Skene. Same endorsement. 1½ pp.
568. ix. Deposition of G. Hay, Deputy Provost Marshall. To the same effect as preceding. The warrants were read, but no regard paid thereto. Signed, Georg Hay. Same endorsement. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 7. Nos. 46, 46.i.vii; and (without enclosures) 29, 9. pp. 133–142.]
Sept. 18.
Barbados.
569. Governor Sir B. Granville to Sir Charles Hedges. My Lord Nottingham, Oct. 28, 1703, commanded me to keep in custody three French prisoners etc. It has happen'd since that the French of Martinique have taken abundance of English prisoners, and use very severely those particularly that belong to this Island upon that account. I beleive I could make good use of these men towards the release of the English prisoners wch. are at Martinique and amount to 250 might I have leave so to doe, etc. The French privateers have don us much mischief by taking very many prizes, they are nimble saylors and H.M. ships cannot come up with them, neither does two suffice, to have allwaies one in the Latitude. The two French men of war that were sometime agoe at Martinique I hear are gon down on the coast of Spanish America. This comes in the fleet wch. will consist in about 50 sail of merchantmen from this Island, besides what are to joyn them at the Leeward Islands. Signed, Bevill Granville. Endorsed, R. March 15, [1705]. Holograph. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 25; and (duplicate)No. 26.]
Sept. 20.
Cockpitt.
570. Mr. Secretary Hedges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The enclosed Petition having been laid before the Queen, you are to examine the allegations thereof, and to report how you find the same, together with your opinion what is fit for H.M. to do therein. Signed, C. Hedges. Endorsed, Recd. Read Sept. 26, 1704. 1 p. Enclosed,
570. i. Address of [7 Members of] the Assembly of Barbados to the Queen. For several years passed petitioners have inhabited Barbados and faithfully discharged many considerable offices, both military and civill therein, and have continually to the utmost of their power upheld and supported the high honour, prerogative, etc. of your royal predecessors and of your Majesty, and upon all occasions so dutifully demeaned themselves, that they have merited the favour and good opinion of all such persons as have been hitherto constituted Governors etc. But we are now constrained by necessity of our fidelity and conscience for the publick good of this Island to complaine, and lay at your Majesty's feet several notable and grievous offences lately committed within this Island by your Majesty's Governor Sir B. Granville, to the great oppression, prejudice and hardship of many of your Majesty's loyall and dutifull subjects of this Island, and tends to the misusing, altering and subverting your Majesty's laws, to the great decay and ruine of this your Majesty's Island. (1) The Militia have been lately commanded upon duty in the several forts and fortifications, and upon the mountains by him, contrary to the laws and statutes of the said Island, and without the advice, consent and approbation of your Majesty's Councill first had therein according to the directions of the Act of Militia, which have very much fatigued the inhabitants, especially the poorer sort, so that many of them are reduced to great hardships and want, which is also declared in the preamble of the Act for the security of the bayes, townes and sea coasts, etc., which was brought into the House of Assembly by a certain Member thereof, who declared that there was no other or better way of giving the Governor mony then by such a law, since the Assembly was restrained from making presents by your Majesty's letter. The illegall and unusuall methods of commanding the inhabitants upon duty as guards, we have had good reason to beleive have been used on purpose to introduce the aforesaid Bill, thereby giving power to the Governor to raise by commission two companies of Granadeers constantly to remain in the forts and fortifications, under certain allowances and pay, which would not only prove destructive to the Militia, but be a means to evade your Majesties command restraining the Governor's receiving presents, for the charges of the two companies will stand the country in at least 9,000l. sterl. per annum, greatest part of which by the words of the Bill is to be paid into the hands of the Governor, or to whom he shall appoint, for the buying of provisions for the soldiers, by which means he will have an opportunity of gaining to himself at least 3,000l. sterl. in one year, by the large allowances made him, over and above what will purchase such provisions in times of the greatest scarcity, for which nor any part thereof is the Governor to be accountable in any manner whatever, which your petitioners and others have fully and plainly demonstrated in their arguments against the passing of the said Bill into a law, whereby the said Bill was by a majority of Members upon a third reading voted and carried in the negative, which have occasioned very great differences and devisions amongst your people moved and stirred by those adhering more to the Governor's private interest and advantage then to the publick good and welfare of this Island. Such is our misfortune in this case, that severall of the Members of the Assembly, who have voted against the Bill (and other inhabitants who are of the same opinion) are discharged from their respective offices and places of trust, and are unjustly charged by the Governor, and branded with charrecters of being factious and turbulent spirits, indeavouring thereby to alienate them from the affections of the people, tho' many of them have continued without blemish in their respective offices above 30 years, by which violent proceedings of displaceing of severall Collonels, Lieut. Colonels and Majors, and other inferior officers of severall regiments of horse and foot without the consent of the Councill. or any just reasons, great confusion and disorders dayly happen, and your Majesties Island thereby exposed to great danger, if an enemy should attempt the same, there being by such removeall of officers scarce a compleat regiment in the Island. In the stead of such officers turned out of commission and abused in their reputations and good names, others are appointed without the advice and consent of your Majesties Councill, and such who are wholely devoted to the private ends and purposes of the Governor, many of them being unquallified and constituted contrary to law, unexperienced and of mean capacities and estates, and by the disposal of his favours and your Majesty's Commissions in this manner severall of the Members of the Assembly have been prevailed upon to alter their opinions of the aforesaid Bill, and having made some small alterations in the said Bill have brought it again into the House, (with the same advantages to the Governor as at first) and have been once passed in the affirmative by 12 of the 22 Members. Petitioners, who gave their votes in the negative to the Bill, consulting the severall freeholders of their parishes and many other judicious persons, found it the opinion of the generality of the people, that the Bill would prove destructive to the Militia and to the publick good, and a direct breach and evasion of your Majesty's gracious commands, and seeing many other indirect practices and unpresidentiall proceedings in the Assembly for private and particular ends and purposes, and your petitioners finding noe other method to prevent the passing the said Bill and such practices and the ill consequences thereof, have thought fitt and advisable to absent themselves from the House, in hopes thereby the Governor would be moved to dissolve the House, that the inhabitants may have an opportunity of a new general and free election of Representatives, wherein they may choose more faithfull and discreet persons to serve your Majesty and the said Island, and that your Majesty may be acquainted with their proceedings in the said Assembly. The absence of petitioners from the House, and the differences of opinion therein, hath not proceeded from any disobedience or contempt to your Majesties laws, want of duty to your Majesty's Governor, or care and zeal for the publick good of this Island, nor from any factious, obstinate or turbulent spiritts as hath been lately laid to their charge by the Governor in his speech to the Assembly, but wholely from the corrupt practices and private designs of those who we have too great reason to conclude have a greater regard to their private profitt and interest, then to your Majesties service and the wellfare and good government of this place. (2) Contrary to your Majesty's commands as to presents to Governors, the Governor has lately received from the Assembly 600l. and 500l. sterl. and soone after voting the first summe the Speaker of the Assembly acquainted the House that the Governor thanked them for the summe of 600l. voted, but he desired that there might be an alteration of the Minute made thereof in the books of the Assembly, for that it would thereby too plainly appeare to be a present, and accordingly to conceale the same from your Majesty's knowledge, and that he might not incur your Majesties displeasure in the receipt thereof, such indirect practices are used that there are noe Minutes regularly made and entred in the books of the Assembly for such particular summs, but verball orders were given to the Treasurer, Charles Thomas Esq. to make payment thereof, which he has accordingly done. (3) Contrary to your Majesties commands aforesaid, the Nation of the Jews in this Island have presented the Governor with the summe of 200l. sterl., and by him received, whereby they have many priviledges allowed them contrary to law, and severall other presents of considerable vallue, as plate, negroes, horses etc. have been received by him from private persons, especially from some of the natives of the Kingdom of Scotland and their particular friends, who by such means have been advanced to the greatest places of trust, profitt and honour, civill and military in this Island (tho' many of them disaffected to the English nation and Government) and have thereby the command of severall fortifications, regiments and places of strength, and also have the custody and keeping of the cheifest of our Records, in the safety of which our whole interests and estates depends, which occasions great disattisfaction to many of your Majesties good subjects here, being informed from the publick prints and private letters from England, that the Scotts have refused the settlement and succession of that Crown farther then your present Majesty and your royall issue, so that if your Majesty (whom God long preserve) should depart this life without issue, the trust reposed here in the natives of that Kingdom may prove of fatall consequence to this your Majesties Island. (4) Notwithstanding your Majesties positive directions that there shall be but 300l. per annum, allowed for a House for the Governor's residence, yet such methods are contrived and used, that the house and buildings fitted up for H.E. will be an expense to this Island at least 600l. sterl. per annum, besides the loss of about 5,000l. sterl. being (as it is said) expended in buildings upon a peece of land rented of Thomas Pillgrim, for which the country hath no lease nor certainty of any time longer then three years, at the end of which, the said Pillgrim may take up his land (which is but 20 acres), and make the advantage of the buildings to himself. (5) Whereas your Majesty was pleased to constitute Robert Steward to be Register of the Court of Chancery here, Examiner thereof and Clarke of the Crowne, by collour of which patent he executes all those places by his severall Deputies, which is expressly against one of your Majesties Instructions, which directs the Commander in Cheife of this Island for the time being not to suffer any person to execute more Offices than one by deputy, and the said Steward notwithstanding he has the whole profitt of such Offices continues one of the most considerable practicers of the Law in this Island, so that scarce any cause happens to be controverted either at the Common Law or in the Chancery wherein the said Steward does not draw, prosecute, defend and plead either for the plantife or defendant, which is expressly against the practice and rules of law and equity in England, and he is so far countenanced therein, that in Dec. he appeared in a Court of Oyer and Terminer in five severall cases, wherein your Majesty was concerned in prosecuting severall persons by way of indictment, and Steward, moved to quash such indictments, which were drawne by his own Deputy, and Steward have rented out the Office of Clark of the Crowne for 100l. sterl. per annum, and for the better secureing the same, have taken severall judgments of 100l. each with security for payment thereof, which are for seven severall years, all which practices tends to the perverting of Justice, a scandall to the severall Courts, and by that means no suitor can be safe in their persons or estates. (6) Severall new and unheard of methods are lately introduced into the Courts and Offices, by means whereof severall summs of mony have been extorted, and in particular no masters of vessell (tho' whole fleets of ships are bound away from hence) can have liberty to sayle either with or without convoy, without petitioning the Governor for leave, for which petition and order thereon 17s. 6d. is extorted and paid to the Secretary of this Island, but for whose and what use the Secretary himself is best able to relate. (7) Notwithstanding it is your Majesties positive instructions, that none of the Judges, Assistants, Justices of the Peace, or other Officers shall be displaced without good and sufficient reason, yet severall persons have been discharged by the Governor without any reason, and severall put into Commission without the consent of your Majesties Councill. (8) William Holder has lately been constituted Cheiffe Judge of the cheiffest Court of Common Pleas, vizt. for the precincts of St. Michaell's, tho' he never was known to be of any Christian community, neither hath he yet been baptized, and was heretofore rejected for that reason, and he is by the Governor admitted to be Speaker of the Assembly. (9) Nicholas Paston, in behalf of himself and severall other poore people, petitioned the Governor against Col. John Holder of great hardships, severityes and abuses to the inhabitants and soldiers under his command, which have been rejected, unheard and unredressed. Pray that H.M. will direct a Commission may be sent to some knowing, discreat and indifferent persons resideing in this Island, with full power to call before them all such persons, books and papers that can prove the matters hereby charged, and that such Commissioners may returne a particular account of their proceedings, and that in the mean time such orders may be sent to H.M. Governor that H.M. subjects here may enjoy the immunities and priviledges of H.M. laws, and not to suffer in their honors, persons and estates, against the known laws, as many of them have allready done etc. Signed, Jon. Leslie, Tho. Maycock, Philip Kirton, Wm. Terrill, Chris. Estwicke, Enoch Gretton, Thos. Maxwell. 8 pp. [C.O. 28, 7. Nos. 47, 47.i.; and 29, 8. pp. 484–503.]
Sept. 20.
Whitehall.
571. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Having received a Petition from the Planters and most of the Merchants in England trading to Barbados together with a Memorial from the Royal African Company, and having heard the said persons thereupon, we humbly offer that there will be at least 20 vessells ready to saile to Barbados in Oct., besides severall others to the Leeward Islands, with utensills and goods necessary for the present supply of those Islands, provided they may be assured of convoy to be ready for them by that time, that 70 days after the arrival of the said merchant ships at Barbados they will be ready to return, with effects from that Island, as several ships will likewise be from divers of your Majesty's other Plantations upon notice that a convoy will at that time be ready to return; upon which considerations they humbly request that a convoy consisting of one 4th rate, and another smaller vessell be allowed them, the same to be ready by the latter end of Oct., and that two of the ships of war that are now upon the guard of that Island be ordered to returne with the said fleet and such ships as shall be ready from the other Colonies at the time beforementioned, that guard to be supplied by the two ships of war thus desired. We humbly take leave to add the opinion of Governor Sir B. Granville, that two convoys yearly are absolutely necessary for the supply and trade of that Island. [C.O. 29, 8. pp. 482, 483.]
Sept. 21.
Hampton Court.
572. Order of Queen in Council. H.R.H. the Lord High Admiral is to consider preceding, and to take such care therein as shall be found most convenient with regard to H.M. service. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 3, 1704. ¾ p. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 48; and 29, 9. pp. 49, 50.]
Sept. 21.
Hampton Court.
573. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following petition to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd, Read 26th Sept., 1704. ¾ p. Enclosed,
573. i. George Lillington, Michael Terril, David Ramsay and Benjamin Cryer to the Queen. Petitioners for severall years past have had the honour to be of the Councill in Barbados, in which, and in severall other considerable stations, they have served your Majesty and the late King faithfully and dilligently. H.E. Sir Bevill Granville procured a Bill to be brought into the Assembly in Nov. last for raising of standing forces in the said Island and for laying a heavy tax upon the inhabitants for maintaining them, which was then thrown out. Your Petitioners conceived that such a Bill would be a great prejudice to the Island for many reasons which they are ready humbly to offer to your Royall consideration, and found that thereby the Governor would have a certain Revenue of 3,000l. per annum, which they apprehend was contrary to your Majesty's directions, signifyed in May last, etc. For which reasons, Petitioners thought it their duty to oppose the passing the said Bill, whereby they incurred the displeasure of H.E., who was thereby provoked so much that in June last he was pleased to suspend your Petitioners from being of the Privy Councill there. The pretended reasons assigned for suspending Lillington were, for encourageing faction, and that his name was mistaken in your Majesty's Instructions, and for suspending Terrill and Ramsay were for encourageing faction, and not attending in Councill, and for suspending Cryer were for encourageing faction, for not attend'ng as he ought in Councill and for marrying without licence from H.E., whereas your Petitioners' loyalty and affection to your Majesty and your Government both here and there and their constant attendance in Councill is too well known in the Island to be questioned, they having never been guilty of any disloyal or factious act, nor ever absented from the Councill but in case of sickness or some other unavoidable necessity, nor were any of your Petitioners ever permitted to be heard touching the crimes alledged to be the cause of their suspension nor did they know they were charged with such crimes till after they were suspended. They are informed H.E. hath since nominated other persons to fill their places, and hath proposed them to your Majesty for your royal approbation, which will be construed as a mark of your displeasure to Petitioners, than which nothing can be more grevious to them, especially when it proceeds from accusations for crimes which they abhor etc. Pray to be heard as to the matters charged against them, and to be restored to their places, and that till such hearing your Majesty will not be pleased to confirme or approve the persons nominated by H.E. to sitt in Councill in their places. Signed, Geo. Lillington, David Ramsay, Michll. Terrill, Ben. Cryer. Copy. 3 pp.
573. ii.–v. The answers of Lillington, Cryer, Terril and Ramsay to Governor Sir B. Granville's reasons for suspending them from the Council. June, 1704. [See under July 1st.] Endorsed, Recd. Read Sept. 26, 1704. 6½ pp. [C.O. 28, 7. Nos. 49, 49.i.–v.; and 29, 9. pp. 1–6; and (duplicate of No. I only) 28, 38. No. 27.]
Sept. 22.
Fleet.
574. Jeronimy Clifford to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays for a copy of a report upon his claim [Feb. 10 etc.] before the same is laid before H.M. Signed, Jer. Clifford. Endorsed, Recd. Sept. 23, Read Oct. 3, 1704. [C.O. 388, 75. No. 100; and 389, 36. pp. 219, 220.]
Sept. 22.
Whitehall.
575. W. Popple, jr., to Josiah Burchett. Enquires the number and rates of the ships of war that are now on the service of Barbados, the Leeward Islands and Jamaica. [C.O. 324, 9. p. 35.]
Sept. 25.
Antigua.
576. Account of exports of Antigua, May 27–Sept. 25, 1704. 53 vessels loading Sugar (1,166 hhds., 3,829 trs., 1,012 barrls. 1,661 hhns. Cotton, 494 bags. Tobacco, 112 bundles, Ginger, 1,979 bags. Lignum Vitæ, 1,425 logs, 46,000 pounds. Rum, 6 hhds. 37 trs. 55 barlls. etc. Signed, John Brett, Naval Officer. 1½ large pp. [C.O. 7, 1. No. 7.]
[Sept. 25.]
Antigua.
577. Account of the imports of Antigua, June 6–Sept. 25. 59 sloops etc. enumerated, chiefly from England, the American Continent and the West Indies; their cargoes described in general terms. Signed, John Brett, Naval Officer. 1 large p. [C.O. 7, 1. No. 6.]
Sept. 26.
Whitehall.
578. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Recommend petition of Wm. Popple for payment of balance of sums disbursed by him. Annexed,
578. i. Petition of William Popple to the Lord High Treasurer referred to in preceding. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 212–218.]
Sept. 26.
Adm. Office.
579. Geo. Clarke to Mr. Popple. Gives names of ships attending the West Indies. (1) Jamaica, Nonsuch, Guernsey, Mermaide, Deale Castle, St. Antonio sloop, Harman and Earle, fireships, Lewes hulke. (2) Barbados, Warwick, Winchelsea. (3) Leeward Islands, Lynn, Margate. Recd. Read Oct. 3, 1704. ½ p. [C.O. 323, 5. No. 62; and 324, 9. p. 36.]
Sept. 28.
Cockpitt.
580. Sir C. Hedges to Governor Sir B. Granville. Encloses letter from the Commissioners for the exchange of prisoners, showing the method it is done in these parts. You are to put the same rules in execution, as far as is consistent with H.M. service, and let me know what objections you have etc. Acknowledges letter of July 2. I wish you could find a way to rid yourself of the French privateers etc. Signed, C. Hedges Annexed,
580. i. Commissioners for exchange of prisoners to Mr. Secretary Hedges. Sick and Wounded Office, Sept. 28, 1704. See preceding. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 7–10.]
Sept. 28. 581. Similar letter to Governor Handasyd. Concludes: The fleet that sailed from Port Royal, July 11, is lately arrived safe. H.M. commands me to recommend William Wanlesse for a Captain's Commission in a regiment under your command. etc. Signed, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 11, 12.]
Sept. 28. 582. Similar letter to Governor Sir W. Matthew. P.S. You will give me leave to put you in mind of your promise to me in relation to Mr. Larkin's widow. Signed, C. Hedges. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 12, 13.]
Sept. 28. 583. Similar letter to Lt. Governor Bennett. Concludes:—Your petition to H.M. for Capt. Lancelot Sandys' Company has been effectually answered, H.M. having been pleased to give you that Commission. [C.O. 324, 30. pp. 13, 14.]
Sept. 28.
St. Christopher's.
584. Extract of letter from Governor Sir W. Mathew to his Agent, Mr. Barwick. I desire your care in receiving sixty carriages from the Ordnance. I have wrote to Mr. Blathwait our great want of six mortars with bombs, as also 30 cannon of 18lb. They shall be mounted at the country's charge, save the carriages for the mortars. If they are of 50lb. shell they are large enough: four master-gunners we much want also. Do not forget to apply to the Bishop of London for Ministers. I have wrote to his Lordship for six. My Lords Treasurer and Chamberlain signed an order for furniture for a Chappell, pray demand the same etc. The seal of the Island is much wanted alsoe. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 9, 1704/5. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 6. No. 1; and 153, 9. pp. 71, 72.]
Sept. 29.
Maryland.
585. Governor Seymour to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I take this occasion by Capt. George Rogers in H.M.S. Gosport (who expects to be joined by Capt. Smith in the Jersey from Boston, and about Oct. 8 next to sail for England, having promised to take under his care and convoy what ships can be got ready to sail by that time as well from Virginia as this Province) to transmit to your Hon. Board Laws, Journals etc. The General Assembly by writs issued since my arrivall, met here the 5th inst., and pursuant to H.M. Instructions H.M. Council and myself having perused, well considered and observed many of the Laws to be ill worded, and insufficient to effect what thereby was intended, and otherwise very irregular and not consonant to H.M. Instructions, this present Sessions is now busied in the revising and re-enacting the whole anew, which I hope will be very speedily and happily effected, and then will take care that by the very first conveyance they shall together with the Journals of the Council and Assembly of this Sessions be transmitted to your Lordships for your better consideration. In St. Marys and Charles Countys, being the Southwest parts and where the Lord Baltemore's seate of Government was, are near 600 or 700 papists, the chiefe whereof are his Lordship's relations and Agents, and they being continually supplyed from Europe with Jesuits (who have houses and lands of great value sett apart for their mayntenance here) have now not less than ten of that sorte among them, who use all their slye and assiduous endeavours to promote their superstition, run about the country, make proselites and amuse dying persons with threats of damnation etc., and thereby give greate offence and scandall to H.M. Governmt. here; so that two of the chiefe of them were presented lately at St. Marys County Court, William Hunter for consecrating a popish Chappel, and Robert Brooke for saying Mass publiquely at the city of St. Marys in the Chappel when ye County Court were sitting there, upon which occasion I had the advice of H.M. Councill here, and it being thought by some, that if the said priests shou'd be prosecuted at the Provincial Court, it might be disputed how far any penal statute of England not expressly naming the Plantations would extend hither; it was resolved least a Jury might mistake and acquit them, and so give them occasion of triumphing, it wou'd be more advisable to summon them to the Council Board, where I severely reprimanded them. My Instructions in this point are different from what other Governors here have had, theirs being to admitt of liberty of conscience to all who behaved themselves so as to give no occasion of scandall or offence to the Governmt., but mine to all such but Papists, whom I take to be expressly excluded from that toleration, and thereupon with the advice of H.M. Councill, have ordered their publique Chappel at St. Marys to be shut up, and shou'd be very glad to have your directions herein. These priests would not long continue here, were it not for the great encouragement that is given them by their disciples, especially the Lord Proprietor's relations, and his Agents, who are Irish Papists and by having the disposall of all lands in their hands, have such an ascendant over severall in this Province that thereby they are alsoe enabled to gaine many voices in ye General Assembly, who as well as others here are made sencible that such as favour Popery are likelyest to be ye kindlyest dealt by in grants of lands. Wee have another sorte of people called Quakers, who are fewer in number, but yet are offensive to H.M. subjects here, under ye pretence of Tolleration refusing to beare any share in the defence of the countrye, or to be any wise usefull in their Generation; and whilst they enjoy plentiful Fortunes sitt at home without ye least concerne of the publique safety or welfare. I am using my utmost endeavours for ye better regulating the Militia here, which is at present very ill disciplined, and whilst all others are called forth upon this occasion, these sorte of people are not in the least burthened by that or any other service, which divers persons who have no foundation or true sence of Religion (but of covetous humours and desiring their private ease) perceiving, have thereby been induced to profess themselves Quakers. These men enjoy the good of the Land, and though they seem not to think themselves concerned for ye defence and security thereof, yet I hope H.M. will direct how they may be made conformable to reason, and that they may bear a share in the Militia, otherwise it will cause many lukewarme Christians to declare themselves of that sect, with designe to excuse and avoyd that service. About Aug. 11, one Capn. Richard Johnson (who sayled out of this Province, being taken into Martinico by the French, and as he says very hardly used) being put on boarde a small barque of 70 tunns called L'Ortolont, Pierre Rolleau master, and bound for Old France, with the assistance of another English prisoner, had in the latitude of 30 and 40 minutes North latd., and in the longitude of 319 and 9 minutes surprized the said vessel, throwing the Commander overboarde and brought her with 8 Frenchmen into this Governmt., upon which the proceedings herewith inclosed were had. I hope you will approve what I have acted with integrity and upon ye best advice I could get. Signed, Jo. Seymour. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 31, Read Oct. 16, 1705. 5 pp. Enclosed,
585. i. Minutes of Council of Maryland upon the case of the L'Ortolan. Sept. 9, 1704. Endorsed as preceding.
585. ii. Duplicate of preceding.
585. iii. Capt. Johnson's narrative of his seizure of the Ortolan. "The French Commander charged a pistoll and carried severall days in his pockett, the said Johnson being dayly in danger of his life, and very much abused and his country, being often telling him Englishmen did not know how to fight, resolved if pleased God to free himself, and on July 13 about tenn of the clock at night, rise, the Capt. falling overboard, command the rest of the French, and in two hours after gave them their liberty, being eight in number, he being only himself, his boy and one Englishman, then making the best of his way towards the Capes of Virginia on Aug. 6 arrived in the bay of Cheasopeak, and delivered the ship to the Governor of Maryland, and she was condemned as lawful prize at Annapolis. Signed, Richd. Johnson. Endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 715. Nos. 81, 81.i.–iii.; and (duplicate of No. i.) 5, 751. No. 55; and (without enc'osures) 5, 726. pp. 313–317.]
Sept. 29.
Maryland.
586. Governor Seymour to the Earl of Nottingham. Acknowledges Instructions relating to trade with New Spain and Prizes (Feb. 16 and 18). Repeats case of Capt. Johnson above. Prays for H.M. Instructions therein, for I am altogether a stranger to ye Court of Admiralty as well as the rights of H.R.H. etc., but have taken the safest measures upon the best advice to have the produce of the said prize forthcoming, etc. Repeats preceding. Signed, Jo. Seymour. Endorsed, R. Sept. 1, 1705. 4 pp. Enclosed,
586. i. ii. Duplicates of above No. 1.
586. iii. Duplicate of No. iii.
586. iv. Duplicate of Letter. [C.O. 5, 721. Nos. 1, 1.i.–iv.]
Sept. 29. 587. Expenses of the Commission for Trade and Plantations, Midsummer to Michaelmas, 1704. Petty Expenses, 19l. 0s. 10d.; Stationary, 19l. 4s. 7d.; Postage, 35l. 4s. 10d. The whole endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 19, 1704. 3½ pp. [C.O. 388, 75. Nos. 101–103.]
Sept. 29.
Barbados.
588. Governor Sir B. Granville to Sir Charles Hedges. The vessel that brings this is sent by the inhabitants who are much alarmed by the proceedings of Capt. Martin, H.M.S. Blackwall. They send complaints to lay before H.M. in relation to his behaviour, and as what he has done has been in opposition both to ye authority H.M. and H.R.H. have put into my hands, as well as to the established laws of this place, I beg that both ye Island and myself may have your protection. I have an account by some prisoners who made their escape lately from Martinique that 3 French men of war arrived there from Europe about six weeks since. There has bin this last year arrived at Martinique from France at about ye distance of every four moneths such a number of men of war; but they make no longer stay there then is necessary to refitt and to proceed for some ports of Spanish America; none of them has cruised in our parts as I can learn. The mischief that is done us is all by their small privateers. Signed, Bevill Granville. Endorsed, R. Jan. 2 [1705]. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 28; and 28, 43. No. 3.]
Sept. 29.
Barbados.
589. Governor Sir B. Granville to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Capt. Samuel Martin, H.M.S. Blackwall, having at his departure hence carryed off severall persons without a tickett contrary to the laws of this place, and committed several other extravagant and unwarrantable actions, the inhabitants have been so alarm'd at it, that the Council and Assembly applyed to me for leave to send an expresse boat to their Agents, giving an account of his whole proceeding, with directions to lay them before your Lordships, and to beg that such justice may be done upon Capt. Martin as may prevent any others from doing the like again. As they will enlarge on the whole matter, I will trouble your Lordships no further then in laying before you some papers which show the share I have had in his extravagancys; from them your Lordships will see the indignities he has offer'd to me and the characters I have the honour to bear, both under H.M. patent as Governour and H.R.H. as Vice Admirall. I make no doubt but that (being as I am under your Lordships' protection) I shall have exemplary satisfaction, which I doe humbly crave. Inclosed is a copy of my last sent by H.M.S. Milford, part of the convoy to the fleet, which sail'd from hence Sep. 18, but was not out of sight by reason of the calms they met with till Thursday, Sep. 21. Repeats last part of preceding. With this I send duplicates of the former Minutes of Councill. Signed, Bevill Granville. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 2, Read Feb. 5, 1704/5. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 50; and 29, 9. pp. 143–145.]
Sept. 29.
Barbados.
590. Governor Sir B. Granville to W. Popple. Refers to despatches "sent by the fleet wch. sailed hence the 18th inst. and consisted in upwards of 50 sail of mercht. men besides what was to joyn them at the Leeward Islands" etc. Signed, Bevill Granville. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 2, Read Feb. 5, 1704/5. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 52; and 29, 9. p. 146.]
Sept. 29.
Barbados.
591. J. Holder to M. Holder and Mr. Bromley. Repeats complaint against Capt. Martin [as above] for carrying off several persons from the Island without tickets etc., notably in the case of one Lee:—Mr. Slingsby, Clerk to the Bridge Court, for a considerable time past hath been complained of for having committed divers irregularities in the execution of his office. At length there was a petition lodged before the Judge, and an Order thereupon made that, about 5 days before the fleet sailed, the Petitioner accusing him of exorbitant crimes should be heard before the Judge and his assistants, but Slingsby by me made an interest with the Judge that, in regard the fleet was so speedily to sail, and that he was embarrassed with the publick and his private affairs, which required dispatch by the Fleet, as well as that he was served with the Order on the said petition but the day before, he might have any short day after the Fleet to answer, which was granted. But now all those proceedings are frustrated, for that one Mr. Lee, who was the only evidence that could prove the articles charged on Slingsby, by a politick contrivance was engaged in a broil, and the Lieutenant of Capt. St. Loe of the Dolphin, with some seamen attending him, siezed Lee and hurried him on board, where for several days he was detained, and though divers applications have been made to this imitator of Martin, and particularly by my Uncle Holder, not only as the Judge wherein Lee was to have proved matters for H.M. service, but also as Speaker of the Assembly, nothing could prevail, for that he had for 100l. undertaken it. If the interest of our friends don't remedy these exorbitancies, we must of necessity desert a country which neither affords us security for our persons or estates etc. Signed, J. Holder. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 26, 1704/5. 7½ pp. [C.O. 28, 7. No. 51.]