BHO

House of Commons Journal Volume 12: 16 April 1698

Pages 208-235

Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 12, 1697-1699. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1803.

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In this section

Sabbati, 16 die Aprilis;

10° Gulielmi Tertii.

Prayers.

Copper Coinage.

A PETITION of the Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs, of the City of Coventry, on the behalf of themselves, and all the Traders within the same, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That the great Quantities of Copper Halfpence and Farthings, that they receive, is a great Discouragement to Trade, and more a Clog than the late White Farthings were: And praying Relief therein, by putting a Stop to the Increase of them.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to the Committee, to whom the Petition of the Grocers, Cheesemongers, Mealmen, Bakers, Victuallers, Market-people, and Retailers in general, of the Borough of Southwark, is referred: And that they do examine the Matter thereof; and report the same, with their Opinion therein, to the House.

Claims on Lottery Tickets.

Ordered, That Sir Cloudesly Shovell, and all the Members that serve for Cornwall and York, be added to the Committee, to whom the Petition of the Proprietors of the Tickets on the Million Lottery-Act is referred.

Marshal of King's Bench.

Ordered, That Mr. Gardner, Mr. Thompson, Mr. England, Mr. Blofeild, Mr. Mawdit, Mr. Thornhagh, Mr. Blake, Mr. Tredenham, Sir Marm. Wyvell, Mr. Woodroffe, Mr. Fuller, be added to the Committee, to whom the Petition of Tho. Sevear Gentleman is referred.

Claims on Lottery Tickets.

Mr. Lowndes reported from the Committee, to whom the Consideration of the Petition of several Persons on behalf of themselves, and others, the Proprietors of the Tickets on the Million Lottery-Act, was referred, the Matter, as it appeared to the said Committee; and the Resolutions of the Committee; thereupon; which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were read: and are as follow; viz.

That the Committee, having taken into Consideration the Petition of the Proprietors of the Tickets on the Million Lottery-Act, do find, by an Account delivered in to the Committee, by the Paymaster of the said Tickets,

£. s. d.
That there remains yet unpaid, of the Million Lottery Tickets, due at Lady-day 1696, the Sum of 18,342 10
There is also unpaid, of 120,000 l. due at Michaelmas 1697, the Sum of 43,000
Towards which there is in the Exchequer 3,000
So remains to be provided for 40,000
There is also due at Lady-day 1698 20,000
78,342 10
Thesaid Paymaster hath received, upon 14 Tallies of Pro, on the Hereditary and Temporary Excise, for Payment of the Tickets due in 1695 7,912
Out of which, deducting for the Tickets of that Year, that remained unpaid 6,363
There will remain to lessen the Deficiency 1,549
So that the whole Deficiency of the Million Lottery-Tickets, due at Lady-day 1698, to be provided for, is 76,793 10

A great Number of the Proprietors of the said Tickets, being present at the Committee, did humbly desire, That the said Deficiency of 76,793 l. 10s. may be supplied, and made good, out of such distinct or particular Funds as this House shall think fit, the Tickets that became payable between the 17th of May 1696, and the 17th of May 1697, being already provided for by the 3s. Aid of this Session.

And all the said Proprietors, appearing, as aforesaid, except One or Two, did further desire, That a Course of Payment of the said Tickets may be established for the future, either, as the said Tickets stand numbered successively, the lowest Numbers to be paid first, one Year, and the highest the next Year; or otherwise, as this House shall think fit:

And that one Half-year shall be paid, and cleared before the next Half-year shall commence, or begin to be paid:

And that the Duty of Nine-pence per Barrel, upon the Excise, be appropriated, during the whole 16 Years, from the 17th of May 1697, for the Payment of the said Tickets, until they be fully satisfied.

And that thereupon the Committee came to these Resolutions following; viz.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the growing weekly Payments, coming into the Exchequer, from the additional Excise for Payment of the Million-Lottery Tickets, be first applied to the Payment of the Tickets of those Half-years, which are already incurred, and grown due, except the Tickets of Michaelmas 1696, and Lady-day 1697, which are appointed to be satisfied out of the Land-Tax.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That, for the future, the growing weekly Payments, coming into the Exchequer, from the additional Excise, for Payment of the Lottery Tickets, be applied to the Payment of the Tickets of every Half-year, which shall first incur, or become due; so that the Tickets of every preceding Half-year shall be cleared, or Money reserved, for them, before any Payments be made, upon any Tickets of a subsequent Half-year.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That, for the more orderly Payment of the LotteryTickets, those for 20s. apiece, commonly called Blank Tickets, shall be paid in arithmetical Progression, beginning first with N° 1, and proceeding to the Number 97,500; and those called Benefit, or Prize Tickets, shall, in the next Place, be paid in Course, from N° 1, to N° 2,500; and afterwards, the Blank Tickets shall be paid from N° 97,500 to N° 1; and the Benefit Tickets, from N° 2,500 to N° 1; and so forwards, alternately.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the Nine-pence per Barrel Excise be appropriated, during the whole Term of 16 Years, to the Payment of the said Tickets, until they be fully satisfied.

The said Resolutions, being severally read a Second time, were, upon the Question severally put thereupon, agreed unto by the House.

Ordered, That a Bill be brought in, pursuant to the said Resolutions: And that Mr. Lowndes do prepare, and bring in, the same.

Fitz-Harris' Estate.

Ordered, That the Report from the Committee, to whom the Consideration of the Petition of Sir Henry Fitz-Harris Baronet was referred, be received upon Thursday Morning next.

Return of Juries at Assizes.

A Bill for the more easy Return of Juries, at the Assizes and Sessions, was, according to Order, read a Second time.

Resolved, That the Bill be committed to Sir John Kay, Sir Robert Cotton, Sir Marm. Wyvell, Sir John Woolstenholme, Sir John Elwill, Mr. Mawdit, Mr. Harrison, Sir Jos. Tily, Sir Robert Burdet, Mr. Spencer, Sir Hen. Colt, Mr. Bohun, Sir Cha. Wyndham, Sir Wm. Lowther, Mr. Gery, Sir Sam. Barnardiston, Sir Francis Masham, Mr. Lowther, Mr. Halsey, Sir Cloudsly Shovell, Mr. Freeman, Sir Tho. Roberts, Mr. Osborne, Mr. Blofeild, Mr. Fuller, Colonel King, Sir Jacob Ashley, Sir Tho. Day, Mr. Staines, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Blake, Sir Matth. Andrews, Mr. Fleming, Sir John Bolles, Sir John Turner, Mr. Sandford, Mr. England, Mr. York, Sir Wm. Hustler, Mr. Brotherton, Mr. Ryder; and all that serve for the Counties of York and Cornwall: And all that come are to have Voices: And they are to meet this Afternoon at Five a Clock, in the Speaker's Chamber.

Army Arrears.

A Petition of Stephen Hutchins, and others, in behalf of themselves, and the late Company of Miners, commanded by Captain John Pitt, was presented to the House, and read; setting forth, That the Petitioners faithfully served his Majesty, all the late War, till the 10th Day of March last, at which time they were broke by Colonel Withers: That there is a great Arrear of Pay due to the Petitioners, who are poor, and want their Money: And praying Relief therein.

Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be referred to a Committee: And that they do examine the Matter thereof; and report the same, with their Opinion therein, to the House:

And it is referred to Mr. Lewkner, Mr. Mountstevens, Sir Henry Colt, Mr. Gery, Sir John Kay, Mr. Bohun, Sir Tho. Roberts, Sir John Elwell, Sir Fran. Masham, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Blake, Sir Matth. Andrews, Sir Jos. Tily, Sir Robert Cotton, Sir Jacob Ashley, Mr. Harrison, Mr. Rider, Colonel King, Mr. Fleming, Mr. Poultney, Serjeant Wogan, Mr. Maudit, Sir John Bolles, Sir Francis Wyndham, Mr. Fuller, Mr. Brotherton, Mr. England, Mr. Palmes, Mr. Spencer, Mr. Blofeild, Sir Robert Burdet, Mr. Hammond, Dr. Oxenden, Mr. Arnold: And they are to meet this Afternoon, at Five a Clock, in the Speaker's Chamber.

R. Smith's Estate.

Mr. Poultney reported from the Committee, to whom the ingrossed Bill, from the Lords, intituled, An Act for the vesting several Lands, late belonging to Robert Smith Esquire, deceased, in Trustees, to be sold, for Payment of his Debts, was committed, That they had examined and considered the same; and had directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment: And he delivered the same in at the Clerk's Table.

Estates given to superstitious Uses.

The House took into further Consideration the Report from the Committee, to whom the Bill for the better Discovery of Estates given to superstitious Uses was committed.

And the Amendments, made by the Committee to the said Bill, were once read throughout; and then a Second time, one by one; and, upon the Question, severally put thereupon, all of them, except Clause B, agreed unto by the House.

Clause B being read a Second time, That nothing in the Bill shall extend to any Gift or Disposition made by Sir William Godolphin Knight, deceased;

And the Question being put, That the House do agree with the Committee in the said Amendment;

It passed in the Negative.

Ordered, That the Bill do lie upon the Table till this Day Sevennight.

Earl of Gainsborough's Estate.

An ingrossed Bill, from the Lords, intituled, An Act for vesting Lands in Trustees, to be sold, for Payment of the Debts of Wriothesly Baptist late Earl of Gainsborough, deceased, was read the First time.

Resolved, That the Bill be read a Second time upon Tuesday Morning next.

Ways and Means.

Sir Thomas Littleton reported, from the Committee of the whole House, to whom it was referred to consider further of Ways and Means for raising the Supply granted to his Majesty, the Resolutions of the said Committee; which they had directed him to report to the House; which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were read; and are as follow; viz.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty be laid upon all Coals imported from Scotland, or other Parts beyond Sea, sold by Weight or Measure.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the said Duty, upon such Coals imported and sold by Weight, be 5 s. per Ton.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the said Duty upon such Coals imported and sold by Measure, be 7s. 6d. per Chaldron.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That a Duty of 3s. 4d. per Ton be laid upon all Coals shipped, or waterborne in order to be shipped; which are usually sold by Weight.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the said Duties be paid at the Place of landing the said Coals.

The said Resolutions being severally read a Second time, were, upon the Question severally put thereupon, agreed unto by the House.

Ordered, That it be an Instruction to the Members, who are to prepare the Bill for the Duty upon Coals, That they do prepare the same, so as to include the Matter of the said Resolutions.

Leave of Absence.

Ordered, That Mr. Ryder have Leave to go into the Country for a Month, upon extraordinary Occasions.

Ordered, That Sir Thomas Roberts have Leave to go into the Country for Three Weeks, upon extraordinary Occasions.

Ordered, That Sir Wm. Morley have Leave to go into the Country for Three Weeks, upon extraordinary Occasions.

Ayre and Calder Navigation.

Ordered, That the ingrossed Bill for making navigable the Rivers Ayre and Calder, in the County of York, be read the Third time upon Monday Morning next.

Seamens Arrears.

Ordered, That the Report from the Committee to whom the Petitions of the Officers and Seamen of the Ships taken as Prizes were referred, be taken into Consideration upon this Day Sevennight.

Foreign Lustrings, and Clandestine Trade.

Sir Rowland Gwynn, according to Order, reported, from the Committee, to whom the Consideration of the Petition of the Royal Lustring Company was referred, the Matter, as it appeared to the said Committee, and the Resolutions of the Committee thereupon; which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were read; and are as follow; viz.

Upon reading the Petition of the Lustring Company, Mr. Henry Baker, Solicitor to the Treasury, laid before the Committee, a French Passport, (marked A) signed by the French King, and dated the 7th Day of July 1695, for John Brady, an Englishman, Master of an English Vessel, called the Providence, Burden 30 Tons, to come from England, in Ballast, into the Ports of Diep and Calais; and there to load, only Silks manufactured in that Kingdom: He also had Liberty thereby to go into the Ports of Holland, to load French Silks only; but was not to touch at Dunkirk: Which Passport was intercepted, being inclosed in a Letter, signed G and B, dated the 31st of January 169 5/6; and directed for Mr. Nicholas Baudran, Banker at Paris.

He further said, That it being discovered, about April 1697, That G and B were Goudet and Barrau, Two Frenchmen, Merchants in London, the Duke of Shrewsbury sent his Warrant, in June, for the Taking of Goudet; his Books and Papers, Barrau being then in Holland: Which was done accordingly.

That there is a Copy of the said Letter, wherein the Passport was inclosed, entered in Mr. Gowdett's Copy-Book, of . . . . (marked C), Folio 129:

And that Mr. Goudet also delivered to him, at the same time his Papers were seized, a Seal, which, in all Appearance, is the same wherewith the said intercepted Letter was sealed.

Then the Committee proceeded to hear the said Company:

And Major Le Keux, Deputy-Governor of the said Company, produced a List (marked B) of the Names of the chief Weavers employed by the Lustring Company, and the Number of Looms under them, in the Years 1695, and 1696; whereby it appears there were 768 Looms at Work, those Years, in making Lustrings and Alamodes:

That the said List was proved by James D' Argent, who said he drew the same from the Company's Books.

Mr. Daniel Rape said, That the Company now employ but 40 or 50 Looms; the Reason whereof, and the Decay of that Manufacture, did first arise, and still continues, from the Combination of many French Merchants, and others, from the running and smuggling great Quantities of Alamodes and Lustrings into this Kingdom, from Lyons, and other Parts in France: That, if the Company had not been discouraged by such Practices, he does not at all doubt, but that they had brought their Manufacture to such a Perfection and Increase, as to have employed treble the Looms they have ever set at Work.

That the Company having a Letter, sent them from the Lords Justices, whereby their Lordships were pleased to intimate to them what Practices they had detected, which had been set up to undermine and destroy their Manufacture; upon which the Company, among other their Endeavours to further such Discoveries, made several Searches about the Town, to find out French Silks, that had been so clandestinely brought in upon them: And, to that End,

Mr. Rape said, That in searching one Mrs. Mason's House, wherein one Mr. Ravaud lodged, whom the Company suspected, he found a Piece of French Alamode under his Bed; and, upon searching another Room in the said Mason's House, he found, in a Closet there, a Bag of Seals to the Number of 1,300; the which he produced to the Committee; and said, They were such Seals as are commonly affixed to Lustrings brought over from Lyons: Whereupon Ravaud is since absconded:

That, on the 8th Day of January 1696, he searched the House of one Peter Montbrun; where, in a Closet, he found 47 Pieces of French Alamodes, and 31 Pieces of Lace; and thereupon carried him before the Lord Mayor, who directed both the Person, and his Letters, which were seized likewise, to be sent to the Secretary of State: Which was done accordingly.

Mr. Le Keux said, That, upon the diminishing of their Manufacture, in the Year 1696, their Stock in Manufactures amounted to 30,000 l.; their Raw Silk amounted to 20,000 l.; and, in June last, they had 4,000 Pieces of Alamodes and Lustrings by them:

That, for Proof of the Goodness of their Manufacture, the said Company placed some of their own Goods, by Permission of the Government, to be seized as French: And, at the same time, there was also a real Seizure of French Lustrings and Alamodes; and all the said Goods were sold by Inch of Candle; and some of the Company's Alamodes sold for 7s. 9d. per Ell; and the French did not sell for above 7s. as appears by a Paper marked C:

And, as a second Experiment in this Matter, Sir Robert Clayton, a Member of this House, took 12 Pieces of English Alamodes and Lustrings, and as many of the French; and, mixing them together, chose Two indifferent Persons, skilled therein, to view and prize the same; and, upon the said View, the said Persons picked out the 12 English Pieces, and prized them at 9d. and 6d. per Ell more than the French:

That, upon the Prospect the World had of a Stop that might be put to the smuggling, and running the Goods from abroad, as aforesaid, the Company, upon a Sale on Thursday the 3d of March last, found a considerable Encouragement in their Sale, and have sold between 10 and 11,000 l. Value of their Goods, at about 6 s. per Ell; but never could come up within 20 l. per Cent. of the Price they sold for at the Custom-house, upon the said counterfeit Seizure, when their said Goods were taken to be French.

And, to prove that the French Smugglers have their Alamodes and Lustrings brought in from France by Way of Holland, as well as from France, he produced

Daniel Baudovin: Who attested, That he lived with one Mr. De la Motte, at Rotterdam, about Two Years from 1690; where he observed vast Quantities of Alamodes and Lustrings to brought from Lyons, by Way of Lisle and Antwerp, to the said De la Motte's Warehouse; and he was employed to take off the French Seals from the said Goods, and affix Dutch Seals upon them:

That the said De la Motte had not above 12 Looms; and, in the whole time he lived with him, he did not send above 3 or 400 Pieces of his own Goods for England; but sent above 25,000 Pieces of the said French Goods, with the Seals altered, as aforesaid; which said Goods were put on board English and Dutch Men of War, in great Boxes, each of which did contain about 100 Pieces, and so brought them over hither:

That he was told, by Mr. De la Mott's Book-keeper, That the said Goods were consigned to several French Merchants here; viz. To Mr. Seignorett, Baudovin, Goudet, Barailleau, and Longueville; and that he had seen several Letters not signed, but, as the Book-keeper told him, they came from those Gentlemen; wherein they owned the Receipt of their said Goods, from time to time: And that Mr. De la Motte was made use of only as a Factor, by the Merchants of Lyons, to receive the said Goods from France; and, by exchanging their Seals, to transmit them secretly for England, as aforesaid:

That he had the greater Opportunity of knowing this Matter, not only as he was a Servant in constant Waiting, but was also Mr. De la Motte's general Inspector of all his said Looms.

Mr. Barry said, That the Manufacture of Lustrings hath been attempted in England, at several times, near 40 Years; but miscarried till set up by this Company: That, if these Silks were not imported, he believes there might be Ten times as many Looms employed; and the Persons employed by each Loom are, the Dyer, Loommaker, Harness-maker, Reed-maker, Winder, Warper, Quill-boy, Dresser, Weaver, Under-weaver, Enterer, and Undertakers:

That he was on a Jury, in Candlemas Term last was Two Years, when Mr. Seignoret was indicted upon a Seizure: That the Evidence was very full: John Pearse was Solicitor.

James Maugendre said, That he was employed, for Two or Three Years, by De la Motte, of Rotterdam, as a Workman at the Loom: That he came, on May the 25th, 1696, on board the Catherine, in the Maese, from Rotterdam, whereof one Nightingale was Master; and, the same Night, there were great Quantities of Silks, as he thinks, for they were made up like Alamodes and Lustrings, brought on board the said Ship, and removed, in the Night, on board the Helvoet, a Dutch Ship.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

Captain Joseph Sanders said, That, on the 11th of November 1692, he sent a Boat from Margate to Calais; John Lethered went Master about Eight Voyages between that time, and May 1694, and brought from 12 to 20 Packets each Return; only once he brought but Seven; and generally 8 or 10 Pieces in a Packet: That he was employed by one Rigden, who was his Partner, in about 100 Packets; and sent several Packets of Alamodes and Lace (as marked in Paper D) to John Rigden, Seignoret and Company, John Du Matre, Francis Grubert, Theodore Haultaine, Peter Dihearce, Boutandon, Mr. Hatton, Peter Barailleau, and Peter Gorey; and several Packets and Parcels of Silks to Mr. Didier, Mrs. Mason, Mr. Buckley, Mr. Singleton, Mr. Corbuzier, Mr. Wragg, Mr. Hart, Mr. Swething, Mr. Toms, and Mr. Ripper, as will more fully appear by the said Paper (marked D); which he delivered in to the Committee:

That he had Letters, by the Hands of Rigden, from some of the said Merchants in the said List directed to Bernard Gilbert, Mr. Pigault, and Mr. James Hayes, Merchants at Calais, for Lustrings Alamodes, and Lace: and received them accordingly:

That he commonly sent his Vessels over in Ballast, but once sent over 10 Bags of Wool; and being at Calais, from November 1696, to January following, he saw many of the French Sloops go out as often as the Weather would permit; and they took Silks on board them:

He saw once Seven go in one Day, and Eleven at another time; and saw above 100 Bags of Wool landed during the time he was there:

That there were about 17 single and double Sloops at Calais; Mr. Gilbert and Pigault were Owners, for the most Part, of Nine of them, as he was informed by themselves:

That he was paid 5 s. per Pound Weight Freight for Silks, and 6 s. per Pound Weight for Lace; and that his Boat was entered, for Protection, at Calais, Bulloign, and Dunkirk: That he sent John Winton once to Holland, and Antony Jewell twice to Rotterdam, in 1696, and 1697:

That his Boat being taken by the Chatham, and condemned, Pearce and Corbuzier promised to reimburse his Charges; but have not yet done it:

That he came from Holland, in September 1696; and Pearce contracted with him, in October following, for 100 Guineas, to carry Passengers to France; whom he afterwards knew to be Colonel Ingram, his Lady, and Niece, and her Woman, Mr. Wm. O Bryan, and Cardell Goodman; and they were landed at Calais:

That he sent and employed John Brady to Holland, to fetch Silks thence; and that the Providence, Wm. Otto Van Acker Master, did, in September 1696, bring about 28 Packets of Silks from Rotterdam, put on board by Barailleau, Didier, and others, as they owned to him, and landed them near Aldborough in Suffolk:

That, in 1694, he received from Arthur Goodwin, of Wivenhoo, in Essex, by the Hands of Thomas Child, 4 Packets of Silks, which he delivered to Peter Gorey, in Queen-street, by Guildhall:

That he was intrusted in the bringing over above 100 Packets of Flanders Lace from Holland:

That he had from 3 to 7 Guineas for Freight and De livery of some of those Packets:

That he delivered several Parcels to Sir Hen. Furnace; the last Parcel was about 3 or 4 Years since.

He produced a Bill of Lading, dated the 5th of August 1697, of 61 Parcels of Goods, being 45 Pieces of Alamodes, 6 Pieces of Lustrings, 45 Pieces of Muslin, 600 Pound Weight of Cocoa Nuts, 32 Necklaces, 70 Pound of Borax, set on board the Dragon, his Ship: The Goods were consigned to Mr. Blackwood, in Edinburgh; but were to be delivered to Mrs. Mason, Mr. Toms, Corbouzier, and Ripper, and others: They were delivered him at Rotterdam, and the Bill signed by Hayes, on Account of the said Merchants:

That, in September 1695, he sent Brady to Dort, at the Request of Mrs. Mason and Wragg, for Lustrings and Silk; but their Correspondents there, having some Jealousy of Brady, would not lade their Silks on board his Vessel.

Gabriel Tahaurdin said, That Mr. Hoffman, a Merchant of Lyons, did, in June 1694, offer him to Sale some Alamodes, which he had in Calais and Holland; but, he refusing to buy them, Hoffman said, He should be ruined, if he could not sell them: And told him further, That he was told in London, that, for 100,000 Crowns, the Patent of the Lustring Company might be broke; and that he was sure the Town of Lyons would most willingly give that Money,

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

Antony Jewell said, That they brought, in the said Dragon, the 2d of January last, 27 Parcels from Ostend, delivered by Joseph d' Egremont, consigned all to George Furnace:

That he went off to Calais, from between Dover and Folkstone, in November last, and carried 9 Packs of Fleece Wool, and 3 small Parcels, which he delivered to Mr. Pigault at Calais: That he saw Mr. Pigault make up 200 Pieces of Lustrings at his own House; he entered them at the Custom-house, and put them on board a Deal Hooker, whereof one Kite was the English Master; there was also a French Master in the Hooker; and she was bound to Rye: That he, most Days, saw French Sloops coming in with Wool, and going out with Silks, whilst he was at Calais.

Mr. John Ford said, That of the Goods seized by him, and now secured in his Majesty's Warehouse, Michael Billingham claims the French Gloves, Fans, Lace, and Muslins: It is proved, That the Three First belong to one Bedford, a Papist; and the last to Sir Henry Furnace.

Reny Harris claims 4 Packets of Lace, 46 Pieces of Cambrick, 13 Packets of Damask, and 3 Packets of Diaper; which are all proved to belong to Geo. Furnace, and were brought over by Jewell.

Anthony Didier claims the Borax and Cocoa, and Mr. Porter and Alston own 500 Pound Weight of Cocoa; the Borax belongs to Toms and Ripper; and Daniel De la Motte claims 45 Pieces of Muslin, of which 25 Pieces belong to Mrs. Mason, and 20 Pieces to one Burdett.

The Claims are made in sham Names, to put the Officer to great Charge and Trouble in condemning the Goods, and to prevent the further Penalties inflicted by Law.

Mr. John Thorp said, That he was employed, about May 1690, by Mr. Barailleau, to hire Boats to go to France: That, having a Boat ready, he received Orders, in Writing, from Barailleau, by Letter, and by Notes inclosed from Goudett, Seignoret, Gorey, and Du Matre, to Pigault, Molien, and Hautville, Gilbert and James Hayes, of Calais, to deliver Lustrings, Alamodes, and Black Lace: He received the Goods, and delivered them all to Barailleau; but they severally paid him Money for bringing the same, and thanked him for his Care: That the First Voyage he carried combed Wool, which he took in at Rumney Marsh: The Wool belonged to James Durden, John Bount, and Daniel Devine, all of Canterbury: Robert Smith went the First Voyage, and brought Bills for the Wool, and the Silks before-mentioned:

There was 20 s. a Pack paid to the Boatman for carrying over the Wool, and 15 s. a Pack for carrying the same from Canterbury to put it on board; and 5 s. for combed Wool being put on board out of the Marsh:

That all Persons living thereabouts are generally employed in the Owling-Trade; that not one in a Hundred but what is concerned therein: And he has heard several of those who live in the Marsh say, That if a Gallows was set up every Quarter of a Mile, yet they would carry the Wool off: That he has lived in Canterbury these 20 Years, and hath observed the said Trade hath always been carried on:

That the late Prosecutions have lessened this Trade; and that there hath not been a Quarter so much carried off last Year as formerly:

That he continued the said Trade for about 3 Years and an Half; and after the First 7 or 8 Months, he commonly sent 2 or 3 Boats in a Week, and brought over from 50 to 100 Packets of Silks in a Week: He managed for Kent; and Mr. Garland for Sussex; and, when he came to any Loss, then more Silks were sent to Garland; and, if Garland had any Loss, then they were sent to him, the said Thorpe.

That there are 10 or 12 Pieces of Silk in a Packet: That he had at once by him 1,760 Pound Weight of Silks and Lace: That those Silks are worth about 4 l. Sterling per Pound Weight; and about 4 Pound Weight of Silk in each Piece:

That he generally went freighted with Wool, and returned with Silks and Lace: That they commonly employed French Boats and Men, to prevent Discovery: That he believes 100 Packs of Wool at least were weekly sent to France from Rumney Marsh and Kent:

And gave in to the Committee a particular Account of Lustrings and Alamodes brought over in 1692 and 1693, which were put on board him by Messieurs Pigault, Gilbert, Molien, and Hautville, and James Hayes of Calais, consigned to the Direction of Peter Barailleau or Dinah Mason; for Peter Gorey, Seignoret and Company, Middy, Du Matre, Goudet and Company, Gairault, Debilly, Messieurs Auriolls, Montbrun, Grubert, Wayemburgh for Dihearce, Bedford, and Mrs. Parthon; and were delivered to Peter Barailleau, or Dinah Mason, at her House, as will more fully appear by the Paper marked E, which he gave in to the Committee; and said, That as much more at least had passed through his Hands, for the same Persons, in a few Years before:

That when the Place was appointed, to which the French Boats should come, then he used to give Notice to the People to get their Wool ready to bring down to the Boats.

Mr. Browne said, That, in October 1691, he was employed by Mr. Garland, of Lewis, in Sussex, to receive Silks and Lace; and ordered them to be delivered to Peter Barailleau, John De Seyne, Peter Dulivier, Wyembergh, Dihearce, Middy, Messieurs Auriolls, Pancier, Gorey, John Du Matre, Seignoret and Company, Debilly, Montbrun, Bedford, Goudet and Company, Grubert, Collins for Smith, Phillips, and John Guiguier; which he did accordingly.

Thomas Serjeant said, That he carried several Parcels for Mr. Brown; viz.
To Mrs. Mason and Barailleau, in Adam's Court, in Broad-street:
To John Deseyne, in Basinghall-street:
To Mr. Dulivier and Dihearse, in Nicolas-lane:
To Mr. Middy, in Basinghall-street:
To Messieurs Auriolls, in Aldermanbury Church yard:
To Mr. Pancier, in Bucklersbury:
To Mr. Gorey, in Great Queen-street:
To Mr. Du Matre, in Lawrence-lane:
To Mr. Montbrun and Debilly, in Bush-lane:
To Mr. Goudett, in the Old Jury: And
To Mr. Grubert, in Sweethings-lane:
That he saw Black Silks in several of the said Packets.

Samuel Blundell said, That he was sent by young Everden, in 1692/3, to Mr. De la Motte, in Rotterdam, who delivered him 24 Packets; and De la Motte said, They were French Silks; with Orders to deliver them at Orfordnesse, to Persons who would be ready to receive them: That they were delivered accordingly:

That he was sent by Everden, about 3 Months after, to one Verbergh, in Rotterdam; who delivered him, by the Hands of his Servants, 26 Packets, which he was directed to deliver at the same Place; and did so: The Vessel was called Thomas and Ellen; and he was ordered to London, where she was sold by Everden to Baillargeau, who made him again Master: Mr. Baillargeau sent her again to Rotterdam, to observe the Orders of one Aslin; and she was rebuilt by the said Aslin, who ordered her to sail in Ballast to Cork; but she was taken on the Back of the Goodwyn, and carried into Calais, where Mr. Aslin bought her, as he was told by Gilbert; who sent him over with 26 Packets of Silks, with Orders to land them 3 Miles Southward of Tinmouth:

That Mr. Gilbert ordered him to deliver the Goods to Persons who should set a white Handkerchief upon a Stick; which Sign was made him, and he delivered the Goods accordingly: He was paid by the Month, by Baillargeau: He went from Tinmouth again, by Order of Baillergeau, to Rotterdam, whence Aslin ordered him again to Cork; and he was taken again on the Goodwyn, carried again to Calais, bought by Aslin in a Fortnight, as Gilbert told him; who again put on board 26 Packets, which he delivered at the same Place, on the same Sign; thence he came for London: Baillargeau paid for the last Freight.

Mr. Thomas Goodwin said, That Mrs. Poole and Mr. Dihearce procured a counterfeit Seal, in Imitation of that at the Custom-house, by the Means of one William Pawlett; and that, in 1694, he saw Mr. Dihearce and Mrs. Pool apply the said Seal to at least 50 Pieces of Lustrings and Alamodes, which Mrs. Pool received of Mr. Dihearce; and, he believed, they sealed great Quantities of such Goods; for she has traded with him for the Value of several 1,000 l.: That the Custom-house Seal is so well counterfeited, that, upon a Tryal between Beverton and Mrs. Poole, the Goods seized were discharged, upon Belief that it was the true Custom-house Seal:

That one Francis Bitell, a Servant to, and employed by, the Lustring Company, in sealing Lustring and Alamodes at the Custom-house, gave to Mrs. Poole many blank Indentures, to affix to the Seals to be put upon French Silks.

Mr. Till produced to the Committee, Two Pieces of French Silks, belonging to Mrs. Barbara Hutton, which he had seized; and had, affixed to them Indentures and Seals, which appeared to be counterfeit.

Peter Lauze said, That he had lived in Lyons above 30 Years, and dealt all the time in Lustrings: That there are 2,500 Master-Weavers, and about 4,000 Looms there for Alamodes; each Loom may make about 10 or 12 Pieces in a Year: That, when the Trade was open, he knew 7 or 8 Houses here, which received each about the Value of 100,000 Crowns: That Lustrings are only made at Lyons:

That Lyons does all they can to hinder the setting up the said Manufacture in other Places, particularly in England; and that they commonly sell Silks at under Rates to break those who make them elsewhere:

That Mr. Seignorett, whilst he lived at Lyons, about 15 Years ago, sent over a Dresser to dress some Alamodes, damaged in their Carriage to England; and that the Town of Lyons did keep Mr. Seignorett in Prison, till the said Dresser returned.

John Montaut spoke to the same Effect, except as to Mr. Seignorett.

Mr. Montgeorge said, That he came over from Holland, about a Year and a Half before the late Revolution, with his Father, who was a Dresser of Silk; and that, about 7 Months after they had been here, his Father was sent for by Monsieur Barrillon, then the French Embassador here, who told his said Father, That both he and his Son should have good Employments in France, if they would return thither; to which End, his said Father being in Debt, the said Monsieur Barillon ordered him 75 l. to clear the same; which was paid him here by Mr. Dulivier; and gave him a Bill for 75 l. more, payable at Rouen in Normandy; which was also paid him; and gave him a Letter to Monsieur Lovois; which he delivered to him, but could get no Answer thereto in Four Months time; when he told him, That, as he had received the said Money in England, and at Rouen, he had nothing more to say to him: Upon which, despairing of any Employment, they intended to make their Way again to England; the which the Son performed, by the Disguise of an Italian; but his Father was taken at Diep, and sent Prisoner to Cordubeck in Normandy; where he was kept about Six Weeks, and thence sent to the Citadel at Arras, where he now remains, or is dead; his said Son never being able to hear any thing of him since.

William Whatton said, That, in 1690, 91, and 92, he seized about 5 or 6,000 l. worth of Lustrings; 30 Packets at Brabourn Lees, and 12 Packets at Folkestone Warren, of Alamodes and Lace, and 10 Packets at Maidston; and Underwood, his Partner, seized in Folkstone Warren 1,800 l. worth of Silk.

Edward Anderson said, That, from 1690 to 95, he seized 330 Packs of Wool, and about 1,500 l. worth of Silks; the Wool he seized in Kent, and the Silks in Canterbury and Lydd.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

John Brady said, That he was employed by old Everden for about 10 years, to bring Lustrings from Calais and Diep; and used to land them at Arundell and Orfordnesse: That he went Six or Seven Voyages before the War, and brought over from 10 to 20 Packets at a Voyage:

That Everden sent him, in May 1694, to Calais, in the Providence: He had no Pass, but was assured by Everden, that he should be safe when he came to France; and, to that End, he was to put out a Lantern at his Boltsprit; upon doing whereof a Boat came off to bring him in; and he was carried befor the Governor at Calais; and Bernard Gilbert, the said Everden's Correspondent, produced to the said Governor a Tin Box and Parchment; upon reading whereof, he the said Brady was permitted to go about his Business; and he then received, from him the said Gilbert, and Pigault, at Calais, 28 or 30 Packets of Silks; which he brought over for England, and landed them at Orfordnesse, and delivered them to Francis Neave, the Lighthouse-man: That Everden paid the said Brady 7 l. 10s. per Month:

That Everden sent him, in April before, into Holland, to De la Motte, De Brasse, and Esselton; and they delivered 17 or 18 Packets to him; which he brought over, landed, and delivered them at Orfordnesse, as aforesaid:

That he went twice more that Year to Rotterdam, to the aforesaid Persons, and one Elbeuf; from whom he had 17 or 18 Packets each time; and which he brought over to Orford Port, and delivered them to one Cosins, and one Capes, who was a Servant to one Mr. Hooks there; which said Hooks used sometimes to pay Brady his Wages for Everden:

That, in October 1696, he the said Brady, the said Cosins, and Capes; were employed by young Everden, to setch 18 or 20 Packets from the Lighthouse; the which they carried to MatthewScawlding's House, at Blackstock; where one Thomas Wright, and Roger Beard, received them on Horseback:

That he carried one Packet to a little House near to Mr. Hooks's Dwelling-house, and upon his Ground:

That he had a Letter sent him from young Everden, by the Name of Green, with a Paper of Directions what he should do, in case of his being taken by the French (which is marked G):

That he made one Voyage from Aldborough, in 1693, to Rotterdam, in the John and Matthew; and received from De la Motte 17 Packets of Silk; which he brought over, and delivered to one William Wade, at Sesewell, near Alborough, and 50 or 60 Bags of Coffee and Cocoa: The which Goods he so received from De la Motte, upon a Letter from young Everden.

Thomas Cosins, of Orford, said, That, about 1694, he and Thomas Capes, received, from on board John Brady's Ship, at Orford, about 18 Packets, made up like Silks; which he carried over the Marsh a Mile or Two in Capes' Cart, and then left them, with Capes to go forward with them; for which Service, it being in the Night-time, he was paid 10s.:

That, in 1694, young Everden employed him, twice or thrice, to fetch such-like Goods from the Lighthouse near Orford; which he brought to a little Cottage on Mr. Hooks's Ground hired by Everden for that Purpose and to one Scawlding's House; for which Services Capes or Everden always paid him:

That, about 18 Months since, he setched Two Vessels, about as big as an Anchor of Brandy, from the said Lighthouse, and put them into Mr. Hook's Stable; as also, about the same time, he and Brady carried about Eight Packets of Goods from the said Lighthouse to Blackstock, where they delivered them to Tho. Wright, and one Rogen Beart, (Everden's Man,) and Matth. Scawlding:

That there are many Holes and Hiding-places contrived in and about the Lighthouses, for secreting Goods run thither, as aforesaid.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

Thomas Capes owned the receiving and helping the said Cosins to carry off the said Goods from Brady's Ship, and from the said Lighthouse; and that, after they had conveyed them safe to a little Shed in Mr. Hookes's Ground, he conveyed them thence to Blackstock; and there delivered them over to one Thomas Wright, and one Peck, who was Everden's Man:

That he has been employed 6 or 7 times by Everden to fetch such-like Goods off the Beach, in the Nighttime; and had 4 or 5 Packets delivered to him out of the Lighthouse, by old Neave, for Everden.

Thomas Wright owned the receiving the said Goods from Capes; and that, when he had them, he carried them on Horses to a Heath between Ixor and Brand; and Beart, Everden's Man, rode with him: And, when he came in Sight of several Persons coming towards them, Beart ordered him to unlade the Goods upon the Ground, and return back before the Persons came up; so that he could never tell who they were that carried the Goods further on: And was paid for such Carriage 20s. for One Horse, and 40s. for Two Horses Lading, about Thirty Miles: And has been employed Three or Four times in the like Service, by young Everden; and always had the Goods from the before-mentioned Place, and carried them to the said Heath, as aforesaid.

Mr. Abel Boroughs said, That, about Three Years since, Thomas Dewy brought to his House about 20 Packets and Bundles of Silk Lace, and other things, out of a Dutch Man of War; and that he used frequently to bring such things unto his House, for about Two Years before; and believes he brought, in that time, between Two and Three hundred Parcels; where he kept the same for him; after they were so brought from the Dutch Ships, till the Custom-house Boats were gone off from waiting; and then they were brought from his House, and put into Dewy's Boats, and so brought away for London; for which he was paid Half a Crown a Parcel, for keeping them at his House, and then putting them into Dewy's Boats, as aforesaid; and was often paid by Barailleau, who was employed by and for Peter Gorey and John Dumatre:

That Mandre and Towsy, Two Watermen, brought him Forty Packets of Silks, and Seven Boxes of Velvet, which they had again from him; and he was paid by Barailleau for keeping them:

That Dewy and his Man also brought to him Two Parcels of Raw Silks, one of 150 Pound Weight, and the other of 60 Pound Weight:

That, when the said Goods were so put ashore, and brought to his House, his Son and himself used to put them into Hogsheads, which they had, for that Purpose, set in the Ground in his Orchard, and about his House; and they, putting on the Lids of the Hogsheads, used to cover them with Earth:

That, about Six Years ago, he delivered Four or Five Packets of Lustrings to Mr. Barailleau; which he received from John Thorp at Canterbury:

That he delivered Eighteen or Twenty Packets to Dewey, since his falling out with Barailleau; and that Dewy told him, He would keep them till he was satisfied by Barailleau:

And that he himself compounded with the Officers for Fifty Pounds when he was taken; and so stopt the Goods that were brought to him by Mandre and Dewy till he was paid that Money; but is still Seventeen Pounds out of Pocket:

That Gorey and Du Matre were the Merchants who employed Dewy for the Eighteen or Twenty Pieces or Packets he brought to his House; which was after he had fallen out with Barailleau.

Abel Burroughs, the Son, said, He used to help his Father in carrying the said Goods from the Water-side to his House, and disposing of them when there, as aforesaid.

Mr. Sansom, Secretary to the Commissioners of the Customs, by Mr. Earle, laid before the Committee, by their Order, Two Accounts of what Gold was seized, upon Exportation, belonging to Mr. Seignoret; and of his Compositions with Mr. Ford (which are marked H.)

Mr. Le Keux laid before the Committee the Proposals (marked I) sent them by the Duke of Shrewsbury, for settling a Correspondency in Piedmont, in order to send our Woollen Manufacture thither, to have Returns in Silk: To which End, about Two Years since, they sent one Paul le Bass to Genoa, with about Fifteen hundred Pounds-worth of Woollen Manufacture, but could not dispose of the same, where some still remain unsold, because the Duties on our Cloth in Piedmont are double what the French pay for their Cloths.

Mr. Grubert, a French Merchant, owned there was a Contribution made by the French Traders, to secure themselves in their Practices of running French Silks against the Company; and that he paid Twenty Guineas, as his Proportion thereto, to Mr. Lambert, a Goldsmith, in 1694; but, relinquishing the said Trade soon after, received his Money again, by Mr. Barrau's Order, from Mr. Lambert.

And the Committee, thinking fit thereupon to examine Mr. Lambert's Books, who kept Cash for several of the Merchants concerned in the Smuggling-Trade, did find therein considerable Sums paid to Everden, Pearse, Saunders, and both the Garlands; as will appear by the Paper marked K.

There was also an Account delivered in, by the Commissioners of the Customs, of the Persons who have been prosecuted and convicted, or compounded with, for importing French Silks and Lace, since the Year One thousand Six hundred and Ninety; who are Mr. Francis Grubert, Mr. John Du Matre, Mr. John Gowdet, Mr. Bartholomew Middy, Mr. Peter Longueville, Mr. David Barrau, William Grover, Mr. Abel Burroughs, Mr. Dickson, Charles Sherman, Mr. Egerton, Isaac Rickecy, Robert Norman, John and Isaac Auriol, Thomas Evans, Francis Holmes, Peter Barailleau, Joseph Saunders, Peter Gorey, Stephen Seignoret, Laurence Noakes, William Garland, Henry Tapsfeild, Richard Parker, John De Seyne, John Harrison, John Frankwell, Peter Collier, Mary Oliver, Thomas Crouch, John Warden, James Tully, Joseph Buckley, Thomas Dewy, John Muscaret, Edward Singleton, John and James Porter, Thomas Grible, and Edward Hasewell; as appears by that Account (marked L.)

The Commissioners of the Customs did also deliver in to the Committee an Account of the Quantity and Customs of Alamodes and Lustrings imported and exported since the First of May 169 2/3, (marked M); by which it appears, That there have been entered, at the Custom-house only, 1,199 Pieces, weighing 4,280 ¾lb. for which there was Custom paid, 2,620 l. 15s. 6d.; of which said Silks there have been exported 1,127 Pound Weight, for which the Drawback amounted to 647 l. 16s. 9d.; though it is manifeft the French Merchants, and others, have dealt for very great Quantities of the said Sort of Silks.

That it did appear to the Committee, by several Letters, produced by Mr. Baker, which were intercepted by the Government, That Mr. Dihearce hath dealt with Persons in France for French Silks, and carried on the said Correspondence in sham Names, which he took to himself, and gave to his Correspondents; as will more fully appear by the said Letters, and Bills of Exchange, inclosed in the same.

Then the Committee proceeded to the Examination of the Books and Papers seized in Mr. Goudet's Custody; whereby it appears, That there are in the Copy-Book, N° A, 472 Letters writ to several Persons in France and Holland, concerning the fraudulent Importation of French Alamodes and Lustrings, by Way of Holland, by French Privateers, from Calais, and by English Boats: And that there are also contained, in the Copy-Book C, 72 Letters, writ to the same Purpose: But the Committee, being desirous to give the House as little Trouble as may be, have made an Abstract of what hath been found most material in the said Books and Papers; which they have drawn up under several Heads; and is as followeth:

References to the Copy-Book, N° A, and the Copy-Book, N° C; and a Collection of Letters, marked Coll.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

A REPORT of what hath been found most material in Messieurs Goudet, Barrau, and Longuevill's Books, Papers, and Letters, seized and delivered to the Committee, to whom the Petition of the Royal Lustring Company was referred; as will appear by their Copy-Book of Letters, N° A, beginning the 20th Day of January 169 0/1;, and ending the 13th Day of January 169 frac23;; and their Copy-Book of Letters, N° C, beginning the 9th Day of August 1695, and ending the 15th Day of May 1696; and the Answers to the Letters contained in the said Copy-Books, concerning the fraudulent Importation of French Alamodes and Lustrings, by Way of Holland, and from Calais into England; and by their Cash-Book, beginning the 31st Day of August 1695, and ending the 28th Day of April 1697; and by their Ledger-Book, marked A, beginning the 17th Day of September 1695, and ending the 16th Day of March 169 6/7;.

HEADS proved by Letters to and from the Correspondents of Goudet and Company. An ABSTRACT of what is most material in the said Letters, relating to the several Heads.
1. To prove, That, by Garrances, is meant Alamodes; by Carts and Calesches, Boats; by Geneva and Bruges, the City of Lyons; by Ostend, Calais; and by Oxon, London. Vide Letters. Letter 1st. From Mr. Philibert, N 1, March 11, 169 2/3. Mr. Vignon, who gave Credit to 400 Looms, being broke, you shall not have so much Garrances in London.
Letter 2d. From Petrequin, Coll. 1 July 1696. And
Letter 3d. 14th of June 1696.
Dated from no Place; indorsed by Goudet, as from Lyons; and the Letter of the 14th June, dated 96, dated from Geneva.
Letter 4th. From Bd. Guilbert, A, N 5, 3 Mar. 9 2/3. Dated from Ostend; indorsed by Goudet, as from Calais.
Martin Francon, Dan. Smith, John James White, are Goudet and Company. Letter 5. To Bernard Gilbert, C, Fo. 5, 6 Sep. 1695. As to the Garrances that you have for us, the Calesch, that ought to be sent to you, is gone into Holland, to take in her Ballast: From henceforth we shall sign our Letters Martin Francon.
Letter 6. From Micoud, A, N 5, 15 Oct. 1693. One of my Letters hath been sent back, because they do not know Daniel Smith at your Post-Office.
Letter 7. From Petrequin, A, N 8, 26 Sep. 93. Direct to Daniel Smith; indorsed by Goudet, as from Lyons.
Letter 1. From Melchior Philibert, A, N 1, Mar. 11, 9 2/3. From Bruges to John James White, at Oxford; indorsed by Goudet, as from Lyons.
2. To prove, That several Persons in England were in Combination to carry on the Smuggling-Trade; and particularly Messieurs Seignoret and Goudet, who were Committeemen of the Royal Lustring Company; and had taken an Oath to be faithful to the said Company, but have betrayed the same. Vide Letter 8. To Fran. De Costa, C, Fo. 4, 3d Sept. 1695. Mr. Seignoret and Goudet, have been most concerned in setting up the Trade of Silks; De Costa was Partner of Seignoret.
Letter 9. To ditto DeCosta, C, Fo. 45, 29 Oct. 95. As for our Trade in Alamodes, we deal for them in Company with Mr. Seignorett, and other Friends; therefore he shall give the Directions therein.
Letter 10. To Bernard Guilbert, C, Fo. 22, 1 Oct. 1695. We have an Invoice of Goods of Mr. Couvreur and Hartner; by Mr. Seignorett and Company have loaden Silks for themselves upon the Ship Fortune: We desire you would not send any for us in the same Ship.
Letter 11. To Couvreur and Comp. C, F. 31, 8 Oct. 1695. Whereupon we have writ to the said Mr. Guilbert, to send us nothing in the same Calesch wherein he sends, to Mr. Seignoret and Baudouin, 30 Pieces on your Account.
Letter 12. To Cusset, C, Fo. 79, 13 Decem. 1695.
Letter 34. And Fo. 29, 8 Oct. 1695. Very material.
Mr. Guilbert having put 3 or 4 Bales on board the Fortune, perhaps he may put more on board the Two other Calesches; and having Yesterday inquired what Goldsmith is, we will order him this Night to send 20 Pieces at a time by him, because we have had a good Character of him: We will also inquire as to Everden, and will make use of him as we find him.
Letter 13. To Guilbert, C, Fo. 134, 7 Feb. 169 3/6;. We conceal from all the World, except the Confederates, that we drive this Trade: Send the Bale FG, N 2; and rather leave behind those directed to Seignoret, Baudouin, and Santini.
Letter 15. To Tho. Herbert, C, Fo. 186, 10 Apr. 1696. For the Alamodes of F. (or France); deliver them to Peter Barailleau, of Rotterdam.
Ltter 16. To Bernard Guilbert, C, Fo. 187, ditto 96. Load Four Bales for Mr. Couvreur and Hartner; for Banuditty or Seignoret, as per Letter here above (C. Fo. 22, and Fo. 31.) will hazard little or nothing for those Friends.
3. To prove a Correspondence between Persons in England and Merchants in Lions, Calais, and Holland, for the Vide The Letters and Answers; and from
Letter 17. To Hubert and Son, A, Fo. 161, August 12, 92.
We see that you will agree with Mr. De la Motte for the Three Pieces lost; the 24 Pieces sent by Mistake to Messieurs Auriols . . . have delivered to us, and so Matters are set right.
Smuggling Trade, and Importation of great Quantities of Alamodes and Lustrings, by Way of Holland, and directly from France. Letter 18, and 19. To Severin Cheze, A, Fo. 163, 16 August 1692, and 225, 6 Jan. 169 2/3. When you send us any Goods from Calais, pray, for the future, write upon the Cover of every Piece containing 65 Ells, that the Length is only 45, and every Piece of 55 Ells, that the Length is only 40; for, if any Accident happen, they are valued according to the Marks set upon the Cover: By these means we may save much.
Letters 20, 21, 22, and 23. To John Peterquin: To Mr. Philibert, John Baptist Cusset, and Couvreur and Hartner; C, N° 104. The Four Letters of the 9 August 1695. We writ to Mr. Philibert, That our Partnership would break up at the End of this Month: And now we acquaint you, That every new Society will write to their Friends, in order to carry on their Trade as they shall think fit. Mr. Goudet, and other Friends, have formed a Project: Goudet hath erected the new Project, to the Purpose: We received the Copy of the Passport. In a new Project, new Persons ought to be employed; therefore Brady is turned out, &c. Goudet hath laid the Foundation of the new Project, &c.
Letter 5. To Bernard Guilbert, C, Fo. 5, 6 Sep. 95. In the same Cart you had Two Months ago, send Four Packets for each Friend: Put not above 30 Pieces for Philibert, and 30 for Cusset, and nothing for Couvreur and Company; Seignoret will send you Directions therein.
Letter 24. To Melch. Philibert, C, Fo. 13, 13 Sep. 95. We have received your Invoice of a Bale of Garrances.
Letter 10. To Bernard Guilbert, C, Fo. 22, 1 Oct. 95. We told you, That the Cart Fortune is a Dane: Couvreur, and Hartner have writ to our old Company, That they have Garrances in your Hands; but, since you have others also to be disposed of as Mr. Seignoret, and others, shall direct; and that they have writ to you to send about 30 Pieces in the said Cart; pray send none for us of those Gentlemens Goods.
Letter 25. Ditto, C, Fo. 67, 29 Novem. 1695. Send us at least Two Packets of Mr. Couvreur's Goods, by the Ship Fortune; and do not send any of our Friends Goods to us, but as our Company shall direct.
Letter 11. To Couvreur and Hartner, C, Fo. 31. 8 Oct. 95. We have received your Letter, and Invoice of one Bale you have sent us; whereupon we have writ to Mr. Guilbert, to send us nothing in the same Calesch wherein he sends, to Mr. Seignoret and Baudouin, 30 Pieces on your Account.
Letter 12. To John Baptist Cusset, C, Fo. 79, 13 Dec. 1695. They acquaint him, That they order Mr. Guilbert, by that Post, to send them 20 Pieces at a time, by Goldsmith.
Letter 26. To Ditto, C, Fo. 144. 18 Feb. 1695/6. We have received by the Fortune, N° 1, and 3, and hourly expect N° 2: We have sold N° 3, at 4s. 10d.
Letter 27. To Bernard Guilbert, C, Fo. 197, 21 Apr. 96. Send us the Bale belonging to Couvreur and Hartner, which consists of Five Packets, each containing Five Pieces: The Two Bales, N° 224, and 225, sent us on Philibert's Account, are come safe.
Letter 28. From Petrequin, Coll. 14 Jan. 1695/6. I wonder at Brady's, and the other Vessel's Delay, which have Passports, and are bound to C. I have no Account, that my Five Bales are sent.
Letter 29. From Cosset, Coll. 24 May, 4 June 1696. I do not doubt but you have received my Four first Bales, and that you have sold them: You must be more exact in writing to me, and sending me the net Proceed, if you will encourage me to deal with you. B. G. has sent you Three Carriages, whereof N° 1, and N° 2, have delivered their Cargo upon the Coast; and I expect to hear, that you have received, from each of them, Three Bales, for my Account: There is more sent you by Goldsmith. I have sent you an Invoice of the Case, N° 3, which contains Six Packets.
Letter 30. From Peterquin, Coll. 5 July 1696. I expect to have an Account, how you have disposed of my Three Bales, N° 22, 23, and 24; and the net Proceeds; and that you will send to Mr. Guilbert for my other Eight Packets, which he has for you.
Letter 31. From Rickesies of Sandwich, Coll. Feb. 18, 1694. Having been employed by you, for the receiving and forwarding Silks and Lace; and an Information being brought against me; Mr. Pearse does advise, to agree the Business; and it is compounded at an easy Rate: So that I desire, every Person concerned will contribute in proportion to reimburse my Charge. The Goods are, Five Packets for Goudet and Company; Six for Viret, alias Grubert; Four for Wayemberg; One for Redoule, alias Tutet; Two for Middy; and One for Boutandon.
4. To prove, That, by Order of Goudet, and others, the French Seals were taken off from the French Alamodes, at Rotterdam, and Dutch Seals put in their Place, that the said French Alamodes might be sent into England, as if made in Holland.
It was one Mr. De la Motte, of Rotterdam, that had the Direction of that Affair:
And Ferdinando Ravoud, who is absconded, was the Manager between the Merchants of Lyons and those of London.
Vide Letters. Letter 32. To Mr. Micoud, of Lyons, A, Fo. 182, 4 Octo. 1692. We shall order Mr. Galacini, this Night, to deliver your Bale, N° 15, to Dan. De la Motte; and De la Motte to take off all the Italian Writings and Stamps, and to affix Dutch Seals in their place: If Galacini had been so able to affix the Dutch Seals as De la Motte is, he would have saved the Charge of a Commission.
Letter 33. To Dan. De la Motte, A, Fo. 84, 20 Oct. 1691. We are willing to try how the fixing your Seals will succeed, allowing One per Cent. for it, and we will run the Hazard of the Goods; for the Charge of Insurance, at 16 per Cent. is extravagant.
Letter 34. To Cusset, C, Fo. 29, 8 Oct. 1695. It is not any one House that sells the Goods, but a young Man, who, in case of Prosecution, can leave this Country.
Letter 35. From Cussett, Coll. 1 Jan. 169 6/7;. Ferdinand Ravaud hath writ to me about the Business I had with Mr. Martin Francon.
5. To prove, That Goudet and others, have made use of John Thorp, under the Name of John Jacob; of Goldsmith, of Everden, Brady, Garland, and others; to bring Alamodes into England. Letter 36. To Melchior Philibert, A, Fo. 170, 6 Sep. 92. We have received 20 Pieces by Jacob, the 30th past: We acquainted you, that we had 10 Pieces by Jacob, of your Case, B. N°24.
Letter 37. From Pigault, A, N 2, 3d Jan. 9 2/3. Garland intending to sail by the first fair Wind, I have taken the Packet, P H, N° 12, out of Everden's Ship, and put it into Garland's; there remains P H, N° 22, on board Everden.
Letter 28. From Petrequin, Coll. 14 Jan. 1695/6. I wonder at Brady's, and the other Vessel's Delay, which have Passports, and are bound to C.
Letter 39. From Cussett, Coll. 8 March 1695/6. I wonder I have not heard from you by this Post, since some Friends, who are concerned, as well as myself, in Blundell's Ship, have Advice, that their Goods are not only delivered, but sold.
Letter 29. From ditto, Coll. 24 May 1696. There are Goods sent by Goldsmith, who is sailed; and, without doubt, there are some put on board him upon my Account.
6. To prove, That the said Goudet, &c. had French Passports for English Vessels. Vide Letter 21. To Melch. Philibert, C, N 104, 9 August 1695. We have received the Copy of the Passport.
Letter 40. To ditto, C, Fo. 28, 8 Oct. 1695. We think the Security given for the Passport is very extraordinary; and say, That they have shifted off Brady from being Master of their Ship.
Letter 41. To ditto, C, Fo. 36, 18 Oct. 1695. We have writ to Mr. Baudran, at Paris, to know how far we are engaged by the Security he has given; and we are upon agreeing with a Person, who is fit to make the Voyage. To the 449 l. 16s. which you have laid out, we have added 1 and ½ per Cent. which makes 456 l. 10s. We thank you for your Care in this Business.
N. B. It appears by Goudet's Cash-Book, Fo. 4, and Ledger, Fo. 103. That the Sum of 456 l. 10s. was remitted to Mr. Philibert on the 18th of October 1695, for a Passport.
Letter 42. To Baudran, C, Fo. 114, 17 Jan 95/6. He is desired to procure a new Passport for the Providence: Mr. Philibert will pay you what you lay out.
Letter 44. To Baudran, C, Fo. 129, 31 Jan. 1695/6 N. B. We writ to you the 17th, and desired you would solicit for a new Passport. We have received a Letter from Mr. Philiberet; wherein he desires us to return you the Passport we had, in order to have it renewed; and you have it inclosed. This Letter was intercepted, with Passport in it.
Letter 44. To Baudran, C, Fo. 129, 31 Jan. 1695/6. N.B. We writ to you the 17th, and desired you would solicit for a new Passport. We have received a Letter from Mr. Philibert; wherein he desires us to return you the Passport we had, in order to have it renewed; and you have it inclosed. This Letter was intercepted, with the Passport in it.
Letter 44. To Philibert, C, Fo. 150, 21 Feb. 169 3/6; We have sent back the old Passport to Mr. Baudran, desiring to have it renewed; and pray write to him, to have it renewed, or to procure another. We are resolved to have a Dutch Master, who is more faithful, and less liable to be prosecuted.
Letter 45. To Baudran, C, Fo. 168, 13 March 95/6. Pray renew your Endeavours to obtain what we desire of you; and speak to Mr. Samuel Bernard; for a Friend of ours, concerned in the same Project, hath writ to him about it, that he may join with you in the more easy procuring of the Passport: The Captain's Name is William Otto Van Aker, who will have Two Men and a Boy, besides himself.
7. To prove, That Goudet and Company have prevented a Treaty of Commerce with the Duke of Savoy. Letter 46. To Camp and Lullin, C, Fo. 129, 31 Jan. 9 5/4; We do advise you, That the Weavers Case was heard at the House of Lords, and their Petition was rejected, contrary to the Opinion of most People: They have yet Hopes from the House of Commons; to whom they now apply themselves: But our Opinion is, That they will be rejected there also; for we know the Lustring Company hath more Creatures there, than in the House of Lords.
Letter 47. To ditto, C, Fo. 137, Feb. 7, 95/6 The Lustring Company doth again solicit for an Order, That my Lord Galway shall desire his Royal Highness of Savoy to exempt them from all Customs upon the Woollen Manufactures, which they shall send into Piedmont: You must engage some Favourite, by any means, to prevent it, if possible.
Letter 48. To ditto, C, Fo. 177, 31 Mar. 1696. We are much obliged to you for the Account you gave us, of the Duties laid upon Goods brought into Piedmont; whereof the Company expected an Abatement: We always hoped they would not succeed therein; but it is fit to thwart them.
Letter 49. From ditto Lullin, C, Fo. 129, Feb. 28, 1695/6 As to the Design the Company had to obtain Privileges upon their importing English Cloth into Piedmont, it has been laid . . . . . long since; and my Lord Galway applied himself to his Royal Highness for it: But be assured, they will never obtain any Abatement: That Prince knows his Interest too well; and this Project will fail.
Letter 50. From ditto, C, Fo. 137, 13 March 1695/6 Some time since my Lord Galway desired, of this Court, an Abatement of the Duties upon English Commodities; but the Ministers did not think fit to advise it. This very Day we imparted your Letters, as soon as they came, to . . Friend, who is a Favourite and Minister, and will prevent my Lord Galway's obtaining what he desires in this Business.

Then the Committee proceeded to hear several in Defence of themselves; the Persons charged with corresponding with France, and importing French Lustrings, and Alamodes and Lace.

And Mr. Goudet, being asked, Whether a Copy-Book of Letters, marked A, then shewed him, and which was taken in his Custody, was his Book? said, in Answer,

That, his Books having been Ten Months out of his Hands, he cannot remember whether it be his Book, unless he should examine it Article by Article, and Sum by Sum; and for that the same have been in the Lustring Company's Hands, who are his Enemies, and have threatened his Ruin: He has Reason to believe they have been counterfeited, and so cannot own them:

And that he should give the same Answer to all the rest of the Books and Papers, then lying before the Committee, having been advised by Counsel; and did so, when they were produced to him; though seized in his Custody, with the Copy-Book of Letters aforesaid.

And being shewed the Letter of the 31st of January 1695/6, signed G and B; wherein the French King's Passport was inclosed, which seems to be sealed with a Seal, which he himself delivered to Mr. Baker, upon the seizing his Books and Papers; he said, That he does not remember he ever wrote such a Letter, or knows that the Seal is his; for that Seals may be counterfeited: That he used to seal his Letters with different Seals:

That he does not know the Passport, or remember any such thing:

That he knows De la Motte, but not Baudovin: That De la Motte is his Correspondent, to whom he sends over the Woollen Manufacture: and that he never wrote to him for any French Silks; and if he, at any time, received any Silks from him, he took them for Dutch Silks, and paid Custom for them here:

That he never made use of Thorp, nor ever saw him, till about Four Years ago, when he was brought to him by Barailleau, who desired him to lend Thorp 50 l.; which he did upon Barailleau's Account; but is not repaid it:

That, soon after, Thorp, did inform against him, for running of Silks; and he was persuaded, by Mr. Hilary Reneu, and Mr. Firmin, to compound for 850 l.

That, for Quietness Sake, he paid the Officer 425 l. Mr. Firmin and Mr. Reneu promising to beg for him the King's Part of the said Composition; but, instead of that, they exclaimed against him to the Secretary of State, and prevented his obtaining it:

That he never received any Silks, or other Goods, from Thorp, directly or indirectly; nor gave him any Letter, nor sent any to him:

That he does not know Brown, nor Sergeant; nor ever had any Silks from either of them:

That, as to the Money charged, in Mr. Lambert's Books, to his Account, he saith, That he hath, as a Merchant, paid Money for Goods bought here, or upon Bills of Exchange:

That the Money paid to Mr. Pearse might be left in his Hands by him:

That, as to the Money paid Saunders, he knows nothing of it; having never seen him but since the Sitting of the Committee:

That as to the Money paid Ravaud, it was upon Bills of Exchange:

That it is suggested against him, That he is an Enemy to Trade in general, and in particular to the Lustring Company:

To which he said, He exports as much of our Woollen Manufactures as any Merchant; and with Raw Silks, which he imports in Return for the same, he employed the Weavers here to make Alamodes and Lustrings; and, in April last, kept 400 Looms at Work, and made better Goods than the Company:

That the Lustring Trade is decayed, in Part, because other Silks are more worn than formerly.

Mr. Barrau, Mr. Goudett's Partner, said, That he was in Holland when the Books and Papers were seized, with the Seal, and knows nothing of them: That he knows not the Seal, nor remembers that they used to seal with a Seal marked G and B.

Mr. Longueville, another Partner, said, That he never dealt in the Lustring Trade, but only in that of the Woollen Manufacture:

That he was in Partnership with Goudet and Barrau for the Whole; but believes that Goudet had some particular Commerce:

That he knows nothing of the Money charged, to be paid in Lambert's Books; but that he did pay his Share of the Composition-money to Thorp, upon the Information against Mr. Goudet:

That he is now parted from the Partnership; though they have not settled any Account, nor given each other any Discharge; but as Debts, that were standing out, are paid, they account for them to each other.

Mr. Buckley said, That he never received any French Silks from abroad: That he knows Captain Saunders, but never had or bought any Goods of him; but only, that the Captain, about a Year and Half since, left a Piece of French Silk at his House, and desired him to sell it for him; and he did so; and gave the Captain the Money, being about 8 l.; and had no other Dealings with him, only once was Bail for him upon a Quarrel.

Mr. Wragg said, That Saunders' Testimony was false; for that he never had any Dealings with him; nor ever received any French Silks from abroad, directly or indirectly; but that, what Silks he had, he bought here in Town, and mostly of the Company: That he does not know Brady, nor did he ever send him to Dort.

Mr. Girault said, That he never had any Silks from Thorp or Barailleau, nor from France.

Mr. Haultain said, That he does not know Saunders, nor ever had any thing to do with him; nor does he know any thing of the Matter.

Whereupon, Mr. Saunders produced Letters from Persons in Calais; whereby it did appear, That several Parcels of the said Silks were consigned to Haultain, and others, and to be conveyed to them by him.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

Messieurs Auriolls said, That they never saw Thorp; nor ever had any Silks from Barailleau, or from France; nor do they remember they ever had any Goods from Brown:

That, as to any Money they paid to Everden, it was by Bill or Orders from Friends; they never had any Silks from him:

That the Money paid to Barailleau was by Bills of Exchange; but knows not upon what Account any Money was paid Pearse or Saunders:

That the Money paid to John Garland, was for his buying a Place for them to set up a Still-house in, for making of Brandy; the which he not effecting, they had their Money again: The Money paid to Ravaud was upon Bills.

Mrs. Mason said, That Mr. Rape did search her House; and told her, That he took the Piece of Silk from her Maid, which he now says he found under Ravaud's Bed:

That she owns the Seals to be found in a Room in her House, where none but herself and Daughter had lain for Three Years; but before that time, Merchants, and others, had lodged there:

That Saunders paid her 50 or 60 Guineas upon Barailleau's Account; but she never had any Silks from Holland: That she knows nothing of the Goods said to be consigned to Blackwood, of Edinburgh, which Saunders says he brought over from Barailleau for her:

That she never knew John Brady; nor ever directed Saunders to send any Boat:

That she never had any Muslin from abroad; nor ever bought any but for her Wearing:

That she knows Thorp, but never had any Silks from him, or from France.

Mr. Saunders confronted her; and said, They have been lately in Holland together; and that he received 14 Pieces of Silk, and 25 Pieces of Muslin, from Barailleau; which were packed up in her Presence, and brought them over for her; but they were seized before they could be delivered to her.

Mr. Montbrun said, That he was not concerned in the 47 Pieces of Silk that Rape found in the House where he lay; he only being a Lodger there: And that he never dealt in any prohibited Goods:

That one Mrs. Carpenter was his Landlady; and that the Silks were taken in another Lodger's Room, whom he did not know.

He knows neither Thorp, Brown, nor Serjeant, nor ever received any Silks from them, or from Pigault, or any other Merchants, either in Calais or France.

Mr. Seignoret said, That he knows not what De la Motte has done concerning Lustrings and Alamodes, in Rotterdam, either in bringing them from France thither, or altering the Seals; that he never gave him any Orders so to do; but that what Silks he at any time received were, as made in Holland; of which there is a very considerable Manufacture in Amsterdam, as well as Rotterdam:

That there are not above 800 Looms at Lyons, which cannot make above 8,000 Pieces in a Year; so that it is impossible Mr. De la Motte should receive so great a Quantity, as is testified by Baudovin, in two Years from thence; since, that all Europe are supplied from Lyons only, with those Sorts of Silks:

That he knows not Saunders, nor ever saw him till his Attendance upon the Committee.

Upon which Saunders confronted him; and said, That he had been with Mr. Seignoret at the Queen's Head Tavern in Great Queen-street, in 169 2/3; where he owned to him the Receipt of 7 Packets of Silks; some whereof, he told him, were wet in the Carriage; and, at the same time, gave him Orders for Four Packets more; which he brought over; and they were delivered him by Mr. Rigden:

That Mr. Seignoret went by the Name of Geo. Smith, and himself by the Name of Jackson.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

Mr. Seignoret said, That he does not know Thorpe; but has heard much of him; that he came once to desire his Assistance in helping him out of some Troubles he was in, but that he refused to see him, and ordered him to be told, That he would have nothing to do with him; and never received any Silks from him:

That what Letters he hath sent to France he hath sent by the Way of Amsterdam, and not by Calais.

Mr. Thorpe confronted him; and said, That when he was sent by Barailleau to Mr. Seignoret's House, Barailleau ordered him to ask for Mr. Seignoret, saying, His own Name was Jacob:

That Barailleau further told him, That the Orders he should receive, were upon Mr. Seignoret's Account: And that he did accordingly go to Mr. Seignoret's House; and, asking for him, was carried up Stairs into a Counting-house; where he received his Orders from a Gentleman he did not know; nor can he say, That Mr. Seignoret was privy to the Orders; but Barailleau told him, That the Person he had the Orders from was Mr. Seignoret's Partner; and that they were upon Mr. Seignoret's Account.

Thorpe said further, That, in the Management of his Affairs with the Merchants, he went by the Name of Jacob; and was known thereby amongst them:

That the Silks, and other Goods, when brought over, were usually delivered to Dewy, and from him to Mr. Barailleau; and by him, as he told him, to the respective Merchants.

Mr. Seignoret said further, That he knows Browne, he having been an Evidence against him upon his Tryal; but he remembers nothing of his own sending any Gold abroad.

Mr. Baudouin, Mr. Seignoret's Partner, said, That he desired he might be included in Mr. Seignoret's Defence, his Case being the same.

Mr. Santini said, That his Concern in Partnership with Mr. Seignoret was only in Bills of Exchange, and lending Money to the Government.

Mr. Du Matre said, That he knows not Saunders, nor ever had any Silks from him, or spoke to him, upon any Account of Trade; in his Life.

Mr. Saunders confronted him; and said, That he has several times sent him, by other Hands, French Silks, Feathers, and a Quilt; the which he owned to him to have received.

Mr. Du Matre said, He knows Thorpe; but knows nothing of any Matter he charges him with.

Mr. Thorpe confronted him; and said, That he has been often in his Company, and has had Money from him in his own House for bringing over Goods.

Mr. Du Matre said, That he knows not Browne, nor ever received any Silks from him.

Mr. Browne confronted him; and said, That he had delivered him Silks, to his own Hands; and has received Money from him for bringing them.

Mr. Du Matre said, That Mr. Brown might say what be pleased; but he remembers nothing of it: That he knows old Burroughs; but he denies employing Barailleau to pay Money either to him or Dewy; or that he ordered any Money to Joseph Saunders.

Mr. Grubert said, That he does not know Captain Saunders, by any Dealings with him.

Mr. Saunders confronted him; and said, That he brought over several Packets of Silk for Mr. Grubert, about Four Years since.

Mr. Grubert said, That he has made Compositions for what Silks he has received from abroad, and paid them, and never traded in the like Nature since: That he never had any Goods from Thorpe, but only compounded once upon his Evidence against him; and denied his having ever received any Goods from Mr. Brown.

Mr. Dihearce said, That he never received any Silks, or other Goods, from Mr. Saunders, or by his Order; and never saw Saunders before his Attendance upon the Committee.

Mr. Saunders confronted him; and said, That he had been in his Company several times; once with Mr. Dulivier; and the last time was, at the Bell Tavern, in Nicholas-lane, with Mr. Rigden, his Partner: And that Mr. Letherhed, Master of the Vessel Mr. Saunders sent to Calais, had, at Three times, Five Packets of Silks from Gilbert at Calais; which he brought over for Mr. Dihearce, in 1693 and 1694:

That his said Partner Rigden gave him several Bills for Gilbert, at Calais, and told him, he had them from Dihearce.

Mr. Dihearce further said, That he does not know Thorpe, nor ever had any Silks from him, nor from Browne.

Mr. Brown, confronting him, said, That in Dulivier's time, who was Partner with Dihearce, he delivered very great Quantities of Silk and Lace at their House; and, since Mr. Dulivier left England, he hath delivered several Packets at Mr. Dihearce's House, for him, and in his Presence.

Mr. Dihearce said, That he might deliver Goods to Mr. Wayembergh, who lived in the same House, but not for him:

To which Mr. Browne said, That his . . . . Mr. Garland told him, That though Mr. Dulivier was gone, he had left Mr. Dihearce in his Place; and that he should deliver what Goods he sent him to Mr. Dihearce; and he did deliver them accordingly: And Mr. Dihearce told him, That, if he would take care in his Matters, he would prove as good to him as ever Dulivier was.

Thomas Serjeant said, That he carried a great many Packets to a House in Nicholas-lane, shewed to him, by Brown, to be Mr. Dihearce's House; but did not deliver them to Mr. Dihearce's Hands, only to Servants.

Mr. Dihearce further said, That he knows nothing of procuring any counterfeit Seal, in Imitation of that of the Custom-house, for Mrs. Poole: That he has dealt with Mrs. Poole for Silks, which he had from Dulivier, and others; but that he did not assist her in affixing any Seals to those Silks.

Mr. Goodwyn, confronting him, said, He could not charge Mr. Dihearce with procuring such Seal; but that he did see him assist Mrs. Poole, in affixing the Seals and Tickets to a great Quantity of Silks, which he had sold her; it was between May and Michaelmas 1694.

Mr. Dihearce said, That Mr. Goodwyn's Evidence ought not to be credited; he having been in his Debt, for which he compounded to Loss: And that he was now in Debt to the Company.

Mr. Goodwyn said, That he was ruined in Partnership with Mrs. Pool; but it was by reason a great Part of his Debtors were undone, upon the Defeat of the Duke of Monmouth; but that, upon parting with Mrs. Pool, he paid his Creditors 15 s. in the Pound:

That he did not come officiously, or for Malice, to be a Witness against Mr. Dihearce, but in Obedience to the Committee:

That Mrs. Pool told him, she had received Five Guineas from Mr. Dihearce, towards paying for the counterfeit Seal:

That he has often seen a Servant belonging to Mr. Harris, who was Packer to Mr. Dihearce, and who used to carry out his Silks, bring Parcels of Silks unsealed, under his Coat, by Night, to Mrs. Pool's Warehouse; where the Seals were put upon them: That he had this further Reason to believe they were Mr. Dihearce's Silks, for that he compared them with Mr. Dihearce's Bills of Parcels, and they exactly agreed in Number, and Length: That he has seen Mr. Dihearce looking over the same Goods with Mrs. Poole, in her Warehouse.

Barth. Middy said, That he does not know Thorpe any other ways than by lending him Money, at Mr. Barailleau's Request, about Five Years ago: Remembers not the having any Goods from him, or any Dealings with him.

Mr. Thorpe, confronting him, said, That he having 180 l. due from the said Mr. Middy, and other Merchants, for Carriage of Goods, he received from Mr. Middy 12 l. 10 s. in Money, at a Coffee-house: and of Mr. Goudet 50 l. Mr. Grubert 25 l. and of Mr. Du Matre 12 l. 10s. by their Notes upon Mr. Lambert; and had the Money paid him at his Shop.

Mr. Middy said, He does not remember he had any Silks from Brown.

Mr. Brown, confronting him, said, That he has delivered several Parcels of Silk and Lace, to his own Hands, some to his Brother, some to his Servants.

Thomas Serjeant said, That he delivered Silks Two or Three times, at Mr. Middy's House, in Basinghallstreet.

Mr. Debilly said, That he does not know Thorpe, nor Brown, nor ever dealt with them for any Silks.

Mr. Brown, confronting him, said, That he carried Silks to his House, and delivered them to him, they being directed to him, and Mr. Montbrun: And that Mr. Debilly gave him, some Money for bringing them.

Thomas Serjeant said, That he carried Silks, Three times, to a House where Mr. Debilly lived.

Joshua Ripper said, That he never received any Silks from Mr. Saunders, only one Remnant, which he bought of him in September last.

Mr. Saunders, confronting him, said, Didier delivered him Ten Pieces of Alamodes for Mr. Ripper; and he saw him write a Letter to him, at the same time that he brought the Silks over; but they were seized coming up the River; and he delivered the Letter to Mr. Ripper's own Hands:

That Mr. Ripper has had other Pieces of Silks since, from on board a Packet-Boat at Harwich; and shewed him Two or Three Pieces of them that were damaged in bringing over; and which, he told him, wanted stiffening.

Mr. Ripper owned the Receipt of a Letter from Mr. Saunders's Hands; but said, It was signed Van Gowde: And that he never had any Letter from Mr. Didier, but has corresponded with Van Gowde for 10 or 15 Months.

Mr. Saunders said, That Van Gowde and Didier was the same Person, he going by different Names; and particularly that of Van Gowde.

Mr. Dihearce said, That he does not remember that he ever lost any of his Letters; and does not know, that any of the Letters shewed to him signed P. Dihearce are his, or signed by him:

That he never went by the Name of Laffan, Kemp, or Lewis Gruet; nor knows that he ever wrote to any Person by the Names of Piasoni, or Gryola.

Mr. Goudet, desiring to be further heard in his Justification, said, That he and Company have, within Five Years last past, exported to the Value of 209,000 l. of the English Woollen Manufactures into Piedmont, and other Parts; so that it was his Interest to have the Duties diminished which were laid on the said Manufactures in Piedmont:

That the Lustring Company desired the Diminution of those Duties only for themselves, that they might ingross the Woollen Trade abroad, as they do the Lustrings at home; therefore he did oppose their having a Diminution particular to themselves: That the Company have not exported above 1,000 l. worth of the Woollen Manufacture.

He did not produce any Witnesses, or other Evidence, to prove the Quantity of the Woollen Manufactures exported by himself and Company, nor that the Lustring Company sought a particular Diminution to themselves.

Mr. Le Keux said, That the Government applied to the Bank of England, to send Cloth to Piedmont; but they refused, and said, That the Lustring Company could better do it: Whereupon Proposals were sent to the said Company to do it:

That there were not above Two Looms for Alamodes in England, before the Patentees set up the Manufacture; for the carrying on whereof there was a Stock of 60,000 l. raised by those who joined with the Patentees, and were made a Body Politick by Charter: And that the Weavers consented to their said Charter.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

Mr. Goudet said, That the 23 Novem. 4 Jac. 2, a Patent was granted to Peter de Cloux, Paul Cloudesley, and William Sherrard, to have the sole Manufacture of Lustrings and Alamodes, for 14 Years, upon Condition that it was an Invention of their own; and that they should breed up Apprentices skilled in making the said Manufacture:

That De Cloux, being a Papist, went out of England upon the Revolution; and the other Patentees not performing the said Conditions, he thinks the Patent is void: That Cloudesley and Sherrard, not knowing how to carry on their Work, desisted till 1692; when Mr. Gervaize set up the Manufacture, and divided the 60,000 l. Stock into 2,400 Shares, at 25 l. each: And the Committee of the said Company thereupon ordered, That no Share should be sold under 30 l. which they did sell them for; and thereby got 12,000 l. before they made any Silks, or had paid down any Money to make up the said Stock of 60,000 l.: That he offered to come into the Company, but was refused:

That between 1688 and 1692, he and several others did set up Looms; but the Company, not knowing how to go on, employed Persons to speak to the French Weavers, to leave off working for themselves, and to work for the Company, at a certain Rate per Ell; which the Weavers accepted, and did work for the Company, for some Years; but, when the Company had bred up others, they put off the Weavers; whereupon they set up again for themselves:

That the Company did not know what Silk was fit for their Work, till he, Mr. Sherbrook, and Mr. Seignoret, came amongst them:

That the Company seized the Weavers Goods, but would never come to a Tryal with them; and aspersed the Merchants who employed the Weavers, with being Smugglers; for that, under the Colour of making Silks here, they did import 100 Pieces for one so made by the Weavers; and thereby they got a Clause in an Act of Parliament in their Favour:

He said further, That Mr. Hilary Reneu lodged, at the Charity-house in Spittle-fields, some French Alamodes, as he thinks; for they had the Stamps of Lyons: He lodged more at one Mr. Leeds', in Spittle-fields; and at another Place there; directing the Persons, with whom he had lodged the same, not to shew the said Silks to any Person, but such as should bring the Counter-part of such Tally as he left with them: And then sent Rape, and others, to see the said Goods; and got those Persons, that went with Rape, to swear, That they had seen French Alamodes in Spittle-fields: To prove which, he produced

George Fido: Who said, That, on the 5th of November, about three Years since, he saw, at the Pelican in the Artillery-lane, Three Pieces of narrow Alamodes, with French Seals: That he was shewed them on Pretence he came to buy them; and they were brought to him upon Mr. Rape's producing a Piece of Stick to match another Part of it the Man had, that kept the Silks; and that, upon his asking Mr. Rape, Why he did not seize the said Silks? he told him, That a Factor belonging to Lyons, not being able to get his Master to increase his Wages, was resolved to betray him; and that, if he should seize that small Parcel, he should lose a better Prize:

That, on the 9th of November the same Year, he saw Three Pieces more, at the Three Pigeons in Spittle-fields; and, on the 20th of November, he saw Six Pieces more, at a French Apothecary's, going with Rape on the Pretence of buying them; and they were shewed him upon Rape's producing such Tally, as aforesaid; who told him, They also belonged to the said Factor, who had betrayed his Master, as aforesaid:

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

That he does not know what Design Mr. Rape went upon, nor that Mr. Rape placed the Silks there; but saw Mr. Reneu give Rape one of the said Pieces of Sticks; and that Mr. Reneu desired him to take his Oath, That he saw such Silks in Spittle-fields; which he accordingly did, before Sir Robert Clayton.

Isaac Pomeraye said, That a Person, that he did not know, brought him Two Pieces of Alamodes to the Charity-house; and said, he came from Mr. Hilary Reneu: And that Mr. Reneu, the Night before, told him, That such Silks would be brought to him; and Mr. Reneu came the next Day, and looked upon them:

That Mr. Reneu gave him a little Stick, and told him, He should shew the Silks only to such Persons as should bring another Piece of Stick, to tally with that: And that the same Person that brought them to him, fetched them away again.

Mr. Reneu said, That he being informed, by Baudouin, That there were great Quantities of French Alamodes brought to Wapping, and sent thence, by Two and Three Pieces in a Parcel, to be sold; that he, upon Inquiry, did find out one of the Persons intrusted to sell them; and, upon his Pretence of buying a considerable Quantity, appointed him to leave them at the several Places before-mentioned, under colour to buy them secretly; and when he had procured a Sight of them, by several Witnesses, he then acquainted the Commissioners of the Customs therewith; and, upon a Search made, upon the Oaths of such Witnesses, discovered, and seized, above Forty Pieces of French Alamodes.

Mr. Goudet further charged Mr. Reneu with carrying on a pernicious Trade with France, by sending Tin, and other contraband Goods, thither:

To prove which, de delivered in to the Committee Four Letters, which, he said, were writ by Mr. Reneu; Three Certificates which, he said, he had from the Register of Guien; with a Bill of Parcels, and Invoice; all which, he said, were sent him from France, within this Month, by Peter Roquet, of Bordeaux.

Solomon Eyme said, That, coming to Mr. Hilary Reneu, at his Brother Mr. Peter Reneu's House, where he then lodged, Mr. Hilary Reneu told him, That he had for some time traded with France, by sending Powder, and Lead, and Tin thither: And that, if he would engage in that Trade with him, he would lend him 5,000 l. to carry it on; allowing him Half the Profit that should be made, to himself.

Mr. Reneu owned the Letters; and said, He never sent any Goods or Ships to France, during the War, but as he was employed by the Government: And refers himself to Sir Richard Onslow, to explain that Matter:

And that, as to Eyme, he was a Man of no Fortune, and a Friend of Mr. Barrau's; and with whom he never had any Conversation, but that once he paid him for Ten Pieces of Cloth he had bought of his Master, Mr. Paris Slaughter; and therefore hopes every body will think it very improbable, that he should treat with him about any such Trade, or lend him 5,000 l. to carry on the same.

And Mr. Baker then produced a Letter, signed Isaac de la Croy, giving Directions how to send Letters privately to Mr. Eyme, from Brussells.

Mr. Seignoret desired likewife to be further heard, in his own Defence: Said, That the Company are ungrateful in prosecuting him who hath done them great Service:

That he dealt in Alamodes and Lustrings, at Lyons; and came over for his Religion; and loves England so well, that he hath settled his Estate upon his Relations in France, conditionally, That they give Security to live in England:

That he hath lent for himself, and other Friends, from abroad, above 400,000 l. to the Government; and had, in July last, publick Securities in his Hands for above 105,000 l.

That, desiring to come into the Company, he bought 46 Shares, at 30 l. each; and 336 Shares, at 25 l. per Share: That, for the 336 Shares, he paid down the whole Money; but Mr. Gervaize, Mr. Noguier, and Mr. Lauze, had each a Fourth Part in the same:

That he procured Correspondents for the Company in Turin; and gave them Credit for above 50,000 l. That he had procured them Money, lent them Money, and been bound for them, for small Profit:

That he lent them 22,000 l. in new Money, when it was very scarce, upon the Recoining:

That the main Business of the Company was done by him, when he was a Committee-man; the Company being ignorant in their own Business: If they had followed his Advice, they would have done better than they have done; but they were jealous of him:

That if he had been a S * * he should not have advised the Company to have lowered the Price of their Goods:

That all Letters wrote by him, or from his House, to de la Motte, of Rotterdam, were always signed with their own Names: That he hath always paid the Customs for all the Goods he hath received:

That he exported, in 1695, The Value . . 20,000 l. in the Woollen Manufacture; and hath exported some every Year, but not so much as in 1695:

That he hath now 174 Shares in the Company; having sold the rest.

Mr. Reneu produced a Paper, signed by many eminent Citizens, and other Gentlemen, concerned in the Lustring Company; whereby they return him Thanks for his great Care and Industry in bringing the said Manufacture to Perfection.

He further said, That, in 1694, when Provision was made by Parliament for the sealing all Lustrings and Alamodes, there were found 13 or 1,400 Pieces of the said Silks in Mr. Seignoret's Custody; which were not entered at the Custom-house:

That Mr. Seignoret hath been convicted for the smuggling such Silks, and compounded for the same:

That the Company paid Mr. Seignoret as much as any other Person would have given him, for whatever Bills of Exchange he supplied them with.

Mr. Gervaize and Mr. Noguier owned, That Mr. Seignoret had bought 336 Shares of the Company, at 25 l. each Share, in Partnership with them, and paid the Money for them; but that only One-fourth Part of those Shares did belong to himself; the rest being made over to him, only as a Security for the Money he laid down for them; for which he was paid 6 l. per Cent. Interest:

That Mr. Reneu offered the Money for the Whole, at the same time, at the same Interest, or would have bought the Whole at 30 l. per Share.

That Mr. Le Keux said, That the Company paid Mr. Seignoret for his Services, and Money lent them:

That he had paid Two per Cent. for Commission into Italy, whereas others had but paid one per Cent. and that he hath had, in the Two Years 1694, and 1696, for Provision, 280 l.; and did run no Hazard; having not only the Company's Seal, but 500 Pieces of Silk, for his Security:

That he had One per Cent. for being bound for them, for Money: And that Sir Thomas Davall, to whom he was bound for the Company, had double the Value of the Money lent, in Goods, in his Hands, for his Security:

That other Persons would have supplied the Company with the Money, when he lent them 22,000 l. for the same Profit: That they did not receive it in milled Money, as is affirmed by Mr. Seignoret, but by Credit and Remittances, drawn abroad, and re-drawn; the Company being liable to the Loss by the Exchange:

That the Company contracted with a Person in Piedmont, who dealt in the best Silks, to supply them, before Mr. Seignoret came into the Company:

And that they have paid to Mr. Seignoret's Correspondents 4 s. or 5 s. per Pound for Silk more than to others; and yet could sell that Silk in Holland for no more, than that which cost them 4 s. or 5 s. less.

Mr. Seignoret said, That he and the Company entered 2,000 Pieces of Alamodes and Lustrings at the Customhouse, in the Year 1692.

(A). A Mons. Baudran.

Monsieur, A Londres, ce 31 Jan. 1695/6.

Le 17 de ce mois nous eûmes l'honneur de vous ecrire, et de vous prier solliciter un nouveau passeport presentement: Nous avons la lettre de Mons. Melch. Philibert, qui nous marque de vous envoyer le dit passeport, à sin de le faire renouveller: Nous vous l'envoyons ci clos, à sin que vous le fassiez, et qu'en même tems vous rendiez nulle la soumission que vous aviez faite: Nôtre ami de Hollande n'aura pas manquê, de mettre, au bas de nôtre derniere, le nom du maître Hollandois qui le doit monter, et par consequent remplir la place de John Brady; et en attendant de vous nouvelles nous vous offrons nos services, et vous asseurons, que sommes veritablement,

Monsieur,
Vos très humbles,
très obeissants serviteurs,
G. and B.

Quand vous l'aurez ou obtenu, ou renouvellé, envoyer le S. V. P. à Mons. Bern. Guilbert, à Cal.

Paris 56½, Lyons 56½, Amsterdam 30 s. 5, Venice 60, Gen. 3, Livorne 63⅓ à ¾.

Addressée, à Mons. Nicolas Baudran, Banquier à Paris.

A Letter intercepted, with the French King's Passport in it.

To Mr. Baudran.

Sir, London, 31 Jan. 1695/6.

On the 17th Instant we had the Honour of writing to you, desiring you to solicit for a new Passport: We have now Mr. Melch. Philibert's Letter, by which we are directed to send you the said Passport (fn. 1); here you have it inclosed for that Purpose, and that, at the same time, you may see the Security you had given, discharged. Undoubtedly our Friend in Holland did not fail to put at the Foot of our Letter the Name of the Dutch Master, who is to command the Ship, and consequently supply John Brady's Place. Thus expecting to hear from you, with the Tender of our Services, we remain sincerely,

Sir,

Your most humble, and
most obedient Servants,
Signed, G. and B.

When you have either obtained or renewed it, be pleased to send it to Mr. Bern. Guillibert, at Cal.

Paris 56½, Lyons 56½, Amsterdam 30 s. 5, Venice 60, Genoa 3, Leghorn 63⅓ to ¾.

Subscribed, to Mr. Nicholas Baudran, Banker in Paris.

(A). Passeport du Roy de France.

De par le Roy.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

A nôtre très cher et bien aimé fils, Louis de Bourbon, comte de Toulouze, admiral de France, aux vice-admiraux, lieutenans généraux de nos armées navales, chess d'escadre, capitaines de nos vaisseaux, et de ceux de nos sujets armez en cours, capitaines, gardecostes, gouverneurs de nos villes et places maritimes, maires, consuls, et echevins d'icelles, lieutenans de l'amirauté, et à tous autres nos officers et sujets qu'il appartiendra, salut: Ayant permis à Jean Brady, commandant de vaisseau Anglois la Providence, de trente tonneaux, devenir d'Angleterre à vuide dans nos ports de Calais et Dieppe, pour y prendre et charger des etoffes de soye, des manufactures de nôtre royaume seulement; aller de là en Angleterre, et revenir dans le dits ports de Dieppe et Calais, pour un et plusieurs voyages, étant qu'il en pourra faire dans le temps et espace de six mois, de la datte des presentes; avec la faculté de pouvoir toucher et entrer dans les ports de Hollande, pendant le cours des dits voyages; et sans pouvoir neantmoints toucher au port de Dunkerque; ni estre chargé d'autres merchandizes, ni d'aures choses, que de ses victuailles, agrez, apparaux, et armement; ni prendre dans les dits ports que les dites etoffes de soye, à peine de consiscation; et sera le dit present passeport nul apres les dits fix mois: Nous voulons, et vous mandons, que vous ayez à laisser seurement et librement passer et repasser le dit vaisseau, sans l'arrêter, ni donner aucun empeschement; mais, au contraire, toute faveur, et assistance, en cas de besoin; car tel est nôtre plaisir. Donné à Versailles, le septiéme jour de Juillet, 1695.
Louis.

Et plus bas,
Par le Roy, Phelypeaux.

(A) The French King's Passport mentioned in the Report.

By the King.

To our most dear and well beloved Son, Lewis Alexander de Bourbon, Count of Toulouse, Admiral of France, the Vice-Admirals, Lieutenants General of our naval Forces, Commanders of Squadrons, Captains of our Ships, our Privateers, Cruisers, Governors of our maritime Towns and Places, Mayors, Consuls, and Sheriffs of the same, Lieutenants of the Admiralty, and all others our Officers and Subjects, whom it may concern, greeting: Whereas we have permitted John Brady, Commander of the English Ship the Providence, of 30 Tons Burden, to come, in Ballast, from England, into our Ports of Calais and Dieppe, there to take in and lade Silk Stuffs, manufactured in this our Kingdom only; then to return to England, and from thence again into the said Ports of Calais and Dieppe, for one or more Voyages, and as many as she shall be able to make during the Time and Space of Six Months from the Date of these Presents; with Liberty and Power to touch at, and go into, the Ports of Holland, during the said Voyages; but not to touch at the Port of Dunkirk; or carry any other Goods or Things, besides his Victuals, Rigging, Tackle, and Arms; neither to lade in the said Ports any thing, save the said Silk Stuffs; upon Pain of Forfeiture: And this present Passport shall be void, and of no Effect, after the said Time of Six Months: It is our Will and Command, That you let the said Ship securely and freely pass and repass, without stopping her, or giving her any Lett or Hindrance; but, on the contrary, favouring and assisting the same, in case of Need; for such is our Pleasure. Given at Versailles, on the 7th Day of July 1695.

Signed Louis.

And lower,
By the King, Phelypeaux:

Passeport de I'Admiral de France.

Louis Alexandre de Bourbon, comte de Toulouse, duc d'Amville, commandeur des ordres du Roy, gouverneur et lieutenant général pour sa Majesté en sa province de Britagne, pair et admiral de France, salut: Scavoir faisons, que veu par nous le passeport du Roy, de l'autre costé, donné à Versailles, le septiéme jour du present mois, signé, Louis, et plus bas, Le Roy, Phelypeaux; accordé à Jean Brady, commandant, le Vaisseau Anglois, nommé la Providence, à nous addressé; nous, en vertu du pouvoir à nous attribuê, à cause de nôtre dite charge d'admiral, mandons aux vice-admiraux, lieutenans généraux des armées navales, chess d'escadre, capitaines des vaisseaux, officiers de l'admirautés, et autres qu'il appartiendra, de laisser librement et seurement passer et repasser le dit Brady avec son dit vaisseau, sans luy donner, ni souffrir qu'il lui soit fait ou donné, aucun trouble ni empeschement quelconque; mais, au contraire, toute aide, faveur, et assistance, en cas de besoin: En témoin de quoy, nous avons signé ces presentes, et à icelles fait apposer le sceau de nos armes, et contresigner par le secretaire general de la marine, au camp de Potte, le huitiéme jour de Juillet mil six cens quatre vingt quinze.

L. A. de Bourbon.
Par Monseigneur de Valincour.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

The French Admiral's Passport.

Lewis Alexander de Bourbon, Count of Toulouse, Duke of Amville, Commander of the King's Orders, Governor and Lieutenant-General for his Majesty in the Province of Britany, Peer and Admiral of France, greeting: Be it known unto all, That having perused the King's Passport, on the other Side, given at Versailles on the 7th Day of this present Month, signed Louis, and lower, by the King, Phelypeaux; granted to John Brady, Commander of the English Vessel, called the Providence, to us directed; we, by virtue of the Power to us given with our said Office of Admiral, do charge and command the ViceAdmirals, Lieutenants-General of the naval Forces, Commanders of Squadrons, Captains of Ships, Officers of the Admiralty, and others whom it may concern, to let the said Brady, with his said Ship, freely and securely pass and repass, without giving him any Trouble or Hindrance, or suffering him to be troubled or hindered, upon any Account whatsoever; but, on the contrary, to shew him all Favour, Help, and Assistance, in case of Need: In Witness whereof, we have these Presents signed, and caused the same to be sealed with our Coat of Arms, and countersigned by the Secretary General of the Navy, at the Camp of Potte, on the 8th of July 1695.

Signed, L. A. de Bourbon,
And lower,
By my Lord,
De Valincour.

(B.) A LIST of the Names of the chief Weavers employed by the Royal Lustring Company, and the Numbers of Looms under them, in the Year 1696.

Names of the Weavers in London. Looms Names of the Weavers in London. Looms. Names of the Weavers in London. Looms. Names of the Weavers in London. Looms.
James Augier 4 Charles Margatts 1 George Rombley 2 Thomas Swinburt 1
Edward Andrews 2 Richard Nicholson 8 Isaac Roger 2 Francis Testu 18
Edward Abbott 2 Edward Ouldis 1 Samuel Reed 2 James Trenel 4
Stephen Adcock 1 Edward Creeck 3 Urbin Robinson 1 Peter Trenel 2
Claude Bellott 4 James Cossar 2 Nicolas Ranson 2 Steph. Touchar 2
Giles Bordyer 2 Jasper Clark 3 Simon Roberts 1 John Trentingnan 6
John Besson 1 William Cockall 1 John Dyer 1 Peter Troubet 1
Benjamin Boouth 2 Lewis Carrs 2 John Dugony 2 John Trolman 1
Paul Balliot 1 Isaac Chabanas 3 James Dubourg 2 Charles Touchar 2
Abraham Coquett 1 George Culvert 2 Peter Douson 1 Steph. Girod 2
John Beesley 2 John Cabanel 12 John Daly 3 John Halavan 1
James Borain 3 Tho. Chandler 1 John Desplancke 9 Henslet Head 3
Peter Brune 2 Roger Climson 3 Edward Dalbyking 3 Epr. Howard 2
John Brand 6 Charles Chausoyr 17 Paul Dieulesiet 4 Peter Hauduroy 1
Daniel Baudovin 18 Samuel Clarck 16 John Dausy 1 Isaac Husse 2
Nicolas Browne 5 Simon Cuvelier 2 James Dupre 2 Jonas Hanrott 2
John Betscomb 3 Isaac Coulette 1 Frederick Denis 1 William Hensly 3
John Baterman 2 Ant. Clairbout 1 John Delacomb 2 Richard Harwood 1
Francis Boiroult 4 John Chapelier 2 Peter Desman 2 James Harrison 1
Thomas Burbidge 2 Michael Couvelle 2 Robert Exelby 2 Thomas Hutt 1
Wm. Bolton 1 Nicolas Cary 1 James Ellum 1 Joseph Hicks 1
Paul Barber 1 John Carpentier 3 George Fido 2 Jacob Hap 3
Richard Bavett 2 William Cateler 1 James Foveault 1 Martin Hays 3
John Beeton 2 Isaac Delsosse Abraham Fausier 3 Thomas Jeffries 1
John Bara 1 Francis Deane 6 John Fumelo 4 Samuel Julian 1
John Blewsee 3 James Dargent 17 Antony Fabre 3 William Kandall 2
Daniel Benoit 1 Henry Delon 4 John Fromsteelt 1 Peter Keys 1
Nicolas Coutelle 16 Samuel Ducrouy 1 Charles Fromager 1 Matth. Leprovot 2
Alexander Cubhet 1 Ant. Delastre 1 Peter Gatout 1 Peter Lelozier 2
John Cownor 12 Nicolas Descodin 2 Peter Gautier 6 Steph. Laforest 1
John Cornwell 4 John Doulhiere 1 Daniel Giles 2 Peter Lagrand 1
George Langbrige 3 Baptiste Dupre 1 Elias Gresulhe 1 Nicolas Leseubure 3
Peter Ludigois 3 Lewis Davehel 1 Charles Genings 4 Tho. Lecanu 2
John Lamon 1 John Debey 1 Thomas Jenkins 2 John Lott 2
Peter Lemoine 1 . . . ipian Dalbyac 9 William Greenwood 1 Elias Lewis 1
Robert Andrews 1 Peter Desramaux 1 Garet Gareson 3 Isaiah Lorrell 1
Jacob Aubry 3 John Duhoos 8 Raphael Guilbert 1 William Lemay 6
Thomas Andrews 1 Simon Oliver 2 Samuel Goulder 2 Peter Lesauvage 1
Daniel Leduck 1 John Peney 4 Daniel Goujon 1 Henry Levessely 1
Peter Leguier 1 Daniel Persons 5 Leonard Grinonau 6 James Letelier 2
Robert Melton 6 John Peter 6 James Sauterel 3 Wm. Leniger 5
Lewis Malfuson 3 Mich. Povein 1 James Sousse 7 John Lovet 1
Richard Mainard 2 John Picard 2 Moses Smith 1 James Ledoux 2
Tout Saint Mallerbe 1 William Price 3 Adam Seagrave 2 Joseph Vacher 2
Francis Martin 2 Isaac Pein 1 Ezekiel Slater 3 Peter Udal 1
John Monford 2 Henry Pett 5 William Somes 2 Peter Valentine 1
Stephen Melot 2 Peter Pinoll 1 Hugh Shelton 3 Jacob Vivier 2
Noe Marishall 2 William Probey 6 Nicolas Smart 2 James Venatier 4
Mark Morau 3 Roger Pinter 3 William Hook 2 John Vernier 1
Isaac Martin 6 Tho. Panteling 2 Thomas Sanders 2 Abraham Velle 1
Peter Martin 2 David Pouget 3 Ant. Sayoye 2 Barent Vandersael 1
Peter Macon 3 Francis Paty 4 George Savell 3 Claude Vitoult 1
Thomas Maison 3 James Gigner 2 Tho. Hurley 2 William Wicks 6
John Marishall 2 Daniel Rape 17 Edmund Shelton 1 Daniel Williams 1
Richard Marwell 2 Andrew Rutland 4 John Scarlate 2 Henry Williams 2
Tho. Witherill 4 Peter Olovine 2 Daniel Guiraud 3 Lewis Pourier 2
Thomas Waley 2 Isaac Allain 2 Abraham Guiraud 2 Peter Pillot 1
Henry Wigham 1 Nicholas Archeville 1 Lewis Gumin 1 John Quenes 4
Thomas White 2 James Bourdon 3 Noel Hauzell 2 Alexander Reseguie 1
John White 19 Isaac Bouchet 4 James Hazell 5 Joseph Sauvage 2
William Willmot 6 Michael Bernard 1 Andr. Honeker 2 John Scott 3
Richard Ware 1 Michael Brunau 2 James Longas 5 Peter Tartin 1
Edward Ward 1 Isaac Lebrement 3 John Lamille 3 Abraham Verudron 2
William Weitherede 2 Peter Catany 5 James Linet 3
Abraham Cherigny 2 Mark Mulero 3 In Ipswich 98
In London 670 John Capon 3 Francis Maurin 1
Sam. Cartigny 1 David Olanier 2 Paul Lacaux, Inspector for the Company of Ipswich.
Names of the Weavers in Ipswich. Nicholas Cholett 1 Lewis Pelet 4
Gabriel Catany 1 Peter Picar 2
John Dufort 4 James Plantier 3
Paul Alavoine 1 John Faverau 5 William Poupee 1 In all 768

Each Loom makes subsist Seven or Eight Persons, one with another, as it was formerly observed.

At that Rate 768 Looms can make subsist Six thousand Persons and upwards.

(C) An Account of a Sale of French Silks by Inch of Candle, the 17th February, 1695/6.

On Monday, the 17th of February, 1695/6, at Two of the Clock in the Afternoon, will be sold by the Candle, at the Custom-house, several Parcels of French Silks following; which are seized and condemned according to Law; and are to be seen in the King's Warehouse at the Custom-house, the 14th and 15th of this Instant, from Two till Four in the Afternoon.

Lot 1; Quantity, 5 Pieces narrow Alamodes, at 5 s. 2d. per Ell; to advance 1d. each Bidding.
Buyers. Ells. Workmen. Weight. Price of the Lustring Company.
lb. oz dr.
John Mire, 6 s. 2d. 4,828 62½ James Plantier 3 4 per Cent. Discount, 5s. per Ell.
8,099 65¼ Mark Mulero 3 3
8,177 665/8 Jacob Aubry 3 6
8,162 64¼ Samuel Clark 3 6 0
8,092 64¼ James Dargent 3 5 0
2d; Quantity, 5 Pieces narrow Alamodes, at 5 s. 2d. per Ell; to advance 1d. each Bidding.
William Vere, 6 s. 2d. 8,253 62 John Daboos 3 8 12 4 s. 10d.
8,098 62½ William Wicks 3 6 0
8,532 66 Tho. Witherill 3 8 18
8,097 65½ Richard Nicholson 3 4 12
8,393 641/8 Abr. Verduron 3 7 0
3d; Quantity, 5 Pieces of narrow Alamodes, at 5 s. 2d. per Ell; to advance 1d.
John Ainge, 6 s. 5d. 8,159 62 Samuel Clark 3 13 0 5 s. 2d.
8,315 65¼ Daniel Albout 3 12 12
8,163 631/8 Samuel Clark 3 10 0
8,091 64 James Dargent 3 10 0
8,452 617/8 Charles Chaufour 3 8 6
4; Quantity, 5 Pieces narrow Alamodes, at 5 s. 2d. per Ell; to advance 1d.
Mungo Rodam, 6 s. 2d. 8,126 60 Mark Mulero 3 5 0 4 s. 10d.
7,773 63½ Jasper Clark 3 6 6
8,479 63 John Monford 3 7 0
8,461 621/8 Nicolas Cholet 3 4 18
5,461 64¼ John White 3 9 0
5; Quantity, 5 Pieces of narrow Alamodes, at 5 s. 2d. per Ell; to advance 1d. each Bidding.
Henry Gandy, 6 s. 2d. 8,113 645/8 James Longat 3 2 6 4 s. 8d.
7,899 62¾ Isaac Lebreman 3 4 18
8,426 64½ Lewis Pourier 3 6 18
8,040 64½ Jacob Vivier 3 3 6
5,380 617/8 Roger Painter 3 9 0
6; Quantity, 5 Pieces narrow Alamodes, at 5 s. 2d. per Ell; to advance 1d.
John Mire, 6 s. 4d. 8,005 62 John Penny 3 5 0 5 s. 0d.
8,104 64¼ James Plantier 3 7 6
7,888 643/8 John Verduron 3 6 18
8,024 51¼ Richard Nicholson 2 10 12
7,947 647/8 William Hensley 3 4 18
7; Quantity, 4 Pieces broad Alamodes, at 6 s. 2d. per Ell; to advance 1d.
Thomas Holmes, 7 s. 3d. 7,165 61 James Letelier 4 7 0 6 s. 2d.
7,207 62 Francis Testu 4 7 12
6,820 60¼ Peter Troubet 4 6 6
7,172 61¼ John White 4 7 0
8th; Quantity, 5 Pieces of broad Alamodes, at 6 s. 2 d. per Ell; to advance 1d. each Bidding.
William Vere, 7s. 8d. 8,422 61¼ John Poupe 4 7 0 6s. 0d.
6,999 61¼ James Dargent 4 8 0
6,655 615/8 Francis Testu 4 7 0
7,695 60¾ Peter Trenell 4 4 0
8,412 61½ John Boucher 4 10 6
9th; Quantity, 4 Pieces of broad Alamodes, at 6s. 2d. per Ell; to advance 1d.
John Mire, 7s. 3d. 9,399 63½ John Conner 4 6 0 5s. 10d.
9,379 633/8 Paul Dieufiet 4 11 0
9,529 62 Peter Legrand 4 4 0
9,403 62¾ Jacob Aubry 4 5 18
10; Quantity, 4 Pieces of broad Alamodes, at 6s. 2d. per Ell; to advance 1d.
John Medley, 7s. 9d. 7,482 611/8 Richard Maynard 4 10 18 6s. 4d.
7,616 60½ Mark Moreau 4 13 6
8,972 62½ John Durand 4 14 0
7,069 611/8 Claude 4 11 0
11; Quantity, 4 Pieces broad Alamodes, at 6s. 2d. per Ell; to advance 1d.
John Mire, 7s. 3d. 6,374 62¾ Francis Testu 4 14 2 6s. 2d.
7,803 613/8 Mich. Covelle 4 9 18
3,349 62¼ Peter Trobatt 4 9 18
7,746 62½ James Trenell 4 8 0

These 11 Lots, containing 51 Pieces, are English Fabrick, wrought by the Weavers above-named; according to the Registers of the Lustring Company, and the Books of their Workmen, all agreeable to the Numbers, Contents, Weights, Quality, and Prices.

12; Quantity, 3 Pieces of broad Alamodes, at 5s. 4d. per Ell; to advance 1d.
John Ainge, 6s. 1d. 5,974 65
976 62 2/3
2,588 56¼
13; Quantity, 3 Pieces broad Alamodes, at 5s. 2d. per Ell; to advance 1d.
William Birks, 6s. 5d. 334 583/8
388 60½
273 63
14; Quantity, 4 Pieces narrow Alamodes, at 4s. 4d. per Ell; to advance 1d.
Geo. Wife, 5s. 2d. 350 613/8
353 60¼
553 61½
374 60½
15; Quantity, 4 Pieces narrow Alamodes; at 4s. 4d. per Ell.
John Ainge, 5s. 2d. 355 57
556 61¼
360 62
557 59
16; Quantity, 5 Pieces and 4 Remnants narrow Alamodes; at 4 s. per Ell; to advance 1d.
John Mire, 4 s. 10d. 995 62½
996 771/8 in 4 Remnants.
1,283 56
997 54½
998 55¼
994 58
17; Quantity, 1 Piece and 6 Remnants of broad Alamodes, at 5 s. per Ell; to advance 1d.
John Tayler, 6s. 6d. 999 86½ in 6 Remnants.
1,000 59

These Six Lots of Alamodes are Fr. Fabricks, and sold for a great deal less than the English; as appears, when 'tis not known they be English Fabrick.

Sold at the Custom-house, the 17th of February, 169 3/6;

Ells. s. d. £. s. d.
Lot 1 3227/8 at 6 2 97 1
2 323¾ at 6 2 97 12 —½
3 316¼ at 6 5 98 18
4 3127/8 at 6 2 94 1
5 318¼ at 6 2 95 12 11¼
6 306¾ at 6 4 94 14 5
7 245¼ at 7 3 86 13
8 3063/8 at 7 8 114 10
9 2515/8 at 7 3 88 18
10 245¼ at 7 9 92 13
11 2487/8 at 7 3 87 19
1,048 14 11½
Deduct the Value of the said Goods according as they were sold at the Company's House 812 3
Profit made upon the Sale at the Custom-house                                                                                       £. 236 11 11½

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

(D) An ACCOUNT of Part of the Marks and Numbers of Packets of French Alamodes, brought from Calais into England, by Joseph Saunders's Direction, from January 1692, to June 1694; delivered to the Persons here under-named, or their Agents, and particularly to John Rigden, then Partner to the said Saunders; who delivered again most Part of the said Alamodes to Mr. Didier, and Barailleau, for themselves, and the Merchants here under-named, and others, viz.

To John Rigden.
Packets.
Jan. 1692 3. P. M. 147, 148, & 149.
ditto 1. M. A. 122.
ditto 2. B. C. 46, 47.
ditto 1. I. B. 12.
ditto 2. M. A. 45, 46.
February 1. M. A. 48.
ditto 1. D. B. V. 6
ditto 4. P. M.177, 178, 179, 180.
March 1. C. B. 4.
ditto 1. F. P. 85
ditto 1. L. M. 3
ditto 1. R. W. 2
ditto 1. I. B. 2
ditto 1. P. M. 267
ditto 1. I. P. 12
ditto 1. M. P. 1.
July 1693 1.A. A. 58
ditto 1. E. E. 3
ditto 1. L. M. 8
ditto 1. O.
ditto 1. I. B. 3.
ditto 2. F. D. 97, 98.
ditto 1. F. M. 8
ditto 1. I. P. 15
ditto 1. M. P. 4
September 1. M. A. 130
ditto 1. A.D. 16
October 1. A. D. 17.
ditto 1. F. G. 79
ditto 1. 11
ditto 1. 10
ditto 1. M. P. 6
January 1. A. A. O.
ditto 1. O. 19
ditto 1. C. B. 220.
43 Packets.
To Seignoret and Company.
Packets.
Jan. 1692 1. A. C. 5
ditto 1. A. P. 5
February 1. M. A. 68
ditto 2. B. C. 24, 25
March 1. P. M. 268
July 1693 1. x 284 x
October 2. M. 292, 293
ditto 2. M. A. 262, 263
11 Packets.
To John Dumastre.
Jan. 1692 1. M. A. 113
Sept. 1693 1. 1
October 1. D.U. M. 6
ditto 3. 3. 4. 6.
June 1694 1. 9.
January 2. D. M. 3. 4.
9 Packets.
To Francis Grubert.
March 169 2/3 1. S. B. 53.
July 1693 1. A. A. 58
October 1. A. K.O.
ditto 1. - - - 6.
January 1. M. P. 28
ditto 1. O. 23.
June 1694 1. D. F. 23
7 Packets.
To Theodore Haultain.
Oct. 1693 1. M. P. 7.
June 1694 1. T.H. 1.
2 Packets.
To Dihearce.
Packets.
October 1693 1. O.
January 1. X. 18.
ditto 2. P. P. 43. doub.
June 1694 1. M. A. 206.
5 Packets.
To Boautandon.
Jan. 1692 1. A. B. 17.
Sept. 1693 1. I. B. 4.
ditto 1. F. D. 4.
ditto 1. P. P. 2.
October 1. I. B. 5.
January 1. I. B. 6.
ditto 1. F. 103.
June 1694 1. I. B. 2
8 Packets.
To Mr. Hatton.
Oct. 1693 1. I. E. 1.
January 1. D. D. 10
June 1694 1. R. 24.
3 Packets.
To Barailleau.
June 1694 3. O. 1, 2, 3.
To Goray.
June 1694 1. C. H. 4.
ditto 1. D. W. 206.
ditto 2. E. F. 17, 18
ditto 1. T. D. 1.
ditto 1. I. E. O.
ditto 1. E. P. 7.
ditto 1. G. 3
ditto 1. E. P. 8
ditto 1. G. 1
10 Packets.
In all 91 Packets.

Several Packets or Pieces of French Lustrings, and Alamodes, and Lace, were delivered to the several other Persons hereunder named; viz. Mr. Didier, Mrs. Mason, Mr. Buckley, Mr. Singleton, Mr. Corbuziere, Mr. Wragg, Mr. Hart, Mr. Swething, Mr. Toms, and Mr. Ripper.

John Saunders.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

(E.) An ACCOUNT of Alamode, Lustring, and Silk Lace, shipped at Calais in France, from the 10th of April 1692, to the 20th of October 1693, by Messieurs Pigault, Guilbert, Mollien and Hauteseville, and James Hayes, to the Direction of Peter Barailleau, alias Guitton, alias Morice, or Diana Masson, Landlady of the said Barailleau, for several Merchants in London; viz. Peter Goray, Seignoret, Baudouin and Santiny, Midy, Du Maistre, Goudet, Longueville and Barrau, Gayrault, De Billy, Mr. Auriolls, Montbrun, Grubert, Wayemberge for Dihearse, Bedfort, Mrs. Parthon, &c.; which Goods were put ashore clandestinely in England, in the County of Kent, near Rumney Marshes, in the Places called Old-Stairs, St. Margaret, the Warren, Brackman's-Barn, Rumney-Warren, and Herenbay and Reculver, in and about the Isle of Thanet, and delivered into the Hands of John Thorpe alias John Jacob, and Benjamin Hill, alias Oliver, alias Le Negre, to convey them in . . London; some in and amongst Bags of Smallcoal, some in Hogsheads of Copperas, some brought by Express in a Place called Shoake, near Gravesend, and carried in Boats, by Tho. Dewy and Tho. Mandry, of Greenwich, to London; and the Whole was brought and delivered to Peter Barailleau, or Diana Mason, at her House; and, by Contract between the said Barailleau and Thorpe, they were to share equally between them Two, Five Shillings and Six-pence for every Pound of Silk, that the Merchants above-named were agreed to pay them at the Delivery of their Goods, and Six Shillings for every Pound of Silk Lace.

Time of Shipping 1692. Names of the Commissioners at Calais in France. Number of Packets sent over.
By Packets.
10 April Bernard Guilbert 5
19 ditto William Pigault 25
9 May James Hays 3
ditto William Pigault 22
18 ditto ditto 29
4 August ditto 55
ditto James Hays 7
9 ditto William Pigault 41
9 August James Hays 4
16 ditto William Pigault 40
5 September ditto 15
7 ditto ditto 10
15 ditto ditto 15
14 October Bernard Guilbert 18
4 November William Pigault 22
14 ditto ditto 22
6 December ditto 6
Without Date ditto 43
ditto ditto 33
ditto ditto 24
439 Packets.
31 Jan. Bernard Guilbert 8
1 February William Pigault 7
24 ditto Bernard Guilbert 8
ditto William Pigault 17
10 March ditto 10
25 ditto Bernard Guilbert 5 1 Dumaitre.
   2 Viret.
   2 Seignoret.
26 ditto Mollien and Hautefeuille 2 Goudet.
5 April Wm. Pigault 8
10 ditto Bernard Guilbert 2
15 ditto William Pigault 19
ditto Mollien and Hautefeuille 4 for James White, alias Goudet, &c.
9 ditto James Hays 10
19 May Wm. Pigault 4
6 June ditto 10
8 ditto Bernard Guilbert 4 1 Dumatre.
ditto Mollien and Hautefeuille 3 for Dan. Smith, alias Goudet.
9 ditto James Hays 3
9 Oct. Wm. Pigault 11
20 Oct. Mollien and Hautefeuille 6
141 Packets.

In all 580 Packets, at 10 Pieces per Packet, is 5,800 Pieces; at 12 l. per Piece, is 69,600 l. Sterling, as it appears by several Letters in the Hands of John Thorp; amongst which there is 142 Letters of Barailleau, not signed.

John Thorp.

(F) A Particular of several Packets of Alamodes, delivered by Charles Brown to several Merchants here under-named, from the 15th of September 1691, to the 12th of January 169 ¾; received by the said Brown from John and William Garland, and Wm. Bayley, of Lewis in Sussex.

Peter Barailleau. John Deseyne. Peter Dulivier, Wayenberg, and Dihearse. Mr. Mydy. Messrs. Auriols. Messrs. Pancier. Mr. Goray. John Du Maitre. Seignoret, Baudouin, and Santini. De Billy and Monbrun. Mr. Bedfort. Goudet, Barrau, and Longueville. Francis Grubert. Mr. Collins, for one Mr. Smith. Mr. Phillips, unknown. John Guiguier.
Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac. Pac.
15 Sept. 1691 3 3 11 1 2
26 Oct. 13 4 2 3
14 November 5 1
27 Jan. 2 1 10£. 5 1
18 ditto 10221
19 ditto 2 1
23 ditto 7 1
24 ditto 5 8 1 2
10 Apr. 1692 2 1 8 1 3 1
17 ditto 3 5 4 1 1
14 May 6 1 15 3 3 5
9 Oct. 3 ½ 10 5 1 1 1 1 2
11 ditto 2 1 gr. 4 2 1
13 Decem. 2 4
2 Novem. 15 2 2
11 December 8 3 6 3
27 January 9 2/3 18 6 17 3 2
3 Feb. 4 4 2 1 1
10 ditto 5 7 1 1 4
14 ditto 6 5 1
9 March 6 3 1 1 1 2
21 ditto 1 1 1 1
28 ditto 1693 2 3 1
16 May 3 4 1
18 Sept. 1 2 1 1 1 1
4 Oct. 2 7 4 2 2
2 November 4 1 1 2 1 3 1 2 2
10 ditto 5 2 3 2
24 ditto 4 2 2 4 2
2 Decem. 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 4
12 January 9¾ 1 2 3 1 3 2 2 1 2
87 27½ 199 34 36 13 10 11 6 3 5 6 15 9 6 1

In all, 468 Packets and ½ besides a great many others, without Direction; which, at 10 Pieces per Packet, makes 4,685 Pieces; after the Rate of 12 l. Sterling per Piece, amounts to the Sum of 56,220 l.

Omitted to declare, That, amongst the Packets delivered to Wayemberg, Auriol, Deseyne, Midy and Goray, &c. there was Silk Lace.

Charles Brown.

(G) Directions to John Brady, what he should do, if taken by the French.

Mr. John Brady,

You must follow the Orders hereunder mentioned.

First of all, here is a Letter without Direction, which you must keep close, and never open it, until Messrs Molliens and Hautefeville bid you.

In case you were taken by a Frenchman, you must write unto Messrs. Molliens and Hautefeville to Calais; but never do it, nor offer to do it, till you are sure to be in a French Sea Port Town.

But if you can pass safe, then you must deliver the above-mentioned Letter unto the same Man that you are to deliver your Goods to upon the Coast.

As you go by Helvoet-Sluys, you must inquire about the Convoy for Hull and Newcastle; and then clear at Helvoet as ballasted; if not, take your time to go in the Evening, that you may do your Business the next Night after

(H) To the Honourable the Committee of the House of Commons, to whom the Petition of the Royal Lustring Company is referred.

The Return of John Sansom, Secretary of the Customs, to an Order of the said Committee, of the 14th of this Instant March, requiring him,

1st, To lay before the said Committee an Account of Mr. Seignoret's late Composition for any Goods or Merchandize of his seized for the King.

2dly, An Account of what Gold has been seized, upon the Account of Exportation, and how the same has been disposed of.

3dly, An Account of what Quantities of Wool had been seized, upon Account of Exportation, ever since the Month of May 1691.

In Obedience to your said Order, I have made Inquiry, as well in the King's Ware-house, as amongst the Officers concerned in the Business of Seizure; and do not find any Composition made by the said Seignoret, for any Goods or Merchandize of his seized for the King; but I find, that about 12 Month since, or more, he made Composition, upon several personal Informations which were prosecuted against him, by Mr. Ford, the Searcher of Sussex, for French Alamodes, and other prohibited Goods, which were said to come to his Hands, and other personal Penalties incurred thereby, to a considerable Value; of which Composition the said Ford is able to give an Account.

To the 2d; I do not find, That any Parcel of Gold has been seized, upon Account of Exportation, besides that Parcel belonging to Mr. Seignoret, of which I gave an Account at my last Attendance, except only a small Parcel of Silver and Gold, to the Value of 264 l. which was lately seized in the Port of Leverpoole, being shipped to be transported to Ireland.

To the 3d; I do herewith transmit an Account of what Quantities of Wool have been seized, upon Account of Exportation, since the Month of May 1691; which Account is disposed into such a Method, as to Time, Place, Quantity, and Value, as may be most obvious to View: And I have chosen to transmit the same by the Hands of the proper Officer; viz. Mr. Earle, the Register of Seizures; who can best answer any Inquiry that may arise, upon perusing the said Account: And if you shall please to command my further Attendance, I shall yield due Obedience thereunto.

All which is humbly submitted to Custom-house, your Honours Consideration. London, 18th March 1697/8. John Sansom.

An Account of what Gold was seized, upon Exportation, belonging to Mr. Seignoret, 4th June 1696; seized by Thomas Walker.

One Bag, qt. a Wedge of Gold, and 26 Pistoles, and 1,210 Guineas.

The Wedge and 26 Pistoles discharged the 30th of June 1696; his Majesty's Moiety being paid per Tally, dated the 23th; and the 1,210 Guineas paid into the Exchequer, as appears by Tally, dated the 23d of June 1696.

For the Warehouse-keeper.

Br. Dawney.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

(I) Proposals transmitted to the Lustring Company, the 6th of June 1695, by my Lord Duke of Shrewsbury, Secretary of State.

1st, That as the King and Parliament have given all Encouragement to the Lustring Company, it may be expected, that the said Company will return some Service to the Government.

2dly, That, at this Juncture, Experience shews, that the most effectual Way to distress France is to ruin their Trade. That the Duke of Savoy has not hitherto followed the Example of the Allies, in forbidding French Commodities, for want of Cloth, which he has a Necessity for and must be furnished from France, unless that could be supplied from England: If that could be made practicable, he would prohibit all Trade and Commerce with France.

3dly, That 'tis thought necessary, that a Commerce should be settled between England and Piedmont, that we should furnish them with the Goods and Manufactures of England, and receive from them in Exchange, Silk, Oil, Soap, and Paper.

4thly, That the Lustring Company, making Use of the Silk of Piedmont in their Manufacture, are most proper to begin this Commerce; and, to that Purpose, shall receive all Encouragement and Assistance which the Government can give them.

5thly, That my Lord Galway gives an Account, that there is a greater Trade for Silk between Lyons and Piedmont, than there has been for some Years, which he desires to obstruct; and says, His Royal Highness will do any thing that may tend to establish a mutual Commerce, and to encourage the English Merchants.

6thly, That both Seas being now opened, frequent Convoys going to the Streights, Lead, Tin, and other heavy Goods, may be sent to Final; and fine Cloth sent by Land, by Way of Germany, to Turin; and that it would be requisite to make some Experiments how our English Manufactures would go off in Piedmont.

7thly, That if the Lustring Company will examine this Matter, and give their Assistance to this Design of obstructing the French Trade, by establishing such a Commerce with Piedmont, the Government will give the Company all Encouragement here at home, and procure for them abroad all the Privileges and Advantages that can be obtained.

Gentlemen, Whitehall, 6th June 1695.

My Lord Duke of Shrewsbury commands me to transmit to you the inclosed Paper. I am,

Gentlemen,
Your most humble Servant,
To the Committee of the R. Yard.

Lustring Company.

(K) An ACCOUNT of Monies paid by Mr. Lambert to Messieurs Everden, Mr. Barailleau, Mr. Pearse, Mr. Saunders, Messieurs Garland, Mr. Ravaud, and for Customs; by Order of Messieurs Auriols, Mr. DuMaitre, Mr. Longueville and Company, Mr. Barailleau, Messieurs Grubert, Mr. Barrau, and Mr. Seignoret; as appeared by Mr. Lambert's several Leigers, marked A, B, C, D, E.

Years and Months. Messieurs Auriolls. Paid both Mr. Everdens.
92. July 16 12 12
Dec. 9 43 11
93 June 1 17 10
July 18 16 3
94. Apr. 27 43
May 26 30
June 8 30
192 16
Paid Mr. Barailleau.
92. July 18 29 14
Sept. 12 20
Jan. 25 12 2
93. July 7 17 16
Dec. 8 18 19
94. Apr. 7th 16 16
May 25 16 11 3
Oct. 6. 30
161 18 3
Paid Mr. Pearse.
92. July 4 100 4 9
Sept. 28 150
Nov. 14 40
92. May 21 50
95. Oct. 24 100
440 4 9
Paid Mr. J. Saunders.
92. Jan. 10 38 12
Paid both Garlands.
92. Oct. 25 30
May 22 30
93. May 6 30
May 12 20
Dec. 2 100
94. Apr. 27 20
June 14 27
Sept. 17 17 9 8
283 9 8
Messieurs Auriolls. Paid Mr. Ravaud.
95. July 16 150
July 29 200
August 8 175
Febr. 4 15 9
540 9
Paid Customs,
93. August 28 93
Jan. 8 40
95. August 1 20
Sept. 7 13 4 6
Dec. 24 40
96. May 2 73
279 4 6
By Mr. Du Maitre Order. Paid Everdens.
92. August 3 21
Dec. 9 22 4
Febr. 9 50
Febr. 23 13 5
93. May 27 20
April 27 17
June 16 30
July 13 45 10
218 19
Paid Mr. Barailleau.
92. August 23 16 14
Oct. 19 11
Jan. 27 18 10
93. August 21 45 10
Dec. 1 25
116 4
Mr. Du Maitre. Paid Mr. Pearse.
92. Sept. 22 50
Sept. 30 40
Nov. 29 50
Apr. 20 60
94. May 27 15
Nov. 13 90
Nov. 27 100 13 8
405 13 8
Paid Mr. John Saunders.
96. Nov. 7 72 11 1
97. August 7 75
147 11 1
Paid both Garlands.
92. Mar. 22 15 4
93. May 19 11 6 9
26 10 9
Paid Mr. Ravaud.
94. Mar. 13 80
Paid Customs.
94. June 18 75
August 12 400
August 13 150
Dec. 18 5 7
Apr. 2 200
830 7
Mr. Longuevill and Company. Paid both Mr. Everdens.
93. June 3 40
Dec. 11 57 2
Mar. 3 47 3 6
94. Mar. 26 17 18 11
Apr. 7 13 10
Apr. 26 58 1
June 4 31 12 8
July 3 26 5
July 14 47
338 13 1
Paid Mr. Barailleau.
93. June 12 65 18
August 10 24 15
Oct. 31 47 5
Novem. 25 18 7 6
94. June 15 17 17
Sept. 15 50
Oct. 17 5
229 2 6
Paid Mr. Pearse.
93 June 28 7
July the 5 35
July 25 5 19
Jan. 22 55 10
94. Febr. 4 12
115 9
Paid Mr. J. Saunders.
93. August 7 30
August 23 30
Septem. 1 30
Oct. 4 32 10
Dec. 5 40
Dec. 19 30
Mr. Longuevill and Company. Paid Mr. J. Saunders.
93. Jan. 9 130
94. Nov. 9 20
Febr. 8 20
362 10
Paid both Garlands.
93. August 18 12 15
Nov. 14 24 13 6
Dec. 152 7 5
ditto 25 11 6
Decem. 22 15 2
Feb. 10 14 4
Mar. 15 34 9
Sept. 1 11 19
290 13 2
Paid Customs.
94. Apr. 20 20
June 21 33
Sept. 19 43 5 6
Nov. 19 10
Nov. 23 40
Nov. 26 15
158 5 6
Mr. Barailleau. Paid both Everdens.
92. Decem. 9 21 9
Febr. 23 30 3
94. May 26 29
Apr. 27 19 4
May 28 30
June 8 13 5
Sept. 12 13 10
Oct. 13 8
Mar. 20 12 14
92. Nov. 3 40
93. Apr. 29 140
July 20 100
457 2
Paid Mr. Pearse.
92. August 1 100
Oct. 4 200
Nov. 8 200
ditto 200
Dec. 22 200
Febr. 4 150
93. Apr. 10 50
May 3 113 2
July 26 66 8
Dec. 2 50
Jan. 23 100
Apr. 19 100
May 2 50
Dec. 12 190
1,769 10
Messieurs Grubert. Paid both Mr. Everdens.
93. Apr. 8 55 5
May 20 28 12
May 1 15
May 16 15
94. May 29 49 2 6
Apr. 14 20
Apr. 20 50
May 4 38 14
May 12 20
May 26 21 9
Messieurs Grubert. Paid both Mr. Everdens.
94. June 14 42 14
August 21 80
Sept. 17 4
Nov. 10 60
Nov. 29 15
Febr. 9 20
May 14 9 13
581 9 6
Paid Mr. Barailleau.
92. Nov. 26 50
94. May 2 225
275
Paid Master Pearse.
92. Oct. 15 200
Oct. 31 241 5
Febr. 10 150
93. Mar. 21 200
Febr. 23 32
823 5
Paid both Garlands.
93. Decem. 2 250
Dec. 6 12
Febr. 23 53 19 7
Febr. 24 60 13
94. May 14 12 8
389 9 7
Messieurs Grubert. Paid Customs.
94. June 77 5 10
Messieurs Goudet and Barrau. Paid Mr. Barailleau.
95. October 22 38
ditto 300
338
Paid Mr. Pearse.
96. Septem. 9 45
Paid Mr. John Saunders.
95. Nov. 29 7 9
Mar. 10 15
96. August 21 40
Sept. 4th 28 14
Oct. 12 28 12
119 15
Paid Mr. Ravaud.
95. Febr. 22 21
96. Sept. 9 102 9
123 9
Mr. Seignoret. Paid Mr. Pearse.
96. Mar. 9 30
To both Mr. Everdens. To Mr. Barailleau. To Mr. Pearse. To Mr. Saunders. To both Garlands. To Mr. Ravaud. To the Customs.
Messieurs Auriols 192 16 8 161 18 3 440 4 9 38 12 283 9 8 540 9 279 4 6
Mr. Du Maitre 218 19 116 4 405 13 8 147 11 1 26 10 9 80 830 7
Mr. Longueville and Company 338 13 1 229 2 6 115 9 362 10 290 13 2 158 5 6
Mr. Barrailleau 457 2 1,769 10
Messieurs Grubert 581 9 6 275 823 5 389 9 77 5 10
Mr. Goudet and Barrau 338 45 119 15
Mr. Seignoret 30
Have paid 1,789 3 1,120 4 9 3,629 2 5 668 8 1 990 2 7 743 18 1,345 2 10

A LIST of such Persons who have been prosecuted and convicted, or compounded with, for importing French Silks and Laces, since the Year 1690.

Convicted for. Compounded for.
John Naish against Francis Grubert, for importing 600 lb. Weight of French Silks, and 100 lb. Weight of French Lace 200 paid.
The same against the same, for the same Quantity of Silk and Lace being conveyed to his Hands 100 paid.
The same against John Du Matre, for importing 500 lb. Weight of French Silks, and 100 lb. Weight of French Lace 125 paid.
The same against the same, for the same Quantity of Silks and Lace coming to his Hands 125 paid.
The same against John Goudet, for importing 1,000 lb. Weight of Silk, and 25 lb. Weight of Lace 80 paid.
The same against the same, for the same Quantity of Silk and Lace coming to his Hands 80 paid.
The same against Bartholomew Middy, for importing 500 lb. Weight of French Silks, and 100 lb. Weight of Lace 125 paid.
The same against the same, for the same Quantity of Silks and Lace coming to his Hands 125 paid.
The same against Peter Longueville, for importing 500 lb. Weight of French Silks 124 paid.
The same against David Barrau, for importing 500 lb. Weight of French Silks, and 20 lb. Weight of Lace 66 paid.
The same against the same, for the same Quantity of Silk and Lace coming to his Hands 66 paid.
John Warden against William Grover, for 149 Pieces of French Silks coming to his Hands 1,192 651 16 7 paid.
Edward Anderson against Abel Boroughs, for French Silks coming to his Hands 450 20 He is poor, and made Discoveries for the King's Service.
Charles Sherman against Dickson, for French Silks coming to his Hands 720 run away.
Charles Sherman, prosecuted in the Name of Mr. Attorney-General, against William Amis, for French Silks coming to his Hands 380 90 Gave Discoveries to the Commissioners: So they compounded with him.
Edward Anderson against Wm. Egerton, for 225 lb. Weight of French Silk coming to his Hands 20 paid.
The same against Isaac Rickesies, for 350 lb. Weight of French Silks coming into his Hands 60 paid.
Edward Anderson against Robert Norman, for 225 lb. Weight of French Silks coming to his Hands 60 run away.
John Naish against John and Isaac Aurioll, for importing 250 lb. Weight of French Silks, and 50 lb. Weight of Lace 250 Non. pros.
The same against the same, for the same Quantity of Silks and Lace coming to their Hands
John Couchman against Tho. Evans, for the Penalty of 500 l. for importing French Silk 100 paid.
The same against Francis Holmes, for 300 lb. Weight of French Silk, and 400 lb. Weight of French Lace coming to his Hands 40 paid.
John Ford, in the Name of the Attorney-General, against Peter Barrailleau, for French Silks coming to his Hands 2,100
Joseph Beverton against Jos. Saunders, for the same Offence 220 paid.
John Ford, in the Name of the Attorney-General, against Peter Goray, for the same Offence 150 Process out against him.
Mr. Ford, in the Name of the Attorney-General, against Stephen Seignoret. for French Silks coming to his Hands 300 paid.
John Naish against the same, for the Penalty for 500 l. for importing French Silks and Lace 150
The same against the same, for a Parcel of French Silks coming to his Hands 150
The same against Lawrence Noakes, for the Penalty of 500 l. for importing a Parcel of French Silks 50 paid.
The same against William Garland, for the same Offence 50 paid.
The same against Henry Tapsfield, for the same Offence 50 paid.
John Goldham against Richard Parker, for the Penalty of 500 l. for importing a Parcel of foreign Silks 20 paid.
The same against the same, for the same 20 paid.
John Ford against John Deseine, for French Silks coming to his Hands 1,400 in Gaol.
John Naish against John Harrison, for the Penalty of 500 l. for importing a Parcel of French Silks 10 Non pros.
The same against John Frankwell, for the same Offence 40 Non pros.
The same against Peter Collier, for the same Offence 40
The same against Mary Oliver, for the same Offence 50
The same against Tho. Crouch, for the same Offence 35
The same against John Warden, for the same Offence 50
The same against James Tully, for the Penalty of 500 l. for conveying 200 lb. Weight of French Silks, and 20 lb. Weight of Lace 25 Process gone.
Joshua Simpson against Joseph Buckley, for French Silks coming to his Hands 240 15 Very poor, and this Sum paid per Friends.
John Naish against Tho. Dewey, for French Silks coming to his Hands 600 100 paid.
John Ford against John Mascaret, for the Penalty of 500 l. for importing a Parcel of French Silks 40 Process gone.
Joseph Beverton against Edward Singleton, for the same Offence 140 in Prison.
The same against John Porter, for French Silks coming to his Hands 210 Process gone.
The same against James Porter, for the same 140 Process gone.
The same against Thomas Greeble, for the same Offence 204 paid.
Edward Martin against Edward Hazwell, a Devenerunt, for a Parcel of Silk 13 6 8 paid.

To the Honourable the Committee, to whom the Petition of the Royal Lustring Company is referred.

The Return of the Commissioners of his Majesty's Customs to an Order of the said Committee, requiring them to lay before the said Committee an Account of what Duties have been paid for Lustrings and Alamodes imported into this Kingdom, for Seven Years last past; as also of the Drawback upon the said Silks, for the same time.

The said Commissioners, in Obedience to the said Order, herewith lay before the said Committee an Account of all the said Commodities imported and exported, from the 1st of March 169 2/3, at which Time a distinct Duty was laid upon the said Goods, until Lady-day 1697: Which Account is distinguished into Pieces and Pounds Weight, together with an Account of the Customs received and drawn back for the same: And they crave Leave to acquaint the said Committee, That until a particular Duty was laid upon the said Commodity, in March 169 2/3, the said Goods were always entered promiscuously with other wrought Silks, and not distinguished by Name; which is the Reason they cannot go further backward in making up the said Account.

Custom-house, London, 6th of April 1698.

Godolphin.
Walter Yonge,
Sam. Clarke,
Benj. Overton,
Robert Henley.

Foreign Lustrings, and clandestine Trade.

An ACCOUNT of the Quantity and Customs of Alamodes and Lustrings imported and exported since the Commencement of the Act, of the 4° & 5°. W. & M. that lays an additional Impost on several Goods and Merchandizes imported after the First of March 169 2/3; by which Act, amongst other things, a distinct Imposition is laid upon Alamodes and Lustrings.

Imported. Pieces. Weight. Custom.
£. s. d.
From the First of March 169 2/3 to Lady-day 1694 98 qt. 371¾ 226 5 10
To Lady-day 1695. 423 qt. 1,501 921 14
To Lady-day 1696. 230 qt. 817 501 17
To Lady-day 1697. 448 qt. 1,591 970 18 1
1,199 qt. 4,280¾ 2,620 15 6

Since which time none have been imported.

Exported. Pounds Wt. Drawnback
£. s. d.
From the First of March 169 2/3. to Lady-day 1694. 98 56 6 8
To Lady-day 1695. 129¾. 74 11
To Lady-day 1696. 435½. 250 6
To Lady-day 1697. 463¾. 266 11 7
1,127 647 16 9

Memorandum: No Account can be given of what Alamodes and Lustrings were imported or exported before the First of March 169 2/3.; by reason they were entered as other wrought Silks, and no Notice taken of those Two Species, till such time the Parliament was pleased to lay a further Duty, and prohibit the Importation thereof without Licence.

Per Charles Carkesse.

That, upon the whole Matter, the Committee came to the several Resolutions following; viz.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee That the Manufacture of Lustrings and Alamodes, set up by the Lustring Company, hath been very advantageous and beneficial to this Kingdom; by employing great Numbers of the Poor, and preventing the Exportation of our Coin for purchasing of those Commodities.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That there hath been a very destructive Trade carried on with France, during the War, for importing Alamodes and Lustrings contrary to Law; whereby the King hath been defrauded of his Customs, and our own Manufactures greatly discouraged.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That it doth appear to this Committee, That the same Vessels which imported Alamodes and Lustrings, did export great Quantities of our Wool.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That by the Vessels importing Alamodes and Lustrings from France, and the exporting of our Wool thither, Intelligence hath been carried to France, during the War, and the Enemies of the Government have been conveyed from Justice out of this Kingdom; and have had frequent Opportunities of returning hither, to carry on their pernicious Designs.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That such Persons, their Aiders and Abetters, as shall be convicted of importing Alamodes or Lustrings contrary to Law, and shall not, within One Month's time, after such Conviction, pay the Forfeitures imposed already by Law, shall be banished into some Island in his Majesty's Plantations in America.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That whatever Commission or Warrant-Officer, in his Majesty's Service, Master or Commander of any other Ship or Vessel whatsoever, shall knowingly import, or suffe to be imported, in any Ship or Vessel under his Command, any Alamodes or Lustrings contrary to Law, and be thereof convicted, shall, over and above the Forfeitures and Penalties already inflicted by Law, be ipso facto rendered incapable of serving his Majesty, either by Sea or Land, or of any Benefit or Advantage he may be entitled to by virtue of such Service.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That any Person or Persons whatsoever, belonging to any Ship or Vessel, that shall discover any Alamodes or Lustrings imported in any Ship or Vessel contrary to Law, shall, over and above the Encouragement and Advantage already provided by Law, be immediately discharged from his or their Service on board such Ship or Vessel, if he or they shall desire the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That Alamodes and Lustrings shall be imported into the Port of London only.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That, for the better preventing the fraudulent Importation of Goods from foreign Parts, and the Exportation of Wool, no Goods whatsoever shall be imported from, or exported into, foreign Parts, in any Vessel of less Burden than 30 Tons, under the Penalty of forfeiting such Vessel and Goods.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That, by the intercepted Letter, wherein the French King's Passport was inclosed, compared with Mr. John Goudet's Hand-writing, and the Copy of the said Letter, entered in Mr. Goudett's Copy-Book of Letters, seized in his own House; by the Seal delivered to Mr. Henry Baker by Mr. Goudet, wherewith the Passport Letter was sealed; and by the Entries in Mr. Goudet's Cash-Book and Leiger; it does appear, That the said Passport was procured, and paid for, by the said Mr. Goudet and Company.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That by the Copies of several other Letters, entered in Mr. Goudet's Copy-Book of Letters, seized in his Custody, it does appear, That the said Passport was sent back in order to be renewed, the time for which it was granted being expired.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That, by the Copies of a great Number of Letters, entered in Mr. Goudet's Copy-Book of Letters; by several Letters from France in Answer thereunto, seized in Mr. Goudet's Custody; and by the Testimony of Witnesses produced to the Committee; it does appear, That Goudet and Company have carried on, during the War, a Correspondence with divers Persons in France, for the importing, into this Kingdom, French Alamodes and Lustrings; and, the better to conceal such their Practices, did, from time to time, cause great Quantities of such Silks to be imported under fictitious and counterfeit Names, and paid the Freight for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That by the Confession of the Parties, as well as by the Copies of Letters, entered in Mr. Goudet's said CopyBooks of Letters, seized as aforesaid, it doth appear, That Goudet, Longueville, and Barrau, were Partners during the time this Smuggling-Trade was carried on.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That by the Copies of Letters entered in Mr. Goudet's said Copy-Books of Letters, and by the Testimony of Witnesses produced to the Committee, it doth appear, That Mr. Stephen Seignoret and Company did cause great Quantities of French Alamodes and Lustrings to be imported into this Kingdom, during the War with France, and paid the Freight for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That, by the Testimony of Witnesses produced to the Committee, it did appear, That when Provision was made by Parliament, in the Year 1694, for sealing of Alamodes and Lustrings, there were found about 1,300 Pieces of those Silks in Mr. Seignoret's Custody, which he owned to be foreign, and for which it doth not appear that any Duty had been paid.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That, by the Confession of the Parties, as well as by the Copies of Letters, entered in Mr. Goudet's said CopyBooks of Letters, it doth appear, That Seignoret, Baudovin, and Santini, were Partners during the time this Smuggling-Trade was carried on.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That it doth appear, by the Testimony of Witnesses produced to the Committee, That Mr. Peter Diharce did cause great Quantities of French Alamodes and Lustrings to be imported into this Kingdom, during the War, and the Freight to be paid for the same.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That it doth appear, by the Testimony of one Witness produced to the Committee, That Mr. Dihearce did, in Confederacy with Mrs. Pool, affix counterfeit Seals and Indentures to many Pieces of Alamodes and Lustrings, in Limitation of the Custom-house Seals and Indentures.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That it doth appear, by several Letters signed P. Dihearce, intercepted by the Government, That Mr. Dihearce dealt with several Persons in France for French Silks, and other Commodities from France, under several fictitious and counterfeit Names.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That it doth appear, by the Testimony of Witnesses produced to the Committee, That John Du Matre, Francis Grubert, Theodore Haultain, . . . Boutandon, Thomas Hatton, Peter Barrilleau, Peter Gorey, Antony Didier, Dinah Mason, Joseph Buckley, Edward Singleton, John Corbuzier, Wm. Wragg, . . . Hart, . . . Toms, . . . Ripper, Arthur Goodwin, Ferdinand Ravaud, Gaspard Bedfort, Bartholomew Middy, John Girault, Peter Debilly, John Auriol, Isaac Auriol, Peter Montbrun, Mrs. Parthon, John De Seine, Peter Dulevier, John Pancier, Henry Collins for . . . Smith, . . . Philips, and John Guygier, have caused great Quantities of French Alamodes and Lustrings to be imported into this Kingdom during the War with France.

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That it doth appear, by the Testimony of Witnesses produced to the Committee, That Mrs. Pool, Wm. Wade, Roger Beart, Mathew Scalding, Francis Neave, Thomas Dewy, . . . Mandre, and . . . Towsey, have received great Quantities of French Alamodes and Lustrings, imported into this Kidgdom from France during the War.

Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Report be adjourned till Tuesday Morning next.

Hudson's Bay Company.

Resolved, That this House will, upon this Day Fortnight, resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider of the Bill for confirming to the Hudson's Bay Company their Privilege and Charter.

Regulating Elections.

Ordered, That the Report from the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill for the further regulating Elections of Members to serve in Parliament was committed, be made upon Tuesday Morning next.

Committees.

Ordered, That all Committees be revived.

And then the House adjourned till Monday Morning, Nine a Clock.

Footnotes

  • 1. Sic Orig.