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House of Commons Journal Volume 7: 2 September 1653

Pages 312-313

Journal of the House of Commons: Volume 7, 1651-1660. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1802.

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Table of contents

Friday, 2d of September, 1653.

Reduced Officers, &c.

THE House resumed the Debate upon the Petition of the reduced Officers and Soldiers.

Resolved, That it be referred to the Committee of Publick Debts, to consider of something to be offered to the House, as fit to be done herein; and report their Opinion therein to the House.

French and Walloon Congregation.

Mr. Strickland reports from the Council of State, The humble Petition of the Strangers of the French and Walloon Congregation, in and about the City of London: Which was this Day read.

The Question being propounded, That this Petition be referred to the Committee of Trade;

And the Question being put, That that Question be now put;

It passed in the Negative.

Resolved, That this Petition be referred to the Consideration of the Council of State; and Report their Opinion to the House.

Petition from London.

The House being informed, That there were at the Door divers Aldermen, and Citizens of London, with a Petition from the Common-Council; they were called in; and being come to the Bar; Mr. Sheriff Eastwick declared:

Mr. Speaker,

"The Lord Mayor of London, the Aldermen, and the Commons, in Common-Council assembled, have commanded these worthy Gentlemen, and myself, to wait upon you, I think, in a Business of as great Concernment as we can possibly propound, in relation to your own Honour, the Good of the City, and to the whole Nation. We are very sensible, Sir, what a great Mercy of God it hath been to England, that the Lord hath trusted this Nation with the Gospel for near an hundred years together: And he hath always provided for us pious and learned Men to dispense it; and to defend it against our common Enemies; and blessed their Labours to the Conversion of so many Thousands, which hath made this Nation more eminent than all the Nations round about us: Other Nations abroad, they have Civil Laws and Liberties, to preserve their Properties; God hath blessed us in a more peculiar manner, than he hath done any other. It was in the Hearts of the last Parliament, and we see it is in yours, to make it your chief Work, to promote Religion in this Nation. We come here upon no other Errand, and shall not meddle with the Particulars of the Petition: But only one thing we are very sensible; Except the Honour of the Parliament he preserved, we think you will be scarce able to do any Great Matters; and if any People in the Nation shall be suffered at their Pleasure, to reflect upon the Supreme Power, we think very ill Fruits must follow of it: We beseech you, therefore, to consider of your own Honour, to preserve it; And so, Mr. Speaker, I here present the Petition to you, according to the Order and Directions I have received." And then presented a Petition: Which was received in; and, after the Petitioners were withdrawn, was read; and was intituled, The humble Petition of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common-Council of the City of London.

Resolved, That it be referred to the Council of State, to receive from the Petitioners, and others, such Informations as shall be given them of any who have traduced the Parliament, or reflected on their Authority.

Resolved, That Mr. Speaker do return Thanks to the Petitioners, for their good Affections to the Parliament; and acquaint them, That some of the Matters in the Petition are under Consideration: And as touching That which concerns the traducing the Parliament; the Petitioners are referred to the Council of State, to give Informations to them therein: And that the Parliament doth not doubt but they will continue their Care of the Peace and Safety of the City.

The Petitioners were again called in; And, being come to the Bar, Mr. Speaker, by Command of the House, did return Thanks to the Petitioners for their good Affections to the Parliament; and acquainted them, that some of the Matters in the Petition are under Consideration: And as touching that which concerns the traducing the Parliament, the Petitioners are referred to the Council of State, to give Information to them therein: And that the Parliament doth not doubt but they will continue their Care of the Peace and Safety of the City.

Letter read.

A Letter from the Commissioners of Parliament in Ireland, dated the 19th of August 1653, was this Day read.

Resolved, That this Letter be referred to the Consideration of the Committee for Ireland.

Envoy's Credentials.

Mr. Speaker acquaints the House, He hath received Copies of Letters from the Duke of Gelders and Juliers, Count of Egmont and Zutphen, dated at St. Clow, near Paris, 26th of August 1653, being Credentials to Monsieur Lodowick de Grand, Lord of Brachey.

Resolved, That these Letters be referred to the Council of State, to consider what is fit to be done herein.