BHO

Milan: 1491

Pages 277-283

Calendar of State Papers and Manuscripts in the Archives and Collections of Milan 1385-1618. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1912.

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Citation:

1491

1491.
Feb. 9.
Potenze
Estere.
Germania.
Milan
Archives.
435. Gian Galeazzo Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Bettini de Claris, his Envoy to the Count Palatine.
We have received your letters of the 8th and 14th ult. about the reprisals, that the Count Palatine could not deny the justice of our case, but that you could not obtain the revocation of the reprisals, the count stating his difficulty in getting his vassals to release the goods, but promising ultimately to secure this. We are astonished that the count has not yet given us this satisfaction, as it is clear that there was no justification for the act, but from what you write we accept his excuse and recognise his goodwill, feeling sure that he will keep his promise to satisfy us.
[Signed:] B. Chalcum.
Milan, the 9th February, 1491.
[Italian.]
Feb. 10.
Potenze
Estere.
Germania.
Milan.
Archives.
436. Letter of Gian Galeazzo Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Philip, Count Palatine.
Accept his excuse about delay in restoring arrested goods, but as the delay inflicts great loss on the merchants, requests him to show them justice by the fulfilment of his promise.
Milan, the 10th February, 1491.
[Latin; copy.]
Feb. 10.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
437. Bartholommeo Chalcio, Principal Secretary of Milan, to Gian Galeazzo Sforza, Duke of Milan.
From the enclosed letter of the King of England in reply to what we wrote about the reprisals against our merchants you will see how much this has annoyed his Majesty and the steps he has taken in writing to the emperor, the King of the Romans, the Count Palatine and the Margrave of Baden, as he has suspended the reprisals, seeing no reason for them, and feels sure that the count and margrave will release the merchants promptly on seeing his letters, and there will be no more trouble. We think more strongly than ever that it will be advisable to wait till we see the end, and whether the letters produce the effect expected, and we think you should also send letters to them at the same time; we feel sure you will act as soon as possible owing to the great losses our merchants suffer.
I am not sending the King of England's letters to the emperor and the King of the Romans because we do not think you will be able to get them well received by that way, and we will send them by another so that you may see their tenor. They could not be in a more efficacious form. It will be advisable not to say a word about them to any one, as if the count and margrave heard about it before they received letters from the King of England it would be derogatory to the dignity of the King of England, who deserves every consideration it seems to me.
Milan, the 10th February, 1491.
[Italian.]
Feb. 11.
Potenze
Estere.
Germania.
Milan
Archives.
438. Gian Galeazzo Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Bettini de Claris, his Envoy to the Count Palatine.
We propose to send to the emperor and the King of the Romans the letter of the King of England for the release of the reprisals made on our subjects in those parts. We do not see how we can send them safely. You will find out if the King of the Romans is going to those parts, and if so you will immediately advise us if the letters can be safely sent to him. We hope that the letter will produce good fruit, as the said king, who is the one chiefly concerned, certifies that the reprisals are unjust and cannot be made.
[Signed:] B. Chalcum.
Milan, the 11th February, 1491.
[Italian.]
June 1.
Potenze
Estere.
Germania.
Milan
Archives.
439. Copy taken from a Letter to the Magnifient Joani Bentivoglio, from Nurenberg.
The King of the Romans would like to see Hungary settled and to turn his course towards France, because he perceives the anxiety and instances of the legates here, and therefore his Majesty inclines thereto because it causes annoyance. I understand that this October he would like to bring the lady without disturbance. But this will not be done because the King of England has broken with the King of France, and it seems it was he who gave the Duchess of Britanny to this Maximilian, and it is necessary he should help him (et pure fusse quello habi dato la Duchessa de Bertagna ad epso Maximiliano quale e mo necessario lo aiuti).
Nurenberg, the Kalends of June, 1491.
[Italian.]
Aug. 22.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
440. Herasmo Brascha, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Gian Galeazzo Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The king has consulted with M. de la Tremouille and the Marshal de Ghie about the siege of Rennes. The place is defended by a large number of brave men and by the English who landed at Quanqualla, about 500 of them, as the rest returned to sea, and it is not known what they mean to do. (fn. 1)
A Scottish ambassador has arrived at Dieppe with a great train. I hear he is the foremost man by birth and influence in Scotland. He comes upon the business of the daughter of Dom Fedrico and other affairs.
La Valle, the 22nd August, 1491.
[Italian.]
Aug. 24.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
441. News. The English landed in Brittany, but did not stay long on land, and we have authentic information that they have landed in England.
Laval, the 24th August, [1491].
[Italian.]
Aug. 21.
Potenze
Estere.
Germania.
Milan
Archives.
442. Giovanni de Bebulcho to Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Bari.
The King of England is armed at sea. The other day they landed in Normandy and near Honfleur pillaged and burned many villages. However, this is not fully believed.
Milan, the 28th August, 1491.
[Italian.]
Sept. 15.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
443. Erasmo Brascha, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court, to Gian Galeazzo Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Scottish ambassadors, who, as I reported, went to meet Monsignor D'Aubigni, arrived here on the same day as his Majesty, and he sent persons to meet them a little way outside the town, to wit, Monsig. di Montpensier, Bonfilo and some gentlemen with the captain of the archers of the royal guard, accompanied by about fifty of the archers. On the following morning they were received by his Majesty at the Church of Saint Martin, in the presence of the lords who were there, accompanied by the Count of Foix and Monsig. D'Aubigny. On that occasion they merely presented their letters of credence and touched his Majesty's hand. Shortly after dinner, at Montilz, they had public audience, at which I was present. On their arrival at Montilz, before they were taken into his Majesty's presence, while he was awaiting them on his royal throne, together with the Cardinal of Bordeaux and his Council, they were given a good collation, and then were accompanied to his Majesty by the Marquis de Rotolino and Monsig. D'Aubigni.
The bishop made a long speech in Latin to the effect that they were sent to confirm and renew the confederation which their king has with this Crown, which dates from the time of King Pipin. He dilated at great length in commemorating the benefits conferred by the Scots on this house and in praising the Scottish nation. In conclusion they said they had other secret things to impart, if an opportunity were afforded them. The chancellor answered them in his Majesty's name. After congratulating them on their coming, he said that as the matter of which they had spoken was of moment some of the Council would be deputed to treat with them upon what was necessary, and at every hour and moment they would have access to his Majesty if they wished to speak with him.
After the speeches were ended they stayed a little to talk with his Majesty about agreeable things. However, he did not seem to take great pleasure in their society, in asking them about the state of affairs in Scotland or in answering what they said about the virtues of their king, but he let them go as soon as he could This does not mean, all the same, that he did not show them more honour than is customarily done with others.
Before they left Montilz they were given another good collation, so that their spirits might not fail them on their return home.
Yesterday they were with the Chancellor and some other of the lords here, but I have not yet been able to learn from them what business was done, though it is freely stated that they have come for a marriage with the daughter of Don Federigo, and the chief reason is to make trouble in England by way of Scotland. I will keep on the alert to discover the real grounds for this visit of theirs.
I have not yet been able to be with Monsignor d'Aubigny for any length of time because for the most part he is with these ambassadors. He told me indeed that he had spoken with them at great length about the business your Excellency knows of, and he had not dared to go too far until he could see the end of this league.
As I met these ambassadors by chance at Saint Martin's, Monsignor d'Aubigny made us shake hands, and he advised me to go and visit them at their house. I would have done so if they had not been prevented by this exposition of theirs. To-day they have gone to hunt in the direction of Amboise with his Majesty, and they will return to-morrow.
Tours, the 15th September, 1491.
[Italian.]
Enclosure. 444. Names of the Ambassadors of the King of the Scots.
The Earl of Badoel, Lord of Ellez, the first man of Scotland by birth and influence, a young man of from twenty-eight to thirty years. He has with him fourteen gentlemen very well equipped, with chains and raiment and eighteen carriages.
The Bishop of Glasgow, with a respectable company.
The Dean of Glasgow.
I have not yet been able to learn the number of horses each of them has, but there are more than a hundred.
[Italian.]
Sept. 25.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
445. Herasmo Brascha, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Gian Galeazzo Sforza, Duke of Milan.
They are showing great honour to the Scottish ambassadors here, and the king has given his order of knighthood to the cavalier who is head of the embassy.
Baugé, the 25th September, 1491.
[Italian.]
Oct. 6.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
446. Erasmo Brascha, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court, to Gian Galeazzo Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Since I wrote to your Excellency about the demand made from Torse here of Monsignor d'Aubigni for the marriage, the business has undergone great changes. Those here were treating for the Princess of Taranto, but seeing that the Scots did not want her and had designs upon the Most Illustrious Madonna Bianca, they persuaded his Majesty that Monsignor d'Aubigni had broken off the negotiations in the hope of greater advantage with your Excellency, in such sort that his Majesty did not seem inclined to say that he would consent about Madonna Bianca despite the fact that the ambassadors had told him that they did not want this daughter at all, and if Madonna Bianca was not granted to them they would be compelled to make a marriage alliance with England or Spain, because there was no other party in Christendom for their king. However, his Majesty persisted in his design to give them this daughter of the prince, and he showed her to them stark naked, hoping in this way to induce them to fall in with his views more quickly, but this did not avail him (imo la maesta sua tuttavia stava in propositi de dargli questa fiola del principe et glil'ha facta vedere tutta nuda, sperando cum questa via tirarli piu presto in sententia sua, ma non li e stato remedio).
It is quite true that Monsignor d'Aubigni, perceiving the impression of him given to his Majesty, was so cooled off that he dared not speak of it any more, and, from chagrin, avoided talking about it with me. However, owing to the commissions I hold from your lordship to encourage this business, and further perceiving that their behaviour here was such that it would soon be necessary to recognise that they make but little account of your Excellency, and that if this business were established by the instrumentality of his Majesty, it would prove that he loves you and wishes to enter into a good friendship with you, and if anything has occurred hitherto, especially in this fact of the league, indicating that he does not hold your lordship in esteem, it will persuade those who do not know that there are no grounds for this; I thought I would leave nothing undone to set the business on its feet again. Accordingly, by ways and arguments which seemed to me appropriate, I have stirred up Monsig. d'Aubigni, who has returned to speak about it to his Majesty. He and his friends have so far prevailed that the king has consented that the Bishop of Glasgow shall go to your Excellency. He is one of the three Scottish ambassadors and a man of great authority with much experience. He will take letters of credence from his Majesty to see Madonna Bianca and ask for her, and to treat about the dowry and conclude the affair. The earl who has been here will go afterwards to marry her. He left to-day to return to Scotland.
In order that he may carry on the negotiations more secretly, this bishop has spread a report that he is going to Rome, and thus, if he comes to no conclusion with your lordship, he may go thither on a very slight pretext. He has left here to-day to go towards your Excellency, and Monsig. d'Aubigni will accompany him as far as Monterizardo. He is only taking twelve horses, although he had forty here. Before he left, the earl and he communicated to me this decision that had been made with the king, expressing the utmost desire that the matter may be brought to completion. Monsignor d'Aubigni, not only in this but in everything else, never ceases to show himself openly the warm friend of your Excellency.
I must not forget to add that if you wish to live in friendship with his Majesty, I see nothing which will secure this more firmly than this Scottish match, as they make more account of that nation than of any other in Christendom.
Baugé, the 6th October, 1491.
[Italian.]
Oct. 6.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
447. Erasmo Brascha, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court, to Gian Galeazzo Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The most reverend Bishop of Glasgow is coming to your Highness as ambassador of the King of Scotland. I have communicated the reason of his coming in my other letters, but I did not think it right to let him go without other letters from me. Accordingly I am writing the present to show that he has not left without my knowledge and also to notify you that, besides the respect for his person and for the King of Scotland, his Majesty here will be much gratified to hear that honour has been shown to him, such as I feel sure that your lordship will show.
Baugé, the 6th October, 1491.
[Italian.]
Oct. 29.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
448. Bartollomeo Chalco, Ducal Secretary, to the Duke of Bari, at Viglevano.
This evening at the twenty-third hour they went to meet the Scottish ambassador with every possible honour. Of the ambassadors Messer Jacobo Troto was present, the others being ill disposed, as your Excellency knows.
This Scottish ambassador is honourably lodged, and they will defray his expenses in accordance with your Excellency's orders. They have given him the hostelry of the “Three Kings” for his quarters, that being the most honourable of the city. Subsequently Messer Branda and I have been to Madonna Bona and informed her of the manner in which your Excellency desires her to be visited by this Scottish ambassador. Accordingly she will attend to this visit to-morrow, and will herself honour the ambassador by accompanying him about the city in visiting the celebrated places and showing him the silver and other notable things. Your Excellency shall be advised of all this afterwards, and your commands as communicated to me by Messer Branda about this visit to Madonna shall be duly carried out.
Milan, the 29th October, 1491.
[Italian.]
Oct. 29.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
449. Ludovico Maria Sforza to Bartolomeo Chalco, the Principal Ducal Secretary.
We enclose the minute we have had drawn up for imparting the news abroad of the coming of the ambassador of Scotland to us. You will have letters prepared to be sent by the first courier, and you will also despatch the enclosed minute to the Marquis of Cena and the Podesta of Genoa.
Viglevano, the 29th October, 1491.
[Italian.]
Oct. 30.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
450. Bartholomeo Chalco, Ducal Secretary, to the Duke of Bari, at Viglevano.
As I wrote yesterday to your lordship, the Scottish ambassador has arrived here, and to-day about the 22nd hour he came to the Castle honourably accompanied. There he visited Madonna Bona, in the manner laid down by your Excellency, and all the rest has since been carried out according to the instructions you gave to Messer Branda. I need add no more because Messer Branda will see your Excellency to-morrow with the ambassador and will give a full account of everything.
Owing to the shortness of time the ambassador was not able this evening to see the silver crosier, or the treasury, which will be shown to him to-morrow. He will then ride off to dine at Cazano, and will join your Excellency in the evening at latest.
Milan, the 30th October, 1491.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

  • 1. “Peu de jours avant la siège, arriverent aux prochains porte de Resnes de quinze a seize batteaux d'Engleterre, sur esperance de mener ladite ducesse se a ce se estoit délibérée; mais elle trouva en son conseil non habandonner ses pays et subjects, ains voloit vivre et morir avecq eulx.” Molinet: Chroniques, ed. Buchon, vol. iv, page 172.