BHO

Introduction, Part 1

Pages ix-liv

Calendar of Treasury Books, Volume 8, 1685-1689. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1923.

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Citation:

Introduction.

The financial history of the reign of James II reverses the verdict which in the introductions to the preceding vols. of this Calendar has been passed upon Charles II's administration. That verdict declared that Charles's policy was national, that his administration was honest, that he was starved, cheated and betrayed by his Parliament and misunderstood by his people, that he was routed by Louis XIV in a diplomatic encounter which was as unscrupulous as any in the annals of the modern world, but that spite of all he fought a clean fight, remained unflinchingly true to his country and to himself, and died a gentleman.

If history is obliged, in the case of James II, to reverse this verdict it is entirely that monarch's own fault. We find at first some difficulty in understanding why his reign should have opened under such distinctly brighter financial auspices than Charles had enjoyed. It is impossible to be explained on the ground of James's personal popularity for he never was popular. The truth can only be that after the fury of the Popish Plot was past the nation's eyes were opened, it became conscious of the fact that Louis XIV had engineered the whole episode and had profited magnificently by it and that the success of the scheme had only been rendered possible by Charles II's impoverishment at the hands of a disloyal and factious Parliament. A mere reaction from a fit of religious fury would never have led the Parliament of James II to remedy the evil at its root, the financial evil at its financial root. Such action could only have been prompted by a clear conception of how deeply the nation had been befooled, and by a stern determination that it should not be so again. The unanimity and decision of James's first, and only, Parliament would be otherwise inexplicable.

James II succeeded to the throne on the 6th Feb., 1685. His Parliament met on the 19th of May. On the 22nd, after three days spent in the formalities of swearing in, the Commons in Committee of the whole House and within a few minutes of listening to the King's speech, voted without a dissentient voice that the revenue which was settled on the late King for life be settled on his present Majesty for life. The significance of this vote may need emphasising. It is the last instance of its kind in English history. Roughly speaking, the revenue comprised under this vote consisted of the old Customs and Excise, all new impositions which would fall under either of these heads, the Hearthmoney, Post Office and a number of smaller miscellaneous hereditary and semi-feudal sources of revenue which in the accounts of the time are generally included under the heading of " small branches of the revenue."

When William III came to the throne all this revenue was granted for one year only ("resolved: that all those branches of the revenue which were due and payable by law in the reigns of King Charles II and King James II be collected to the use and service of the Crown until the 24th day of June, 1689, as by law they might have been during either of those reigns," 11 Mar., 1688–9, Commons' Journals, Vol. X, p. 46). But under James II the theory of the Constitution was still that of the Tudor monarchy. The executive, the administration of the country, was entirely in the hands of the King and the revenue which was granted him at the outset of a reign, for the maintenance of such executive, was really the King's by right, was hereditary; the grant was only a formality to betoken his entering into his own. Between the death of Charles II and the passing of the Act based on this vote of 1685, May 22 (the consequent Act for the Continuance of the Customs and Excise was pressed through with such expedition that it received the royal assent on May 30) an interval of 3½ months had elapsed, during which there was theoretically no legal justification for demanding either Customs or Excise or Hearthmoney. But James had demanded them and collected them without any opposition from the mercantile or other classes concerned (see his explanation of the situation in his interview with Barillon 18 Feb., 1685, Dalrymple, Vol. II, Appendix, p. 100, I have resolved to call a Parliament immediately. . . I shall publish at the same time a declaration that I am to maintain myself in the enjoyment of the same revenues the King my brother had. Without this Proclamation for a Parliament I should hazard too much by taking possession directly of the revenue which was established during the lifetime of my deceased brother"). Accordingly when Parliament met this act of the executive was not challenged. The matter was passed over in silence. "In the affair of money," says Sir J. Reresby (p. 324), "men seemed content to settle a handsome revenue on the King and to give money; but whether this was to be a constant revenue or only temporary to be renewed from time to time, that Parliament might be consulted the oftener, was the question." In presenting the Bill to the King on May 30 the Speaker of the House of Commons used the following extraordinary language:— " We do now come in all duty to present to your Majesty the revenue you pleased to demand at the opening of this Parliament, wherein we proceeded with as much speed as the forms of passing Bills of that nature would admit. We bring not with it any Bill for the preservation or security of our religion which is dearer to us than our lives, in that we acquiesce, entirely rely and rest wholly satisfied in your Majesty's gracious and sacred word, repeated declaration and assurance to support and defend the religion of the Church of England as it is now by law established. We present this revenue to your Majesty without the addition of any conditional, appropriating or tacking clauses etc. and we humbly beseech your Majesty to accept of it" (Lords' Journals, Vol. XIV, p. 21).

Language more abject and servile than this was never used by any of Queen Elizabeth's Parliaments.

In the whole proceedings—they are indeed slight—on this Bill in the Commons there is not a trace of the slightest attempt at calculating the revenue needs of the Government. There was no estimate formed or even asked for as to what would be the normal yield or produce of the revenue so to be granted, nor as to what was the normal expenditure of the country. The whole thing was left passively in the hands of the King.

But there was more to come.

In thanking the House of Commons for this Act, James put them in mind of the departmental debts resting upon the executive : " After so happy a beginning you may believe I would not call upon you unnecessarily for an extraordinary supply. But when I tell you that the stores of the Navy and Ordnance are extremely exhausted ; that the anticipations upon several branches of the revenue are great and burdensome ; that the debts of the King my brother to his servants and family are such as deserve compassion ; that the rebellion in Scotland without putting more weight upon it than it really deserves, must oblige me to a considerable expense extraordinary, I am sure such considerations will move you to give me an aid to provide for those things wherein the security, the ease and the happiness of my Government are so much concerned. But above all I must recommend to you the care of the Navy, the strength and glory of this nation."

By the side of the appeals which Charles II had made to his Parliaments, appeals that were pressing, manly, frank and completely justified, this appeal of James II to his first and only Parliament is tame and colourless, lacking at once in justification and in conviction. And yet it met with instant and unquestioning acquiescence. Indeed, more than that. The terms of the appeal were such that the Commons would have been perfectly justified in voting an aid calculated to raise once and all an amount of, say, 2,000,000l. to wipe out the departmental debts (including, of course, the Household debts to Charles II's servants etc.), thus making the executive solvent and giving it an unhampered start for the new reign.

Instead of adopting this course, however, the Commons actually granted the King increments of his standing revenue. In other words, they increased the " King's own," his permanent hereditary revenue. That which James I had striven in vain to attain by the Great Contract, that which Charles II had begged of his Commons, insistently, beseechingly, convincingly, but always in vain, all this was granted to James II at the first time of asking. The only limitation was that these new grants, as will be seen, were limited to the period of eight years, 1685, June24, to 1693, June 24.

The moment the Speaker had reported the King's speech to the Commons the House resolved itself into Grand Committee and after apparently a most perfunctory debate resolved to grant the King [for life] the duties on wines and vinegar which at three separate times (by the Acts of 19 and 20 Car. II, c. 6; 22 Car. II, c. 3; 30 Car. II, c. 2) had been granted to Charles II for specific restricted periods (Commons' Journals, Vol. IX, pp. 722–3, May 30). With equal precipitancy and complacency the Grand Committee on the following day resolved to grant the King [for life] additional duties on tobacco and on sugars (fn. 1) (Ibid, p. 724).

The Bill for the duties on wines and vinegars passed the Commons without opposition on June 3 (Commons' Journals, Vol. IX, p. 726), that is within three days of the original resolution. It passed the Lords on the 5th June without amendment (Lords' Journals, Vol. XIV, p. 32).

The treatment which was accorded to the companion measure, the Bill for a duty on sugars and tobacco, was equally cursory. It was rushed through the Committee stage in the Commons in a single afternoon (12 June, Commons' Journals, Vol. X, p. 734), was carried up to the Lords on the 15th June, read a first time in the Lords on that day, finally passed on the following day and on that same day, June 16, these two Bills of supply, the Wines and Vinegar Duties Act and the Sugars and Tobacco duties Act, received the royal assent.

Thus without the slightest deliberation and within three weeks of the opening of the session two important grants of supply had been made to reinforce the ordinary revenue of the Crown for a period of eight years. The little light that is thrown upon the debates by outside sources shows that the only subject of dispute arose over the proposal to tax Plantation sugar. Those members of the House who were interested in the Plantations opposed the proposal on the ground that it behoved England to foster the sugar trade in the Plantations in imitation of the French, who were then endeavouring to encourage that trade. At the same time the importers, merchants and grocers, attempted a factious opposition purely from their own trade standpoint, but they were easily dashed and put out of countenance by Sir Dudley North, then one of the Treasury Lords, to whom the scheme of this tax in particular is attributed:—
"Divers proposals were made, some for a land tax on purpose that the duty might be unpopular; some for a tax upon new buildings ; and others had their projects which they had little reason for. . . Sir Dudley North took a strict account of all the commodities in trade from the Custom House books and considered which would best bear a further imposition, for if commodities are overrated it amounts to a prohibition. At last he thought fit to propose a tax of one farthing upon sugars and an halfpenny upon tobacco imported, to lie upon the English consumption only and not upon the export, and this as he estimated would yield the sum expected and would scarce be any burthen sensible to the people. In short, this tax was approved and voted at the Committee and a Bill directed which was drawn up and brought in." (North's Life of Sir Dudley North, pp. 377–9, and Life of Lord Keeper North, p. 377; Reresby's Diary, pp. 330–1.)

The third Act of Supply which passed this Parliament was intended, in its inception, not so much as a general reinforcement of the King's revenue as for the extraordinary occasion of suppressing the rebellion of the Duke of Monmouth. But although intended ostensibly to meet so temporary and extraordinary an occasion, the form which the supply finally took was a permanent one. The first proposal for this supply was made on June 17, the day following that on which the two preceding grants had received the royal assent. At first the new proposal took the form of a projected tax on new buildings in London and Southwark (Commons' Journals, Vol. IX, p. 739). Reresby's part in the debate on this proposal is a very interesting one:—
"I spoke thrice in this debate, first in answer to the gentleman that said this was laying a tax for a public use upon one piece of a county and upon private persons; to which I replied that this one county drained all England of its people, especially the North, our tenants all coming hither, finding by experience that they could live here better in a cellar or a garret than they could live in the country on a farm of 30l. rent; that hereby this little piece of England had laid a tax in a manner upon all the rest of England and was a nuisance to all the rest and therefore it was not so improper that it should be taxed separately and the rather because it was never taxed before or but once very little. Some moved that it should be laid for one year and a half, but that I opposed, for I said there were some few foundations taxed in Oliver's time and that tax was laid but for one year in the worst of times, and therefore we ought not now to lay it for a longer period in good times. It was moved that more money might be laid upon brandies towards this supply to the King; but this I spoke against, saying it was fit this [the new buildings fund] should be computed how much it would arise to before another fund was encumbered or more money voted to be raised."

On the following day, however, June 18, James sent an urgent message to the House desiring them to provide a good fund of credit [to borrow on] for a present sum of money, to answer the immediate charge of the rebellion in the West. Without hesitation or debate the House voted that a supply not exceeding 400,000l. be given to the King. Finding that the project of a tax on new buildings would take a considerable time to work out, estimate and enact, the House turned to the more ready alternative of a tax on certain imported commodities, French linen, brandies, calicoes and wrought silks (June 20, Commons' Journals,Vol. IX, pp. 742–3). It was resolved that on the credit of the fund thus allocated the King should be empowered to raise loans to an amount not exceeding 400,000l. (June 24, ibid, p. 747). In this form the Bill passed the Commons on the 25th June and was carried up (ibid, p. 749; Lords' Journals, Vol. XIV, p. 58). The Bill passed the Lords on the following day (Lords' Journals, Vol. XIV, p. 60) and received the royal assent on June 27.

This last Act of Supply, therefore, of the Session was passed through all the stages in both Houses in five days and received the royal assent within a week. And it is to be especially noticed that this Bill, though called into existence as a temporary and extraordinary supply for the purpose of suppressing Monmouth's rebellion, had a comparatively long time limit. The grant of these duties was to be for the five years from 1685, July 1, to 1690, July 1.

To complete this hasty sketch of the financial provision made by Parliament for James II it is only necessary to add the Bill for removing the prohibition of the import of French wines and vinegar. On the 18th June, Roger North was instructed to prepare such a Bill. It passed the Commons on the 25th, and the Lords on the 26th, and received the royal assent on the 27th June (Commons' Journals, Vol. IX, pp. 740, 748; Lords' Journals, Vol. XIV, pp. 57, 60, 65).

The importance of this last Act lies in the fact that the prohibition (in the Act for the Poll of the year 1677) of the import of French goods had produced a very serious shrinkage in the Customs receipts from 1677 onwards. The loss of revenue from this source alone was very great during the remaining years of Charles's reign. For the whole of those remaining years it has been even stated at 1,000,000l. The removal of the prohibition, therefore, meant that the Customs receipts would be enabled, and actually were enabled, to go back to their high water level of the years 1675–7.

Before concluding this list of the supply granted by Parliament to James II, reference must be made to the Coinage Duty Act. By the Act of 1 James II, c. 7, the two former Acts (of 18 Car. II, c. 5, and 25 Car. II, c. 8) were revived for seven years with the purpose of providing, as those two Acts had done, for practically free coinage of gold and silver. In order to meet the cost of such free coinage, Parliament had under Charles II granted the King a new impost on certain liquors with the stipulation that the receipts should be applied to such coinage and that the accounts of such moneys should be kept separate from the general accounts of the Customs. It will be at once apparent that for all purposes of revenue and expenditure such a provision can be left out of account. Under both Charles II and James II these Coinage Duty Acts simply imposed a burden of so much on the King and found a supply of so much (the equivalent amount) to meet that burden. The grant was not therefore a grant of revenue nor was the expenditure a normal part of national expenditure.

This explanation is only necessitated by the fact that in the series of accounts below the Coinage duty will be found occupying a separate compartment or account from the General Customs account. As already said, this is due to the terms of the Act of Parliament referred to.

It almost takes one's breath away to compare such complacent, subservient, breakneck financial legislation with the treatment which for the preceding 15 years had been meted out to Charles II. Within three weeks the Parliament had voted James II a permanent hereditary income for life, which ultimately was proved to average over 1,500,000l. per an.; and over and above that it had voted three additional Acts of Supply which in their totality increased James's annual revenue by over 400,000l. per an., thus bringing his actual income to nearly 2,000,000l. per an., as against 1,200,000l. which the Restoration Parliament had promised to give to Charles II. And all this had been done without any estimate having been called for as to the national expenditure. When James II's Parliament voted him this money it had not the slightest idea what need there was for it or what use it would be put to. There was not a single clause of appropriation in any one of the Acts. No statement of departmental debts had been submitted to the House, nor any outline of proposed expenditure for the future. The House of Commons simply shut its eyes and opened its mouth.

On the 2nd July the Parliament was adjourned to Aug. 4, and on that day again to Nov. 9. Even yet the reactionary wave which had made the Commons so subservient to the King had not spent itself, and when James approached them with a request for further supply the Commons were prepared to meet him. But this time James made the mistake of being explicit, of showing his hand. Taking Monmouth's rebellion as a pretext, he told the two Houses how he had increased the standing Forces and he asked for a supply for the support of this great charge " which is now more than double what it was " (Lords' Journals, Vol. XIV, p. 73, Nov. 9), at the same time telling the Houses quite plainly that he had retained in commission divers Catholic officers who had not qualified themselves by taking the Test. On their first subsequent meeting (Nov. 13) the Commons refused to pass a vote of thanks for the King's speech. It voted supply for the King's extraordinary occasions, but would not fix the quantum nor the appropriation—the proposal to appropriate the supply to the support of the Army being lost by 250 to 125. Then by a narrow majority, 183–182, it was decided to postpone the question of supply and to devote attention to the employment of Catholic officers (Reresby, p. 344; Commons' Journals, Vol. IX, p. 757). The account of this day's debate, as sketched in Clark's Life of James II, Vol. I, pp. 51–5, reveals the astounding fact that the Commons were aware of the needlessness of their generosity —that they had given the King four millions at once, that the present income was near two millions and the charge of Government not more than 1,300,000l. On the following day (Nov. 14) the Grand Committee resolved to indemnify the [Popish] officers as to the past, but to petition the King not to maintain them in employment. But so complacent and timid was the House still that this latter item was altered to the form " that his Majesty would graciously be pleased to give such directions that no apprehensions or jealousies may remain in the hearts of his Majesty's good and faithful subjects." After drawing up an address to the King in the terms of these votes (Nov. 16) the Grand Committee of the Commons sat down to the consideration of supply. At first "200,000l. was moved to be given, then 400,000l. by the country gentlemen. The counties [by the mouth of Sir John Ernie, Chancellor of the Exchequer] insisted upon 1,200,000l. for paying the new raised Forces for five years. The House would not hear of that use for the money, lest it might prove an establishment of a standing Army; but would give it to the King to be employed as he thought fit [that is without mentioning the Forces, the service for which the money was intended: and so avoiding the semblance of giving a Parliamentary sanction to a standing Army]. At the last 700,000l. was named and granted to the King. In this debate the usefulness of a standing Army (till the rebellion or rather the ferment of it was perfectly quieted) was much insisted upon on one side; the danger of it and the inconveniences (especially considering the unruliness and insolence of soldiers, their ill example in the country and the burthen of free quarters) on the other. But all this was compromised in the declared intention of the House to make the Militia more useful, until which time it was agreed as a thing necessary that the Army ought to be kept up" (Commons Journals, Vol. IX, p. 758; Reresby, p, 346).

Accordingly on the morning of the following day, Nov. 17, the Commons went into Committee of Supply to decide on what funds to raise this sum of 700,000l. It was decided in the main to raise it by 400,000l. on East India and French linens and stuffs and brandies and that the duties already granted thereon should be prolonged for another five years from 1690, July 1, and by 300,000l. on French wines.

Having reached this point, the Houses adjourned to attend the King at Whitehall for his reply to their address. The reply was quite as injudicious and much more ungracious than the original speech, which had stirred distrust in the breast of the Commons, " I did not expect such an address from this House of Commons." James absolutely refused to recede from his position.

Still, as far as the Commons were concerned, the position was not hopelessly lost for the King. On their reassembling on the following day, Nov. 18, Mr. John Cooke of Derbyshire, a gentleman of an estate of 3,000l. per an., stood up in his place and said, " We are Englishmen and we ought not to be frighted out of our duty by a few high words." The House resented the words as an indecent reflection on the King and ordered the Serjeant at Arms to conduct Cooke to the Tower. Nay more: at the next sitting (Nov. 19) it actually returned to the question of supply, ordered the engrossing of the Bill on the lines abovesaid and with the insertion of a credit clause or borrowing power clause. Even at the last moment, therefore, the House of Commons still showed itself servile enough to vote a large supply without any explanation or justification as to its necessity, without any guarantee as to its application and in the face of a direct and deliberate affront from the King.

The Commons were, however, saved from draining the dregs of their own servility by the spirit of the Lords. On the same day, Nov. 19, on which the Commons had tamely resumed discussion of supply the Lords had taken up the consideration of the King's speech and of the employment of Popish officers. The debate was very warm and the King, who was present, as usual with him, was much concerned at the plainness of speech employed in it. The debate was adjourned until the following Monday (Nov. 23) and all the Lords in and about town were ordered to attend then under penalty. There is no doubt that the opposition was urged on by Louis XIV from a fear of the military force which James was developing and from a consequent wish to stir up domestic strife again in England. But James intervened. Rather than undergo the humiliation of a hostile vote in the Lords he preferred to sacrifice the supply of 700,000l. which was already nearly perfected for him. On the following day, Nov. 20, he prorogued the Parliament and it never sat again. By five successive prorogations it was continued until 1687, Nov. 22, and it was finally dissolved on the 2nd July, 1687 (Lords' Journals, Vol. XIV, p. 88; Dalrymple, Vol. I, p. 87).

As far as English monetary legislation or grants of supply is concerned, there is probably nowhere in our history a more ludicrous instance of complacent subservience to the Court than is revealed in the above rapid sketch of the financial dealings between James and his only Parliament. Without the King's confiding in them at all, without his submitting an estimate to them, without the slightest justification for any or for all of his demands, the Commons met his wishes, voted supply in inconsidered and precipitate haste, exacted no guarantee as to the application of the money, inserted no appropriation clause, nor ever raised the question of accountability.

Such was the price which England paid for the reaction from the Popish Plot.

Before turning to the investigation of the figures of the revenue enjoyed by James II as a result of the above detailed legislation, and before describing the uses to which he applied that revenue, it is necessary to characterise the part he played in this Parliamentary transaction. For had the Commons known the extent of his duplicity they would not have been so servile and so precipitate in their grants to him.

On Feb. 18 [=18/8], two days after his accession, he sent Rochester to Barillon to explain that he would be dependent on the French King's subsidies and that he hoped for his help in order to be independent of Parliament —help which he said would engage him still more not to depart from the road which he used to think Charles II should have kept with regard to France. Before he heard of this request Louis had already sent a present of 500,000 livres [40,640l. sterling] to James through his Ambassador Barillon. James's expressions of gratitude were unkingly in their fulsomeness. But this donation only whetted the English King's appetite. He sent (Feb. 24/14) Rochester, Sunderland and Godolphin to Barillon to represent the necessity of his, James's, affairs and how much it imported him to receive supplies in the beginning of his reign. In the interview, Rochester appears to have aimed at obtaining a promise of renewal of the subsidy of 2,000,000 livres or 1,500,000 livres which Louis XIV had promised to Charles II in the last years of his reign. Failing to obtain any satisfactory assurance, James sent Lord Churchill to Paris (Feb. 17/27) to request from Louis a present and considerable supply, and when Churchill failed, the King and his three ministers turned again upon Barillon (Mar. 10–15).

Our interest in this diplomatic wrangle lies not so much in the matter of the subsidy as in the revelation it throws upon the working of James's mind. It was represented to Barillon that a subvention from Louis was absolutely essential to enable him to meet his Parliament with firmness, and to resist the imposition of any conditions prejudicial to his authority which would undoubtedly be proposed when the House came to renew the grant of Charles II's revenue—especially any condition of time limit if there should be a disposition to grant the Customs etc. only for a year or for a certain period instead of for the King's life. Such a condition the King would resent so deeply that he would be prepared to break the Parliament and maintain himself by force in the enjoyment of the hereditary revenue; and in order to this James looked for a subsidy from Louis, and so on and so on. Thus spake James through his ministers when he addressed Barillon.

When, a week later, he met the newly elected Parliament he addressed them as follows:—" I cannot doubt that I shall fail of suitable returns from you with all imaginable duty and kindness on your part and particularly in what relates to the settling of my revenue and continuing it during my life as it was in the time of the King my brother. I might use many arguments to enforce this demand, from the benefit of trade, the support of the Navy, the necessity of the Crown and the well-being of the Government itself which I must suffer not to be precarious. But I am confident your own consideration of what is just and reasonable will suggest to you whatsoever might be enlarged upon this occasion. There is one popular argument which I foresee may be used against what I ask of you from the inclination men have for frequent Parliaments; which some may think would be the best secured by feeding me from time to time by such proportions as they shall think convenient. And this argument, it being the first time I speak to you from the throne, I will answer once for all; that this would be a very improper method to take with me and that the best way to engage me to meet you often is always to use me well. I expect, therefore, that you will comply with me in what I have desired and that you will do it speedily."

If the Commons showed no resentment of these extraordinary words, if they complied with servile alacrity in carrying out the King's wishes beyond even his expectations, it was only because they had not fathomed the depths of his duplicity and of his unfitness for rule. They did not know what he had said to Barillon.

It remains now to see what James's revenue was and what use he put it to.

In estimating his revenue we have two parallel sources of information which are set out in full in the following pages: the one source derived from the Exchequer Declarations gives in effect the net revenue: the other source, compiled by William Lowndes, gives both the gross and net revenue. There is in existence a third computation which was made for the Revolution Parliament in 1689. This latter statement (Commons' Journals, Vol. X, pp. 37–8) is as follows:—

Per an.
l. s. d.
The old Customs 577, 507 12 10¼
Logwood, coal farm, salt farm etc. 19,500 0 0
Four and a Half per cent. 12,119 4 4
Excise 610,486 10 9
Hearthmoney, about 200,000 0 0
Post Office, about 55,000 0 0
Small branches of the revenue, about 26,350 15
£1,500,964 3
New impositions:—
Wine and vinegar 172, 901 10
Tobacco and sugar 148,861 8 0
Linen and brandies 93,710 8
£1,916,437 10 3

For the purposes of the above statement the yield of the new impositions is taken from the year 1687, Michaelmas, to 1688, Michaelmas; and the yield of the old Customs and Excise is the average of the four years as follows:—

l. s. d.
Old Customs, anno 1685 532,143 9
" " 1686 595,688 7 101½
" "1687 630,700 15
" "1688 551,497 18 11¾
Yearly average £577,507 12 10¼
Excise, anno 1685 567,064 12
" "1686 581,664 4
" "1687 623,891 1
" "1688 636,358 12
Yearly average £610,486 10 9

The more authentic and detailed net account of the revenue and expenditure as stated in the Exchequer half yearly Declarations (Auditors and Pells) is as follows:—

Table I—Table of Exchequer Income.

1685, Easter, to Michaelmas. 1685, Michaelmas, to 1686, Easter 1686, Easter, to Michaelmas. 1686, Michaelmas, to 1687, Easter. 1687, Easter to Michaelmas. 1687, Michaelmas, to 1688, Easter. 1688, Easter to Michaelmas. 1688, Michaelmas, to 1689, Easter.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Customs 200,586 4 8 253,624 11 0 Account missing Account missing 292,664 11 9 234,879 1 7 309,543 7 10 115,528 0
Excise 235,022 7 248,528 4 7 290,084 17 4 277,864 15 2 263,660 6 1 195,821 10
Hearthmoney 39,489 18 2 49,318 19 0 121,836 19 134,671 10 10 105,131 9 0 71,569 2
Hearthmoney arrears 175 9 4 5 1 0
Letter Office 28,638 6 3 31,280 3 10 29,617 2 2 31,910 4 5 30,723 14 2 23,000 1 0
Wine Licences 6,920 10 11½ 1,825 0 0 3,825 0 0 367 18 0 1,453 10 6
Duchy of Cornwall 2,127 2 4 1,279 10 0 3,000 0 0 3,100 0 0 5,500 0 0
Receivers General 29 10 0 201 12 3
Duty on French linens etc 5,868 4 11½ 75,663 12 11 91,389 16 1 55,352 7 41,422 8 10 40,884 0 7
Duty on wine and vinegar 934 2 71,731 10 81,725 6 96,800 6 10 76,457 19 1 87,481 12 6
Duty on tobacco and sugars 6,618 13 2 54,906 2 2 115,755 19 29,644 17 123,156 17 27,061 11
First Fruits 1,500 0 0 500 0 0 1,250 0 0 250 0 0 1,450 0 0
Tenths of clergy 2,131 1 7 1,500 0 0 2,013 19 9 3,890 18 0 2,576 2 2 1,288 9 0
Fines of alienations 300 0 0 300 0 0 350 0 0 400 0 0
Rents reserved on various concessions 950 0 0 1,134 6 8 3,082 0 0 3,839 13 4 235 0 0 2,516 13 4
Fines of leases 402 0 0 27 6 10 288 17 1 42 9 8 5 11 8 8,503 8 4
Fines of alienations 260 0 0
Sheriffs of counties 451 3 715 18 11 572 6 478 17 8 617 10 0 227 0 1
Sheriffs of cities and bailiffs' of liberties 69 5 11 43 0 11 49 14 9 75 10 11 46 6 4 24 2 11
Fines etc in Exchequer Court 1,400 14 5 4,587 12 1,910 14 3,113 10 3 2,864 2 7 998 6 11
Compositions in Exchequer Court 48 4 0 26 3 8 12 14 1 15 17 8 22 2 0
King's Bench fines 133 6 8 1,074 8 10 570 0 0 280 6 6 131 4 6
Recusants 2,024 2 5 1,016 19 48 8 1 40 0 0
Rents of forfeited lands 229 13 6 146 16 8
Forfeitures for treason 71 11 0 1,322 19 2 325 0 0 50 15 0
Lord Grey's lands 2,100 0 0 2,950 0 0 1,300 0 0 486 12 0
Sale of woods 800 0 0 600 0 0 300 0 0 2,502 1 11 500 0 0 775 0 0
Profits of coinage of farthings 2,080 4 4 2,039 9 0 574 5 1,800 0 0
East India Company's present 10,750 0 0
Loan money 2,000 0 0 27,500 0 0
Loan on the Hearthmoney 18,000 0 0 5,200 0 0 15,000 0 0
Loan on the Excise 225,675 0 0
Loan on the French linen duty (afterwards on linen and tobacco combined) 149,303 0 0 56,523 0 0 85,570 0 0 129,800 0 0 51,138 6 9 44,900 0 0
Loanonthe Aid (1 William Account and Mary) Account missing Account missing 1,600 0 0
Arrears of the first part of the First Disbanding Act (30 Car. II,c. 1) 30 0 0 60 0 0 304 19 6
Ditto of second part of same 33 16 4 325 13 9 200 0 0 100 0 0 272 7 5
Ditto of second Disbanding Act(31 Car II, c.1) 434 10 9
In part payment of Sir W. Doyly sdebt 245 0 0 100 0 0 104 7 9
Arrears of Poll1 150 0 0
Fine on Richard Young 1,200 0 0
Fine on William Leake 266 13 4
Lands seized 0 13 4 537 13 9
Rent of lands 2 3 4 788 18 22 16 8 37 4 767 18
Redemption of lands 100 0 0
Payments into the Exchequer by order of the King 15,000 0 0 2,700 0 0
The King's dividend in the Royal Africa Company 322 10 0 322 10 0 322 10 0
Ditto in the East India Company 750 0 0 750 0 0 2,500 0 0
Ditto in Hudsons Bay Company 150 0 0
Queen Dowager's dowry 23,630 0 0
Coinage duty 3,890 2 10,300 0 0 11,000 0 0 7,012 10 0 6,600 0 0
Four and a Half per cent. duty in Barbados and the Leeward Islands 3,478 10 8 5,000 0 0 1,062 0 7,500 0 0
Payment by Roger Whitley (Post Office defalcations). 7,630 15 4
Received out of the revenue of Ireland 10,000 0 0 14,254 15 5 10,944 4 8
Voluntary benevolence or collection for redemption of captives in Barbary 1,038 0 0
King's part of recovery from the Hispaniola wreck Account missing. Account missing. 20,872 10 7 4,000 0 0 9,021 18 6
Receipts from the revenue of Barbados 450 0 0 800 0 0
Sede vacante temporalities of the archbishopric of York 1,106 13 11½ 1,000 0 0 984 19 11½ 230 0 0
Payment by Lord Ossulston (Post Office defalcations). 4,000 0 0 4,000 0 0
Fine on George Speke 1,000 0 0
Fine on Thomas Gouldsmith 100 0 0
Fine on divers persons 7,121 4 351 6 8
Paid in by Henry Guy 300 0 0 1,089 0 0
Imprests repaid 13 7 9 1 12 2
Issues of jurors 8 0 0 6 3 4 4 10 0
Arrears of subsidy (1671) 133 6 8
Arrears of Poll [? 1677 or 1666] 410 0 0 175 1 0
Arrears of Royal Aid 200 0 0 260 0 0
Arrears of Additional Aid 140 0 0
Arrears of Eleven Months' Assessment 30 0 0 62 8 3
Arrears of Seventeen Months' Assessment 1,247 7 7
King's private revenue as Duke of York before his accession 900 0 0 331 15 800 0 0
Forfeiture of a ship 3,161 0 2
Payments by Hackney Coaches Commissioners (redd'cur'aurigationum) 166 13 4 198 11 3
Sale of lands 200 0 0
Sale of fee farms 29 6 4
Sale of stores 251 12 3
Consciencemoney 200 0 0
713,037 19 1,017,189 15 1,188,154 2 0 1,045,065 15 1,054,865 9 924,784 9

Table II—Table of Expenditure.

1685, Easter, to Michaelmas. 1685, Michaelmas, to 1686, Easter. 1686, Easter, to Michaelma. 1686, Michaelmas, to 1687, Easter. 1687, Easter, to Michaelmas. 1687, Michaelmas, to 1688, Easter. 1688, Easter, to Michaelmas. 1688, Michaelmas, to 1689, Easter.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Privy Purse 9,750 0 0 16,200 0 0 Account missing. Account missing. 13,000 0 0 15,500 0 0 18,000 0 0 6,755 0 0
Cofferer of the Household 22,100 0 0 30,500 0 0 47,998 10 1 44,540 3 4 35,000 0 0 19,419 15
Master of Robes 1,780 4 3 1,250 0 0 2,850 0 0 1,250 0 0 625 0 0
Great Wardrobe 2,000 0 0 15,912 7 11,614 6 4 7,000 0 0 4,196 0 0
Treasurer of the Chamber 7,558 10 0 14,311 17 5 32,165 17 1 20,522 8 21,606 4 6,749 15 0
Stables 4,700 0 0 8,420 18 11,100 0 0 4,587 9 0 1,850 0 0
Works 10,145 7 10½ 13,997 12 9,507 12 12,562 17 3 11,631 13 4 5,590 14
Navy 176,882 17 5 178,521 12 11 235,774 0 234,206 0 10½ 213,976 0 11 232,068 0 1
Ordnance 36,800 0 0 35,000 0 0 51,500 0 0 49,775 16 7 62,551 13 2 58,354 16 11½
Lieutenant of Tower 551 4 0 521 8 2 474 8 5 231 9 4
Band of Gentlemen Pensioners 6,000 0 0 3,153 12 9 4,500 0 0 2,998 0 0
Mint 4,000 0 0 2,234 15 8 9,937 10 0 11,462 10 0 6,787 10 0 6,262 10 0
Lord President of Privy Council 750 0 0 375 0 0 750 0 0 1,125 0 0 375 0 0 375 0 0
Lord Privy Seal 724 0 0 736 0 0 900 0 0 1,100 0 0 364 0 0
King's Jeweller 5,000 0 0 7,000 0 0 1,000 0 0 1,500 0 0 4,000 0 0 900 0 0
King's Goldsmith 5,500 0 0 4,587 0 0 4,000 0 0 7,363 17 0
Ambassadors 10,912 10 5 13,656 3 10 11,508 17 6 18,527 5 5 15,368 9 1 6,502 0 0
Secret Service (Secretaries of State) 5,450 0 0 11,549 13 0 10,650 0 0 3,000 0 0 1,500 0 0 5,140 0 0
Army 224,498 8 11 (fn. 2) 296,600 11 1 308,900 0 0 238,465 9 321,135 4 621,426 9 11
Tangier 17,125 15 0 7,000 0 0
Governor of St Christopher 3,478 10 8
Governor of Barbados 815 6
Secret service, rewards etc 50,036 13 61,534 16 56,337 17 70,362 14 8 53,774 0 8 13,661 7 5
Extraordinaries 32,612 1 10 33,538 0 0 9,063 13 10¾ 11,180 5 11¼ 16,693 3 2
Repayments of loan money and interest and gratuity thereon 55,043 13 1 86,202 13 151,931 2 4 130,107 6 7 167,786 5 82,364 17 10½
Liveries of Exchequer 1,415 18 9 899 3 9 230 5 3 1,754 14 5 338 16 257 4 7
Annuities and fees, by privy seal 3,191 5 5 19,895 11 9 22,269 16 21,046 4 15,840 0 0 4,895 0 0
Annuities and Fees, by debentures 20,351 6 47,720 12 11½ Account missing Account missing 75,334 9 67,974 16 10½ 42,861 7 10¼ 18,896 14
Messengers of Exchequer and Chamber 1,075 0 0 651 2 8 343 10 8 508 2 8 745 4 8 138 11 4
Payments on Second Disbanding Act 150 3 7 10 15 11 435 0 0
Prince of Wales 3,000 0 0
700,079 0 901,949 17 1,082,796 9 1,093,124 8 6 1,029,402 9 1,096,428 17 11
Assignations on divers branches of the revenue 38,761 19 10½ 22,778 8 4 29,320 6 11 21,721 19 5 16,613 13 10 210,379 3 (fn. 3)

Table III.—Statement of Income and Expenditure according to the Exchequer Declaration.

1685. 1686. 1687. 1688.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Income 1,730,227 14 7 Account 2,233,219 17 1,979,649 19
Expenditure (not including the Assignations) 1,602,028 17 7 missing. 2,135,920 17 10¼ 2,125,831 7

Only a close acquaintance with the forms of Exchequer accounting will enable a proper use to be made of the above last two preceding tables (which are of course similar in form and in origin to the tables of revenue and expenditure consistently printed throughout in the introductions to the successive volumes of the present Calendar). Certain forms or items of revenue never reached the Exchequer at all, being arrested half way and diverted into issues or payments by means of tallies of anticipations. Also the payments into the Exchequer from the Customs and Excise and Hearthmoney represent not only net receipts (that is after deducting salaries and expenses of management), but even represent those net receipts still further diminished by tallies of pro. For instance, certain annuities (to the Duke of York, to the Queen Dowager and the bankers' debt interest) were paid at the Excise Office by tallies of pro or assignation and these payments should be added to the total Exchequer receipts in calculating the full actual yield or receipt from the Excise. And so for the Customs etc. It is very fortunate that for the whole of the reign of James II we possess a quite independent contemporary computation of the revenue. This was made by William Lowndes, who during this period was a Treasury clerk, but subsequently became Secretary to the Treasury. He is well known for his Essay for the amendment of the silver coin 1695 etc., and was manifestly a master of national finance.

For some purpose which is not yet clear, Lowndes compiled a yearly account of the revenue and expenditure from 1679 onwards, and after an eventful history the manuscripts containing these valuable accounts now repose safely in the Bodleian. On account of the fact that they represent quite a different statement and method of computing the national revenue, they are here printed in abstract for the period covered by the present volume. It will be noticed that under each head of Departmental revenue Lowndes gives (1) the cash balance in hand at the opening of each half year; (2) the receipts classified according to the respective accounts or years or half years to which they belonged It is therefore abundantly clear that he must have had access to the books of each of these Departments, for this information and classification could not have been drawn from the Weekly Certificates or from the half yearly Declarations It is this fact which gives such value to these statements by Lowndes, for some of the material on which they were based is no longer existent These statements, for James II's reign, are as follows:—
Mich, 1684, to 6 Feb, 1684–5, under Treasury Lords, and 6 Feb, 1684–5, to Lady day, 1685, under Treasurer Rochester

Customs— l. s. d. l. s. d.
Remains 8,166 1
Receipts proper to the account of the year ended 1684, Sept 29 52,370 3 8
Receipts proper to current year 112,523 2
173,059 7 7
Receipts, account Feb to March 76,808 5 7
Excise—
Remains 9,371 14
Receipts proper to year ended at 1684, Midsummer 1,976 10 8
Receipts proper to year from Midsummer, 1684 196,675 11
208,023 16
Feb-Mar account 79,504 8 4
Remains. Receipts. Receipts. Feb-Mar.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Hearthmoney nil 38,410 13 9 24,879 10 9
First Fruits 8 5 500 0 0
Tenths 765 16 5
Ditto Feb-Mar 140 3 0
Divers small branches—
Compositions 38 5 4 17 3 10 1 3 4
King's Bench fines 22 6 0 1,249 6 3
Recusants' money 6 0 0 410 2 4 84 6 8
Proffers 18 12 747 11 71 5 11
Coinage duty 1,186 0 7
Fine on Daniel Gate 100 0 0
Rent of Recusants' lands 200 0 0
Wine licences 2,600 0 0
Goods seized 1,837 1 445 10 8
Cornwall Duchy 2,234 2
Fines of alienations 350 0 0
Lands seized 0 13 4
Rent of lands 2 3 4
Rent of lighthouses 26 13 4
Sea coal (4s. duty) 500 0 0
Fines of leases 7 5 2 0 18 10
Sale of wood (woods) 600 0 0 1,200 0 0
Rent of Bombay 10 0 0
Unwrought wood 450 0 0
per cent. duty 600 0 0
Rents of Lord Grey's lands 3,000 0 0
Export of woollen cloth 1 0 0
1,271 4 7 16,213 7 1,804 14 5
Casual money 8,816 10 3,203 17 400 0 0
(Redemption of captives; Doyly's debt; imprests repaid.)
Arrears of Taxes—
Twelve Months' Tax 47 16 11 100 0 0
Second Disbanding Act 153 9 6 200 0 0
Loans nil. 67,000 0 0 20,000 0 0
(Duncombe, E. Sheldon, T. Hall, Lord Churchill.) (Duncombe.)

Receipts and Payments made by Tallies [of pro].

To Feb. 6. From Feb. 6.
l. s. d. l. s. d.
First Fruits 2,500 0 0
Tenths 2,087 10 0
Profits, Alienation Office 500 0 0
Profits of Hanaper 10 0 0 27 4 7
5,097 10 0

Expenditure.

To Feb. 6. From Feb. 6.
l. s. d. l. s. d.
Navy 67,018 16 7 32,869 6 6
Ordnance 29,000 0 0 3,000 0 0
Forces 85,500 0 0 32,500 0 0
Tangier 18,656 2 9
Household 28,800 0 0 5,000 0 0
Treasurer of Chamber 5,687 16 200 0 0
Wardrobe and Mr Knight 1,809 2 0
Robes 1,500 0 0
Works 11,356 7 2
Foreign ministers 5,390 9 6
Stables 3,598 11 1
Sundry fees and salaries 14,025 18 2 330 2
Pensions in respect of places 5,518 1 0
Pensions in lieu of diets 1,236 0 0
Other pensions and annuities 34,922 8 0 19,175 7 7
Band of Pensioners 146 0
Bounties in gross sums 3,200 0 0
Secret services 19,137 19 0 2,300 0 0
Management of Customs 12,716 0 8,800 10
Management of Excise 8,813 4 0 3,655 0 0
Privy Purse and Healing gold 6,723 17
Mint 1,000 0 0
Loan repayments, principal, interest and discount 122,670 14 50,531 15 0
Redemption of captives 4,060 0 0
Jewels and plate 231 18 3
Contingencies not reducible to foregoing heads 5,245 12 147 16 11

Lady day, 1685, to Midsummer, 1685

l. s. d. l. s. d.
Customs—
Remains 14,837 3
Receipts 169,726 2 11½
184,563 6
Excise—
Remains 17,917 1 11½
Receipts 362 14 6 (fn. 4)
Receipts (current quarter) 156,459 2
174,738 18
Hearthmoney—
Remains 10,790 4 6
Receipts on half year due Mich., 1684 34,532 2
Receipts on half year due at Lady day, 1685 12,398 10 3
Receipts (Arrears) 135 14 1
57,856 11 2
Letter Office—
Receipts (arrears due before 1685, Lady day) 7,446 15 3
Receipts (current quarter) 11,115 3 4
18,561 18 7
First Fruits—
Remains 15 3 0
Receipts 750 0 0
Tenths 2,482 16 3
3,232 16 3
Arrears. Receipts. Total.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Divers small branches—
Compositions on Exchequer 56 12 5 14 0
Goods seized 259 3 8 701 14
Cornwall Duchy 60 0 0 1,100 0 0
Recusants' money 284 6 8 236 0 6
per cent. 600 0 0
Sale of woods 1,200 0 0 1,300 0 0
Coinage (Doyly) 1,186 0 7
Coinage of tin farthings 4,448 5 5
Wine licences 2,184 13 11
Fines of leases 20 0 0
Unwrought wood 225 0 0
Proffers 410 17
Sea coal (4s. duty farm rent) 500 0 0
Lord Grey's rents 2,600 0 0
Profits of alienation, per tall[y] 250 0 0
3,646 3 13,982 5 6
17,628 8 11½
Casual money— l. s. d. l. s. d.
Remains 7,131 13 4
Forfeiture for treason 229 13 6
7,361 6 10
Remains. Receipts. Total.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Arrears of Taxes—
Second Disbanding Act 26 14 186 18
Second part of First Disbanding Act 33 16 4
220 15
Loans— l. s. d.
Remains 9,200 8
Receipts (W. Harbord) 2,000 0 0
11,200 8

[Expenditure.]

l. s. d.
Navy 89,347 12 11
Ordnance 21,000 0 0
Forces 76,500 0 0
Tangier arrears 1,125 15 0
Household 15,100 0 0
Treasurer of Chamber 2,083 0 0
J. Knight for provisions 5,000 0 0
Works 9,711 19 8
Foreign ministers 15,434 17 2
Sundry fees and salaries paid at the Receipt 11,098 9 10¾
Pensions in respect of places 1,250 0 0
Pensions in lieu of diets 610 0 0
Other pensions and annuities paid at the Exchequer 14,604 18
Bounties in gross 12,136 0 6
Secret services—
Guy 12,774 9 11
Sunderland 1,000 0 0
Middleton 500 0 0
Management of Post Office 569 3 0
Management of Customs 9,323 6
Management of Hearthmoney 2,202 0 0
Management of Excise 6,360 17 11¼
Privy Purse [nil. Sic.]
Mint "
Jewels and plate 2,000 0 0
Loan repayments, principal and interest 65,221 7 0 (fn. 5)
Ditto current—
(on the Customs) 6,679 7 10
(on the Excise) 9,879 11 1
(on the Hearths) 2,920 0 0
(on the other small branches) 4,948 5 5
(on the arrears of taxes) 146 3 7
Redemption of captives 1,000 0 0
Contingents 3,245 15 2

1685, Midsummer, to 1685, Michaelmas.

l. s. d. l. s. d.
Customs—
Remains 18,135 19 10
Receipts 135,411 13 6
153,547 13 4
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
French linens—
London 2,626 8 1
Outports 473 8 1
3,099 17 11½
Brandies—
London 4,263 0 0
Outports 42 7 1
4,405 7
7,505 5
Wine and vinegar—
London 938 6 1
Outports 29 16
968 2
Tobacco and sugar—
London 12,652 10
Outports 760 0 0
13,412 10
Excise—
Remains 31,563 15
Receipts, arrears for year to 24 June, 1684 170 19 5
Receipts, arrears for year to 24 June, 1685 91,265 10
Ditto(current quarter) 68,583 3 2
191,583 8 9
Hearthmoney—
Remains 2 252 8 4
Receipts 55,831 15 4
161 0 0
58,245 3 8
Letter Office—
Remains 4380 9 8
Receipts due before 1685, June 24 2,546 2 3
Receipts (current) 14 939 1 11
21,865 13 10
Remains. Receipts. Total.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
First Fruits 72 19 3 750 0 0
Tenths 3,910 15 4
72 19 3 4,660 15 4
4,733 14 7
Divers small branches—
Compositions in Exchequer 62 6 42 10 0
Goods seized 724 0 789 9 3
Duchy of Cornwall 489 3 8 2,027 2 4
Recusants'money 434 6 8 1,788 1 11
Wine licences 2,084 13 11
Proffers 42 13 109 11 9
Coinage (Doyly) 1,186 0 7
Sale of tin farthings 2,080 4 4
King's Bench fines 133 6 8
Fines of leases 402 0 0
Fines of alienations 300 0 0
Wood farm 225 0 0
Lord Grey's rents 400 0 0
Profits of alienations, per tall 250 0 0
5,023 5 8,547 6 3
13,570 11
Casual money—
Benevolence money for redemption of captives 5,731 13 4
Sir W. Doyly's debt 200 0 0 245 0 0
Moneys forfeited for high treason 229 13 6
East India Company's present 10,750 0 0
6,161 6 10 10,995 0 0
17,156 6 10
Arrears of taxes—
Second part of First Disbanding Act 33 16 4
Second Disbanding Act 67 9 7
First part of First Disbanding Act 30 0 0
101 5 11 30 0 0
131 5 11
l. s. d. l. s. d.
Loans—
Remains 3,916 13
Receipts on French linen 149,303 0 0
Receipts, several (T. Hall, on Hearthmoney, etc.) 18,000 0 0
171,219 13

Expenditure.

l. s. d. l. s. d.
Navy 115,119 6 6
Ordnance 20,800 0 0
Forces 161,498 8 11
Tangier 16,000 0 0
Household 7,000 0 0
Treasurer of Chamber 6,878 0 0
Wardrobe 4,000 0 0
Works 4,720 7 10½
Foreign Ministers 8,119 6 2
Fees and salaries paid at the Exchequer 6,070 15 4
Pensions in respect of places 4,200 0 0
Pensions in lieu of diets 614 0 0
Pensions and annuities paid at the Exchequer 16,528 10 59½
Bounties in gross sums 13,500 0 0
Secret services (Guy, Fox and Sunderland) 33,344 1 4
Management of Customs 10,884 6
Management of Excise 6,230 0 0
Management of Hearthmoney 886 4 4
Management of Post Office 1,951 0 11
Privy Purse and Healing gold 9,750 0 0
Mint 4,000 0 0
Jewels and plate (Rosse and Vyner) 8,500 0 0
Loan repayments— l. s. d.
Principal and interest in further part of debt of 549,747l. 9s. 0¼d as in preceding statement 65,500 0 0
Ditto (current) 21,653 2 0
87,153 2 0
Redemption of captives 1,615 3 0
Contingencies 3,109 10 5

1685, Mich., to 1686, Lady day.

l. s. d. l. s. d.
Customs—
Remains 20,074 17 10¼
Receipts (preceding account) 48,796 0
Receipts (current) 241,280 11 10¾
310,151 10
Wine and vinegar—
Remains 968 2
Receipts (preceding account) 419 1 7
Receipts (current account) 70,256 12 9
71,643 16
Tobacco and sugar
Remains 13,412 10
Receipts (preceding account) 10,105 15 10½
Receipts (current account) 37,337 0
60,855 6 11½
French linens—
Remains 2,957 10
Receipts (preceding account) 1,841 18
Receipts (current account) 47,085 2 11¼
Brandies 13,995 8
65,880 0
Excise—
Remains 20,175 0 10½
Receipts (preceding account) 179 8
Receipts (preceding account) 7,104 16
Receipts (current account) 279,083 17 10¼
Receipts over payments 1,230 12
Receipts not yet credited 4,000 0 0
311,773 16 9
Hearthmoney—
Remains 7,840 15 10
Receipts (arrears) 400 11 0
Receipts (arrears) 1,273 2 8
Receipts (arrears) 34,746 16 9
Receipts (arrears) 5 1 0
Receipts (current) 70,601 14 1
114,868 1 4
Letter Office—
Remains 5,449 7 8
Receipts (arrears) 3,730 18 7
Receipts (current) 34,257 12 6
43,437 18 9
First Fruits—
Remains 763 2 1
Receipts 1,000 0 0
Receipts (per tallies) 3,159 4 0
Tenths—
Receipts (cash) 1,939 4 10
Receipts (per tallies) 4,265 16 0
10,364 4 10
11,127 6 11
Remains. Receipts. Total.
Divers small branches— l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Compositions in Exchequer 104 16 26 3 8
Goods seized 198 1 8 4,347 18
Recusants' money 2,222 8 7 1,016 19
Wine licences 2,084 13 11 4,624 12 10½
Proffers 0 6 758 19 10
King's Bench fines 133 6 8 1,407 15 6
Fines of leases 402 0 0 27 6 10
Coinage (Doyly) 1,186 0 7
Coinage duty 3,890 2
Sale of tin farthings 2,039 9 0
Lands seized 0 13 4
Wood farm 450 0 0
Rent of Bombay 10 0 0
Ulnage of cloth 4 10 0
Duchy of Cornwall (revenue) 230 0 0
per cent, duty 3,478 10 8
Rent of lands 2 3 4
Profits of alienations in money 260 0 0
Profits of alienations in per tallies of pro 750 0 0
Sale of woods 600 0 0
Coal (4s. duty) 500 0 0
Coal (ls. duty) 2 13 4
Rent of lighthouses 6 13 4
Rent of Carolina 93 6 8
Rent of export of woollen cloth 0 10 0
Profits of Hanaper (per tallies) 37 4 7
King's Bench fine (R. Young) 1,200 0 0
Lord Grey's rents 2,950 0 0
6,331 14 28,715 12 11
35,047 7
Casual money— l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Remains 15,541 3 10
Receipts—
Paid in by the King, per W. Shaw 10,000 0 0
R. Whitley (award) 7,630 15 4
Estates forfeit for treason 146 16 8
King's East India Co. dividend 1,072 10 10
Revenue of Ireland 10,000 0 0
Queen Dowager's portion 23,630 0 0
52,480 2 0
68,021 5 10
Remains. Receipts. Total.
Arrears of taxes—
First part of First Disbanding Act 30 0 0
Second part of First Disbanding Act 33 16 4 325 13 9
Second Disbanding Act 63 9 7
127 5 11 325 13 9
452 19 8
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Loans—
Remains 7,825 15
On French linen 105,223 0 0
Kingdon (fictitious) 27,500 0 0
Hall 4,000 0 0
Ernie 1,200 0 0
145,748 15

Expenditure.

Navy 162,663 14 1
Ordnance 28,500 0 0
Forces 279,125 18 10
Tangier 7,000 0 0
Household 30,500 0 0
Treasurer of Chamber 14,311 17 5
Wardrobe 1,000 0 0
Robes 1,780 4 3
Works 13,997 12
Stables 4,200 0 0
Foreign ministers 13,881 3 10
Sundry fees and salaries paid at the Exchequer 26,310 4
Pensions_Complete list: ([Exchequer] Customs, Excise, Post Office, First Fruits (tallies), Tenths (tallies), Alienation Office, Hanaper) 79,636 9
Band of Pensioners 3,000 0 0
Bounties in gross 19,250 0 0
Secret services (Guy, Middleton, Fox, Sunderland, Preston) 71,272 5
Management of Customs 21,939 5
Management of Excise 9.758 0 0
Management of Hearthmoney 1,310 0 0
Management of Post Office 4,259 14 10
Privy Purse and Healing Gold 16,200 0 0
Mint 2,234 15 8
Jewels and plate 10,587 0 0
Loan repayments—
Principal, interest and discount, in part of 549,747l. 9s. 0¼d. [ut supra] 129,617 16 3
Ditto (current) 85,336 14 11
214,954 11 2
Redemption of captives 1,000 0 0
Bills of impost 96 12 0
Contingencies of divers natures 9,606 9 8

End—rest blank.

Lady day, 1686, to Michaelmas, 1686.

l. s. d. l. s. d.
Customs—
Remains 10,344 1
Receipts 358,746 3 9
9 0 11
369,099 6
French linens—
Remains 5,714 16
Receipts 56,409 4 10¾
Brandies 20,298 14
82,422 15 12
Wines and vinegar—
Remains 30,558 12
Receipts 68,563 18
2 0 0
99,124 11
Tobacco and sugar—
Remains 60,855 6 11½
Receipts 116,949 12 6
177,804 19
Excise—
Remains 12,414 2 8
Receipts 325,465 6
337,879 9
Hearthmoney—
Remains 7,849 17 5
Receipts 105,368 13 0
113,218 10 5
Letter Office—
Remains 1,453 10 0
Receipts (arrears) 321 12 8
Receipts (current) 37,970 2 9
39,745 5 5
First Fruits—
Receipts 1,205 0 0
Receipts (per tallies) 425 0 0
Tenths—
Receipts 3,121 8
Receipts (per tallies) 2,500 0 0
7,251 18
Remains. Receipts. Total.
l. s. d l. s. d l. s. d
Divers small branches—
Goods seized 128 13 3,117 14 7
Coinage money or duty 1,655 6 6,000 0 0
Coinage money (Doyly's debt) 1,186 0 7
Recusants' money 546 9 289 0 8
King's Bench fines 815 19 8,397 0 0
Compositions in Exchequer 9 5 33 15 0
Rent of lands 0 6 8
Fines of leases 7 0 6
Proffers 21 4
Wine licences 2,295 18 1
Duchy of Cornwall (revenue) 4,466 6
per cent. 3,278 10 8
Wood farm 450 0 0
Proffers 551 1
Coal (4s. duty) 500 0 0
Fines of leases 7 2 2
Lord Grey's estate 2,500 0 0
Rent of lighthouses 320 0 0
Fines of alienations 500 0 0
Fines of alienations, per tally of pro 250 0 0
Ulnage of cloth 12 0 0
4,370 5 10¼ 32,968 9 4 37,338 15
Casual money—
East IndiaCo'spresent 1,250 0 0 10,750 0 0
King's East India Co dividend 750 0 0 750 0 0
King's Africa Co dividend 322 10 0
Queen Dowager's portion 12,000 0 0
Redemption of captives 316 10 4
Col Whitley 7,630 15 4 7,630 15 4
Irish revenue 6,880 0 0
Sir W Doyly's debt 15 0 0
Paid by the King into Exchequer 8,676 18 3
Baronet fee 1,095 0 0
Paid in by H Guy for the King 667 16
Imprest repaid 300 0 0
31,964 15 8 29,870 10
61,835 5 10½
Arrears of taxes— l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
First part of First Disbanding Act 30 0 0
Second part of First Disbanding Act 54 12 1 660 0 0
Second Disbanding Act 52 13 8
Poll (1666) 30 2 0
Last Poll (1677) 950 0 0
137 5 9 1,640 2 0
1,777 7 9
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Loans 24,939 8 11
On linen 86,714 0 0
On tobacco 29,000 0 0
24,939 8 11 115,714 0 0
140,653 8 11

Expenditure

l. s. d
Navy 205,071 3 5
Ordnance 36,500 0 0
l. s. d
Forces 314,400 13 4
To Fox for arrears 14,500 0 0
To Stapleton for Leeward Islands 2,778 10 8
331,679 4 0
Tangier for arrears 23,424 0 0
Household 30,300 0 0
Treasurer of Chamber 13,102 0 3
Wardrobe 8,000 0 0
Robes 2,500 0 0
Works 15,080 0 0
Stables 3,500 0 0
Foreign ministers 11,482 12 2
Sundry fees and salaries paid at the Exchequer 31,585 4
Arrears of late King's servants 92,911 12
Pensions: full list 73,794 12
Band of Pensioners 4,500 0 0
Bounties in gross 4,196 16 8
Secret service 51,498 15
Management of Customs 24,126 3 10¾
Management of Excise 11,139 10 0
Management of Hearthmoney 1,693 3 11
Management of Post Office 3,589 0 3
Privy Purse and Healing gold 11,000 0 0
Mint 7,205 6
Jewels and plate 5,400 0 0
Loan repayments— l. s. d.
Principal, interest and discount, in part of 549,747l. 9s. 0¼d., as before 53,108 5 9
Ditto (current) 138,436 15 10
191,545 1 7
Redemption of captives 2,000 0 0
Contingencies 11,120 5 11½

Michaelmas, 1686, to Lady day, 1687.

l. s. d. l. s. d.
Customs—
Remains 12,504 12
Receipts (arrears) 49,523 10 0
Receipts (current) 221,328 16
283,356 18 91
French linens—
Remains 3,618 9
Receipts (arrears) 7,007 14
Receipts (current) 34,254 3
Brandies 22,135 8
60,008 0
[67,015 15 4]
Wine and vinegar—
Remains 9,191 12
Receipts (arrears) 11,755 12
Receipts (current) 90,861 6 9
23 0 0
111,831 11
Tobacco and sugar—
Remains 90,558 3
Receipts (arrears) 13,682 4
Receipts (current) 37,748 15
141,989 3
Excise—
Remains 26,987 14 9
Receipts 306,474 5 2
333,461 19 11
Hearthmoney—
Remains 12,992 2 1
Receipts 104,084 6 7
16 3 0
162 3 7
117,254 15 3
Post Office—
Remains 3,154 13 6
Receipts 37,612 9 4
40,767 2 10
First Fruits—
Remains
Receipts 840 0 0
Receipts (by tallies of pro) 2,500 0 0
Tenths—
Receipts 3,359 0 11½
Receipts (tallies of pro) 3,425 0 0
10,124 0 11½
Remains. Receipts. Total.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Divers small branches—
Goods seized 23 13 4,291 12 9
King's Bench fines 2,742 13 2,233 18 9
Compositions in Exchequer 9 1 8 817 10 2
Recusants' money 89 0 8 925 10
Cornwall Duchy 12 11 2 302 0 2
Coinage duty (Doyly) 1,186 0 7
Coinage duty 8,950 0 0
per cent, duty 4,982 0 0
Wine licences 3,309 11 0
Coal (4s. duty) 500 0 0
Coal (1s. duty) 1 6 8
Sheriffs' proffers 663 16 2
Unwrought wood 450 0 0
Fines of leases 166 7 6
Rent of lands 9 13 4
Rent of Carolina 13 6 8
Rent of lighthouses 46 13 4
Rent of Bombay 10 0 0
Sale of woods 800 0 0
Issues of jurors 6 0 0
Lands seized 0 13 4
Lord Grey's rents 1,000 0 0
Export of woollen cloth 1 10 0
Sale of tin farthings 5,500 0 0
York archbishopric temporalities 1,000 0 0
Alienation fines (in money) 350 0 0
Alienation fines (in tallies) 500 0 0
Profits of Hanaper (by tallies of pro) 37 4 7
4,063 1 0 36,868 14
40,931 15
Casual money—
East India Co. (present) 10,750 0 0
East India Co. (King's dividend) 750 0 0
Queen Dowager's portion 9,483 15 6
Redemption of captives 1,116 10 4 304 2 0
Col. Whitley 8,865 6 9
Paid in by the King's command 2,378 4 6
Out of the Irish revenue 6,880 0 0 6,000 0 0
King's dividend in the Royal Africa Co. 322 10 0
A wreck on the coast of Scilly 1,524 19 10½
Product of a bar of silver 198 4 0
In part of Doyly's debt 100 0 0
40,223 17 1 8,449 15 10½
48,673 12 11½
Arrears of taxes—
Second Poll (1666) 30 2 0 2 3 0
Last Poll 290 0 0 468 16 11
First part of First Disbanding Act 30 0 0 200 0 0
Second Disbanding Act 6 8 9 354 14 10
Second part of First Disbanding Act 4,480 0 0
Eighteen Months' tax (1661) 103 3 6
356 10 9 5,608 18 3
5,965 9 0
Loans—
Remains 55,122 11 1
Receipts—
On French linen 28,600 0 0
On French linen and tobacco jointly 39,090 0 0
67,690 0 0
122,812 11 1

Expenditure.

l. s. d.
Navy 239,734 1 5
Ordnance 50,404 11
Forces (Ranelagh) 295,805 2 10
Forces, Fox (arrears) 6,775 0 0
Household 35,856 15
Treasurer of Chamber 13,425 2 4
Wardrobe 6,600 0 0
Robes 1,250 0 0
Works 10,205 0 0
Foreign ministers 20,965 6 6
Fees and salaries paid at Exchequer 29,278 2 2
Arrears to late King's servants 110,865 13
Pensions and annuities paid at Exchequer 85,115 10
Tangier arrears 3,450 5 0
Band of Pensioners 4,500 0 0
Bounties in gross sums 10,716 14 10½
Secret services 52,992 17 10½
Management of Customs 26,403 17 10½
Management of Excise 10,747 10 0
Management of Hearth 1,715 12 6
Management of Post Office 5,048 2 5
Privy Purse and Healing gold 16,300 0 0
Mint 7,950 0 0
Jewels and plate 5,000 0 0
Loan repayments—
Principal and interest in further part of 549,747l. 9s. 0¼d., as before 104,559 18 7
Ditto (current) 78,559 18 7
Redemption of captives 1,011 19 0
Bills of impost 96 12 0
Contingencies (detailed) 18,923 9

Lady day, 1687, to Michaelmas, 1687.

l. s. d. l. s. d.
Customs—
Remains 11,231 0
Receipts 377,909 1
389,140 1
Wines—
Remains 13,045 5
Receipts 82,038 6 10
95,083 12
French linens—
Remains 4,589 13
Receipts 69,568 6
Brandy 22,393 4
96,551 3
Tobacco and sugar—
Remains 25,026 17 0
Receipts 121,012 10
146,039 7 3frac34;
Excise—
Remains 12,575 15
Receipts 349,876 15 4
362,452 11
Hearth—
Remains 3,994 9
Receipts 138,157 4
142,151 13
Post Office—
Remains 3,031 9 4
Receipts 38,571 16 8
41,603 6 0
First Fruits—
Remains 13 12
Receipts 500 0 0
Receipts (tallies) 1,250 0 0
Tenths—
Receipts 2,013 19 9
Receipts (tallies) 3,175 0 0
6,952 11 11½
Remains. Receipts. Total.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Divers small branches—
Goods seized 149 1 1,910 14
Compositions (in Exchequer) 6 7 10 12 14 1
Fines of leases 15 14 288 17 1
Wine licences 1,000 0 0 1,825 0 0
Sale of woods 500 0 0 300 0 0
York (archbishopric temporalities) 500 0 0 1,106 13 11½
Profit of tin farthings 4,000 0 0 574 5
Coinage Duty 550 0 0 10,300 0 0
Coinage (Doyly) 1,186 0 7
Sheriffs' proffers 622 1
Coal (4s. duty) 500 0 0
Rent of lighthouses 30 0 0
Rent of lands 788 18
Issues of jurors 8 0 0
per cent duty 5,000 0 0
Receivers General 29 10 0
Recusants' money 48 8 1
Lands seized 207 13 9
King's Bench fines 2,000 0 0
Wood farms 450 0 0
Ulnage of cloth 2 0 0
Cornwall Duchy 3,000 0 0
Rent of a lottery 2,100 0 0
Profits of Alienation Office in money 300 0 0
Profits of Alienation Office (by tallies of pro) 500 0 0
7,907 4 39,812 1
47,719 5 4
Casual money—
East India Co. present 10,750 0 0
East India Co. King's dividend 322 10 0
Queen Dowager's portion 9,483 15 6
Col. Whitley 8,265 6 9
Paid in by King's command 2,378 4 6
Irish money 8,559 2 6
Irish Revenue 2,700 0 0
Product of a bar of silver 198 4 0
Redemption of captives 920 12 4 1,038 0 0
King's dividend, Royal Africa Company 322 10 0
Lord Ossulston (award) 4,000 0 0
Paid in by Guy from Frowde 300 0
Barbados revenue 450 0 0
King's part of wreck at sea 20,872 10 7
Arrears of farm of Great Branches, Ireland 14,254 15 5
Forfeitures for treason 71 11 0
Sir W. Doyly's debt 100 0 0
40,877 15 7 44,109 7 0
84,987 2 7
Arrears of taxes—
Second Poll (1666) 2 3 0
Last Poll 17 18 0 410 0 0
First part of First Disbanding Act 72 0 0 60 0 0
Second part of First Disbanding Act 140 0 0 200 0 0
Second Disbanding Act 0 9 3 434 10 9
Subsidy (1671) 133 6 8
Royal aid 200 0 0
Eleven Months' assessment 30 0 0
232 10 3 1,467 17 5
1,700 7 8
l. s. d. l. s. d.
Loans—
Remains 10,330 7 3
Receipts (linen and tobacco) 85,570 0 0
95,000 7 3

Expenditure.

l. s. d.
Navy 235,774 0
Ordnance 51,500 0 0
Forces 303,000 0 0
Tangier 5,000 0 0
Household 40,261 10 10
Treasurer of Chamber 19,624 5 9
Wardrobe 11,617 19 10½
Robes 1,250 0 0
Works 9,469 18 9
Stables 5,746 11
Foreign ministers 11,888 17 6
Fees and salaries paid in Exchequer 30,117 8
Arrears of late King's servants 55,536 19
Pensions and annuities paid at Exchequer 82,111 5
Band of Pensioners 1,500 0 0
Bounties in gross 4,279 10 0
Secret services (Guy, Fox, Aldworth, Sunderland, Middleton) 61,362 15
Management of Customs 33,383 5 8
Management of Excise (fn. 6)

Michaelmas, 1687, to Lady day, 1688.

l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Customs—
Remains 45,270 7 11¼
Receipts (arrears) 43,376 15
Receipts (current) 153,774 9 10¼
3,500 0 0
150 0 0
200,801 5 4
246,071 13
Wines—
Remains 26,871 2
Receipts (arrears) 13,688 7
Receipts (current) 68,247 19 10½
108,807 9
French linen—
Remains 15,433 4
Receipts (arrears) 9,452 3 11¼
Receipts (current) 13,101 10 0
Brandies— 26,445 12
64,432 10
Tabacco and sugar—
Remains 24,218 3 10¾
Receipts (arrears) 4,700 19 9
Receipts (current) 15,401 10
44, 320 14 1
Excise—
Remains 25,163 8 9
Receipts 316,551 11 3
161 12
341,876 12
Hearthmoney—
Remains 23,249 14
Receipts 108,284 8 7
131,534 3
Post Office—
Remains 10,786 9 4
Receipts 37,746 2 2
48,532 11 6
l. s. d.
First Fruits—
Remains 307 1
Receipts 1,000 0 0
Receipts (tallies) 2,000 0 0
Tenths—
Receipts 3,890 18 0
Receipts (tallies) 3,525 0 0
10,415 18 0
10,722 19
Remains. Receipts. Total.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Divers small branches—
Goods seized 334 10 9 3,019 19 11
Sale of woods 65 0 0 2,102 1 11
Archbishop of York's temporalities 1,106 13 11½ 1,000 0 0
Product of tin farthings 3,574 5
Proffers 4 16 554 8 7
per cent. Duty 3,100 0 0
King's Bench fines 900 0 0 7,261 12
Rent of lotteries 2,100 0 0 2,100 0 0
Duchy of Cornwall 3,000 0 0 3,100 0 0
Lands seized 157 13 9
Profits of alienations 300 0 0
Coinage duty 800 0 0 7,200 0 0
Coinage money (Doyly) 1,186 0 7
Rent of lighthouses 16 13 4
Rent of lands 17 16 8
Coal (4s. duty) 500 0 0
Wood farm 450 0 0
Wine licences 2,825 0 0
Lord Grey's estates 1,300 0 0
Fines of leases 43 13 0
Issues of jurors 6 3 4
Recusants' moneys 40 0 0
Compositions in Exchequer 15 17 8
Coal (1s. duty) 1 6 8
Lands seized (Earl of Macclesfield's) 138 5 6
Salt farm rent 8 0 0
King's revenue when Duke 900 0 0
Rent of Bombay 10 0 0
Rent of Hackney coaches 166 13 4
Fines of alienations [money] 350 0 0
Fines of alienations in tallies of pro 500 0 0
Profits of Hanaper 37 4 7
16,648 10 33,664 16
50,313 6 11¾
Remains. Receipts. Total.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Casual money—
Benevolence (redemption of captives) 1,958 12 4
East India Co. (present) 10,750 0 0
East India Co. (King's dividend) 645 0 0 750 0 0
Queen Dowager's portion 9,483 15 6
Col. Whitley 7,265 6 9
Paid in by the King's command 2,378 4 6
Irish revenue 8,559 2 6
Arrear of farm of great branches, Ireland 14,254 15 5
Forfeitures for treason 71 11 0
Hispaniola wreck 20,872 10 7
Sir W. Doyly's debt 104 7 9
Forfeitures for treason 1,298 4 2
Brought forward
King's share of forfeited ship Andalusia an interloper 3,161 0 2
Lord Ossulston 4,000 0 0
"Money paid for redemption of lands" 100 0 0
76,238 18 7 9,413 12 1
85,652 10 8
Remains. Receipts. Total.
l. s. d. l. s. d. l. s. d.
Arrears of taxes—
Poll 224 6 0 175 1 0
First part of First Disbanding Act 132 0 0
Second part of First Disbanding Act 340 0 0 100 0 0
Royal Aid 200 0 0 260 0 0
Eleven Months' tax 30 0 0
Subsidy (1671) 133 6 8
Additional Aid 140 0 0
1,059 12 8 1,734 13 8
2,794 6 4
l. s. d. l. s. d.
Loans—
Remains 39,873 1 5
(Linen and tobacco) 107,350 0 0
147,223 1 5

Expenditure.

l. s. d.
Navy 192,414 5
Ordnance 41,775 16 7
Forces 277,000 0 0
Tangier 16,200 0 0
Treasurer of Chamber 15,905 9 11
Wardrobe 9,157 12 0
Robes 1,250 0 0
Works 10,806 19 5
Stables 11,100 0 0
Foreign ministers paid at the Exchequer 16,200 5 5
Fees and salaries paid at the Exchequer 35,026 12 11½
Pensions and annuities paid at the Exchequer 81,646 5
Late King's servants 5,928 0
Band of Pensioners 4,500 0 0
Bounties in gross sums 18,962 0 0
Secret service 46,270 2 10¾
Management of Customs 25,188 15 10¼
Management of Excise 13,334 19 0
Management of Hearths 1,720 5 7
Management of Post Office 4,917 9 7
Privy Purse and Healing gold 13,000 0 0
Mint 7,775 0 0
Jewels and plate 8,733 18 2
l. s. d.
Loan repayments—
Principal and interest in part of 549,747l. 9s. 0¼d., as before 18,000 0 0
Ditto (current) 126,234 8
144,234 8
Contingencies (detailed) 36,979 6

Dapartmental Accounts.—(1) Customs Accounts.

1685, Sept 29, to 1686, Sept. 29.

GENERAL ACCOUNT

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears 68,927 3 8
Receipts (London, exports) 41,497 13 6
Ditto (London, grand receipt) 183,523 10 6
Ditto (London, wine and vinegar) 144,933 11 11
Ditto (London, Plantation goods) 153,324 16 4
Ditto (outports) 257,400 2
Ditto (Plantations) 2,893 12
Overpayments 4,808 14 11
857,261 15

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Charged in Cash Account 723,618 2 11¼
Collectors' overpayments 1,638 5
Outport (salaries) 19,160 13 9
Ditto (incidents) 14,040 14
Repayments of half subsidy etc 55,224 14 10¼
Repayments of damage 2,724 0 5
816,406 11

CASH ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears 17,563 9 8
Receipts (London, grand receipt) 220,590 7 10½
Ditto (London, wine & vinegar) 144,935 11 11
Ditto (London, Plantation goods) 143,920 19
Ditto (London, exports) 41,497 13 6
Ditto (outports) 161,624 7
Ditto (Plantations) 1,049 2
741,181 12

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Salaries (London) 21,542 16 7
Ditto (patent officers, London) 3,964 10 0
Ditto (patent officers, outports) 1,810 15 10
Pensions 8,300 12 9
Rent etc 2,247 2 4
Exchequer fees 1,190 0 2
Incidents 17,284 0
Repayments of damage, portage and half subsidy 67,316 8 2
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 596,787 15
720,444 2

NEW DUTIES ON WINE AND VINEGER.

(1685, June 24, to 1686, Sept. 29.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (first account) nil
Receipts (London) 133,961 12
Ditto (outports) 38,556 11
172,518 3

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Repayments of damage and overentries 1,422 7
Ready moneys paid into the Exchequer 151,988 8 8
Due on bonds 19,107 7
172,518 3 11¼

NEW DUTIES ON TOBACCO AND SUGARS.

(1685, June 24, to 1686, Sept. 29.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (first account) nil
Receipts (London) 125,943 18 11½
Ditto (outports) 71,540 11 5
197,484 10

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Repayments on re-exports 4,540 18 2
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 191,487 4
Due on bonds 1,456 8
197,484 10 5

NEW DUTIES ON SILKS, LINEN AND CALICO.

(1685, Aug. 1, to 1686, Sept. 29.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (first account) nil
Receipts (London) 95,787 10 10
Ditto (outports) 21,073 2
117,460 13

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 115,420 19 2
Repayments for re-exports and damaged goods etc 2,039 14
117,460 13

COINAGE DUTY.

(1685, Aug. 1, to 1686, Sept. 29.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (first account) nil
Receipts (London) 12,374 3 9
Ditto (outports) 4,380 2
Overpayments by collectors 82 0 3
16,836 6

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Money charged in cash account of coinage duty 14,168 1 8
Grants to officers for collecting 286 1 6
Depending on collectors. 2,381 13
16,836 6

COINAGE DUTY: CASH ACCOUNT.

(Date as above.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Receipts (London) 11,750 0 0
Ditto (outports) 2,418 1 8
14,168 1 8

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Repayments on re-export 7 2
Dottp on damaged goods 7 15 9
Allowance 472 5 4
Readu money paid into the Exchequer 13,590 2
14,077 5 7

NEW DUTIES ON WINE AND VINEGAR.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (bonds) 23,535 11 7
Receipts (London) 139,202 13 11
Ditto (outports) 41,556 17
204,295 2

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 0 0 31
Repayments for damaged goods etc 3,136 2 11
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 164,211 4 0
167,374 7

NEW DUTIES ON TOBACCO ANDSUGARS.

Charges.

l. s. d.
Arrears (bonds) 2,175 7 1
Receipts (London) 119,960 2 2
Ditto (outports) 46,131 1 3
168,266 10 6

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 15 1
Repayments for damaged goods and re-exports. 11,953 9 2
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 155,172 9 0
167,140 19

NEW DUTIES ON SILKS, LINEN AND CALICO.

Charge.

l.. s. d.
Arrears nil.
Receipts (London) 16,084 10 3
Ditto (outports) 21,556 8 3
37,640 18 6

Discharge.

1. s. d.
Surplus 0 0
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 37,640 18
37,640 18

1686, Sept. 29, to 1687, Sept. 29.

GENERAL ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Arrears 40,860 4 9
Receipts (London, exports) 46,570 10 7
Ditto (London, grand receipt) 224.601 10 9
Ditto (London. Plantation goods) 156,714 16 10½
Ditto (London, wine & vinegar) 159,022 19 0
Ditto (outports) 295,681 14 5
Ditto (Plantations) 2,368 8 8
Overpayments by collectors 3,197 14
929,013 19

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Money charged in Cash Account (below) 740,949 3 1
Discompted to collectors for overpayments 4,758 14 11
Outports (salaries) 18,890 2
Ditto (incidents) 13,632 8 8
Repayments of half subsidy etc 95,797 5 10¼
Allowance for damaged goods etc 5,175 13 9
Portage money allowed to merchants 753 8
Allowances by privy seal 3,678 10
883,635 7

CASH ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears 21,296 5 10½
Receipts (London, grand receipt) 224,825 9
Ditto (London, wine and vinegar) 152,969 1
Ditto (London, Plantation goods) 136,728 16 1
Ditto (London, exports) 46,570 10 7
Ditto (outports) 154,855 12
Ditto (Plantations) 933 6
740,949 3 1

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 558 15 5
Salaries (London) 21,097 14 10¾
Ditto (patent officers, London) 13,630 11 8
Ditto (patent officers, outports) 2,086 4 5
Pensions 7,785 19 9
Rent 4,572 1 4
Exchequer fees 1,305 1 8
Discount on bonds 27 17 10
Incidents 18,733 4
Repayments (half subsidy etc.) 98,584 12 5
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 572,990 15 10½
741,372 19 8

NEW DUTIES ON WINE AND VINEGAR.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Due on bonds 19,107 7
Receipts (London) 146,321 3 3
Ditto (outports) 46,166 10
211,595 1 5

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 0 0
Repayments for damaged goods 1,467 4
Discount of bonds 4 5 0
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 186,588 0
Due on bonds 23,535 11 7
211,595 1

NEW DUTIES ON TOBACCO AND SUGARS.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears nil.
Due on bonds 1,456 8
Receipts (London) 123,920 7 1
Ditto (outports) 57,888 8
183,265 3

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Payments on re-exports. 17,608 15 7
Discount of bonds 47 1 7
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 163,449 0
Due on bonds 2,175 7 1
183,280 4

NEW DUTIES ON SILKS, LINEN AND CALICO.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Receipts (London) 80,069 10 11½
Ditto (outports) 26,197 7 52
106,266 18

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 0 0
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 106,266 18
106,266 18

COINAGE DUTY.

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Arrears 2,381 13
Receipts (London) 14,216 4 6
Ditto (outports) 4,841 15 10¾
Overpayments by collectors 338 0 11
21,777 14 9

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Charged in Cash Account (as below) 20,272 6
Allowance to officers for collecting 332 17 8
Defalcations and overpayments 82 0 3
20,687 4

COINAGE DUTY-CASH ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears 90 16 1
Receipts (London) 13,812 11 11
Ditto (outports) 6,459 14
20,363 2

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Repayments on re-exports 153 11 11½
Repayments on damaged goods 9 0 10½
Officers' allowance 675 14 10
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 19,350 0 0
20,187 7 8

From 1687, Sept. 29, to 1688, Sept. 29.

GENERAL ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears 66,674 17 5
Receipts (London, exports) 41,529 2
Ditto (London, grand receipt) 173,196 19 10½
Ditto (London, Plantation goods) 142,093 9 9
Ditto (London, wine & vinegar) 151,016 2 8
Ditto (outports) 274,151 7
Ditto (remitted from Ireland by J. Price) 3,500 0 0
Ditto (Plantations) 2,732 6 4
Collectors' overpayments 9,403 10
864,297 17 3

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Charged in Cash Account (below) 654,720 9
Collectors' overpayments 3,198 14
Outport (salaries) 20,331 6
Ditto (incidents) 15,366 3 10¼
Repayments of half subsidy etc 86,416 0
Allowance for damaged goods etc 5,470 13 7
Portage 1,095 12
786,599 0 10

CASH ACCOUNT

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains 22,210 0 11
Receipts (London, grand receipt) 176,428 9 9
Ditto, (London, wine and vinegar) 146,962 3 9
Ditto (London, Plantation goods) 122,487 6 6
Ditto (London, exports). 41,529 2 94
Ditto (London, bonds) 22,133 5 7
Ditto (outports) 145,941 5
Ditto (Plantations) 669 14
Ditto (remitted from Ireland by J. Price, Receiver General) 3,500 0 0
681,861 9

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 423 16 7
Salaries (London) 15,026 8 5
Ditto (patent officers, London) 7,160 13 4
Ditto (patent officers, outports) 2,690 18 2
Pensions 8,008 5 0
Rent 2,845 7 1
Exchequer fees 1,171 1 0
Incidents 21,690 4 84
Allowance for damage, portage, debenture 84,748 0
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 510,769 13 0
654,534 7 10

COINAGE DUTY.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears 1,090 10
Receipts (London) 14,605 16
Ditto (outports) 4,370 8
Overpayments 216 7 6
20,277 2 7

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Charged in Cash Account (below) 17,746 0 5
Paid to officers for collecting (in the out-ports) 329 12 5
Repayments for damaged goods 17 5 9
Overpayments 338 0 11
18,413 13 9

COINAGE DUTY: CASH ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains 174 14
Receipts (London) 14,964 14 4
Ditto (outports) 2,781 6 1
17,920 14 11½

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Repayments for re-exports 183 16
Repayments for damaged goods 33 7
Allowances to officers [London port] 591 10 8
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 17,112 10 0
17,921 4 6

From 1688, Sept. 29, to 1689, Mar. 25.

GENERAL ACCOUNT

(Not extant).

CASH ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains 186 1
Bonds 27,141 0 6
Receipts (London, grand receipt) 57,916 14 11
Ditto (London, wine and vinegar) 53,814 15 0
Ditto (London, Plantagoods) 15,821 14 3

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Salaries (London) 9,349 1 1
Ditto (patent officers, London) 3,358 16 8
Ditto (patent officers, outports) 982 3 3
Pensions 3,408 0 0
Rent etc 1,677 6 6
Incidents (London port) 8,887 19 8
Ditto (Plantation bonds) 2,148 17 10
Ditto (London, exports) 15,226 3 0
Ditto (outports) 26,182 8
198,437 15
Allowances for damage etc 1,994 0 41/2
Ditto for portage 876 0 6
Ditto for half subsidy 28,099 9 10
Ditto for silk debentures 5,197 0 10
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 113,726 0
Interest on loan money 522 14 0
Bonds delivered to Successor Cashier 19,387 10 2
Ready money paid into the Exchequer to balance this account. 971 12
198,437 15

NEW DUTIES ON WINE AND VINEGAR.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Bonds (supers) 36.920 15 10
Receipts (London) 46,749 2
Ditto (outports) 5,247 11 11¼
88,917 10

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 0 0
Repayments for damaged goods 635 0 7
Ready money paid into the Receipt 83,537 14
84,172 15

NEW DUTIES ON TOBACCO AND SUGARS.

(No account extant.)

NEW DUTIES ON SILKS, LINENS ETC.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Receipts (London) 13,531 7 8
Ditto (outports) 6,447 2
19,978 9 11¾

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 0 0
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 19,978 10 0
19,978 10

COINAGE DUTY: GENERAL ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears nil.
Receipts (London) 5,969 0 11½
Ditto (outports) 2,146 0 1
8,115 1

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplusage 0 9
Repayments for goods re-exported 64 10 11½
Repayments for goods damaged 2 3 9
Payments to outports officers for collecting. 270 10 0
Ready money paid into the Receipt 7,700 0 0
8,037 14

COINAGE DUTY: CASH ACCOUNT.

(No account extant.)

(2) Excise Accounts.

1684. June 24, to 1685, June 24.

GENERAL ACCOUNT.

Charge

l. s. d.
Arrears 75,233 8 3
Receipts (counties) 425,016 19
Ditto (Wales and four Northern Counties) 50,833 17
Ditto (London) 182,617 14
751,248 10

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Salaries [country] 51,718 17 7
Ditto (country) 9,496 12
Ditto (Wales) 1,861 5 8
Ditto (London) 23,186 14 4
Paid for exported beer 890 5 5
Overcharged 13 1
Royal bounty 5 10 11
Coffee officers 229 14 0
Ready money received and accounted for separately [in Cash Account as below] 594,915 4 7
682,317 7

CASH ACCOUNT.

SeeIntroduction to Treasury Calendar, Vol. VII, p. xlviii.

From 1685, June 24 to 1686, June 24.

GENERAL ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains and supers depending 68,831 3
Whole produce of Excise 673,516 14 11¼
742,347 18

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Salaries (country) 52,895 1 8
Ditto (Wales and four Northern Counties) 10,143 18 4
Ditto (London) 21,813 1 10½
Ditto (imported liquors) 1,005 1 3
Overcharged 13 18 10¼
Defalcation for exported beer 607 9 8
Royal bounty 205 14
Ready money accounted for separately [in Cash Account as below] 614,006 15
700,691 1 0

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains 12,001 5
Arrears 65,573 19
Receipts (to account of previous years) 108,152 3 10¼
Current receipts (London, beer and ale) 129,946 15 1
Ditto (London, imported liquors) 23,445 4 11
Ditto (London, coffee & strong waters) 3,100 0 0
Ditto (Wales and four Northern Counties, beer and ale) 31,202 0 7
Ditto (ditto, imported liquors) 323 1
Ditto (rest of England, beer and ale) 311,311 18 11¾
Ditto (ditto, imported liquors) 5,022 9
674,408 17

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Salaries 18,946 0 0
Rent 250 0 0
Repairs and incidents 2,375 6 0
Queen Dowager 12,209 15 2
Prince and Princess of Denmark 27,000 0 0
Patentee, perpetual interest 1,152 6
Bankers' perpetual inter est 3,199 19 0
Ditto assignees' per petual interest 12,647 14
Tallies of assignation 13,441 0 0
Loan money repaid 41,500 0 0
Interest 825 15
Payments by special warrant 955 0 0
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 479,321 14
613,829 11 11½

From 1686, June 24, to 1687, June 24.

Charge.

l s. d.
Arrears 41,756 17
Receipts (counties) 467,787 0 6
Ditto (Wales and the four Northern Counties) 56,081 2
Ditto (London) 182,769 17
Ditto (imported liquors). 11,674 17 10
760,069 15 11½

Discharge.

Salaries (counties and Wales) 63,681 15
Ditto (London) 22,425 4 5
Ditto (imported liquors). 1,271 15
Overcharged 5 4
Allowance 141 0 0
Ready money accounted for separately [in Cash Account as below] 647,220 10
734,745 10

CASH ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l s. d.
Arrears 60,579 6 7
Receipts (to accounts of previous years) 106,746 16
Ditto (London, beer and ale) 130,027 6
Ditto (London, imported liquors) 30,429 9 9
Ditto (London, coffee and strong waters) 3,150 0 0
Ditto (Wales and four Northern Counties, beer and ale) 34,893 9 10
Ditto (ditto, imported liquors) 1,081 17
Ditto (rest of the country, beer and ale) 336,761 18
Ditto (ditto imported, liquors 6,065 9
Disallowed in previous account 805 5 0
709,541 17 11½

Discharge.

l s. d.
Salaries (London) 19,404 13 0
Rent 100 0 0
Repairs and incidents 1,089 10 0
Queen Dowager 12,209 15 2
Prince and Princess of Denmark 32,500 0 0
Patentees' perpetual in terest 529 8 1
Goldsmiths' or bankers' perpetual interest 4,678 15 2
Bankers' assignees' perpetual interest 8,491 16 9
Repayments of loan money 31,000 0 0
Interest 535 4
Yarmouth fishery 160 0 0
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 536,521 7 10
647,220 10

From 1687, June 24, to 1688, June 24.

GENERAL ACCOUNT

Charge.

l s. d.
Arrears 25.324 5
Receipts (counties and Wales) 526,563 6 10¾
Ditto (London) 195,289 14
Ditto (imported liquors) 10,610 16
Allowed for salaries of head office in last four years 89,250 7 1
Overallowed for brewers and victuallers in Lon don 48 5
847,086 15

Discharge.

l s. d.
Salaries (England and Wales) 64,490 8
Ditto (imported liquors). 205 17 11
Incidents 1,214 7 0
Allowances to brewers 303 15
Ready money Accounted for separately [in the Cash Account as below] 646,830 19
713,045 7 9

CASH ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l S. d.
Remains 7,943 8
Arrears 53,572 14 3
Receipts (proper to previous years' accounts) 108,938 19 7
Ditto (London, beer and ale) 131,891 11
Ditto (London, imported liquors) 38,047 7 1
Ditto (London, coffee & strong waters) 3,400 0 0
Ditto (Wales and the four Northern Counties, beer and ale) 34,393 10
Ditto (ditto, imported liquors) 648 3 11½
Ditto (rest of England, beer and ale) 329,590 7
Ditto (ditto, imported liquors) 5,620 3
Arrears depending 805 5 0
715,365 3

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Salaries 23,536 4 9
Rent 300 0 0
Repairs and incidents 3,415 14 8
Queen Dowager 12,209 15 2
Prince and Princess of Denmark 48,000 0 0
Patentees' perpetual interest 664 19 5
Goldsmiths' or bankers' perpetual interest 1,415 8
Bankers' assignees' perpetual interest 11,668 2 3
Yarmouth fishery 160 0
Loan money repaid 21,000 0 0
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 524,460 14 11½
646,830 19

From 1688, June 24, to 1689, June 24.

GENERAL ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains 134,041 7
Receipts (the Counties and Wales) 540,741 4 10
Ditto (London) 216,607 5 11¾
Ditto (imported liquors) 12,906 16
980,296 15

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Salaries (England and Wales) 66,287 0 8
Ditto (imported liquors) 280 11 1
Allowance for damage 1 9 4
Allowance to distillers 31 10
Separately accounted for in the Cash Account [as below] 669,107 14
737,043 0 3

CASH ACCOUNT.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains, supers and arrears 54,377 19 3
Receipts (proper to the account of preceding year 117,011 7
Ditto (London, beer and ale) 133,827 18 10¾
Ditto (London, imported liquors) 53,948 15 8
Ditto (London, coffee and strong waters) 2,850 0 0
Ditto (Wales and the four Northern Counties, beer and ale) 33,842 2
Ditto (ditto, imported liquors) 336 2 5
Ditto (rest of England, beer and ale) 323,614 18 0
Ditto (ditto, imported liquors) 5,350 14 2
739,316 1

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Salaries 20,127 16 5
Rent 100 0 0
Repairs and incidents 1,382 1 4
Commissioners' incidents 1,881 16 0
Queen Dowager 12,209 15 2
Prince and Princess of Denmark 30,000 0 0
Loan money repaid 80,000 0 0
Interest 605 9 5
Yarmouth fishery 160 0 0
Perpetual interest (bankers) 160 4 7
Perpetual interest to bankers' assignees 287 4 4
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 521,943 7
668,857 14

(3) Wine Licences Accounst. (fn. 7)

From 1685, Mar. 25, to to 1686, Mar. 25.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Supers depending 13,897 7 9
Surcharge 150 0 0
Receipts 12,779 17 5
26,827 5 2

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 782 7
Salaries 2,150 0 0
Interest 653 4 10¼
Reward 208 14 9
Principal repaid 4,000 0 0
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 5,650 0 0
13,444 6 10½

From 1686, Mar. 25, to 1687, Mar. 25.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Supers depending 14,009 5 1
Receipts (this year) 12,539 19 6
Ditto (proper to account of preceding year) 353 12 6
26,902 17 1

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 626 6
Salaries etc. 2,150 0 0
Interest, reward and principal repaid 4,363 15 4
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 5,650 0 0
12,790 2

From 1687, Mar. 25, to 1688, Mar. 25.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Supers depending 14,968 19 8
Receipts (this year) 12,442 14 11
Ditto (proper to account of preceding year) 110 10 0
27,522 4 7

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 856 4
Salaries 2,150 0 0
Interest, reward and principal repaid 5,513 15
Ready money paid into the Receipt 4,312 18 0
Money allowed in repayment of advance money formerly omitted 2,320 2
14,476 14 4

From 1688, Mar. 25, to 1689, Mar. 25.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Supers depending 15,748 5 2
Receipts (this year) 11,659 5 5
Ditto (arrears) 74 15 0
27,482 5 7

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 2,101 5
Salaries 2,150 0 0
Interest, reward and principal repaid 5,348 15
Ready money paid into the Exchequer 2,992 16 2
12,592 16

(4) Navy Accounts.

From 1685, Dec. 31, to 1687, Mar. 25.

(Visct. Falkland, Treasurer.)

Chabge.

l. s. d.
Remains 143,611 9
Supers depending 281,293 15 7
Money out of the Exchequer 521,128 0 2
Sale of old goods and provisions 904 19 8
Imprests made by former Treasurers and cleared by this Accomptant 5,356 15
Abatements on several persons' accompts detailed 1,368 2
Ditto on several persons' bills and wages 1,155 5 7
Stores sold 397 6 5
Overpaid to several persons 91 0 11
955,220 12

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Emptions & provisions 171,999 10
Salaries (Admiralty and Navy Office) 15,261 14 1
Travelling charges 635 2 6
Pilotage 709 12 0
Freight and transport of hired ships 3,470 12
Rewards, royal bounty etc 2,960 12 8
Interest on tradesmen's bills of store 426 5 5
Rent 1,261 16 10
Disbursements 14,103 3
Pensions 3,311 15 4
Half pay 666 4 6
Free gift (Barber Surgeons' Company for men on the Oxford) 48 10 0
Landcarriage 60 7 6
Bills of extraordinaries 318 16
Repairs and workmanship in the Yards 13,021 18
Volunteers' diet 8,381 13
Payments by assignments from the Commissioners appointed to examine and pass the old accompt:
(1) Wages, commanders 6,787 15 1
(2) Ditto, ships 79,823 19 1
(3) Scraping & tarring ships 401 6 0
Payments by assignments from the Navy Commissioners on the current services:
(1) Wages to ships 18,877 18 5
(2) Wages, dockyards 113,197 16 5
(Total, 455,721l. 9s. 8d.)
Ordinary allowances 29 3 4
Accomptant's salary 5,033 2 4
On the Victualling
Account:
Emptions and provisions 22,269 17 0
Freight 696 9 6
Disbursements by the Victualling Agents at the outports, for sea provisions 15,837 5
Ditto for bakehouse work etc. 1,631 13 0
Rent 259 0 0
Salaries (Victualling Commissioners and Office) 3,242 10 0
Repairs and incidents 1,124 15
(Total Victualling Account, 45,060l. 14s. 4d.)
505,844 9
Remains 449,376 2
Whereof supers 277,037 1 11½
Remains 172,339 0

From 1686, Dec. 31, to 1687, Dec. 31.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (remains) 172,339 0
Ditto (supers) 277,037 1 11½
Receipts (money out of the Exchequer) 428,188 5
lmprest bills cleared within the time of this accompt 4,282 10 9
Old goods and provisions sold 870 11 0
Rent of Lordship Fields at Chatham 37 10 0
Sale of provisions 413 19 11
883,168 19 10

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Emptions & provisions 133,399 8
Salaries (Admiralty and Navy Office) 18,743 14 6
Interest on tradesmen's bills of store 227 4 0
Travelling charges 751 15 7
Pilotage 437 2 9
Volunteers' diets 944 10 6
Transport 1,599 12 9
Stores for Tangier and Gibraltar in 1680 18,928 7 11
Rigging wages 113 16 5
Rewards and bounty 1,244 2 9
Half pay 586 6 9
Pensions 2,651 11 2
Rent 8,743 14 0
Wages (by assignments from the Commissioners for the old accompt) 22,059 1 5
Ditto (by assignments from the Navy Commissioners for the current year) 32,605 7 7
Dockyard wages 90,530 5 1
(Total, 333,561l. 1s. 7½d.)
Accomptant's salary 4,029 10 0
Ordinary allowances 23 6 8
The accompt of the Victualling:
Emptions and provisions 28,554 7
Freight 884 1 9
Disbursed by the Victualling Agents in the outports for provisions 8,125 3 6
Bakehouse, brewhouse etc. 2,107 18 5
Rent 208 0 0
Salaries (Victualling Commissioners and Office) 3,220 0 0
Repairs and incidents 2,880 6 0
(Total of theVictualling 45,979l. 10s. 8¾d.)
383,593 15
Remains 499,575 4
Whereof supers 274,065 17
Remains 225,509 7

From 1688, Mar. 25, to 1G89, April 4.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears: Remains 225,509 7
Ditto, supers depending 274,065 17
Money received out of the Exchequer 470,033 9 6
Ditto received towards the thirty ships' account 1,014 7
Money received in imprest bills paid by former Treasurers and cleared within the time of this accompt 4,926 12 2
Old goods and provisions sold 13,003 18
Rent of the Lordship Fields at Chatham 7 10 0
On accompt of the Victualling:
Money received by this Accomptant's Agent Mr. Sturt for the service of the Victualling 1,310 7 5
Overpayments 12 4 8

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Emptions and provisions 99,111 10 10
Salaries (Admiralty and Navy Office) 11,680 10 10
Pensions to several officers of ships and others 3,637 4 1
Rewards for extraordinary services 637 3 6
Disbursements of various natures 10,291 13
Travelling charges 768 3 6
Volunteers1 diet charges 317 16 0
Pilotage 2,528 13 6
Free gifts and medicines 477 6 5
Rebuilding and [contract] price of ships and lighters 10,894 1 10
Hire and freight for transport 3,973 2 7
House rent 1,357 2 3
Wages and entertainment of officers and seamen 94,507 6 1
Wages etc. in the dockyards and ropeyards 47,614 7 6
Short allowance money 3,584 9 1
Bounty to widows and orphans of seamen slain in the service 55 0 0
Imprests cleared by succeeding Treasurers 46,205 4 0
(Total, 343,600l. 11s. 6¾d.)
Payments pursuant to assignments by the Commissioners for the old account, viz. between 1687–8, Jan. 1, and 1689, Mar. 31.
Emptions and provisions 8,020 4 9
Interest to tradesmen 478 8 11
Salaries (Admiralty & Navy Office) 2,362 15 7
Pensions to officers of ships and others 2,265 10 3
Rewards 557 12 5
Disbursements of various natures 7,519 8 4
Half pay 1,653 5 0
Hire and freight 167 0 0
Wages in rigging time 133 17 10
Travelling charges 684 18 6
Volunteers' victuals 3,245 0
Pilotage 25 7 0
Necessary money 130 18 6
Wages of officers and men 20,517 10 0
Dockyard and ropeyard wages 6,858 4 8
Payments on lists of arrears to yards 1,725 18 10
Imprests cleared by succeeding Treasurers 24,390 13
Imprests cleared by a, certificate from the Navy Board 12,796 1
(Total, 93,532l. 16s. 2½d.)
Payments on the account for the thirty ships:
Emptions and provisions 13,796 0
Interest 540 4 7
Carriage 64 19 9
Salary (storekeeper at Harwich Yard) 90 2 0
Gratuities 100 0 0
Disbursements 74 19 3
Freight and transport 33 12 3
Travelling charges 33 13 10
Wages in the Yards and ropeyards 17,872 7 10
(Total, 32,605l. 19s. 10½d.)
Payments on the account for the war with the French King:
Emptions and provisions 132 5 7
Interest to tradesmen 3,373 10 6
Disbursements 262 11 6
Transport 1,815 9 8
Travelling charges 60 18 6
Victualling charges (pursers') 58 0 0
(Total, 5,702l. 15s. 9d.)
Victualling accompt:
Emptions and provisions 80,798 10
Hire and freight 2,171 10 1
Balances of (various Captains') victualling account 702 19
Money disbursed by the agents in the outports and others for sea provisions 28,900 7
Sundry repairs and incidents 2,063 14 10¾
Rent 513 0 0
Salaries (Victualling Commissioners and Office) 4,345 0 0
Coopers' and labourers' work 4,392 10
(Total, 123,887l. 12s. 9¼d.)
Accomptant's salary 3,989 2
Ordinary allowances 30 0 0
Imprests vacated and cleared by succeeding Treasurers 208,059 19 10
Sundry allowances for services and payments 9,815 6
Imprest bills paid by this Accomptant for the Victualling and charged on the Earl of Orford
989,883 14
the succeeding Treasurer of the Navy 7,864 2
Money paid over by this Accomptant to the Earl of Orford, his successor 1,600 0 0
822,824 4 11¾
Remains 167,059 9
Whereof supers dependent 139,447 19
Leaving; this Accomptant finally indebted 27,611 10 5

(5) Army Accounts.

From 1 Jan., 1684-5, to 31 Dec, 1685

(Charles Fox, Paymaster-General).

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Money out of the Exchequer 498,021 5 1
Deduction of I2d. per £ out of Army pay 7,972 17
Deduction for bread delivered to the Forces on Hounslow Heath 486 5 8
Money remitted out of Ireland 17,500 0 0

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 10,518 0
General officers 2,894 0 11
King's Own Troop of [Horse] Guards under the Duke of Albemarle 21,397 12 8
Second Troop of the King's Horse Guards (under successively Sir Philip Howard and the Duke of Northumberland, consisting of officers, 200 gentlemen Troopers and 1 Troop of Grenadiers) 20,669 2 8
Third Troop of the King's Horse Guards (under successively the Earl of Feversham and John Lord Churchill; composed ut supra) 20,639 2 8
Royal Regiment of Horse Guards (Earl of Oxford) 26,447 12 8
First Regiment of Foot Guards (Duke of Grafton) 35,067 4 0
Coldstream Regiment of Foot Guards (Earl of Craven) 18,009 17 8
Scotch Regiment [of Foot] 24,454 14 8
Queen Dowager's Regiment of Foot Guards (under Col. Piercy Kirke) 11,826 8 0
Prince of Denmark's Regiment [formerly Duke of York's] under Sir Charles Littleton 14,136 2 6
Holland Regiment, with one Company of Grenadiers 13,003 10 6
Queen Consort's [formerly the Duchess of York's] Regiment of Foot Guards 11,739 17 4
King's Regiment of Dragoons (under successively Lord Churchill and Visct, Cornbury) 14,408 6 8
Col. Strother's Troop of Dragoons 725 9 2
(Total for the Guards and Land Forces, 235,419l. 2s. 1d.)
Garrisons:
Berwick 1,197 12 8
Carlisle 1,116 5 4
Chepstow 278 0 0
Chester (officers, 50 soldiers and 3 gunners; establishment dated 1685, July 1). 581 2 0
Calshot Castle 154 14 0
Cinque Ports 1,254 16 0
Dartmouth (1 master gunner & 1 gunner) 54 12 0
Guernsey 1,870 9 4
Gravesend and Tilbury 1,798 15 4
Hull 2,339 2 4
Holy Island 109 4 0
Hurst Castle 154 13 6
Jersey 1,243 13 4
Sir John Lanier's allowance 300 0 0
St. Mawes 54 12 0
Pendennis 838 16 5
Plymouth 2,325 16 0
Portsmouth 5,957 15 1
Scilly 1,240 12 4
Scarborough 91 0 0
Teignmouth and Clifford's Fort 1,613 18 8
Tower of London 1,782 11 2
Upnor, Gillingham and Calshot Wood 882 14 0
Windsor 963 10 0
Isle of Wight 2,306 9 0
York and Clifford's Tower (the Governor, a Company of Foot and a storekeeper) 1,572 7 9
Yarmouth 109 4 0
Gunners in St. James's Park 136 10 0
Lord Colepeper's pension 598 7 6
(Total for the garrisons, 32,927l. 19s. 9d.)
Army raised in 1685:
General officers 4,597 18 0
Recruits (10 men per Troop) added to the Earl of Oxford's 5 Troops of the Royal Regiment of Horse). 387 10 8
Ditto to the Duke of Grafton's 1st Regiment of Foot Guards 5,702 12 0
Ditto to the Coldstream Regiment 2,813 9 4
Ditto to Major Robert Douglas's RoyalRegiment of Foot (disbanded) 1,112 10 0
Ditto to Col. C. Trelawney's Queen [Consort's] Regiment of Foot 666 1 8
Ditto to Col. P. Kirke's Queen Dowager's Regiment of Foot 518 5 4
Ditto to Sir C Littleton's Prince George of Denmark's Regiment of Foot 713 2 8
Ditto to the Earl of Mulgrave's Holland Regiment of Foot. 758 15 10
Ditto to Lord Churchill's Royal Regiment of Dragoons 118 19 0
Ditto to Col. W. Strother's Troop of Dragoons 317 18 10
I Ditto to Independent Companies under the Earl of PlyI mouth, Sir ChrisI topher Musgrave, I Col. Sackville Tufton, Sir J. Reresby, Capt. Thos. Cheeke, Capt. Peter Shakerley, George Lord j Dartmouth, Earl of Bath, Earl of Gainsborough, Capt. Rich. Carter, Capt. Cornwallis 614 19 2
Ditto to ditto under Capt. Hy. Villiers, Capt. Charles Potts, Capt. Francis Godolphin, Sir Robt. Holmes 230 6 10
Ditto to ditto under Capt. Robert Myners 205 12 0
Sir J. Reresby for the officers of the Independent Company of Grenadiers under him 32 0 6
Christopher Lord Hatton, for recruits of an Independent Company of Foot under him" to Sept. 1 53 18 8
(Total pay for recruits, 14.062l. 1s. 10d.)
New raised Regiments and Troops of Horse:
Queen's Regiment of Horse under Sir J. Lanier (9 Troops) 14,414 0 10
Earl of Peterborough's Regiment of Horse. 8,243 11 10
Earl of Plymouth's ditto 9,218 1 10
Henry Lord Dover's ditto 9,352 0 6
Earl of Thanet's (afterwards Col. Robert Werden's) ditto 9,112 19 7
James Earl of Arran's ditto 8,767 1 0
Charles, Earl of Shrewsbury's ditto 9,101 16 8
Robert, Earl of Scarsdale's ditto 9,144 6 4
Visct. Lumley's ditto 9,336 5 8
Troop of Horse under Capt. David Lloyd 1,734 0 8
Ditto under Marquess of Worcester (to Oct. 31) 1,052 14 2
(Total for new raised Regiments etc. of Horse.89,476l. 19s. 2d.)
New raised Regiments of Dragoons:
Five Troops of Dragoons added to the Royal Regiment of Dragoons late under Lord Churchill (to Sept. 1) 2,199 10 6
Two Troops of Dragoons to same Regiment under Visct. Combury from Sept, 1 under Wm. Cul liford and Wm. Strother 1,452 0 0
Two Troops of the Queen Consort's Regiment of DraI goons under the Duke of Somerset 5,211 14 10
Princess Ann of Denmark's Regiment of Dragoons under Col. John Berkeley (six Troops complete) 6,099 10 4
Two Troops unmounted and four Troops mounted of the Regiment of Dragoons under Col. Rich. Hamilton (to Oct. 31) 3,981 7 2
(Total for the Dragoons, 18,944l. 2s. 10d.)
Royal Regiment of Fusil leers under George,
Lord Dartmouth (to Dec. 25) 7,675 0 1
New Raised Regiments and Companies of Foot:
Princess Ann of Denmark's Regiment of Foot under Robt., Lord Ferrers 5,931 6 2
Regiment of Foot under Col. Henry Cornwall 5,852 18 4
Ditto under Earl of Bath 5,431 12 10
Ditto under Duke of Beaufort and Marq. of Worcester successively 5,452 19 6
Ditto under Earl of Huntingdon 5,389 17 2
Ditto under Duke of Norfolk 5,525 19 10
Ditto under Sir Ed. Hales 5,653 5 6
Ditto under Sir William Clifton 5,547 17 6
Major-General Hugh Mackay, Commander in Chief of three Scotch Regiments of Foot that lately came from Holland (pay from June 5 to Aug. 3) 5,582 2 8
Sir Hy. Belasyse, Commander in Chief of three English Regiments of Foot that lately came from Holland (pay from June 30 to July 31) 2,938 8 0
Company of Foot under Richard, Lord Arundell of Trerice 448 6 0
Ditto under Sir Tho. Huggerston 468 1 0
(Total pay of new raised Foot, 54,222l. 14s. 6d.)
Horse, Foot and Dragoons raised and disbanded within the time of this account:
Eleven Troops of Horse and one Troop of Dragoons 3,338 18 0
Two Troops under Capt. Baldwin Leighton & Capt. John O'Neile. 326 5 0
"Several" Independent Companies of Foot 1,629 7 10
(Total, 5,394l. l0s. 0d.)
(Total pay of established Forces and of
521,380 8
Forces raised this year, 194,383l. 7s. 3d.)
Contingencies.
Pensions and allowances 2,345 1
Pay of several officers and others 2,401 19 11½
Special services and royal bounty 1,478 13 0
Fire and candle 1,067 0 4
Medicaments 306 7 10
Sundries 3,574 7 4
Standards and colours 578 0 0
Trumpets' liveries 1,058 12 5
Smart money 235 5 0
Annual allowances 1,450 16 8
Reformed and disabled soldiers 3,108 12 9
Loss of horses and accoutrement 2,455 2 6
Payments ordered by Charles II and hire allowed 29,445 8 4
Advanced by Accomptant to the Duke of Norfolk for levy money of the Earl of Thanet's Regiment 334 14 7
Reformed officers and others under the warrant of 1686–7, Jan. 1 1,386 1 4
Sundries 905 16 0
Stationery 316 13 5
Money lost in the hands of Thos. Price [by his failure], being for quarters in the Western Counties 4,203 17 0
(Total of Contingencies, 54,307l. 8s. 5½d.)
Deduction of a day's pay per an. for the years 1684 and 1685 for Chelsea Hospital (777l. 6s. 10d. and 1,575l. 12s. 3d.) 2,352 19 1
Accomptant's salary 364 0 0
532,615 18 3

From 1685–6, Jan. 1, 1686, June 30

(Earl of Ranelagh. Paymaster General).

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears nil
Money out of the Exchequer 242,400 13 4
Money remitted out of Ireland 15,000 0 0

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Principal officers 7,479 3
First Troop of Guards and Grenadiers (Earl of Feversham) 10,739 6 8
Second ditto 10,458 15 6
Deduction of 12d. per £. 5,155 4 8
Third ditto 10,458 15 8
Royal Regiment of Horse Guards (Earl of Oxford nine Troops) 14,943 1 2
Queen Consort's Regiment of Horse (nine Troops) 13,038 0
Regiment of Horse (six Troops) 8,875 0 8
Ditto under Earl of Plymouth 8,875 0 8
Ditto under Major-Gen. Robert Werden 8,847 11 8
Ditto under James, Earl of Arran 8,875 0 8
Ditto under Charles, Earl of Shrewsbury 8,875 0 8
Ditto, Princess Ann of Denmark's Regiment 8,875 0 8
Ditto, Queen Dowager's 8,875 0 8
Ditto under Lord Dover 8,404 0 8
First Regiment of Foot-Guards under Duke of Grafton (24 Companies, 1,920 soldiers) 21,983 14 8
Coldstream Regiment under Earl of Craven (12 Companies, 960 soldiers) 11,154 12 0
Royal Regiment of Foot Guards under Earl of Dumbarton (20 Companies, 1,000 soldiers and one Company of Grenadiers) 10,292 11 4
Queen Dowager's Regiment of Foot (10 Companies, 500 soldiers and one Company of Grenadiers) 5,948 17 4
Prince George of Denmark's Regiment of Foot (12 Companies, 600 soldiers) 6,950 8 0
Holland Regiment of Foot (same) 6,950 8 0
Queen Consort's Regiment of Foot (same) 5,948 17 4
Princess Ann of Denmark's Regiment of Foot (10 Companies, 500 soldiers) 5,416 8 6
Marquess of Worcester's Regiment of Foot (same) 5,416 8 6
Duke of Norfolk's same 5,416 8 6
Sir Edward's Hales's same 5,416 8 6
Earl of Huntingdon's same 5,416 8 6
Col. Cornewall's same 5,407 5 11
Late Sir William Clifton's, now Col William Herbert's same 5,408 0 6
Earl of Bath's same 5,585 3 9
Royal Regiment of Fusiliers under Lord
Dartmouth (11 Companies 550 soldiers) 7,388 3 10
Royal Regiment of Dragoons under Visct. Cornbury (8 Troops, 400 soldiers) 9,273 0 8
Queen's Regiment of Dragoons (6 Troops, 300 soldiers) 7,119 6 8
Princess Ann of Denmark's Regiment of Dragoons under Col. John Berkeley (same) 7,119 6 8
Sixteen non-regimented Companies of Grenadiers, 13 thereof of 50 privates each and three thereof under Lord Arundell of Trerice, Sir J. Reresby and Capt, Rob. Holmes 7,802 15 6
(Total pay for the Guards and Land Forces, 288,033l. 13s. 11¾d.)
Garrisons:
Berwick 482 6
Carlisle 161 19 0
Chepstow 18 2 0
Chester 126 14 0
Calshot 67 17 6
Gravesend and Tilbury 542 8
Hull 500 4
Hurst Castle 67 17 6
Jersey 90 10 0
Landguard Fort 90 10 0
Guernsey 72 8 0
Holy Island 27 3 0
St. Mawes 27 3 0
Pendennis 303 18 7
Plymouth and St. Nicholas Island 595 4
Portsmouth 767 3
Sheerness 447 19 6
Scilly 90 10 0
Scarborough 53 3
Tynemouth Castle and Clifford's Fort 289 12 0
Tower of London 173 9 2
Windsor 181 0 0
Isle of Wight 632 11
Upnor, Gillingham and Cockham Wood 199 2 0
YorkandClifford Tower 247 18
North Yarmouth 54 6 0
Gunners in St. James's Park 67 17 6
Lord Colepeper's compensation 297 10
Cinque Ports 692 2
Sundry reformed officers and soldiers 817 12 9
Rent of rooms in the Savoy 30 0 0
J. Mawgridge, drummajor-general 15 0 0
(Total of garrisons, 8.241l. 4s. 6½d.)
262,555 18 0
Contingencies:
Fourth Troop of Guards under Lord Dover (192 privates and one Company of Grenadiers of eight officers and eight privates) 1,475 10 0
King's bounty and rewards 3,096 0 0
Labour of soldiers in Hyde Park 116 11 6
Clothes for disbanded recruits 2,959 11 10
Fire and candle 988 0 3
Particular services 1,776 0
Seven Companies of Scots Guards under Col. James Douglas, in England 1686, May 1 to June 29 1,521 6 4
Extra officers mustered in the Earl of Dumbarton's Royal Regiment of Foot more than were mustered in the Battalion of Scots Guards in England 1686, May 1, to June 30 423 19 0
Pensions 450 9 3
Reformed officers and disabled soldiers 953 17 0
(Total of contingencies, 13,761l. 5s. 6½d
310,036 4

From 1686, July 1, to Dec. 31

(Earl of Ranelagh, Paymaster General).

Charge.

l. s. d
Arrears nil.
Money out of the Exchequer 346,385 6 2
Money remitted out of Ireland 15,000 0 0
One third of the deduction of 12d. in the£ 5,090 14 10
Deductions for provisions [furnished for the encampment] 9,226 10 8

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplusage 47,480 6
General officers 7,602 17 10
First Troop of Horse Guards and Grenadiers (Earl of Feversham) 10,521 14 8
Second ditto 10,236 10 8
Third ditto 10,236 10 8
Fourth ditto (Lord Dover) 10,236 10 8
Royal Regiment of Horse Guards (Earl of Oxford) 15,190 14 8
Queen Consort's Regiment of Horse 13,254 2 8
Earl of Peterborough's ditto 9,022 2 8
Earl of Plymouth's ditto 9,022 2 8
Major.-Gen. Werden's ditto 9,022 2 8
Earl of Arran's ditto 9,022 2 8
Earl of Shrewsbury's ditto 9,022 2 8
Princess Ann of Denmark's ditto 9,022 2 8
Queen Dowager's ditto 9,022 2 8
First Regiment of Foot Guards 22,360 12 0
Coldstream ditto 11,339 9 8
Royal Regiment of Foot [? erratum for 10,620l. 9s. 4d.] 6,620 9 4
Queen Dowager's Regiment of Foot 6,010 14 4
Prince George of Denmark's ditto 7,007 0 0
Holland ditto 7,007 0 0
Queen Consort's ditto 5,991 10 8
Princess Ann of Denmark's ditto 5,450 4 0
Col. Hy. Cornwall's ditto 5,451 17 4
Marquess of Worcester's ditto 5,456 2 8
Earl of Lichfield's ditto 5,428 4 0
Earl of Huntingdon's ditto 5,458 4 0
Earl of Bath's ditto 5,948 0 0
Sir Edward Hales's ditto 5,451 4 8
Col. Herbert's ditto 5,449 8&8
Royal Regiment of Fusiliers 7,748 4 10
Royal Regiment of Dragoons (Visct. Cornbury) 9,314 3 8
Queen's ditto (Duke of Somerset) 7,237 6 8
Princess Anne of Denmark's ditto 7,237 6 8
Several Independent Companies of Grenadiers:
Sir Tho. Huggerston (July 1 to Aug. 31) 170 5 4
Capt. Peter Shakerly, Sir Robert Holmes and Capt. Edw. Villiers (1 July to Oct. 31) 1,010 0 0
Earl of Gainsbro, Capt. Carter, Capt. Godolphin (same period) 1,010 14 0
Christopher, Lord Hatton, and Thomas, Lord Jermin (same period) 673 13 4
Sir Christopher Musgrave (same period) 336 14 8
Capt. Sackville Tufton (same period) 336 19 4
Earl of Plymouth (same period) 337 0 0
Capt. Robt. Minors (same period) 287 14 0
Capt. Tho. Cheeke (same period) 395 6 9
Sir Jo. Reresby (same period) 358 3 2
Fourteen of the said Companies upon the
375,702 12 8
muster commencing Nov. 1 and ending Dec. 31 2,320 10 10
(Total pay of the Guards and Land Forces, 289,638l. 5s. 9d.)
Garrisons:
List in substance, ut supra, p. lxxii, (but including two Companies of Foot in New England) 9,247 19
Contingencies:
Medicaments 1,566 2 2
Fire and candle 2,155 3 6
Carts and carriages 306 15 10
Ferrymen 46 14 0
Sundry allowances 457 2 0
Stationery 223 10 4
Clothes for recruits and hauboyes 1,995 7 8
King's bounty and reward 2,454 12
Sundries 2,971 10 0
Pay of several Scotch officers with several Companies of Scotch Guards:
Twelve Companies of the Earl of Dunbarton's Regiment upon the muster July 1 to Aug. 30 and 52 officers etc. in the Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Foot in Scotland more than were mustered in the Battalion of the Scotch Guards now in England 1,978 10 8
Ditto upon the muster Sept. 1 to Oct. 31 1,945 5 4
Ditto upon the muster Nov. 1 to Dec. 31 1,951 12 0
(Total, 5,875l. 8s. 0d.)
J. Shales, Commissary of Provisions 15,002 5 10
379,421 2 10¾

From 1686–7, Jan. 1, to 1687, Dec. 31

(Earl of Ranelagh).

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears nil.
Money out of the Exchequer 589,038 13 0
Money remitted out of Ireland 30,000 0 0

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplusage 3,718 10
General officers 16,487 4 2
First Troop of Horse Guards (Earl of Feversham) 20,859 14 4
One third of the deduction of 12d. per £ 10,243 17 8
Second ditto (Duke of Northumberland) 20,293 19 4
Third ditto (Lord Churchill) 20,220 15 4
Fourth ditto (Lord Dover) 20,293 19 4
Royal Regiment of Horse (Earl of Oxford) 30,130 0 10
Queen Consort's ditto 26,292 3 4
Earl of Peterborough's ditto 17,809 8 10
Ditto under Earl of Plymouth and afterwards under Sir John Fenwick 17,878 8 4
Major-General Werden's ditto 17,893 5 10
Earl of Arran's ditto 17,897 3 4
Col. Rich. Hamilton's ditto 17,873 18 4
Princess Anne of Denmark's ditto 17,893 8 4
Queen Dowager's ditto 17,862 3 2
First Regiment of Foot Guards 44,487 18 0
Second ditto (Coldstream) 22,587 18 2
Royal Regiment of Foot 13,106 10 10
Queen Dowager's Regi ment of Foot 12,863 10 0
Prince George of Denmark's ditto 13,841 14 0
Holland ditto (Sir T. Oglethorpe) 13,860 17 0
Queen Consort's ditto (Col. C. Trelawney) 12,883 8 6
Royal Regiment of Fusiliers (Lord Dartmouth) 16,528 17 4
Princess Anne of Denmark's Regiment of Foot 10,796 1 7
Col. Cornwall's ditto 10,616 10 5
Earl of Bath's ditto 11,796 11 10
Marquess of Worcester's ditto 11,303 17 10
Earl of Lichfield's ditto 11,283 19 2
Earl of Huntingdon's ditto 11,296 3 10
Sir Edw. Hales's ditto 10,977 18 8
Ditto under Col. Arthur Herbert and afterwards under Col. Sackville Tufton 11,381 16 6
Royal Regiment of Dragoons 18,687 3 4
Queen's ditto 14,356 13 4
Princess Anne of Denmark's ditto 14,364 6 10
Independent Companies.
Peter Shackerley (Grenadiers) 828 4 0
Col. Sackville Tufton (ditto) 412 14 8
Capt. Hy. Villiers (ditto) 1,002 15 5
Thos. Lord Jermin (ditto) 494 14 8
629,282 10 8
Christopher Lord Hatton (ditto) 490 4 8
Four under Earl of Plymouth, Earl of Gainsborough, Capt. Francis Godolphin, Capt. Rich. Carter (ditto) 1,978 18 8
Capt. Thos. Cheeke (ditto) 328 0 0
Sir Christopher Musgrave (ditto) 494 14 8
Sir Robt. Holmes (ditto) 1,002 15 5
Sir J. Reresby (ditto) 1,061 10 10
Capt. Robt. Minors (Foot) 851 13 4
(Total pay of Guards and Land Forces, 575,644l. 16s. 4d.)
Garrisons:
Items in substance, ut supra, p. lxxii 17,544 6
Contingencies:
Items on the lines of those supra, pp. lxx, xxiii 28,389 3
625,296 16 11¾

From 1687–8, Jan. 1, to 1689, April 30 (Earl of Ranelagh).

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains 3,985 13
Money out of the Exchequer 1,165,432 15 3
Money remitted from Ireland 20,000 0 0
Voluntary charge.
(1) Received out of the Treasury in Scotland in part of 2.190l. 2s. 0d. directed by the late King to be paid to this Accomptant 930 0 0
(2) Received of Mr. Walmesley of Lancashire by way of benevolence to the late King 2,000 0 0
(3) Received of Thos. Osborne, collector of Excise of Bristol 1,302 0 0
(4) Received of George Newton, ditto in co. Monmouth 650 0 0
(5) Received of Richard Tooth, ditto in co. Gloucester 454 0 0
(6) Received of the collector of Excise at Salisbury 400 0 0

Discharge.

l. s. d.
General officers 22,228 3 8
First Troop of Guards and Grenadiers (Earl of Feversham) 26,745 8 4
Second ditto (Duke of Northumberland) 27,203 2 0
Third ditto (Earl of Marlborough) 27,169 0 0
Fourth ditto (Henry, Lord Dover 20,577 2 2
Royal Regiment of Horse (Earl of Oxford . Col. J. Graham some time between Feb. and Dec.) 39,886 0 9
Queen Consort's Regiment of Horse 37,361 17 6
Earl of Peterborough's ditto 25,065 17 6
Ditto under Sir John Fen wick and then Lord Colchester 25,331 15 0
Ditto under Earl of Arran and then Col. Godfry 25,371 8 0
Ditto under Maj.-Gen. Werden 19,388 1 0
Ditto under Col. Hamilton and then Col. Coy 25,248 19 0
Princess Anne of Denmark's ditto 25,388 1 11
Queen Dowager's ditto 25,269 5 6
(7) Received of Anthony Row towards the pay of Regiments detailed 3,837 6 8
(8) Money received as deduction from John Clancy, agent to Col. Mac Elliyott's Regiment 100 0 0
Marquis de Miremont's ditto (6 Troops, 300 Troopers) 5,246 11 8
Charles, Lord Brandon's ditto (same; disbanded 1688–9, Jan. 4) 4,891 3 0
James, Earl of Salisbury's ditto (same; disbanded 1688–9, Jan. 7)
Col. Hy. Slingesby's ditto (same; disbanded same) 3,377 6 2
Col. George Holman's ditto (same; disbanded same) 2,314 12 0
Henry, Lord Delamere's ditto 6,784 0 0
William, Lord Cavendish's ditto 6,784 0 0
Sir Thomas Barton's Troop of Horse (disbanded 1688–9, Jan. 4) 477 19 0
First Regiment of Foot Guards (Duke of Grafton and then Hy., Visct. Sidney) 57,740 9 2
Second ditto Coldstream (Earl of Craven with four additional Companies) 34,035 4 6
Royal Regiment of Foot (Earl of Dumbarton and then Duke of Schomberg: with four new Companies and one Company of Grenadiers) 33,149 4 4
Queen Dowager's Regiment of Foot (with two Companies of Grenadiers added and 10 men to each Company 19,950 16 2
Prince of Denmark's Regiment of Foot (with 10 men added to each Company) 18,132 1 6
Holland Regiment of i Foot (additions as above) 19,872 5 4
Queen Consort's Regiment of Foot (two Companies of Grenadiers added and 10 men to each Company) 19,838 18 7
Royal Regiment of Fusiliers (10 men added to each Company) 23,158 12 2
Princess Ann of Denmark's Regiment of Foot (with one additional Company and several recruits) 16,503 6 8
Col. John Cornwall's Regiment of Foot (with 10 men added to each Company) 18,274 5 0
Earl of Bath's Regiment of Foot (with two additional Companies and 12 added to each Company) 18,271 3 4
Regiment of Foot under the Earl of Montgomery and then Sir John Hanmore (with the like additions) 18,081 13 6
Ditto under Earl of Lichfield and then Col. Hy. Wharton (with like additions) 18,239 3 10
Ditto under Earl of Huntingdon and then Col. Ferdinand Hast ings (with like additions) 18,472 8 6
Ditto under Sir Edw. Hales and then Col. William Beveridge (with like additions) 17,377 1 2
Ditto under Col. Sackville Tufton and then Sir James Leslie (with like additions) 18,322 13 4
Ditto under Col. John Hales (with like additions) 16,464 15 6
Ditto under Col. Roger Mac Elligott (raised 1688, May ; disbanded 1688–9, Jan. 8) 9,390 8 2
Ditto under Col. Solomon Richards (raised in Oct., 1688) 8,578 13 8
Ditto under Col. Bevill Skelton: ut supra 8,719 15 10
Ditto under Sir John Guise (raised in Jan. [1688–9]) 4,638 14 2
Ditto under Earl of Monmouth (same) 4,741 17 6
Ditto under Col. Francis Russell (same) 4,641 15 6
Ditto under Sir David Colyear: from 1688, Nov 8,063 11 4
Ditto under Earl of Leven 4,648 17 10
Ditto under Henry, Duke of Newcastle (raised Oct., 1688 ; disbanded Dec.) 2,656 15 2
Ditto under Col. Hy. Gage (same) 1,844 12 2
Ditto under Col. John Carne: 1688, Nov., to 1688–9, Jan. 7 1,278 11 2
Ditto under Col. Robert Hodges (raised Oct., 1688) 8,691 18 2
Ditto under Col. Gustavus Hamilton, lately Sir Rob. Peyton (six Companies, 300 soldiers): from 1688, Nov. 3,161 18 0
Royal Regiment of Dragoons (with 10 additional to each Troop). 26,073 12 0
Queen Consort's ditto (same) 19,943 16 6
Princess Ann of Denmark's ditto (same) 20,069 0 0
Col. Francis Wahup's Regiment of Foot: from 1688, April, when they landed in Scotland, to the 24 th of the same month, when they entered into Scots' pay 1,251 1 6
Scots' Horse and Foot:
Troop of Scots Guards (Earl of Drumlanrig: 118 gentlemen) 4,768 12 10
Royal Regiment of Scots Horse (Earl of Selkirk: 294 privates) 7,191 7 6
Lieut. Gen. James Douglasse's Battalion of Scots Guards according to the warrant of 1686, July 22 (13 Companies, 1,027 privates) 14,894 18 6
Col. Thomas Buchan's Regiment of Scots Foot (Scots Regiment of Foot) (same warrant: 13 Companies, 650 soldiers) 10,266 2 0
Sir Thomas Levingston's Regiment of Scots Dragoons (six Troops, 294 men) 6,606 10 0
(Total of Scots Horse and Foot in English pay,43,727l. 10s. 0d.)
Irish Foot and Dragoons:
Duke of Ormonde: Battalion of Irish Foot Guards in England (six Companies and one Company of Grenadiers: Nov. 1 to Jan. 6) 1,212 5 6
Col. Anth. Hamilton's Regiment of Foot (12 Companies and one Company of Grenadiers: same date) 2,263 14 10
Sir John Edgworth (ditto: Nov. 1 to April 30) 6,927 15 6
Col. John Butler: Regiment of Irish Dragoons (10 Troops: Nov. 1 to Jan. 6) 3,481 10 6
(Total for Irish Foot and Dragoons in English pay, 13,885l. 6s. 4d.)
Independent Companies:
Sir J. Reresby 875 15 10
Sir R. Holmes 1,056 7 0
Capt. Peter Shackerly (until its incorporation with Sir E. Hales's Regiment, 1688, April 30) 330 14 8
Capt. Robt. Minors 1,134 0 0
Capt. Edw. Braughall (until its incorporation with Col. Bevil Skelton's Regiment, 1688, Dec. 1) 144 19 0
Capt. John Sibly(raised 1688, Oct.; disbanded 1688–9, Jan.) 193 4 4
Capt. William Gibbons (same) 207 1 4
Capt. Elias Be'ake (same) 72 2 8
Capt. Francis Ingolsby (same) 94 3 8
Capt. Morrice Flynn (same) 172 11 0
Capt. Math. Smith (same) 237 13 2
Capt. Anthony Power (same) 221 15 8
Capt. Hy. Davies (same) 253 7 4
(Total pay of Guards and Land Forces, 993,096l. 3s. l1d.)
Garrisons:
Berwick 1,098 1 1
Carlisle 387 10 0
Chepstow 72 18 0
Chester 340 4 0
Cinque Ports 1,838 8 10½
Calshot Castle 182 5 0
Dartmouth 54 18 0
Guernsey 194 8 0
Gravesend and Tilbury 1,456 9
Hull and blockhouse 1,314 16 11½
Holy Island 72 18 0
Hurst Castle 182 5 0
Jersey 243 0 0
Landguard Fort 243 0 0
St. Mawes 72 18 0
Pendennis 97 4 0
Plymouth 1,598 4
Portland 222 15 0
Portsmouth 1,499 1
Sheemess 1,202 17 0
1,199,091 15
Scilly 243 0 0
Scarborough 142 15 3
Tynemouth and Clifford's Fort 777 12 0
Tower of London 2,434 2 8
Upnor etc 534 12 0
Windsor 486 0 0
Isle of Wight 1,698 9
North Yarmouth 145 16 0
Governor of York 501 6 10½
Lord Colepeper 601 12 3
Two Companies of Foot in New England 2,770 4 0
Gunners in St. James's Park 182 5 0
Gunners in the Medway 120 16 0
Additional gunners in the Medway 205 14 0
Gunners at Woolwich. 84 14 0
(Total of garrison, 23,303l. ls. 7¼d.)
Contingencies:
Bounty and rewards 3,525 18
Medicaments 1,145 13 6
Fire and candle 2,259 19 6
Ferrymen at Fulham, Lambeth & Datchet 97 15 9
Stationery wares 487 7 6
Clothes and liveries 2,937 6 0
Repairs, Horse Guards 1,136 11 7
Sundry services 4,387 7 8
Sundries 14,544 7 10
(Total of contingencies, 30,522l. 7s. 6½d.)
Paid to the Earl of Monmouth's and Col.Earle's (late Col. Luttrell's) Regiments 2,917 17 0
Paid upon account to be rendered only to his Majesty: Mr. Benlench, 1,000l.; Lord Dartmouth,700l.; Henry Powle, 1,140l.; Monsieurlsaac, 6,000l.; Ann Vangolstein, 1,000l.; Jacob Vanderesch, 162,500l 172,340 0 0
Money paid without accompt under warrant of 1689, April 10 4,000 0 0
Remainder of 200l. advanced to Major O'Connor 142 1 0
Paid to reformed and disabled officers 4,686 0 0
1,258,758 11
The Accomptant further claims 4,398l. l1s. 5ld. as the remainder of 12,249l. 1s. 1d. by him paid to Commissary General Shales for Hounslow Heath encampment in 1687 : towards which he has only deducted from Army pay 7,850l. 9s. 7½d.

(6) Ordnance Accounts.

From 1685, June 30, to 1686, June 30.

(C. Bertie, Treasurer and Paymaster.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (remains) 3,774 17
Ditto (supers) 78,802 14
Money out of the Exchequer 70,800 0 0
Voluntary charge 4,892 8 6
158,269 19 10½
Wages etc. of principal officers, armourers, engineers, fireworkers, gunners etc. 13,231 17 6
Emptions and provisions, viz. of:
Powder 655 10 0
Shot 701 0 9
Small arms and repairs. 10,923 16 10
Ship carriages and standing carriages 1,932 17 11½
Sundry provisions 15,056 19 7
Artificers and tradesmen 6,394 17 2
Repairs of castles and forts 13,847 5 l0¾
Sundry disbursements 6,875 18
Rewards 1,889 12 7
Land and water carriage 1,589 6 6
Salaries 827 5 10
Travelling charges 1,130 7 6
Rent of houses 550 2 6
Ordinary allowances 15 0 0
75,622 5 6

From 1686, June 30, to 1687, June 30.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (remains) 256 18 10¼
Ditto (supers) 82,390 15
Money out of the Exchequer 95,404 11
Voluntary charge 1,806 17
179,859 2 11

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Wages etc. ut supra 11,030 5 0
Emptions and provisions, viz. of :
Powder 6,860 0 0
Shot 4,060 12
Ordnance 1,045 6 3
Tents 2,575 14 9
Carriage for ordnance 1,691 1
Small arms 13,412 19 7
Sundry provisions 14,254 15 10½
Land and water carriage 989 19 5
Sundry disbursements 6,784 14 11½
Reparations of castles and forts 26,370 0 8
Rent of houses 484 0 0
Rewards 1,953 14 0
Salaries 748 14 11
Travelling charges 1,830 9 5
Ordinary allowances 15 0 0
94,107 15

From 1687, June 30, to 1688, June 30.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (remains) 4,433 3 4
Ditto (supers) 81,318 3 11½
Money out of the Exchequer 97,827 9 9
Voluntary charge 2,173 16

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Wages etc. ut supra 11,377 0 0
Emptions and provisions, viz. of:
A mortar piece 80 0 0
Granado shot 3,423 6 6
Powder 4,515 0 0
185,752 13 8
Shot 1,037 1
Match 259 8 11
Tents and toils 2,818 8
Carriages for Ordnance 2,915 16 3
Small guns and small arms 16,865 16 4
Sundry provisions 11,975 10
Reparations of castles and forts 25,862 2 5
Land and water carriage 1,941 16 6
Sundry disbursements 8,144 6
Rent of houses 556 5 0
Rewards 1,737 14
Salaries 1,267 3 6
Travelling charges 4,136 18
Ordinary allowances 15 6 8
98,929 2

From 1688, June 30, to 1689, June 30.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (remains) 2,113 17
Ditto (supers) 84,709 13 l1½
Money out of the Exchequer 127,506 10
Voluntary charge 1,526 8 l1½
215,856 10

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Wages etc. ut supra 7,923 12 6
Emptions and provisions, viz. of :
Powder 5,110 14
Shot 2,609 10
Ordnance 1,061 3
Carriages 2,093 3 5
Tents 2,222 1
Small arms 8,217 18 11
Sundry provisions 5,814 19
Sundry artificers and tradesmen 22,178 17 3
Repairs of castles and forts 21,685 8 11½
Sundry disbursements 4,235 13
Rewards 1,785 4 10
Land and water carriage 4,689 8 0
Salaries 1,691 8 2
Travelling charges 916 15 3
Rent of houses 452 0 4
Ordinary allowances 15 6 8
92,703 7 0

(7) Cofferer of the Household.

From 1685, June 30 (the day of the death of Henry, Visct. Brouncker, the previous Cofferer), to 1686, Sept. 30.

(Sir Peter Apsley.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains (not charged)
Ready money out of the Exchequer 66,800 0 0
Remains of provisions (not charged)

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Diet and maintenance of the Household and Stables 78,877 12 10
Writing of this account 30 0 0
Received of the executors of William Ashburnham, late Cofferer, and from William Whitmore & partners. 873 17 0
Beer etc. sold 83 2 4
67,756 19 4
Dr. William Holder, subalmoner, for the King's daily alms 274 4 0
Diet and expense of the King at Windsor, Winchester, on progress etc. 10,453 18 10¼
Remains of provisions in the various offices of the Household etc. (not credited)
89,656 15

From 1686, Sept. 30, to 1687, Sept. 30.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Money out of the Exchequer 76,118 6 6
Beer etc. sold 25 9
Remains of provisions etc. (not charged)
76,143 16

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplusage 21,399 16
Diet and expense of the Household and Stables 63,398 17
Writing of this account. 21 0 0
Auditor's fee 30 0 0
Dr. William Holder, for the King's daily alms 219 0 0
Divers tradesmen and creditors 11,980 4
97,048 18 3

From 1687, Sept. 30, to 1688, Dec. 31.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Money out of the Exchequer 124,322 18
Remains of provisions (not charged)
Forinsec receipts (from Thomas Pechey, Thos. Neale and Hugh Mayo) 591 1 4
124,913 19 6

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplusage 20,905 2
Diet and expenses of the Household & Stables 81,957 14 1¾½
Writing of this accompt 42 0 0
Auditor's fee 60 0 0
John,Bishop of Adramyti, the King's almoner, for the King's daily alms 274 16 0
To Sir Stephen Fox 110 0 0
Divers tradesmen and creditors 20,994 0
Remains of provisions etc. (not credited)
124,343 13 3½¼

(8) Treasurer of the Chamber.

From 1685, Michaelmas, to 1686, Michaelmas.

(Edward, afterwards Lord, Griffin.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (not stated)
Money out of the Exchequer 39,247 13 2

Discharge.

l. s. d.
King's daily alms 565 14 1
Trumpeters 175 0 0
Musicians 1,560 0 0
Falconers 551 0 0
Huntsmen of the Privy Buckhounds 1,320 0 0
Huntsmen of the foxhounds 480 0 0
Huntsmen of his Majesty's harriers 800 0 0
Foresters or officers of the King's forests 36 10 0
Jewel House officers 382 5 0
Moletaker 8 1 8
Ratkiller 48 3 4
Cofferbearers 54 15 0
Grooms of the Chamber 400 0 0
Groom Porter 550 0 0
Yeomen ushers to the House of Peers 109 10 0
Yeomen ushers to the King 80 0 0
Yeomen hangers 60 0 0
Bedgoers to his Majesty. 20 0 0
Waiters on his Majesty's robes 20 0 0
Rich coat keepers 20 0 0
Pond keeper in St. James's Park 30 0 0
Theatre keeper 30 0 0
Gallery keepers 109 10 0
Housekeeper at Whitehall 650 0 0
Ditto at Windsor 250 0 0
Ditto at Hampton Court 300 0 0
Keeper of the house, gardens and wardrobe at Greenwich 225 0 0
Keeper of the Standing Wardrobe at Whitehall 200 0 0
Ditto of ditto at Windsor 160 0 0
Ditto of ditto and of the Privy Lodgings at Hampton Court 200 0 0
Ditto of the house at Audley End 250 0 0
Ditto of the house and wardrobe at Newmarket 200 0 0
Housekeeper and gardener at Richmond 153 0 0
Signor Verrio, keeper of the Great Garden at St. James's Park 400 0 0
Gardener of St. James's house garden 91 5 0
Keeper of the gardens and bowling green at Hampton Court 73 0 0
Officers of the Removing Wardrobe 790 0 0
Clerk of the Wardrobes. 160 0 0
Yeoman of the Wardrobe at St. James's 110 0 0
Physicians of the King and Household 1,389 0 0
Apothecaries ditto 1,160 0 0
Chirurgeons ditto 1,094 8 4
Messengers 997 10 0
Pensions 320 0 0
Total [not struck]
Watermen 210 0 0
Yeomen of the Guard 5,619 19 8
Payments on Council warrants 136 13 4
Payments on Lord Chamberlain's warrants [1,903 12 0]
Bills of allowance 699 2 11
Watermen's bills 239 11 0
Ordinary allowance 63 6 8
Total [not struck]

[Account not declared.]

From 1686, Mich., to 1687, Mich.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (not stated)
Money out of the Exchequer 33,049 8 1

Discharge.

l. s. 3.
King's alms 567 3 0
Serjeant trumpeter 160 0 0
Musicians for the violin. 1,560 0 0
Falconers 551 0 0
Huntsmen (privy buckhounds) 1,341 5 0
Ditto (foxhounds) 480 0 0
Ditto (harriers) 800 0 0
Officers of the forest 36 10 0
Ditto of the Jewel House 382 5 0
Ditto of the Removing Wardrobe 950 0 0
Physicians of the King and Household 1,389 0 0
Apothecaries ditto 1,160 0 0
Chirurgeons ditto 1,381 18 4
Antonio Verrio, chief and first painter to the King (two years on 2001. per an.) 400 0 0
Jeremy Gohory, dancing master to the late King 450 0 0
Moletaker 8 1 8
Ratkiller 48 3 4
Nurseryman and pond keeper 30 0 0
Theatre keeper 30 0 0
Gallery keepers 109 10 0
Rich coat keepers 20 0 0
Cofferbearers 54 15 0
Bedgoers 20 0 0
Waiters on the Robes 20 0 0
Messengers of the Chamber 997 10 0
Grooms of the Chamber. 390 0 0
Groom porter 550 0 0
Repairer of bridges 45 0 0
Yeomen ushers of the House of Peers 109 10 0
Ushers and yeomen hangers attending the King 140 0 0
Annuities and pensions 320 0 0
Clockmaker and watchmaker 450 0 0
Housekeepers, wardrobe keepers avid gardeners 4,262 5 0
Total (not struck)
Watermen 210 0 0
Officers and yeomen of the Guard of the Body 5,906 5 0
Issues by Council warrant 146 13 4
Ditto by Lord Chamberlain's warrant 4,893 16 3
Watermen's bills 636 1 9
Messengers' bills 2,136 2 4
Ordinary allowances 377 8 0
Total (not struck)

[Account not declared.]

From 1687, Mich., to 1688, Christmas.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (not stated)
Money out of the Exchequer 48,570 7

Discharge.

l. s. d.
King's alms 568 12 1
Trumpeters 200 0 0
Musicians 1,600 0 0
Falconers 541 0 0
Huntsmen (privy buckhounds) 1,841 5 0
Ditto (foxhounds) 712 10 0
Ditto (harriers) 1,000 0 0
Foresters 27 7 6
Jewel House officers 382 5 0
Moletaker 8 1 8
Ratkiller 60 4 2
Cofferbearers 68 8 9
Grooms of the Chamber 480 0 0
Groom porter 687 10 0
Repairer of bridges 15 0 0
Yeomen ushers to the House of Peers 136 17 0
Yeomen ushers to the King 95 0 0
Yeomen hangers 70 0 0
Bedgoers to the King 25 0 0
Waiters on the King's Robes 25 0 0
Rich coat keepers 22 10 0
Pond keeper 37 10 0
Theatre keeper 30 0 0
Gamekeeper 25 0 0
Gallery keepers 123 3 9
Clockmaker and watchmaker 250 0 0
Locksmith 63 17 6
Housekeepers, wardrobe keepers and gardeners 1,697 5 0
Officers of the Removing Wardrobe 1,097 10 0
Yeoman to the Wardrobe at St. James's 137 10 0
Physicians to the King and Household 1,596 5 0
Apothecaries ditto 1,325 0 0
Chirurgeons ditto 1,393 0 5
Verrio, chief painter 250 0 0
Messengers of the Chamber 1,271 16 3
Jeremy Gohory, dancing master 200 0 0
Total (not struck)
Pensioner footmen and falconers 320 0 0
Watermen 259 7 6
Yeomen of the Guard 7,023 15 0
Duke of St. Alban 313 15 0
Payments by Council warrants 130 0 0
Ditto by Lord Chamberlain's warrant 7,499 17 5
Stationers 690 11 0
Watermen's bills 576 7 6
Messengers' bills 5,794 12 6
Ordinary allowances 213 6 8
Total (not struck)

[Account not declared.]

(9) Works Paymster.

Philip Packer's final account for extraordinaries, including the rebuilding the Privy Gallery at Whitehall.

From 1685, April 1, to 1686, Dec. 24.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears nil.
Remains unpaid to sundry tradesmen 6,216 1 11½
Money out of the Exchequer 42,891 16 8
Value of provisions out of the stores 89 17 0
49,197 15

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplusage 12,504 15
Rebuilding the Privy Gallery at Whitehall 29,358 16 11¾
Stable repairs at Newmarket 114 11 8
Money formerly charged as received and afterwards discharged by privy seal 2,476 18 11½
Money repaid into the Exchequer 3,061 6
Ordinary allowances 107 0 0
47,623 9

From 1685, April 1, to 1686, March 30.

[Account missing.]

From 1686, April 1, to 1687, Mar. 31.

(Thomas Lloyd, Paymaster.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears (first account) nil.
Money out of the Exchequer 19,163 16 3
Value of provisions out of the stores 20 0 0

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Payments on several former accounts of the late Paymaster 12,930 10
Works etc. at the Tower 141 19
Ditto, Whitehall 1,821 9 10
Ditto, St. James's 305 11
Ditto, Westminster 57 7 4
Ditto, Hampton Court 667 19
Ditto, Greenwich 210 6 10
Ditto, Newmarket 56 7 10
Ditto, Audley End 776 8
Officers of the Works 1,152 12 5
19,183 16 3
Extraordinary works at St. James's 227 6 11½
Exchequer fees etc. 68 10 6
Ordinary allowances 62 0 0
18,478 10 ll¾

From 1687, April 1, to 1688, Mar. 31.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains 705 5
Money out of the Exchequer 836 3 9
Value of provisions out of the stores 35 17 2
Received of the Paymaster of the Forces for building a sutlery at the main Guard in Scotland Yard 640 10 0
2,217 16

Discharge.

Payments on several former accounts of the late Paymaster 14,394 6
Works etc. at the Tower 927 18
Ditto, Whitehall 3,308 12
Ditto, St. James's 335 19
Ditto, Westminster 152 0
Ditto, Hampton Court 1,555 1
Ditto, Greenwich 371 15
Ditto, Newmarket 63 0 6
Ditto, Winchester 597 1 10
Officers of the Works 1,154 18 2
Extraor dinar ies.
Guard Chamber at Whitehall 358 6
Ditto at the Mews 312 17
Public paving 137 0 2
Chapel of the Tower of London 222 11
Chapel on Hounslow Heath 505 19
Audley End 625 15
King's progress 93 1 4
Queen's progress to Bath 98 2 6
Paid by virtue of Treasury warrants 430 17 10
Ordinary allowances 62 0 0
25,707 6

From 1688, April 1, to 1689, Mar. 31.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Money out of the Exchequer 17,473 18 1
Value of provisions out of the stores 199 15 11
Value of timber sold 689 12 0

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 23,489 10
Works etc. at the Tower 212 16
Ditto, Whitehall 2,664 6 8
Ditto, St. James's 445 18 10¼
Ditto, Westminster 418 12
Ditto, Hampton Court 1,634 3
Ditto, Greenwich 193 17 7
Ditto, Winchester 100 5 9
Ditto, Newmarket 67 8 8
Extraordinaries:
Audley End 136 9 4
New-building the sutlery at Whitehall 641 11
Fitting up Hampton Court for the Princess of Denmark 446 13 3
Paving 622 4
18,363 6 0
Altering and fitting up the King's house at Richmond 1,813 16
Altering and fitting up Mr. Ronche's and Mr. Le Croy's lodgings at St. James's 694 7 7
New building for the guns at Whitehall adjoining the Privy Gallery 372 7
Raising higher the butlery building in Whitchall 1,741 3
Reparations in the Mews 68 8
Reparing the dial in the Privy Garden 150 0 0
Officers of the Works 1,207 2 6
Trees and plants bought of Signor Verrio 766 8 0
Votary keeper 56 13 4
Repairs in St. James's Park 289 5
Ordinary allowances 62 0 0
38,295 11

(10) Wardrobe Accounts.

From 1685, Sept. 29, to 1686, Sept. 29.

(Visct. Preston, Keeper.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Money out of the Exchequer 13,369 4 8
13,369 4 8

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Emptions and necessaries by royal warrant 16,631 17
Fees and wages 2,850 7 10
Annual liveries and payments 58 13 2
Usual allowances 10 19 0
19,551 17

From 1686, Sept. 29, to 1687, Sept. 29.

(Account missing.)

From 1687, Sept. 29, to 1688, Sept. 29.

(Account missing.)

From 1688, Sept. 29, 1689, Sept. 29.

(Ralph, Earl Montague, keeper.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears nil.
Money out of the Exchequer 25,107 13 0

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Surplus 23,789 15
Emptions and necessaries by royal warrant 17,446 12 10¼
25,107 13 0
Payments by patent and by dormant warrant 478 13 4
Liveries to officers of Exchequer and Wardrobe 173 8 6
Fees and wages 629 15
Usual allowances 10 19 0
Provisions and work for the Coronation of William and Mary 9,738 17
Clerk of Wardrobe 20 0 0
52,288 1

(11) Robes Accounts.

From 1685, Lady day, to 1686, Lady day.

(Arthur Herbert, Gentgleman and Master of the Robes.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains nil.
Money out of the Exchequer 3,780 4 3
3,780 4 3

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Suits, cloaks and other apparel for the King's wearing 821 6 4
Silks, cloth, silver, work, point lace, gloves ribbons, periwigs, hats, belts, swords, hose, shoes etc. for the king etc. 1,088 6 3
House rent 30 0 0
Payments by particular warrant 35 0 0
Auditor's allowance 35 0 0
Payments for royal robes for the Coronation 1,695 2 2
Exchequer fees 27 16 0
3,732 10 9

From 1686, Mar. 25, to 1687, Mar. 25.

Charge.

l. s. d.
Remains 47 13 6
Money out of the Exchequer 2,850 0 0
2,897 13 6

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Robes and apparel for the King and several of his servants and other charges of the Office of Robes 2,256 9 10
Ordinary allowance 603 10 0
Money paid into the Exchequer to balance this account 37 13 8
2,897 13 6

From 1687, Mar. 25, to 1688, Dec. 25.

(Lord Thomas Howard, Gentleman and Master of the Robes.)

Charge.

l. s. d.
Arrears nil.
Money out of the Exchequer 3,500 0 0
3,500 0 0

Discharge.

l. s. d.
Necessaries and provisions for the King's robes etc. 3,532 0 7
House rent 52 10 0
Fees at the Exchequer and Treasury 107 19 9
Auditor's allowance 17 10 0
3,710 0 4

The above tables of expenditure speak for themselves, and in doing so they afford the moral justification of the revolution of 1688. They show that the greater part of the additional revenue which James enjoyed was spent on the Army. In view of the statements which are widely made as to James's solicitude for the Navy and in view of James's own language on the subject when addressing his Parliament, we should have expected that whatever excess of revenue he received over and above that enjoyed by Charles II he would have spent on the Navy. The above tables do not bear out this idea at all.

It would be difficult to average Charles's naval expenditure, but roughly for the whole reign I should put it down at 400,000l. per an. James's expenditure on this head averages a little more, but not much.

On the other hand, James's expenditure on his Army shows an enormous increase. Charles's normal establishment for the Forces (Guards and Garrisons) was about 200,000l. per an.; James's establishment averages over 530,000l. per an. even excluding the last half year (1688, Mich., to 1699, Easter). The almost stereotyped composition of the Land Forces under Charles (it will be understood, of course, that I am speaking only of the English establishment) was three Troops of Guards, one Regiment of Horse Guards, one Troop of Dragoons and four Regiments of Foot Guards—in all not quite 4,500 men, not including officers. The garrisons numbered normally in all about 1,500 men. The total force, therefore, for both Guards and Garrisons was 6,000 men plus officers. This standing Army Charles never increased. The expeditionary Forces new raised for the intended war with the French King were raised by direct Parliamentary sanction and were disbanded in accordance with Parliamentary desires. The only apparent increase in the standing Army under Charles took place in the last year of his life, and this was not a real increase, but nominal only. It consisted simply in taking on to the English establishment the returning Garrison of Tangier when Tangier was abandoned (see the Introduction to the preceding Vol. VII of this Calendar, pp. lxvii-lxviii). These Tangier Regiments had been previously on the Irish establishment.

It is therefore an absolute fact that Charles never in his reign increased the standing Army.

Under James, however, an enormous increase took place. The full details of the increase will be found set out supra, pp. lxv seq. The increase consisted ultimately of a Fourth Troop of Guards, eight Regiments of Horse, twelve Regiments of Foot, three Regiments of Dragoons and fourteen Independent Companies of Grenadiers. At a very reasonable estimate James more than trebled Charles's standing Army. The pretext for the increase was of course furnished by Monmouth's rebellion, but the speciousness of that pretext need hardly be pointed out, for the greater part of the increase took place after the rebellion was over. In James's hands this disproportionate Land Force was a menace not to France but to the liberties of England, and what the Revolution of 1688 accomplished was simply the inversion of these terms. The increased Army which James had raised was not disbanded in 1689. By the harmonious action of William III and the Parliament the increased Army was maintained and was simply made a menace to France and thereby a protection to the liberties of England. A careful study of the details of James's Army increase will show how efficiently though unintentionally he had prepared the ground or the machinery for the greater Army of William's campaigns and how enormously he thereby facilitated the establishment of William's Government by the elimination of such Parliamentary friction as would certainly have arisen over a new or de novo increase of the standing Forces.

Wm. A. Shaw.

Footnotes

  • 1. There are many unwritten chapters in the complicated story of the English Customs duties. That relating to the duties on tobacco and sugars is an instance. Duties on these commodities appear in all the printed Books of Rates (viz. of the years 1611, 1642, 1660 and 1671). Such duties, therefore, would form part of the general corpus of " Customs and Subsidy " which at the commencement of a new reign was granted en bloc to the new Sovereign. But in the middle of Charles II's reign the Act for the Greenland and Eastland trade (25 Car. II, c. 7) conditionally imposed certain duties on sugars, tobacco, wool, indigo etc. of the growth of the English Plantations. These duties were to be paid at the port of shipment or export [that is in the Plantations] in cases where the shipper refused to give bond to bring the goods to England. The Act does not impose these duties in the English ports, but that they were levied at the English ports on importation is clear from the fact that from 1676 the Customs Cashier's accounts contain separate headings of receipts from Plantation goods [in England] and from ditto [in Plantation ports]. There appears to be no legal justification for this. The duties instituted by the above votes of 1 James II can only be regarded as additional to this Plantation bond duty. If this is so, there were three concurrent and cumulative rates on sugars and tobacco under James II, viz. (1) the Book of Rates duty; (2) Charles II's Plantation duty; (3) James' II's additional duty.
  • 2. Sic? 237,998l. 8s. 11d.
  • 3. Of which 202,175l. represented loans repaid to the city and to C. Duncombe
  • 4. Proper to the account of the preceding year ended 1684, June 24.
  • 5. "Paid in further part of the debt of 549,747l. 9s. 0¼d. which was due by tallys on the three great branches on the 6th of Feb., 1684–5."
  • 6. Rest of book torn out bodily.
  • 7. There is a double series of accounts for Wine Licences, corresponding apparently to the system of General and Cash Accounts in the case of the Customs and Excise. The account here printed is probably the Cash Account. The parallel [? General] Account is very imperfect and impossible to give for the whole reign of James II.