BHO

Spain: June 1522, 16-30

Pages 434-447

Calendar of State Papers, Spain, Volume 2, 1509-1525. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1866.

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Citation:

June 1522, 16-30

16 June.
S. E. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 14.
427. Treaty Of Alliance between the Emperor and King Henry VIII.
The Turks, being the irreconcilable enemies of Christendom, have conquered new territories from the Christians, and are more dangerous than ever. Some of the Christian princes, instead of employing their forces in repelling the Turks, are only trying to gain private advantages by the troubles which the attacks of the Infidels cause to the whole of Christendom. The King of France is the worst of them, and gives a bad example to others. The King of England, therefore, renounces his friendship with the King of France, and regards his treaties with him as not concluded.
As the Emperor and the King of England, who is the Defender of the Faith, are in duty bound to defend the Catholic Church, they have concluded an everlasting alliance on the following conditions :—
1. All the former treaties between them remain in full force, in as far as they are not abrogated by the stipulations of this present treaty. Both parties bind themselves to assist one another with all their power in defending their dominions, those which they at present possess, as well as those which they hereafter may conquer in accordance with this treaty.
2. If the Emperor is attacked by any person or persons whosoever, or if he is injured in his honour, rights, or concerns, the King of England is bound to come in person to his assistance with as numerous an army as may be necessary. The Emperor binds himself in the same manner towards the King of England.
3. The contracting parties have decided not only to defend their present possessions, but also to reconquer from the King of France all their former dominions which have been wrested from them. The contracting parties, therefore, bind themselves to make a common war upon France by land and by sea, and not to desist from it until they have reconquered all that France unjustly withholds from them. The number of troops and the number of ships will afterwards be settled according to circumstances. Until a great war with France can be begun, both contracting princes bind themselves to infest the coasts and frontiers of France, and to do her as much harm as they can.
4. Neither of the contracting parties is permitted to diminish his naval forces or his army until both contracting princes have recovered from the King of France all that by right belongs to them. If the naval forces or the troops of either of the contracting parties should be defeated by the enemy, or diminished in any other manner, they must, within one month, be restored to their former strength.
5. Neither of the contracting parties is permitted to conclude a peace or a truce, or to begin negotiations with the King of France, without the knowledge of the other contracting party.
6. Either of the contracting princes is at liberty, if necessary, to conduct his army through the dominions of the other contracting party, and all facilities shall be given him, he paying the expenses.
7. If one of the contracting princes conquers towns, castles, &c., from the King of France which by right belong to the other contracting party, such towns, castles, &c., are to be restored to their rightful proprietor within one month after their conquest.
8. The enemies or rebels of one of the contracting parties are to be regarded as the enemies or rebels of the other contracting party, and are to be delivered, if claimed.
9. Pope Adrian VI. has been elected Pope. He has always been honoured by the contracting princes, and is now more revered by them than ever. The contracting parties, therefore, bind themselves to ask the Pope, through their ambassadors, to become the head of their league. In case, however, that the Pope does not accept their offer, the force of this treaty remains unaltered in as far as the Emperor and the King of England are concerned.
10. The republic of Venice is to be invited to enter this league.
11. The Swiss are also to be invited to declare themselves members of this league.
12. No prince or republic is to be admitted into this league except with the approval of both contracting princes.
14. The Kings of Hungary, Denmark, Portugal, Poland, the Empire and the princes electors and princes of it, the Archduke Ferdinand, Madame Margaret, Duchess Dowager of Savoy, the Cardinal de Medicis and the Florentine republic, and the House of Medicis, the Archbishop of Liege and the republic of Liege, the Bishop of Sion, the Dukes of Savoy, Milan, Juliers, and Cleves, the Marquises of Monferrato and Mantua, the Bishop of Utrecht, &c., are comprehended in this treaty.
15. Henry, King of England, promises strictly to fulfil all the articles of this treaty.—Windsor, the 16th of June 1522, 14th Henry VIII.
(Signed)
Henry.
Throkmorton.
(Great Seal.)
Latin. Written on a large sheet of parchment. Autograph.
18 June.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 24. ff. 194-197.
428. Juan Manuel, Imperial Ambassador in Rome, to the Emperor.
Has read his letter, dated Canterbury the last day of May, in which he speaks of the affairs of Italy. It is impossible for him to give a positive answer to his questions, as the political state of Italy is so very changeable. Is, however, of opinion that he ought to choose such servants to govern Italy as are best qualified for that difficult task, without having regard to any other consideration whatsoever. The ordinary garrisons seem to be sufficient, and the men-at-arms, the German troops, and the Spanish infantry can be disbanded. This measure cannot be executed without money. The Council of Naples have probably already informed him how much money they can send. The Viceroy can perhaps procure some more money by extraordinary means. Thinks Lucca ought to pay a fine of 40,000 ducats, Florence 100,000 ducats, and Siena 30,000 ducats, for their negotiations with the King of France.
Prospero (Colonna) and the Marquis of Pescara have asked the Viceroy to beg the Cardinal de Medicis to send the Florentine army to them. Has told the Viceroy not to do so, as the Florentine army consists of very bad troops. If the Florentines send their army to the aid of Prospero and the Marquis, they will think that they are excused from contributions in money, whereas Florentine money is much better than Florentine soldiers.
The 50,000 ducats which the Viceroy has brought (from the King of England) have come just in time. Five and twenty thousand ducats are on their way from Monferrato. These sums and the money which will be raised in Italy are, however, not sufficient, as the Duke of Milan cannot get any money from his duchy, which is almost entirely ruined. The soldiers, who have plundered Genoa and other cities, ask nevertheless to be paid, as though they had got nothing by plundering. When soldiers get rich, they are only the more inclined to forsake their colours.
The money which the Pope has promised to bring with him is anxiously expected. Hopes the Pope will come soon.
Has read the proposals made to him by Venice, and his answer to them. Approves of his answer. The Venetians are always grandiloquous, especially when they get into a passion. They are more French in their hearts than ever. It is well that they are on the direct road to perdition, as they always covet the property of their neighbours. Often writes to Alonso Sanchez, saying what he thinks will be most advantageous (to the conclusion of the alliance between the Emperor, the King of England, and Venice), but he knows full well that the Venetians will offer nothing that is worth accepting until "the water comes up to their mouths."
Has already stated his opinion that he (the Emperor), the Pope, and the King of England ought to send ambassadors to Switzerland. If these ambassadors could only persuade the Swiss not to give troops to the King of France, the advantage of their embassy would be very great.
Deprivation of the hostile cardinals of the church preferment which they hold in the dominions of the Emperor.
The Pope has written and asked that the pension of 10,000 ducats should not be given to the Cardinal de Medicis, because he is a French partisan. Others pretend that it is not true. Neither the one nor the other know what they say.
The servants of the Pope who are in Rome write to him always in favour of his (the Pope's) enemies.
Cardinals of Sion, Campegio, &c. Marquis of Mantua, &c.
Will in future send his letters to Bartholomy Ferrer in Barcelona, who can forward them to the Licentiate Ferrer, as he expects that he (the Emperor) will soon have satisfactorily settled with the King of England, and leave for Spain. Whether he and the King of England decide upon making war against the King of France, or prefer to conclude peace with him, it is to be hoped that he (the Emperor) will in either case be the gainer ; for France is very weak just at present, and incapable of either vigorously attacking them, or energetically defending herself. One danger, however, must be avoided with the utmost care, viz., that of the Cardinal preventing the King of England from taking energetic measures, and persuading him to delay actual hostilities in case war is to be made.
The King of France has sent 30,000 ducats to raise troubles in Italy.—Rome, the 18th of June 1522.
Addressed : "To the Cœsar and King of Spain &c., our sovereign Lord."
Indorsed : "To the King. Don Juan Manuel. Rome, the 18th of June 1522."
Spanish. Autograph in cipher. Contemporary deciphering. pp. 4.
18 June.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 24. ff. 203-206.
429. Alonso Sanchez, Imperial Ambassador in Venice, to the Emperor.
The Venetians wish to discontinue the negotiations in Venice concerning the alliance (between the Emperor, the King of England, and Venice), and to carry them on only at the Imperial court. They told him that their ambassadors who are at his (the Emperor's) court have reduced to writing a draft of the intended alliance.
The Cardinal of England has asked for a copy of it, as he wishes to give his opinion on it.
Answered the Venetians that if they duly considered his (the Emperor's) former offers, they would see that he earnestly wishes the alliance. Begged them, at the same time, not to overlook the last clause of the treaty, by which the Emperor nominates the King of England conservator of the separate) (fn. 1) peace. Did so because the Venetians are afraid he will not keep his promises.—Venice, the 18th of June 1522.
Addressed : "To his Sacred, Imperial, and Catholic Majesty the Emperor and King, our Lord."
Indorsed : "To the King. 1522. From Venice. Alonso Sanchez. The 18th of June."
Spanish. Autograph in cipher. Contemporary deciphering. pp. 5.
19 June.
S. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 19.
430. Secret Treaty between the Emperor and King Henry VIII.
War had been begun between the Emperor and the King of "the French," although the King of England had endeavoured to reconcile them. In pursuance of a treaty concluded between the Emperor, the King of "the French," and the King of England, the King of England had sent Cardinal Wolsey, to whom he had entrusted the task of reconciliation, to Calais. As, however, all the endeavours of the Cardinal remained without effect, and as it is clear that the King of "the French" had begun hostilities with the Emperor, both the Emperor and the King of England regard themselves as released from all their obligations towards the said King of "the French," and conclude the following treaty of strict confederacy between themselves and of marriage between the Emperor and the Princess Mary :—
1. The Emperor binds himself not to contract marriage with any other woman whilst the Princess Mary is under age. As soon as the Princess will have completed the twelfth year of her age, the Emperor promises to send a proxy to England, and through him to contract his marriage with the Princess per verba de prœsenti. The "Empress" will send at the same time a proxy to the Emperor, for the same purpose.
2. The King of England binds himself not to marry the Princess Mary to any other man.
3. Both parties bind themselves to ask the Holy Father, as soon as this league is published, to dispense with the law for this marriage, the Emperor and his bride being related to one another in the second degree of affinity and consanguinity.
4. The King of England binds himself to send, at his own cost, the Princess Mary either to Bruges or to Bilbao within four months after the marriage per verba de prœsenti is concluded. The Emperor promises to repeat the marriage ceremonials publicly in the face of the Church within four days after the arrival of the Princess at Bruges or Bilbao.
5. The dower of the Princess is to consist of 400,000 crowns, half of which sum is to be paid on the day of her wedding or within eight days after it, and the other half within the year next following. In case, however, the Princess should succeed to the throne of England, she is to have no dower, and whatever might have been already paid on that account is to be repaid to the executors of the King of England. The King of England shall be at liberty to deduct from the second half of the dower all the debts of the Emperor and of his grandfather Maximilian. If the King of England should have a son, the dower of the Princess shall be increased by 600,000 crowns, so that the whole sum to be paid as her dower shall consist of 1,000,000 of crowns. The additional 600,000 crowns are payable in yearly instalments of 200,000 crowns. The jointure of the Princess shall consist of 50,000 crowns a year from the revenues of towns in the Low Countries and in Spain.
6. Each of the contracting parties binds himself to pay the other contracting party 400,000 crowns, as forfeiture, if the marriage be broken off by his fault.
In order to render this marriage the more sure, the following league is concluded between the contracting parties :—
7. All former treaties of alliance, &c., between the contracting parties remain in force, except in as far as they are in open contradiction with this treaty.
8. If one of the contracting parties is attacked, the other contracting party is bound to assist him with all his power.
9. The King of England having carried the Emperor over to England in a fleet manned by 3,000 soldiers, the Emperor binds himself to carry over the King of England and his army to Calais.
10. Both contracting parties bind themselves to invade France before the end of May 1524. The Emperor is bound personally to invade France on the Spanish frontiers, at the head of an army of 10,000 horse and 30,000 foot or more. The King of England binds himself to cross the Channel at the same time in person, and to attack France with an army of the same force as that of the Emperor. As it would be difficult for the King of England to find 10,000 horse in his kingdom, the Emperor binds himself to procure as many horse and also foot for him as he may want, the King of England, however, paying for them.
11. Each of the contracting princes binds himself to have at least 3,000 fighting men at sea.
12. Neither of the contracting parties is at liberty to desist from hostilities, or to conclude a truce or peace with the King of France, without the knowledge and consent of the other contracting party.
13. Each contracting party is to give free passage through his dominions to the troops of the other contracting party.
14. The King of England shall keep at least 2,000 soldiers at Calais, and the Emperor as many or more in Artois, in order to repel the inroads of the French.
15. As the French employ a great number of German soldiers in their army, the Emperor and the King of England bind themselves to enlist as many German troops as possible, rendering it thereby difficult for the King of France to form a powerful army. The Emperor shall, within the two months next following, forbid all Germans to take service in the French army, and both princes shall request the Duke of Lorraine not to permit German soldiers to pass through his dominions on their way to France.
16. Places which belong by right to one of the contracting princes, but are held at present by the King of France, are to be restored to their rightful owner independently of the circumstance by whom they are reconquered. Each of the contracting princes is at liberty to name, before the month of May 1524, the provinces, places, castles, &c., which he claims from France.
17. The contracting princes are to assist one another in case either of them should be engaged in recovering his property from others who withhold it from him, as, for instance, if the King of England should undertake to conquer Scotland or to reduce Ireland into his obedience, or the Emperor to recover Gueldres or Friesland, &c.
18. Neither of the contracting parties is at liberty to enter into negotiations of peace with France without the consent of the other contracting prince. All former treaties to the contrary are null and void.
19. Each of the contracting princes will request the Cardinal of York to pronounce a sentence of excommunication against either of them who violates this treaty, and will promise to subject himself to the Cardinal's legatine jurisdiction.
20. Should the Princess Mary die before she is married, the contracting parties bind themselves to conclude a marriage between their future children.
21. This treaty is to be kept secret.—Windsor Castle, the 19th of June 1522, 14th Henry VIII.
(Great Seal.)
(Signed.)
Henry R.
Throkmorton.
Latin. Written on three great sheets of parchment bound together by the ribbon of the great seal. Autograph.
An extract from this treaty is printed in Lord Herbert's History of Henry VIII.
19 June(?)
S. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 18.
431. King Henry VIII. to All Persons.
Swears to the treaty concluded with the Emperor Charles on the 19th of June 1522.
Latin. Autograph. Written on parchment. 9 lines.
19 June.
S. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 15.
432. The Emperor and King Henry VIII. to All Persons.
Charles, Emperor elect, and Henry VIII., King of England, &c., swear, on the 19th of June 1522, in the chapel of Windsor Castle, and in presence of the Cardinal, Thomas, of York, Legate a Latere, and Chancellor of England, to the treaty which they have in person concluded on the same day, 19th of June 1522, against the King of France.
(Signed)
Charles.
Henry R
The witnesses follow : Henry, Count of Nassau, &c.
(Signed)
Robert Toneys, Clericus Norviciensis ;
William Burbank, Clericus Carliolensis,
Public Notaries.
Latin. Written on a sheet of parchment. Original. p. 1.
19 June.
P. A. d. l'E. Mon. Hist. K. 1641. No. 3b
433. The Emperor to All Persons.
Has concluded a stricter and more intimate alliance with his uncle, the King of England, who has bound himself to succour him on his journey to Spain, and to declare himself an enemy of the King of France. The reasons why the King of England declares war on France are, in the first place, because the King of France is his (the Emperor's) enemy, and secondly, because the King of France has for the last year ceased to pay the King of England the pensions which he was bound by treaty to pay.
Binds himself to indemnify the King of England for the losses he sustains by paying him 133,305 gold crowns, viz. :
On the 1st of November next, 66,802 crowns, payable at Calais ;
On the 1st of May next, 66,802 crowns, payable at Calais.
These payments are to be continued every six months and every year until the King of England is entirely indemnified for all the losses he has been subjected to through the King of France, or until the said King of England, in their common war with France, conquers French provinces or towns the net revenue of which amounts to the sum of at least 133,305 gold crowns.
His obligation to pay the King of England 133,305 gold crowns a year will cease as soon as the King of England concludes a treaty with the King of France, according to which the latter will bind himself to resume his former obligations with respect to the pensions paid to the King of England.
In case the King of England conquers French provinces, towns, &c., the net revenue of which does not amount to the sum of 133,305 gold crowns, he (the Emperor) is bound to pay him as much as the revenues are below the said sum.— Windsor Castle, the 19th of June 1522.
(Signed)
Charles.
Lalemand.
Indorsed : "Obligatio Cœsaris."
The signatures are out through.
Latin. Autograph, p. 1. On parchment.
20 June.
P. A. d. l'E. Mon. Hist. K. 1641. No. 3e.
434. The Emperor to All Persons.
The King of France has created great troubles and rebellion in his (the Emperor's) dominions. Wants, therefore, a large army and a powerful fleet. The King of England has offered to lend him the sum of 150,000 scudos or gold crowns, each crown being worth four shillings and four pence English, in order to assist him in the pacification of his states. Has received 100,000 scudos through Robert Fowler, and the remaining 50,000 scudos through Richard Wingfield.
Binds himself to repay the King of England the 150,000 scudos or gold crowns within one year, in the city of London.
Pledges his person and his property, and that of his successors, subjects, &c., for the punctual fulfilment of his obligations. —Windsor, the 20th of June 1522.
(Signed)
Charles.
Lalemand.
The signatures are cut through.
Indorsed : "Obligatio Imperatoris pro forma centum quinquaginta millium scutorum."
Latin. Autograph. p. 1. On parchment.
20 June.
S. E. T. c. I. L. 6. f. 22.
435. Cardinal Wolsey to All Persons.
On the 20th of June 1522, constituted his legatine court in one of the upper rooms in Windsor Castle ; and the Emperor elect and King Henry VIII. have declared before him, in his quality of Papal legate, that they have sworn to their treaty of the 19th of June 1522. Whichever of them shall break the treaty, or any clause of it, subjects himself to all the penalties of excommunication.
The witnesses are : Henry, Count of Nassau ; Mercurino, Count Gattinara ; Petrus de Mota, Bishop of Palencia ; Count Parma ; Laurentius de Gorrevodo ; Johannes Aleman de Crissey ; Thomas, Bishop of Durham ; George, Earl of Shrewsbury ; Charles, Earl of Worcester ; Lord Herbert ; Cuthbert Tunstall, Doctor of Law and Bishop elect of London ; Henry Marney, Knight of the Garter ; Thomas Bulleyn.
Notaries : Robert Toneys ; William Burbank.
Indorsed : "1522. Public instrument of the Cardinal of St. Cecilia, Primate of England, &c."
Latin. Written on parchment. p. 1.
20 June.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 24. ff. 213-216.
436. Alonso Sanchez, Imperial Ambassador in Venice, to the Emperor.
Asked the Venetians to give him a final answer to the proposals made to them by the Viceroy of Naples in his (the Emperor's) name. They replied that it was impossible for them to give a final answer, as their ambassador in England had informed them, on the 28th of May, that the King of England wished to be the mediator of a peace and of an alliance between the Emperor, England, and Venice. The Venetian ambassador at the Imperial court has also written that the Cardinal of England, having been informed that he (the Emperor) was carrying on negotiations with Venice, wished to take an active part in them, and begged both the Venetian ambassadors who were in England to come to Greenwich. The Venetians said that before they knew what the King and the Cardinal of England had decided on with respect to the treaty and league they could give no binding declaration. Letters from England are daily expected.
Told them that neither the King nor the Cardinal of England had it in their power to conclude a peace between Venice and the Emperor. The Cardinal, he added, was entirely mistaken even in the manner in which he conducted this business, as his interference only produced unnecessary delays.
The Venetians, however, insisted on knowing the opinion of the King of England before giving a binding answer.— Venice, the 20th of June 1522.
Addressed : "To his Sacred, Imperial, and Catholic Majesty the Emperor and King, our Lord."
Indorsed : "To the King. Venice. From Don Alonso Sanchez, the 20th of June 1522."
Spanish. Autograph in cipher. Contemporary deciphering. pp. 4.
21 June.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. C. 71. f. 12.
437. Martin De Salinas, Ambassador of the Archduke And Infante Ferdinand at the Imperial Court, to the Treasurer Salamanca.
The Emperor has left London, and has been going from one country seat of the King of England to another, on his way to Windsor, which "is the capital of the Order of the Garter."
At Windsor all his time has been occupied in hunting and in despatching business concerning the French war. The Chancellor (fn. 2) has not had time to give him an answer to the letters of the Infante.
Has already informed him of the answer which the Queen of England gave him when he communicated his commission to her. Not having received the answer of the King of England, he asked the Viscount (fn. 3) to help him, who promised to do so and spoke in his presence with the Emperor. That done, the Viscount told him that he should not much insist on an answer from the King of England, and that it would be preferable to speak only to the Queen of England about this matter. Went to the Queen and asked her whether she had already sent her answer to the Infante. She said she had not, but would soon write the letter, although her answer would be that it was impossible for the King of England to send succour to the Infante whilst all the resources of England were employed in the war against France. She had spoken, she said, with the King on this matter. The King, however, is quite of the same opinion.
Has not spoken with the Cardinal of England, who has been staying at a country house of his in order to despatch business there with the Chancellor. Asked the Chancellor to speak with the Cardinal, and to hear his opinion concerning the succour against the Turks. The Chancellor told him that he had spoken with the Cardinal on that matter, but that the Cardinal had said to him, "The real Turk is he with whom we are occupied, (fn. 4) and I know no other Turk." Is quite persuaded that all he does is in vain. No succour against the Turks will be obtained. As the Queen has promised to answer the Infante, he will go to her once more, and beg her to send her answer, which will show them how little is to be expected from England.
Last Sunday, the 16th of June, the King had intended to confer the order of the Garter on the Infante. Does not know for what reasons it has not been done.
The same day the King gave a great banquet. Does not think it worth the trouble to describe it. After supper, however, a French play was performed by young gentlemen. It was a farce, and in it the King of France and his alliances were ridiculed.
The first actor who came on the stage declared that he was Friendship, who had performed many great and noble deeds in the time of the Romans, and afterwards. After Friendship, Prudence entered, and was received by Friendship with many demonstrations of joy. Friendship said that he had sought him, and that both, if united, could perform very great deeds. They concluded an alliance. Whilst they were doing so, Might entered, and was very well received by Friendship and Prudence, who told him that they wanted no other ally than him, in order to execute their great plans. Friendship was to see that no disunion broke out between them ; Prudence would counsel, and Might would carry out the measures. Thus, there was nothing in the world they could not do, and any horse, however wild and unruly he might be, would soon be made to obey them.
Workmen entered with anvil and hammers.
A man came on the stage with a great horse, very wild and ferocious. Friendship, Prudence, and Might asked him what he wanted. He answered that that horse belonged to him, but that it was so wild and untamable that he could not make any use of him. Friendship said to the man with the horse that he had come just to the right persons, as they knew best how to manage an unruly horse. If he would confide the horse to them, they would not only subject him, but also make him as tame and obedient as any horse in the world. They made a bridle, and bridled the horse with it. That done, they asked the master of the horse to mount him. At first the master was afraid, but when he mounted the horse found he was quiet and obedient, although he raised his head very high. Friendship said they would make him lower his head. A curb (fn. 5) was attached to the horse, which directly lowered his head. Without being led, the horse followed his master wherever he went.
Thus the farce ended. The meaning of it is clear. The horse is the King of France. Whether they have bridled and tamed him he is unable to say.
When the comedy was concluded, eight ladies came into the room in fancy dresses and danced the "Pabana" with eight gentlemen whom they chose as partners. After them came eight gentlemen, who were disguised, and who also danced. After the dance came supper, and after supper all went to bed.
Festival of the Order of the Garter.
News from Italy. Genoa has been taken and pillaged.
So many people have come to Windsor, and lodgings are so scarce, that the Emperor has sent part of his court back to London. Alvaro de Luna ; Pedro de Mendoza, &c.
The Emperor says he will embark at Southampton on Saturday next. Does not believe it, as the fleet has not yet arrived from Zealand. Even if the weather should be favourable, other difficulties would still remain. The captains of the fleet ask for payment. The German troops near the frontier of Calais had expected to be embarked at St. Omer, and as they are ordered to march on foot to Zealand, they make difficulties about obeying this order. God alone knows how long the Emperor will stay in England. But as the country is cheap, the living easy, and the King gives many feasts to the Emperor, he (Salinas) and his servants spend little money. Protests that Germany is a very good country, but "in order to tame some of those who go there (to Spain?) it was well that they should first make a trip to England." (fn. 6)
Rincon has come to London in search of money. Does not think that he has been successful.
Maximilian has spoken with the Licenciate, and told him that the Infante is wrong not to cultivate the friendship of his master, the Cardinal, &c.—Windsor, the 21st of June 1522.
Addressed : "To the Treasurer Salamanca."
Spanish. Register, pp. 6.
25 June.
M. D. Pasc. d. G. Pa. r. a. 1. Hist. d. Es.
438. Lope Hurtado De Mendoza to the Emperor.
The Pope has complained that he has had no letter from him (the Emperor) since the 19th of April ; but as such good news has at last arrived (from England), his Holiness rejoices very much, and says that he will go directly to Rome. The news that the Marquis of Pescara has taken Genoa and sacked it has also made a favourable impression on the mind of the Pope.
It is not yet known who will accompany his Holiness to Rome. The Bishop of Burgos has positively declared that he will not go.
The Pope has decided to disembark at Ostia, and to see there the Cardinal de Medicis, with whom he is reconciled.
News concerning the fleet on board which the Pope is to embark, and concerning the troubles in Spain.—Tortosa, the 25th of June.
Addressed : "To his Sacred, Imperial, and Catholic Majesty the Emperor and King."
Spanish. Autograph, partly in cipher and partly in plain writing. Contemporary deciphering. pp. 4.
26 June.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 24. f. 229.
439. Alonso Sanchez, Imperial Ambassador in Venice, to the Chancellor Gattinara.
The Venetians refuse to give him any positive answer respecting the treaty with the Emperor. Their excuse is that the King and the Cardinal of England have taken it upon themselves to conduct the negotiations, and to conclude the treaty of alliance between the Emperor, the King of England, and the republic of Venice. They even pretend that he (the Chancellor) and the Bishop of Palencia were present when the Cardinal of England spoke on this subject with the Venetian ambassadors.
Begs him to persuade the King and the Cardinal of England to speak in a different sense to the Venetian ambassadors.
Indorsed : "To the Chancellor, from Alonso Sanchez, the 26th of June."
Spanish. Contemporary copy. p. 1.
26 & 30 June.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. A. 24. ff. 241-250.
40. Alonso Sanchez, Imperial Ambassador in Venice, to the Emperor.
Has received his letters of the 9th. Went to the Signory and told them that the King of England had declared war with France, and made warlike preparations on a very great scale. Said further to them that the King of England and the Cardinal had told the Venetian ambassadors in England that they (King Henry and Wolsey) could not give an opinion on the manner in which the alliance ought to be concluded before they knew what the result of the negotiations in Venice had been. Thus, he said, the Signory waits for the decision of the King and the Cardinal of England, whilst the King and the Cardinal of England wait for the decision of the Signory. But, however that may be, Venice is included in the treaty of London. As the King of France has broken the truce, the Emperor and the King of England have declared war against France. Venice, being the ally of the Emperor and the King of England, is, therefore, bound to follow the example of her confederates, and to begin war likewise against France.
The Venetians answered that they must wait for information from their ambassadors. As soon as they should have received it, they promised to give their final answer.
News respecting the state of affairs in Italy.
Letters from the Venetian ambassadors in England have at last arrived. Went to the Signory, and was told that the Cardinal of England had promised to conclude, within two days, a league between the Emperor, the King of England, and Venice, reserving to the Pope the right to enter into it if he wished.
Said to them that they wished only to put off their final answer.
They replied that they would conclude a league with the Emperor if they thought it right to do so, but that they did not like to be forced.
Spoke to the Signory of their obligation to declare war against France, in accordance with the treaty of London, in which they are included.
They, however, replied that the Cardinal of England had told their ambassadors that letters patent will be sent to them, and that they will be formally summoned by a herald to declare their will respecting the league against France.
When he spoke of the fleet which he (the Emperor) and the King of England were about to send to sea, the Venetians answered that they also had 50 galleys at their disposal. Suggested that their galleys were destined to fight the Turks, but they replied, without hesitation, that their galleys were destined to fight any enemy of the Republic without distinction. They added that the Cardinal of England had advised their ambassadors to conclude a truce with the Emperor, the King of England, and the King of France.
[The date is not deciphered.]
Addressed : "To his Sacred, Imperial, and Catholic Majesty the Emperor and King, our Lord."
The deciphered copy is indorsed : "To the King, from A. Sanchez, the 30th of June 1522."
The copy in cipher is indorsed : "From A. Sanchez. Venice, the 26th and the 30th of June 1522."
Spanish. Autograph in cipher. Contemporary deciphering. pp. 7.

Footnotes

  • 1. The subject of the negotiations with Venice were two distinct treaties, viz. 1°, a (separate) treaty of peace between the Emperor, the Archduke Ferdinand, and the Republic ; and, 2°, the general league against France, of which the Pope the King of England, &c., were to be members.
  • 2. Gattinara.
  • 3. Hannart.
  • 4. The King of France.
  • 5. Barbada.
  • 6. The sense is not clear. "Plazeme questa tierra barata y de buena conversacion y con esto y con las grandes fiestas quel rey nos haze no emos menester dineros : yo le juro que alemania es harto bueno y para domar algunos de los que alla van no querria sino que diesen una vuelta por esta tierra."