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Lancashire Fines: 12-19 Henry III

Pages 54-74

Final Concords For Lancashire, Part 1, 1189-1307. Originally published by Record Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, Edinburgh, 1899.

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Citation:

12-19 Henry III.

No. 29.—At Westminster, on the Quindene of Easter, 12 Henry III. [9th April, 1228].

Between William, son of Henry, plaintiff, and Gilbert, son of Roger, (fn. 1) tenant, by Henry, son of Gilbert put in his place, of half a carucate of land and one messuage with the appurtenances in Dalton. (fn. 2)

Gilbert acknowledged ten acres of this land to be the right of William, to wit, those ten acres which lie between Arkillesthorn and Soudhusthorn, extending to the highway which is the division between the town-field (campus) of Burton, and the town-field of Dalton; to hold to him and his heirs, of Gilbert and his heirs in perpetuity, together with all the land which William formerly held of the said Gilbert in Burton, rendering yearly for the said ten acres, as also for the other land, 2s. 6d. at four terms, to wit, at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 7½d., at the feast of St. Michael 7½d., at the Nativity of our Lord, 7½d., and at Easter 7½d., for all service and exaction. With warranty.

For this acknowledgment William quit-claimed to Gilbert and his heirs, all the right which he had in the residue of the said land and messuage. And be it known that William and his heirs, and his men of Burton shall have "husbot & haybot" in a competent place by view of Gilbert's forester, and likewise common of pasture for their beasts in Gilbert's wood in Dalton, and likewise in the fields of that town after the corn and hay have been carried away. Be it known also that it shall be lawful for Gilbert and his heirs to uproot his wood, and make assart within the ancient fences, wherever they will, without gainsay of William and his heirs.

No. 30.—At Westminster, on the morrow of All Souls, 13 Henry III. [3rd November, 1228].

Between William de Tatham, plaintiff, and Robert, Abbot of Deulecres, tenant, by Brother William de Deulecres, his monk put in his place, of three carucates of land with the appurtenances in Roshale. (fn. 3)

William quit-claimed to the Abbot and his successors, and to his church of Deulecres, in perpetuity, all right in the land. For this quit-claim the Abbot gave him 200 marks sterling.

No. 31.—At Westminster, in three weeks from the feast of St. Michael, 13 Henry III. [20th October, 1229].

Between Sygerith de Dumplinton, (fn. 4) plaintiff, and Robert Grehley, tenant of 40 acres of land with the appurtenances in Dumplinton. (fn. 5)

Sygerith quit-claimed to Robert and his heirs in perpetuity, all her right in the land. For this quit-claim he gave her twenty shillings sterling.

No. 32.—At Westminster, in five weeks from the feast of St. Michael, 14 Henry III. [3rd November 1229].

Between Hubert de Burgh and Margaret, his wife, plaintiffs, by Henry de Bradegar put in their place, and Henry de Monckeden, deforciant, of the Manor of Horneby with the Castle, honour, and soke, and the advowson of the Priory of Horneby, the Manor of Malling [Melling] and the advowson of the Church of Malling, and the lands of Wra, Wraiton, Cancefeld, Weninton, Old Weninton, Tunstal, Argun [Arkholme], and Farleton, with the appurtenances. A plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them. (fn. 6)

Henry acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Hubert and Margaret, as those which they have of his gift; to hold during the life of either of them, and after their decease to their heirs, of him and his heirs for ever, performing the service of half a knight for all service. And if they should die without heir of them issuing, the said tenements shall revert to Hubert's heirs, to hold of Henry and his heirs by right of inheritance for ever, by the said service. For this acknowledgment they gave him one goshawk of a year old (austurcus sorus).

No. 33.—At Westminster, on the morrow of St. Martin, 18 Henry III. [12th November, 1233].

Between William, son of Ralph, plaintiff, and William de Parles (fn. 7) and Matilda, his wife, tenants of the manor of Thoredesholm [Torrisholme], with the appurtenances.

William, son of Ralph, quit-claimed to William and Matilda, and the heirs of Matilda in perpetuity, all right in the manor. For this quit-claim they granted to him 16 acres of land with the appurtenances in Katon [Caton], to wit, those 16 acres which lie between the land of Ingerithe, formerly the wife of Thomas de Halton, and the land of Thomas de la More; to hold to him and his heirs, of them and the heirs of Matilda, rendering yearly one pair of steel spurs, or three pence, at the feast of St. Michael, for all service and demand.

No. 34.—At Lancaster, (fn. 8) on the Octave of St. John, ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May, 1235].

Between Geoffrey de Chetham, plaintiff, and Robert de Middleton, impedient, respecting one carucate of land with the appurtenances in Chetham. A plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

Robert acknowledged the land to be the right of Geoffrey as that which Geoffrey has of his gift, to hold to him and his heirs of Robert and his heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly one mark of silver at four terms, to wit, at the Nativity of our Lord 3s. 4d., at Easter 3s. 4d., at the feast of St. John the Baptist 3s. 4d., and at the feast of St. Michael 3s. 4d., for all service and demand. With warrantry. For this acknowledgment Geoffrey gave him twenty shillings sterling. (fn. 9)

No. 35.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. John ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May, 1235]

Between Gilbert de Kellet, plaintiff, and William de Tunstal, tenant of one carucate of land with the appurtenances in Tunstal. A jury of grand assize had been summoned between them.

Gilbert quit-claimed to William and his heirs in perpetuity, all right in the land. For this quit-claim William gave him twenty shillings sterling.

No. 36.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. John ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May, 1235].

Between Alexander, son of Alexander, plaintiff, and Ralph, son of Roger, tenant of one toft with the appurtenances in Cliderow [Clitheroe]. An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

Ralph acknowledged the toft to be the right of Alexander and rendered it to him, and quit-claimed all right therein to Alexander and his heirs in perpetuity. For this acknowledgment Alexander gave him half a mark of silver.

No. 37.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Octave of St. John ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [14th May, 1235].

Between Simon, son of Matthew, (fn. 10) plaintiff, and Alan de Kyrkeby, (fn. 11) deforciant, respecting common of pasture of Brocton [Broughton-in-Furness].

Simon quit-claimed to Alan and his heirs in perpetuity, all right in the common of pasture. For this quit-claim Alan granted that he and his heirs would render every year to Simon and his heirs four shillings for a tenement which he holds of him in Brocton, for which he formerly rendered only two shillings; to wit, one moiety at Easter, and the other moiety at the feast of St. Michael, for all service belonging to Simon or his heirs. And further Alan gave him six marks of silver. And if it happened that Simon's cattle, or those of his heirs strayed within the pasture of Alan or his heirs, between Welpesat and Styrespol, without a watch being set (sine wardo facto), they should be driven out without penalty.

No. 38.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May, 1235].

Between Ralph de Mitton, plaintiff, and Jordan de Wetelegh, (fn. 12) tenant of half an oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Hacton [Aighton].

Jordan acknowledged the land to be the right of Ralph, and rendered it to him, and quit-claimed to Ralph and his heirs in perpetuity, all right therein. Moreover he quit-claimed to him all his right in the lands and tenements which belonged to Robert de Mitton, Ralph's father, in Mitton and Hacton. For this acknowledgment Ralph gave him two marks of silver.

No. 39.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Octave of St. John ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May 1235].

Between William, son of Robert, plaintiff, and Benedict, Prior of Burescho, tenant of 40 acres of land with the appurtenances in Lathum.

William quit-claimed to the Prior and his successors, and to his Church of Burescho, in perpetuity, all his right in the land. For this quit-claim the Prior granted to him all that land which Everard de Marton formerly held of the Prior in Marton; to hold to William for life, of the Prior and his successors, and of his Church of Burescho, rendering yearly 2s. 6d sterling at the Nativity of the blessed Virgin Mary, for all service and demand. After his death the land to revert to the Prior and his successors, and to his Church of Burescho, quit of any claim by the heirs of William.

No. 40.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. John, ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May, 1235].

Between Thomas de Middleton, plaintiff, and William de Lancastre, tenant of two carucates of land with the appurtenances in Middelton and Kneton. (fn. 13)

Thomas acknowledged the land to be the right of William, to hold to him and his heirs, of Thomas and his heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly one pound of cumin at Pentecost, and performing forinsec service belonging to two carucates of land, where twelve carucates make the service of one Knight's fee, for all service and demand. For this acknowledgment William gave him 12½ marks of silver.

No. 41.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. John, ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May, 1235].

Between Richard de Bracebrigh, (fn. 14) plaintiff, and Gilbert de Barton, (fn. 15) tenant, respecting the fee of one knight and a half, with the appurtenances in Barton. A jury of grand assize had been summoned between them.

Richard quit-claimed to Gilbert and his heirs, in perpetuity, all his right in that fee. For this quit-claim Gilbert granted to him three oxgangs of land with the appurtenances in Bruneshop [Boysnope], to wit, whatever he (Gilbert) had in the town of Bruneshop on the day that this concord was made, except the town mill, which shall quietly remain to Gilbert and his heirs; to hold to Richard and his heirs, of Gilbert and his heirs, rendering yearly four barbed arrows, or one penny, at the feast of St. Michael, for all service, saving forinsec service. And be it known that Richard de Bruneshop (sic) shall be quit of multure [at Boysnope Mill] for ever.

No. 42.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. John, ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May, 1235].

Between John, Prior of Cuningesheued, (fn. 16) plaintiff, and William de Parles, tenant of one carucate of land with the appurtenances in Pulton. (fn. 17)

The Prior quit-claimed from himself and his successors, and from his church of Cuningesheued, to William and his heirs in perpetuity, all right in the land. For this quit-claim William granted to the Prior half an oxgang of land, and one toft, and one croft, with the appurtenances in the said town of Pulton, to wit, the half oxgang and the toft, which Richard, son of William, formerly held, and the croft which William, son of Andefrey, formerly held; to hold to the Prior and his successors and to his church, of William and his heirs, in free, pure and perpetual alms, quit from all secular service and demand.

No. 43.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. John, ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May, 1235].

Between Elias de Stiveton, plaintiff, and William de Lancastre, whom Hereward, Abbot of Cokersand, called to warranty, and who gave warranty to him, respecting one carucate of land with the appurtenances in Midelergh [Medlar]. (fn. 18) An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

Elias quit-claimed to William and his heirs in perpetuity, all right in the land. For this quit-claim William gave him 25 marks of silver.

No. 44.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May, 1235].

Between Richard Waleys (Walensis), Blethin de Acton, and Madoc de Acton, plaintiffs, and Roger Gernet and Quenild his wife, Thomas de Bethum, and Avice de Mullum, deforciants, by the said Roger, put in the place of the said Quenild and Avice, respecting the advowson of the Church of Acton (fn. 19) with the appurtenances. An assize of last presentation had been summoned between them.

Roger, Quenild, Thomas and Avice acknowledged the advowson to be the right of Richard, Blethin, and Madoc, and rendered it to them in the said court, and quit-claimed from themselves and the heirs of Quenild, Thomas, and Avice, to Richard, Blethin, and Madoc and their heirs in perpetuity, all right therein. For this acknowledgment Richard, Blethin, and Madoc gave them two marks of silver.

No. 45.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May, 1235].

Between Richard de Trafford, plaintiff, and Robert de Hilton, deforciant, respecting common of pasture in Russum [Rusholme].

Richard quit-claimed to Robert and his heirs in perpetuity, all right in that common of pasture, saving, nevertheless, to himself and his heirs common of pasture on the stubbles and fallow land (in stipulis et warettis) of Robert and his heirs, in Russum, within these bounds, to wit, between the dyke which Richard de Hilton raised, and the land which Hugh de Haselum formerly held. For this quit-claim Robert gave him one mark of silver.

No. 46.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May, 1235].

Between John de Cancefeld, plaintiff, and Joan de Cancefeld, Utred Prat, Alice his wife, and William Kidel, tenants of three oxgangs of land with the appurtenances, except half an acre, in Cancefeld [Cantsfield]. An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

John quit-claimed to Joan, Utred, Alice and William, and the heirs of Joan, Alice and William, in perpetuity, all right in that land, except in the half acre. For this quit-claim Joan, at the request of Utred, Alice and William, rendered to John one oxgang of land, which she held in dower in the said town of Cancefeld, to wit, that which John de Cancefeld formerly held, and quit-claimed to him and his heirs all her right therein in name of dower.

No. 47.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May, 1235].

Between Robert de Carrhou, plaintiff, and William Gawrad, tenant, by Robert, son of Edulf, put in his place, of eight acres of land with the appurtenances in Little Heton. (fn. 20)

William acknowledged the land to be the right of Robert, and rendered it to him, and quit-claimed to Robert and his heirs in perpetuity, all right therein. For this acknowledgment Robert gave him five marks of silver.

No. 48.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May, 1235].

Between Robert de Carrhou, plaintiff, and Edulf, son of Roger, tenant, by Thomas his son put in his place, of thirteen and a half acres of land with the appurtenances in Little Heton.

Edulf acknowledged the land to be the right of Robert. For this acknowledgment Robert granted it to him, to hold to him and his heirs, of Robert and his heirs, in perpetuity, rendering yearly 40½d. at two terms, to wit, at Pentecost 20½d. and at the feast of St. Martin 20d., and a halfpenny yearly for cornage (fn. 21) at the feast of St. Michael, for all service and demand.

No. 49.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. John ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May, 1235].

Between Richard de Copland, plaintiff, and Roger de Heton and Agnes, his wife, impedients, respecting four oxgangs of land with the appurtenances in Bowolton. (fn. 22) A plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

Roger and Agnes acknowledged the land to be the right of Richard, as that which he has of their gift, to hold to him and his heirs of them and their heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly one pair of white gloves, or one penny, at the Nativity of our Lord, for all service, saving forinsec service; and they and their heirs will warrant the land to him and his heirs for ever. For this acknowledgment Richard gave them one sor sparrowhawk.

No. 50.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [19th May, 1235].

Between Walter de Tatham, plaintiff, and Ralph, Abbot of Croxton, (fn. 23) tenant, by brother Andrew, his monk, put in his place, of sixty acres of land with the appurtenances in Wytewra [Whiteray]. (fn. 24)

The Abbot granted to Walter twenty acres of the said land, to wit, those which lie near Walter's land between Midelgile (fn. 25) and Botnebek, (fn. 26) towards the north, to hold to him and his heirs, of the Abbot and his successors, and of his church of Croxton in perpetuity, rendering yearly one penny at Easter, to the house of Horneby for all service and demand. For this grant Walter quit-claimed to the Abbot and his successors, and to his church of Croxton, all right in the remainder of the land.

[Endorsed on the back].—The Earl of Kent [Hubert de Burgh], put in his claim to chase, and to the hawks which any persons might take, and also in case his cattle should enter upon that land.

No, 51.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May 1235].

Between Matthew de Bromhal and Ellen, his wife, plaintiffs, and Reyner, son of Henry, tenant of two oxgangs of land with the appurtenances in Buterwrth. (fn. 27) An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

Matthew and Ellen quit-claimed from themselves and the heirs of Ellen, to Reyner and his heirs in perpetuity, all their right in the land. For this quit-claim he gave them forty shillings sterling.

No. 52.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Octave of St. John ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [14th May, 1235].

Between Mabel, who was the wife of Geoffrey de Staleminne, (fn. 28) plaintiff, and Robert, Abbot of Furneis, tenant of the third part of half an oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Staleminne [Stalmine], which she claimed to be her reasonable dower of the free tenement which belonged to Geoffrey, formerly her husband, in the said town.

Mabel quit-claimed to the Abbot and his successors and to his church of Furneys, in perpetuity, all her right in the name of dower in the said third part. For this quit-claim the Abbot gave her half a mark of silver.

No. 53.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. John ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May, 1235].

Between Robert de Flayneburg (fn. 29) and Alice, his wife, plaintiffs, and Andrew de Hunewrthefeld, and Peter, and Alexander, his brothers, tenants of half an oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Hunewrthefeld [Hundersfield].

Andrew, Peter and Alexander acknowledged the land to be the right of Alice. For this acknowledgment Robert and Alice granted it to them, to hold to them and their heirs, of Robert and Alice, and the heirs of Alice in perpetuity, rendering yearly eight pence at the feast of St. Martin for all service saving forinsec service. Moreover Andrew, Peter and Alexander quitclaimed from themselves and their heirs, to Robert and Alice, and the heirs of Alice, all their right in the wood of Walseden, and in all other woods which belong to the said town of Hunewrthefeld, saving nevertheless to themselves and their heirs reasonable estover in the said woods for "Husbote & Haybote," by view of the foresters of Robert and Alice, and her heirs, without hindrance; and saving to Andrew, Peter and Alexander, and their heirs, common of herbage in those woods for their cattle of Hunewrthefeld. And be it known that it shall be lawful for Robert and Alice, and the heirs of Alice to assart the whole of that wood, which is on the north side of Lichitheselegh, and there to make meadow or arable land at their will, and to put up forges, and dig for iron and steel ore to supply those forges, wherever they will on the moors and in the woods which belong to the town of Hunewrthefeld. (fn. 30)

No. 54.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of St. John ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May, 1235].

Between Gilbert de Kellet, plaintiff, and Roger, son of Adam, tenant of one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Tunstall. A jury of grand assize had been summoned between them.

Gilbert quit-claimed to Roger and his heirs in perpetuity, all right in this land. For this quit-claim Roger gave him ten shillings sterling.

No. 55.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May, 1235.]

Between Adam, son of Gilbert, (fn. 31) plaintiff, and Siward de Saleby, tenant of one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Saleby [Salesbury]. An assize of mort d'ancestor had been summoned between them.

Siward granted to Adam one acre and one rood of the said land, to wit, those which lie between Brademedwe and Clouwes; to hold to him and his heirs, of Siward and his heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly one penny at the Nativity of our Lord, for all service and demand. For this grant Adam quit-claimed to Siward and his heirs all his right in the remainder of the land. And Siward gave Adam one mark of silver.

No. 56.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Octave of St. John ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [14th May, 1235].

Between William de Pres, plaintiff, and Gilbert de Croft, (fn. 32) tenant of two carucates of land with the appurtenances in Birtone [Burton-in-Kendal] and Dalton. A jury of grand assize had been summoned between them.

William quit-claimed to Gilbert and his heirs in perpetuity, all his right in the land. For this quit-claim Gilbert gave him twenty shillings sterling.

No. 57.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May, 1235].

Between Adam de Copenewra, plaintiff, and Benedict, son of Ketel, (fn. 33) tenant of one oxgang of land, with the appurtenances in Gersingham.

Adam acknowledged the land to be the right of Benedict, to hold to him and his heirs, of Adam and his heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly sixpence at the feast of St. Michael, for all service pertaining to Adam or his heirs, and acquitting the land towards the chief lords of that fee, of all other services belonging to the said land. For this acknowledgment Benedict gave him forty shillings sterling.

No. 58.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May, 1235].

Between Robert, Abbot of Furneys, plaintiff, and Matthew de Redeman and Amabel his wife, (fn. 34) impedients, respecting the fourth part of the Manors of Carleton and Dreg (fn. 35) with the appurtenances. A plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

Matthew and Amabel acknowledged the fourth part of these Manors to be the right of the Abbot, and of his church of ffurneys, as that which he and his church have of their gift; to hold to him and his successors, and to his church in perpetuity, performing to the chief lords of that fee for Matthew and Amabel, and Amabel's heirs, forinsec service belonging to that fourth part, for all service and exaction. And Matthew and Amabel and the heirs of Amabel will warrant the said fourth part to the Abbot and his successors, and to his church, by the said service. For this acknowledgment the Abbot gave them forty marks of silver.

No. 59.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Octave of St. John ante portam Lantinam, 19 Henry III. [14th May, 1235].

Between Ellen, who was the wife of Richard de Ryminton, plaintiff, and Adam de Bredekyrk, tenant of one oxgang of land with the appurtenances in Westhus. (fn. 36)

Ellen acknowledged the land to be the right of Adam, to hold to him and his heirs, of her and her heirs in perpetuity, rendering yearly sixpence at four terms, to wit, at the Nativity of our Lord 1½d., at Easter 1½d., at the feast of St. John the Baptist 1½d., and at the feast of St. Michael 1½d., for all service, saving forinsec service. For this acknowledgment Adam gave her half a mark of silver.

No. 60.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May, 1235].

Between Hamon de Oregrave, plaintiff, and Robert, Abbot of Furneys, tenant of half an oxgang, and half an acre of land, except five and a half acres of land with the appurtenances in Oregrave. (fn. 37)

Hamon quit-claimed to the Abbot and his successors, and to his church of Furneys, all his right in the land, except as aforesaid. For this quit-claim the Abbot gave him two marks of silver.

No 61.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Ascension of our Lord, 19 Henry III. [18th May, 1235].

Between William Aaron and Godith his wife, plaintiffs, and Hugh de Morewyc, tenant of three oxgangs of land with the appurtenances in Farleton. (fn. 38)

William and Godith quit-claimed from themselves and the heirs of Godith to Hugh and his heirs in perpetuity, all their right in the land. For this quit-claim Hugh gave them four marks of silver.

No. 62.—At Lancaster, on the morrow of the Octave of St. John, ante portam Latinam, 19 Henry III. [13th May, 1235].

Between Robert, Abbot of Furneys, plaintiff, and Hamon, son of Roger de Houegrave, impedient, respecting a certain iron mine (minera ferri) with the appurtenances in Houegrave [Orgrave]. A plea of warranty of charter had been summoned between them.

Hamon acknowledged the mine to be the right of the Abbot, and of his church of Furneys, as that which he and his church have of the gift of Roger de Houegrave, father of Hamon, whose heir he is; to hold to the Abbot and his successors and church, of Hamon and his heirs, in free, pure and perpetual alms for ever, quit from all secular service and exaction. Hamon and his heirs will warrant the said mine to the Abbot and his successors, and to his church as aforesaid. The Abbot has received Hamon and his heirs into every benefit and prayer hereafter to be made in his church of Furneys.

Footnotes

  • 1. See note to the Fine No. 56, 19 Henry III., postea.
  • 2. The township of Dalton is in the county of Lancaster, although it is in the Westmorland parish of Burton-in-Kendal.
  • 3. Rossall, in the parish of Poulton-in-the-Fylde. By writ dated at Bath, 28th August, 1216, King John sent word to Ranulf, Earl of Chester, then Sheriff of Lancaster, to deliver seisin of the pasture of Rossale to the Abbot and monks of Deulacrese, which he had given them for the love of God, and in conformity with the earl's request. Further, upon his advent to those parts, to cause William le Boteler and Adam de Yealand to appear before him to testify by word of mouth, that which they had testified to him by their letters patent. (Close Roll, 18 John, m. 4). By writ dated 26th January, 1221, the Sheriff was directed to make diligent inquiry by discreet and liege men of co. Lancaster, as to what amount of ferm the said pasture bears in the Corpus Comitatus. (Ibid. 5 Henry III., m. 20 dorso). On the 29th October, 1222, another writ was issued directing Brian de L'Isle to diligently inquire by free and liege men of the district of Amounderness, as to what had been the boundary between the Hay of Roshale and the land of Roger de Heton in Brunne (Burne Hall), before that Hay passed into the hands of the Abbot of Deulacresse, and according to the verdict, to re-establish the former boundaries. (Ibid. 7 Henry III., m. 29). From January, 1221, the abbey continued in possession, and accordingly the Pipe Roll of 5 Henry III. records an allowance of 75s. out of the Corpus Comitatus to the Sheriff for a period of nine months, for the pasture of Rosshale, which the abbey held during the king's pleasure, as a result of the inquest held according to the king's precept. By charter, dated at Westminster, 14 July, 1228, the king granted the land of Roshale in frankalmoign to the said abbey, which they had formerly held in bailiwick of King John. (Charter Roll No. 20, m. 3). Before the Conquest there were two team-lands in "Rushale." (Domesday Survey). But this manor, like many others north of the Ribble, was laid waste after the Conquest, and degenerated into an afforested "Hay" or pasture. As part of the comitial demesne, it rendered £5 yearly to the ferm of the Honour of Lancaster, from the time of Henry II. to the reign of John. By some means a number of persons acquired certain rights in this pasture, which the abbey appears to have bought up. The Register of Deulacres, formerly (1637) in the possession of Benjamin Rudyard, gent. (present whereabouts unknown), contained quit-claims to the abbey from Theobald Walter, Roger de Heton, William de Clifton, and William de Tatham, the plaintiff in the above Fine, to whose charter the following persons were witnesses:—Sir William de Lancaster, Adam de Yealand, then Sheriff of Lancaster (12 Henry III.), William de Vernon, Geoffrey de Dutton, Thomas de Bethom, Geoffrey Arbalaster, Walter de Parles, William de Karlinton [Carleton], Henry de Waleton, Adam Banastre, Alan de Singleton, and Roger de Dereby. (Dodsworth's MSS., lxvi., f. 112 b). In Mich. Term, 12 Henry III., the abbey of Deulecresse gave the king 20s. for licence to concord with William de Tatham in a plea of land. (Curia Regis Roll, No. 98, m. 8 dorso).
  • 4. In Easter Term, 13 Henry III., in the King's Court, Robert Gresley puts in his place Robert de Perington versus Siering (sic) de Dumplington in a plea of land The said Siering puts Ralph, son of Walter, in her place. She was the plaintiff. A day was given to them in three weeks from Michaelmas, at their request. (C. R. Roll, No. 101, m. 3 dorso). Upon that date they made concord as above.
  • 5. Dumplington is a hamlet in the township of Barton-upon-Irwell, parish of Eccles, 5 miles W.S.W. of Manchester.
  • 6. In the King's bench at Westminster, in Trinity Term, 1229, Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent, and Margaret his wife, by their attorney, sued Henry de Muneghden in a plea to warrant to them the Manor of Horneby, and the Castle and Honour of Horneby, which they held by his charter. Henry did not appear, the summons was testified to. Judgment—that he be attached to appear in three weeks from the feast of St. John Baptist [15th July, 1229], and that he be attached in co. Suffolk. Upon which day he came and acknowledged that gift and charter. They have made concord and shall have a chirograph. (C. R. Roll, No. 102, m. 16). This Final Concord demands a short history of the Manor and Castle of Hornby. Before the Conquest, (1) Ulf had one Manor in Mellinge, Hornebi and Wennigetun, where there were nine team-lands to geld. Orm had also a Berwick there, where there was one team-land and a half to geld. (2) In Whitetune [Whittington] Earl Tosti had one Manor, where there were six teamlands to geld. Appurtenant to this Manor were the following towns—Neutune ij. carucates, Ergune [Arkholme] vj. c., Ghersinctune ij. c., Hotun iij. c., Cantesfelt [Cantsfield] iiij. c., Irebi [Ireby] iij. c., Borch iij. c., Lech iij. c., Borctune iiij. c., Bernulfesuuic j. c., Inglestune vj. c., Castretune iij. c., Berebrune iij. c., Sedbergt iij. c., Tiernebi ij. c. (3) In Benetain, Wininctune [Wennington], Tathaim [Tatham], Fareltun, [Farleton], and Tunestalle [Tunstall], Chetel had four Manors, and there are [in A.D. 1086], in them, eighteen team-lands to geld, and three churches. These were all surveyed under Yorkshire, as in the West-riding, and they were included in the royal estate (Terra regis). In the reign of Henry I., (1) Melling, Hornby, and Wennington, composing the first mentioned estate (2), Arkholme and Cantsfield, forming only a small portion of the second estate (3), another portion of Wennington, Farleton and Tunstall, forming the greater part of the third estate, were held by Swain fitz Alric, together with other large estates in Cumberland and Yorkshire, presumably by grant from Henry I. He was a benefactor to the Priories of Pontefract and Nostel, and died before 1130, at which date his widow had been married to Hervey de Veceio (Pipe Roll, 31 Henry I.) His son and heir, Adam fitz Swain founded the Priory of Monk-Bretton, and died before 1159 (Pipe Roll, 5 Henry II.), leaving two daughters, (1) Amabel, the eldest, who married firstly Alexander de Crevequeur, and secondly William de Nevill, and had her purparty in cos. Cumberland, and Yorkshire, and a moiety of Croston cum membris, in co. Lanc., and (2) Matilda, who married Adam de Montbegon, a military tenant of the Honour of Lancaster in cos. Lincoln, Lancaster and Suffolk, to whom she brought her purparty of the estates in Cumberland and Yorkshire, the Manor and Castle of Hornby, and the other moiety of Croston cum membris, in co. Lancaster. Adam de Montbegon died before 1 Richard I., leaving issue Roger, his son and heir; Clemence, wife of Sir Eudo de Longvilers; Mabel, wife of Geoffrey de Nevill; and Alice, wife of Esward, or Efward de Bury. Roger de Montbegon was a stout adherent to the cause of his chief lord, John, Count of Mortain, on whose behalf he defended Nottingham Castle against the forces acting on behalf of King Richard, in 1194. He paid a fine of 600 marks for the King's pardon in 9 Richard I., and for restitution of his estates. He was also a benefactor to the Priories of Monk-bretton and Thetford. He married Olive, widow of Robert de St. John, about 1 John, and died about the middle of March, 1226, leaving no issue. By inquest made according to the King's precept, at Lincoln, before Martin de Patshull and his co-justices itinerant, by knights of the counties of Lincoln and Lancaster, it was found that Henry de Muneghdene was a relation, and next heir of Roger de Montbegon. The King having received his homage, directed the Sheriff of Lincoln to take security for the payment of relief of eight knights' fees, and to deliver seisin of Roger's estates. Writ dated at Windsor, 25th September, 1226. (Fine Roll, 10 Henry III., m. 3.) The relationship of the heir to Roger de Montbegon was ascertained at the Lincoln Assizes, 29 Henry III., as follows:—Agnes, sister of Adam de Montbegon married and had a son Robert, whose second son Robert, became heir to his father after the death of Henry, his elder brother without issue; Robert had issue Henry de Muneghden. This name seems to have been derived from Monewden, co. Suffolk, which was one of the eight knights' fees, which Roger de Montbegon held of the Honour of Lancaster. See also Fine No. 121, 20 Henry III., Divers Counties, postea. It is difficult to see why the claims of Roger de Montbegon's daughters were overlooked, in favour of the great-grandson of his aunt Agnes, except on the ground that the inheritance passed in tail male. Ultimately, as will be seen hereafter, John de Longvilers recovered Hornby, in right of his mother Clemence, elder daughter of Roger de Montbegon.
  • 7. In Mich. Term, 1233, at Westminster, William de Parles gave half a mark for licence to concord with William, son of Ralph, in a plea of land. (C. R. Roll, No. 113, m. 24). Among the essoins taken at Westminster on the Quindene of St. John Baptist [8th July, 1233], William de Parles, by his attorney, Walter de Brid, and Matilda, wife of the said William, by Adam de Lancaster, were pledged to sue on the morrow of St. Martin. (C. R. Roll, No. 114, m. 1). John de Thoroldesholm held one carucate of land in Thoroldesholm in 1212 by serjeanty, viz., to cure venison, bacon, &c. His successor Nicholas de Thoroldesholm, died not long after, leaving a dau., Matilda, whose wardship Roger, clerk of . . . obtained. (Testa, ii., f. 664). She became the wife of William de Parles above-mentioned. Alan de Parles held this estate in 1297, in socage for 6s. 4d.
  • 8. Final Concords of 29 pleas, heard before the Justices itinerant at Lancaster, on the 13th, 14th and 18th May, 1235, have been preserved, and are printed here, Nos. 34 to 62. The Justices were—Roger Bertram, Robert de Roos, William be York and Richard de Levington. In the Pipe Roll of 19 Henry III., the Sheriff accounted for £534 17s. 8d., for the amercements of men and townships, of which details were given in the Assize Roll, which the justices delivered to the Exchequer, now, unfortunately, no longer in existence. A few payments for chattels of felons are recorded, but no details of any concords are given.
  • 9. This Final Concord was cancelled by another made the following year. See No. 63.
  • 10. Simon, son of Matthew, of Broughton. See Furness Coucher.
  • 11. Alan de Kirkby, of Kirkby-Irleth. (Ibid).
  • 12. See No. 19 supra. Jordan de Wetelegh took his name from Wheatley, a joint township with Thornley, in the parish of Chipping.
  • 13. This is a Yorkshire Fine, relating to Middleton Tyas, and Kneeton, Wapentake of Gilling West, in Richmondshire. From an extent of the lands of Peter of Savoy, made in 1282, it appears that William de Lindsay, the descendant of William de Lancaster III., Henry de Middleton, and Alan de Kneeton, each held the ¼th part of a Knight's fee in Middleton Tyas and Kneeton (Yorks. Record Series, xii, p. 235. See also Kirkby's Inquest, Surtees Society, xlix., p. 170). In a note on the Genealogy of the family of Lancaster, in the Cockersand Chartulary, p. 307, I have ventured to suggest a descent of this family from Ribaud, Lord of Middleham, who is supposed to have been connected with Alan, Earl of Brittany, the first Lord of Richmondshire. The history of William de Lancaster's connection with Middleton Tyas would be interesting, and might throw light on the genealogy of that family.
  • 14. Richard de Bracebridge (circa 1242) appears to have been a tenant of Thomas Grelley, in Lincolnshire. "Richard, son of William, holds half a Knight's fee in Bracebridge and Canwick, of the fee of Thomas Grelley, who holds of the King in chief, as of the Honour of Lancaster de veteri feoffamento." (Testa ii., f. 464). Robert de Bracebridge, who had been enfeoffed of two oxgangs of land in the demesne lands in Manchester, by Albert Grelley (1160–1188), was probably the ancestor of Richard, as the heirs of Robert were said to be in possession of that land in 1212, (Testa ii., f. 823). There is no evidence as to the grounds of Richard's claim against Gilbert, but it is probable that there was a relationship by marriage between Barton and Bracebridge. A similar claim against Gilbert de Barton was made in the year 1241. See No. 98, postea.
  • 15. In the reign of Henry II. Worsley and Hulton cum membris, consisting of 14 oxgangs of land, were held of the King in thanage by Augustine de Barton by the yearly service of 26s. (Schedule of the ferm of Salford Hundred, Pipe Roll, 5 Henry III). In 1195–6, Hugh Purcell proffered 5 marks for a writ of right to sue Edith, Lescelina and Matilda for the fourth part of two Knight's fees in Barton and Worsley. Robert Grelley was his surety. (Lancashire Pipe Rolls, pp. 94, 96). In Easter Term, 4 John, in the King's Court, the assize between Eda, dau. of Matthew, plaintiff, and Richard de Worsley, tenant, of 40 acres of wood and appt. in Worsley, to remain over, because she has a husband, who is not named in the writ. (C. R. Roll, No. 26). A further entry states that the assize between Gilbert de Notton and Eda his wife, plaintiffs, and the said Richard, respecting half a carucate of land with appt. in Worsley to remain over, because Eda has sisters who are not named in the writ. (Ibid). No further reference to this suit is to be found in these Rolls, but the Survey of 1212 affords the further information that "Gilbert de Nocton holds in right of his wife 14 oxgangs of the King in thanage by the service of 26s. Richard de Wyrkedale (Worsley) holds one carucate [i.e. Worsley] of the same Gilbert by the service of 16s. 8d." (Testa ii., f. 825). "Gilbert de Notton holds with the lady of Barton, the fee of one Knight and a half of Robert Grelley; and Thomas de Wythington (read Worthington) holds the fee of half a Knight of the same Robert, of ancient feoffment." (Ibid., f. 822). It may be assumed from these particulars that Barton, Worsley and Hulton, were held temp. Henry II. by Augustine de Barton, and that he was succeeded by Matthew de Barton, who died young, leaving three daughters named above. The eldest, Edith—who had a daughter and heiress by a first husband— married secondly Gilbert de Notton, or Nocton, a Lincolnshire man, who held various other estates in Lancashire, chiefly in Roger de Montbegon's fee of Tottington. As Gilbert's son was named William, he may possibly be identified as the William de Notton who in 1212 held Breightmet (1 carucate) of Roger de Marsey, then under age. This William married the daughter and heiress of Edith de Barton, by whom he had issue a son, Gilbert de Notton, who assumed the name of Barton upon succeeding to the estates of his maternal grandmother, Edith de Barton. (Further reference to these important corrections in the pedigree of Barton, as given in the Coucher Book of Whalley, p. 45, will be found in the note to No. 93, 26 Henry III., postea).
  • 16. Conishead Priory, par. Ulverston, founded temp. Hen. II. by Gabriel de Pennington.
  • 17. Poulton-le-Sands, par. of Lancaster. An account of the family of Parles will be found in Baines' History of Lancashire, edit. 1870, vol. II., p. 578.
  • 18. See Cockersand Chartulary, s. t. Midelhargh, p. 167 n.
  • 19. Aughton, a parish in the hundred of West Derby. Before the Conquest, Uctred the thane held Dalton, Skelmersdale, Up-Litherland, and Aughton. Each Manor consisted of one team-land, and each was worth 32d. There was another place called Achetun, also held by a thane called Uctred, but it was Aston juxta Sutton, afterwards a member of the barony of Widnes. As Up-Litherland, a manor and hamlet in the parish of Aughton, is historically connected with Aughton, some account of both places is given here. Henry II. gave Up-Litherland to Warin de Lancaster, his Chief Falconer to hold with other estates, by falconry. This grant was confirmed by John, Count of Mortain (1189–1194), to Henry de Lancaster, son of Warin, and again after John became King. (Charter Roll, 1 John, Pt. 1, m. 5.) By charter dated 23rd August, 1207, the King granted to Henry de Lancaster the Manor of English Lea, in exchange for Liverpool and Up-Litherland, which Henry had resigned, and confirmed the previous grants of the remainder of Henry's estates, to hold in fee farm for 20s., instead of by serjeanty. (Ibid. 9 John, m. 6.) In the Survey of 1212, Richard le Waleys (Walensis), is returned as holding one carucate in Litherland of the King for 10s. (Testa ii., f. 814.) He died between 1217 and 1221, for in the latter year, Richard his son fined 40s. for his relief. (Fine Roll, 6 Henry III., m. 9). Quenild, the widow of Richard le Waleys, was of the King's donation at this time, and her land was valued at half a mark. (Testa ii., f. 662). Aughton was held temp. Henry II. by Richard, son of Roger (the well known founder of Lytham Priory), of the King in chief by military service, but whether in his own right, or in right of his wife Margaret, dau. and coheiress of Thurstan Banastre, is uncertain. It was included in his dau. Quenild's purparty. She married Roger Gernet, Chief Forester of Lancashire, but having no issue by him, her sisters' heirs became entitled after her death to this and her other estates. Accordingly in the above Fine, in addition to her husband, she was joined by Thomas de Beetham, who had married her sister Amuria, and by Avice, widow of William de Millum, another sister, as deforciants. Quenild died about the middle of April, 1252, and in the inquisition taken after her death, "Achton in Derbischyr" appears among her various estates, consisting of one team land held of William, Earl Ferrers by military service. (Escaeta, 36 Henry III., No. 63). Roger Gernet, her husband, had pre-deceased her about a month. According to an Extent taken about the year 1320, Ralph de Beetham held two-thirds of the Manor of Aughton, by homage and fealty in socage; Nicholas de Eton and Margaret (sic, but read Joan), his wife, in her right, held one-third of the Manor. Richard Walsh held the advowson of the church of Aughton, and the hamlet of Up-Litherland by service of 10s. for all services. (Birch Feodary.) As is probably well known, Nicholas de Eton had married Joan de Stockport, heiress to the barony of Stockport, the above third part of Aughton, being the share which had descended to her from her ancestress Matilda, dau. and co-heir of Richard, son of Roger, above-named. This Fine, and an inquest "de anno et die," taken at West Derby in the year 1282 (Escaeta, 11 Edward I., No. 62), supply some interesting information about the family of the plaintiffs above-named. By writ, dated at Rhuddlan, 27th September, 1282, the King sent word to the Sheriff of Lancaster to seize the land and tenements of "Guy (Wido), son of Madoc, son of Bleddyn, a Welshman, and an enemy and rebel against ourselves in the parts of Wales, who was lately killed in the company of our foes." The inquest, taken by a jury of West Derbyshire free tenants, found that the said Guy held a messuage and one carucate of land in Aughton (Acton), and also sundry parcels of land assarted from the wastes, worth 29s. 4d., which he held in demesne. The rents of the free tenants amounted to 9s. yearly, and he held the whole of Evan (Ayvum, Eyvan), his brother, for 12d. yearly. It seems, therefore, that the three plaintiffs named in the Fine, held Up-Litherland and Aughton between them, and that Richard le Waleys, who died in 1221, and Bleddyn de Acton were brothers, and Madoc de Acton, the son of Bleddyn. The similarity of these names with those given in the earlier generations of the pedigree of Halghton, alias Rylands, of West Houghton (Hist. of Lancashire, edit. 1891, vol. iii., p. 162) suggests a doubt as to whether the Halghton named in the Assize Roll of 30–31 Henry III., is not Aughton, rather than West Houghton. In the thirteenth century Aston-juxta-Sutton, and Aughton, both in West Derby Hundred, Haighton in the parish of Preston, Aighton in the parish of Mitton, and Aughton in the parish of Halton in Lonsdale, were all usually described "Acton," consequently difficulty often arises in distinguishing which of these places is referred to. West Houghton was usually styled "Halcton."
  • 20. Little-Heaton, parish of Prestwich.
  • 21. A service for land, rendered in cattle instead of money.
  • 22. The manor of Bolton, parish of Urswick, in Furness, was long in the possession of the Copeland family. It was given by Richard de Copeland to the Abbey of Furness in the latter part of the fourteenth century. (Annales Furnesienses, passim.)
  • 23. The foundation of Hornby Priory has been already referred to (p. 51). It is not known at what date, or by whose deed it became a cell to the Premonstratensian Abbey of Croxton in Leicestershire. It seems probable, however, that when Hubert de Burgh acquired Hornby from Henry de Monewden, he gave the foundation at Hornby to Croxton, as some sort of compensation for lands in Croxton, of which he had deprived them. See Monasticon, vi. p. 877. Adam de Montbegon gave the churches of Melling and Tunstall to the Abbey of Croxton, co. Leicester, during the reign of Henry II. (Nichols' Hist. of Leicestershire).
  • 24. "Whiteray" is the name of a messuage in Tatham.
  • 25. "Middlegill" divides Tatham from Botton.
  • 26. "Botton Beck."
  • 27. Butterworth, a township in the parish of Rochdale. See Fishwick's History of the Parish of Rochdale, p. 113.
  • 28. Geoffrey de Stalmine was the son of Alan, who was a younger son of Robert de Stalmine, a benefactor to Furness Abbey, to which he gave one carucate of land called "Corcold," in Stalmine. Alan received from his father for his filial portion two oxgangs for his homage and service. (Testa ii., f. 820).
  • 29. Before the year 1211, Roger de Lacy gave to Robert de Flamborough in marriage with Alice, daughter and heiress of Robert de Liversedge, 10½ oxgangs and the third part of half an oxgang of land for 20s. yearly service. This estate probably included the whole of Hundersfield. (Testa ii., f. 818). Robert de Flamborough died in the year 1246, when his son, Roger de Flamborough had livery of the ninth part of a knight's fee which his father had held in Yorkshire of John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln. (Fine Roll, 31 Henry III., m. 13). Afterwards the Liversedge family appear to have again been in possession of Hundersfield. (Fishwick's History of Rochdale, p. 95), but in 1311 John de Eland held Hundersfield (one carucate) of the Earl of Lincoln for homage and service 60s.
  • 30. The etymology of this place-name appears to be the "hills (feld) around the homestead (worth) of Hun or Hunne."
  • 31. Adam de Healey (in Salesbury), son of Gilbert de Salesbury, gave to the monks of Salley all his dead wood in Healey wood. Witnessed by Geoffrey, dean of Whalley, Henry, parson of Blackburn, and Roger, clerk of Blackburn (Coucher of Salley, f. 81 b). Gilbert de Healey also gave them an acre of land in the town field of Salesbury, near land belonging to them, which Siward de Salesbury holds. Witnessed by Ralph de Clayton, Robert de Mitton, Robert de Bolton. (Ibid., f. 81).
  • 32. The family of Croft acquired their surname from the estate of Croft in West Derby Hundred. Roger de Croft, the first of the name, was falconer to John, Count of Mortain (1189–94). Gilbert, his son, appears in the Survey of 1212 as holding one carucate in Croft by serjeanty, one and a half carucate in Southworth in fee farm for 20s. (these were both members of the fee of Makerfield), and two carucates in Dalton in Lonsdale in thanage for 10s. (Testa, ii., f. 834). Hugh de Croft, probably a brother of Gilbert, held five oxgangs in Croft of the said Gilbert. The first-named Gilbert was the ancestor of a long line of Crofts, who held estates in Dalton, Leighton, Silverdale, Claughton, Over-Kellet, and Whittington, until in the fifteenth century, the daughters and heiresses of James Croft conveyed these estates into the families of Legh of Lyme, and Middleton of Middleton in Lonsdale. Between October, 1213, and July, 1219, Gilbert de Croft, son of Roger, alienated Southworth and Croft to Gilbert, son of Hugh de Croft, which grant was duly confirmed by Thurstan Banastre, lord of Makerfield. (Dodsworth MSS., liii., ff. 20b, 23). Thenceforth the grantee assumed the name of Southworth, and his son, as Gilbert, son of Gilbert de Southworth, had a grant of two oxgangs in Croft from Robert Sceryswerz some time after 1232, the witnesses being inter alios Sir Robert de Lathom and Sir Henry de Torbock. (Ibid., f. 17b).
  • 33. A number of persons held land in Gressingham by "forestry" or by "falconry" (Testa). Adam, son of Ketel, gave land there to the monks of Cockersand, and Gilbert, son of Ketel, occurs in a Final Concord of 4 John, No. 10 (p. 12). Possibly they may have been brothers of Benedict. Dolfin de Gressingham occurs in the Pipe Roll of 1184. William, his son, was a benefactor to Cockersand Abbey, and together with William, son of Gilbert, held two oxgangs by forestry. Barnard, who was living in the time of Henry II., seems to have possessed half the township, viz., one carucate. He had two sons, Bernard and Geoffrey. In the reign of King John, Margery, widow of the said Bernard, held two oxgangs by serjeanty, which the elder Barnard had given to her husband. Geoffrey, the other son, had six oxgangs, which descended to his daughter Alice, who married Thomas de Gersingham, son of Adam de Capernwray, or Coupmanwray. She died in 1227, when her grandfather Adam proffered 100s. for her wardship, which was, however, granted to her father on 12th March, 1227, in consideration of his proffer of 10 marks (Fine Roll, 11 Henry III., m. 8). Adam de Coupmanwray died in 1236, when Thomas de Gressingham, his son, gave 15s. 6d. for his relief, and had livery of his father's estate on the 17th July, 1236 (Ibid., 20 Henry III., m. 6). After that date he seems to have adopted the name of Coupmanwray.
  • 34. Matthew de Redmayne, or Redman, was son and heir of Henry de Redman, seneschal of Gilbert fitz Reinfred. On the 12th December, 1215, Henry de Redman was delivered to Robert de Courtnay to keep in durance, having been taken prisoner with the rebel barons at the fall of Rochester Castle. On the 22nd January, 1216, Norman, his son and heir, was named as one of the hostages given by Gilbert fitz Reinfred for his pardon, and for the release of his knights from prison. In May, 1222, William de Lancaster, son and heir of Gilbert fitz Reinfred, complained that Norman, son of Henry de Redman, Richard, son of Roger de Kirkby, and the son of William de Windesore, returning to their own country after being released from hostage, had been seized by Philip Mark, Sheriff of Nottingham, who had lodged them in Nottingham Castle. The writ for their release was dated 19th May, 1222. (Close and Fine Rolls, passim).
  • 35. Carleton and Drigg are in the ward of Allerdale-above-Derwent. This Fine therefore belongs to Cumberland. The fourth part of these vills was given to Furness by Matthew de Redman, with the consent of his wife Amabel, of whose dower it was. (Furness Coucher, Add. MS., 33, 244, f. 189). I have not been able to discover the parentage of Amabel, wife of the above-named Matthew. These manors were members of the Stutevill fee in Cumberland, which Joan, daughter and co-heiress of Nicholas de Stutevill, lord of Liddel, conveyed by marriage to Hugh Wake. Amabel was probably a Greystock or a Harrington, as these families held the two manors between them temp. Henry III. and Edward I.
  • 36. Westhus, or Westhusham, now called Wesham, is a joint township with Medlar, in the parish of Kirkham. Mowbrick and Bradkirk were demesnes in this township. In the 47 Henry III., Roger de Heaton died seised of the manor of Westesham, containing eight oxgangs of land, which he held of the king in chief by the yearly service of 4s. It was a member of the Boteler fee of Weeton, which at that time (1262–3) was in the king's hands.
  • 37. Orgrave in the parish of Dalton-in-Furness. Various references to Hamon de Orgrave will be found in the Furness Coucher, pp. 249–255 passim.
  • 38. Cf. note to Fine No. 54, temp. John, p. 31.