BHO

Henry VIII: February 1537, 16-20

Pages 210-225

Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 12 Part 1, January-May 1537. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1890.

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February 1537, 16–20

16 Feb.
R. O.
C's Works, 334.
436. CRANMER to CROMWELL.
As to the misdemeanour of the monks of Christchurch, knows no more than he wrote, except that the King's injunctions are not regarded. When any of the convent wishes to have them observed the prior says he has a dispensation for it. On St. Blase day last he commanded the relics to be set forth as usual, and sent word to the convent in the chapter house that it was the King's pleasure. Was uncertain whether he really has a dispensation. Sends a copy of a letter to the prior from Dan Robt. Antoney, sub-cellarer, who has gone away for fear of examination. Sends also a letter from Calice concerning an oath for the extirpation of the bishop of Rome's power and authority. Has in durance a French priest of Calais, with whom Cranmer received an English book, in reprehending which his commissary and some soldiers of the town received much reproof and displeasure. Will send the priest to Cromwell if he wishes. Thinks, as he is a simple man without learning, that he has spoken nothing of malice but only of ignorance. As he is the French king's subject and was only fit there to be a gardener, recommends that he should be sent back to Calais and banished into his natural country. Forde, 16 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
R. O. 437. CHRISTCHURCH, CANTERBURY.
A list of the monks of [Christchurch] Canterbury, giving the age of each, and his scholastic degree and office, with the characters of several written in a different hand in the margin. At the beginning of the list is the name of Thos. Goldwell, the prior, D.D., aged 61. The number of monks in all is 58, including the prior and Wm. Hadley, sub-prior, B.D., Wm. Sandwyche, B.D., (fn. 1) warden of Canterbury College, Oxford, 42 years old, 2 masters of the shrine, 2 scholars of Oxford, ages 29 and 30, and 2 studying at Paris, viz., Thos. Wilfryde, 34, and John Waltham, 28, Wm. Gregory, master of the martyrdom, aged 32, and Robt. Anthony, now in the keeping of my lord of Canterbury. The last and youngest on the list is Ric. Marshall, "of the age of deacon and no priest, 21."
Pp. 3.
16 Feb.
R. O.
438. HARRY HUTTOFT to CROMWELL.
The French have lately taken an Arragose ship laden with malmseys, silks, and camlets, which remains still in their hands, lying under Wight. They looked for an answer from their admiral, and would have brought away the ship ere this, but that it is large and draws much water. They daily continue to do mischief in these parts; on Wednesday a poor fisherman coming to this port met with a ship of St. Malo's, which after five hours' sailing with him, boarded him, slew a man, and hurt five or six more, some dangerously. The fisherman, I understand, was bringing fish for your Lordship from the abbot of Buckfast, and has been robbed to the value of 50l. The town is utterly decayed and no man comes with victuals or merchandise. I fear, unless remedy be provided, the King's customs this year will not be 200l. I would suggest that some of the King's ships now ready to set forth should keep these two forelands, the Needles and St. Helen's under Wight. I lately sent your Lordship a declaration of what had been spent until Christmas last. There has been issued since almost 100l., and money is wanted with all speed. 16 Feb.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
16 Feb.
R. O.
439. NORFOLK to CROMWELL.
As I have written to the King of this ungracious business, I forbear to write to you, save that if Thomas Clifford had not brought with him the thieves of Ask and Levon, and that they had not spoiled, this had not happened. I shall this night have with me most of the nobles and gentlemen, not daring to assemble the people, for I cannot trust them. This journey will "pluck out the bottom of my purse," but, this pageant well played, this realm shall be the quieter. I shall not risk anything. If lord Dacre's company come to our aid we shall beat them easily; if not we will keep them in play with our horsemen. Of my letter to Sir Chr. Dacre I, for surer conveying, sent two copies by diverse men. I have sent into Westmoreland Sir Thomas Wharton, who is come from London, and Sir Thomas Curwen and four gentlemen of Westmoreland that have been serving with Thomas Clifford, whose names are in a bill, enclosed, to raise men. This night I will send 200 or 300 light horses to them, and have commanded them to fire the rebels' dwellings, to make them "scale," and, "if the traitors so sparcle," not to spare shedding of blood. As they are countrymen, I will send such as I can rely on. I will make haste, and on Sunday or Monday at latest we shall be busy with them. "Now shall appear whether for favour of these countrymen I forbare to fight with them at Doncaster," as the King showed me had been said. Richmond, 16 Feb.
P.S.—Has received the accompanying letter from Sir Chr. Dacre. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
16 Feb.
R. O.
440. SIR ROBT. WYNGFFELD to CROMWELL.
Wrote last on the 9th, sending Cromwell a complete harness, which he trusts is suitable. Has this day received by his nephew, Fras. Halle, Cromwell's letters of the 11th, advertising him of the diligence his said nephew has used in his long suit. Thanks for continued favour. Cromwell writes in praise of Wingfield's nephew, John Wingfield, and asks that he may have a partnership in the lands the writer has of the King. Never intended otherwise, and would have made him partner in the Meanebrok if he might have kept it. Has brought up his nephews, John Wingfield and his three brethren, and Halle, and intends to divide his property amongst them. Has given John Wingfield 20 marks a year since he entered the King's service, and leaves him a lordship worth 100 marks a year, on which he (the writer) is now building him a house that will cost 500l. Cromwell writes that the Council of Calais intend making Sir Robert mayor there next year, and reminds him of a letter the King wrote him on the subject. Remembers the letter well: it must have been procured in right sinister manner. Never intends to be mayor again. Took the office before only to gain experience, which has taught him that unless remedy be found the town will decay. Calais, 16 Feb. 1536.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
16 Feb.
R. O.
441. CHARLES DE GRAVE to LORD LISLE.
On the 7th Feb. I received your letters by Jean Berrincourt, your servant, at the hotel of Antoine Chocquart, receiver of the grand tonlieu and mayor of Gravelines, without which comfort from you I should not have known what to do, nor could I have got out of the place without the assistance of Chocquart, who stood in fear of you after he had received your news by Master Jorge Esclusier, your subject. I am disappointed at Mons. de Reux refusing the horse which I presented to him in your name, as I will tell you tomorrow by mouth. As to the "eauwes" (waters?) of Bredenarde, the said person has twice asked me for a copy of a letter that I said I had written to him at your request, from which I know truly that the said Sieur du Reux received them three days after you had given me charge to write, by the hands of Mons. Delfault. As to the said "eauwes," du Reux has made answer to me that the thing is not within the power of the governors, and that he would inform the Emperor by post. Although I expected Mons. du Reux daily while I was at Gravelines, on Monday, 12 Feb., I came to the house of Master George Esclusier. I would have come that day to you but was still daily expecting Du Reux at Gravelines till yesterday evening, when I had certain news that he was at Reminghem making musters of gens d'armes. I hear that his men yesterday burnt some houses at Ardre, and that he means to take the castle of Outtinghes and other places before his return. At the house of Maitre Jorge Esclusier du quartier de Gravelinghes, 16 Feb. 1537.
Hol. Fr., pp. 2. Add. Sealed.
R. O. 442. CHARLES DE GRAVE to LORD LISLE.
Desires to be recommended to Lady Lisle. Has been away from Antwerp and the Emperor's countries for a long time without writing, and some say they had orders to keep him prisoner. His debtors in many places will not pay him. Is afraid of his creditors. Asks Lord Lisle to give him an asylum in English territory (de moy volloir donner francquise dedens le pays d'Engleterre) for a month or more. Is accused of being a traitor to the Emperor.
In order that he may come freely to lord Lisle, asks his Lordship to send him a letter styling him his servant.
Fr. P. 1. Add.: A Callays.
16 Feb.
R. O.
St. P.,
VII. 674.
443. SIR JOHN WALLOP to LORD LISLE.
The best news I have is that I trust shortly to see you at Calais. Secondly, the Pope has sent a sword to the king of Scots to encourage him to defend the Faith. "I insure you the Pope meaneth shrewdly and what other doth God knoweth: I pray God we know it not." Great preparation is made for revictualling Tourwen; there will be 10,000 foot, 4,000 Almains under Count Guillaume, 1,000 men of arms, and 1,000 light horse. Mons. de Vendôme and the Great Master will be there and the French king at Amyas. My wife's and my recommendations to you and my lady. Tell Mr. Porter his vyalls may be in good order as also his hawks, with whom I trust to take pastime. Paris, 16 Feb. Signed.
Add.: Deputy of Calais. Endd.
16 Feb.
R. O.
444. CARD. POLE to [THE KING'S COUNCIL].
"My lor[ds, ... w]here as I have received the letters you wrote un[to me] subscribed with all your hands, you being those noble persons [whom]e I have borne special love unto," I am the more grieved to see the ill opinion you have of my conduct towards the King and my acceptance of the degree of Cardinal. Apart from what touches myself it grieved me to see your opinions such as cannot fail to damage the whole realm. First, [as touc]hing my [wri]ting I would know (1) whether when commanded by the King to write my opinion, I could refuse, especially in a matter of learning wherein by the King's goodness I have been nourished from childhood; and (2) whether I should treat it according to learning and conscience or only write to please. If you allow that conscience should be our guide in all opinions, then when I saw great dishonour to the King and dispeace to the realm, with the death of those men "which afore these new opinions were brought in were cou[nted b]othe for learning and goodness the chief of the realm, and in their end showed them self chief of Christendom," whether was it a loving subject's part to say nothing of such dishonour, or to explain it, when commanded so to do? In my book it will be found I have sought only to explain this dishonour and suggest how it might be "turned to honour." Yet I am charged with setting forth matters to the King's dishonour. He that would reprove me should show that I have untruly described the King's acts. Then before whom, "my good lords," do I distain the King's honour? Never confessor desired to be so secret as I desired to be in that book. I have been now many months in Rome and daily with the Pope "where men might think my book might have no ingrateful audience," and have been often desired of him for the s[ight] thereof, and yet have kept it close. Yet what witholds me from printing it but that I tender the King's honour more than some others would? And now as to my mind concerning the King's honour. Why am I a banished man? Why could I come to no honour or living at home? You, my lord of Norfolk can tell whether, "if [I wou]ld a 'greed" to the Divorce when the abpric. of York was void, I might have had that honour or no, and you can tell too how I ever said that my love for the King's honour alone restrained me. (fn. 2) I will not deny that when I saw the only way to the King's favour was by favouring the Divorce I did incline thereto for the sake of my friends, and I remember saying to Doctor [Fo]x, who was with me for the King's matter, that I trusted I had found a way to satisfy his Grace. I showed the same to my lord my brother and they both informed the King; and I shall never forget that when I was sent for, "his Grace was the first that showed himself at the door (fn. 3) when I entered to speak with him." But when I came to look on him my mind changed from what I had intended and ran upon nothing else but how I could find it in my best to confirm [him] in what, in my opinion, was dishonour (fn. 4). As to my coming to Rome, I have always maintained the Pope's authority and it would be strange if I did not obey. You write that this opinion of mine is but a fantasy. If I differed from you in the feat of war, wherein divers of you are very expert and I ignorant, you might bid me hold my peace. But I who have spent all my life in learning, wherein you have not had such practise, might surely rather desire you in this point to credit me than force me to agree with you. But not to rest on my own opinion, if you will not deprive your forefathers of all goodness, they all agreed with me.
As to your accusation that by taking the degree of Cardinal I profess myself enemy to the King, because cardinals are councillors to the Pope, whom you call the King's enemy:—whatever other popes may have been, the pope that made me cardinal, whom I see daily and hear his sayings of the King and realm, although he be sore irritated, as you know best yourselves, never shows himself other than an indulgent father towards his only son that has offended him. This love for our nation he showed in calling me first to Rome for mat[ters of] the Council; for I think there could be no greater dishonour to a nation than to be excluded from a General Council of Christendom, and I have read that at the Council of Constance when the English nation was not called they made such protest that they acquired the right to be called. The Pope seeing me nothing slack to serve God and the Church, as there be three great matters disturbing the Church, viz., the war between Christian princes, heresies, and the expected attack from the Turk, made me legatum ultramontanum a latere to treat with the princes beyond the mountains. You have written that if I will come without office, commission or dignity into Flanders, you have license from the King to send thither elect persons to confer on matters of religion. I have obtained from the Pope that either in Flanders or in France, wherever suits you, I may entreat with you, if you will entreat with a cardinal and a legate. Now whether you will use me or let others take the whole use of my services, lies with you. Rome, 16 Feb. Signed R. Pole, Card. legs.
Pp. 16. Slightly mutilated.
R. O. 2. Latin version of the same, differing in some parts from the English. Printed in Poli Epp., I. 179, where it is inaccurately headed as addressed to the Parliament of England.
Pp. 18. Endd.: Pole to the Council.
17 Feb.
Add. MS.
25,114, f. 244.
B. M.
445. HENRY VIII. to GARDINER.
Has received by his servant, Oliver Vachell, his letters of 26 Jan., and has seen his private letters with the same to the lord Privy Seal. In the first he relates a long conference with the French king about the matter of the princess Mary; in the second, he states certain objections which he believes will be advanced by the French in discussing it with him, and desires to know how to act. Considering how slackly they have proceeded in the matter, and how continually they have harped on that string of legitimation, which the King will not condescend to, though he is not disinclined to the alliance, if they will accept it on reasonable conditions such as the King has already notified, has determined to make no further overture, but leave it to them. Gardiner must not press them in any manner to renew the communication thereof, nor show himself anxious to listen if they begin, but hear them like a man who would be glad for his own part that the thing came to effect, but lamented that they had trifled over it so long, that the prospects of it are doubtful. "Where first you ground yourself upon the answer made to Pomeroy, wherein it is expressed that we cannot legitimate our said daughter Mary in such wise as she should be preferred to the daughters legitime of this marriage, or any other lawful marriage hereafter to be made, for that God's law will so that the legitime shall be preferred; whereupon you infer that all others of our blood being legitime, though they be never so far off in degree from us, must be preferred before her, God's law so willing that the legitime should be preferred:—To this may be answered that albeit those words, 'that God's law will the legitime to be preferred,' imply not so certain a conclusion as the same may be verified in all like cases, yet in the matter now in question those words of God's law might be well inserted, as well for that both the old law of this realm so ordereth, as that it is by a special law made for that purpose so determined, for that the marriage was never good, as our good brother himself cannot deny; which law, therefore, it is to be by all men observed as long as it remaineth in his force, and is not, by like authority as it was first made, upon just cause repealed, that whosoever would infringe or break it doth offend God's law therein; so that both laws in the answer may well be joined together and not yet induce such a necessity, as in no case of like nature the contrary may be justified. And, therefore, if they should build upon those bare words, as you think they will, their argument shall have but a weak foundation, for the laws that would that the legitime shall be preferred permit those that be legitime and might claim title, to surrender and yield up the same for the preferment of any other, as in this time all that might pretend any title to the crown Imperial of our realm have yielded their rights into our hands, that we may name thereunto whom we think most meet, if God send us not succession legitime, which they will in no wise condescend to disinherit." As to the second objection they might make, that if they acknowledge the title of Mary to depend only upon Parliament, then if Henry have a son he may provide by means of Parliament that such as he shall appoint shall succeed before Mary and the duke of Orleans; Gardiner may reply, that although she can have no title except by Parliament, it is not to be supposed that the nobles and commons of this realm could be so light and inconstant as to disinherit her without cause, even if Henry's son desired it, which is improbable, she being his sister, and though not legitimate, of such noble parentage on both sides. He may remind Francis that he himself has no better title to the crown of France, for if the legitimate heir should be absolutely preferred by God's law, and no ordinance of Parliament be valid, "our good brother could not enjoy the crown of France," for he holds it by the Salic law.
Since Gardiner's letters arrived the French ambassador has requested licence for the passage of the queen of Scots through England into Scotland, because she is very sickly, adding that by a letter from the Great Master he thought the king of Scots would be glad to accompany her. The king of Scots himself has not written upon the subject. The ambassador also requested an aid of ships for defence of the coasts between Usshant and the Downs, in accordance with the treaty concluded by Pomeray, and complained that English merchants had conveyed victuals from France into Flanders. On the subject of the queen of Scots, the King made answer by his Council, that although he can refuse the French king nothing reasonable, yet considering that last summer the king of Scots had broken his appointment about the interview, and excused it by saying he would have been betrayed in England, Henry thinks that if anything should happen to the queen of Scots in her passage, her husband might find some pretext for a matter wherein honor would be touched. Henry would therefore neither grant the request nor utterly refuse it, but referred it to Francis whether he ought with due regard to his honor to allow her a passage without her husband. To the demand for ships the King replied there were many points in Pomeray's and other treaties that would have to be considered, and that his ambassador in France would make answer, he hoped to his good brother's satisfaction. To the complaints about the English merchants, he offered redress if the offenders could be pointed out. The answer Gardiner is to give about the aid of ships is, that the King having considered the provisions of Pomeray's treaty, finds that such an aid cannot be demanded unless France be invaded by the Emperor; that the Emperor's invasion last year cannot serve as a pretext unless it is renewed this year, for the words of the treaty require that there should be a present invasion and a certificate made thereof to Henry, which has not been done yet, after which the King should have two months to get his ships ready; that Francis has not fully observed the article that neither prince should make any alliance which might be to the other's prejudice, so that Henry might consider the whole league invalidated, (for, first, Francis has made an alliance with the bp. of Rome and violated his promise never to conclude any marriage with him except to the King's benefit. Again, the alliance he has made with the king of Scots is most injurious to Henry; for though he is the King's nephew and in league with England, he and his progenitors are our ancient enemies. Thirdly, the amount of aid required by the treaty in case of invasion is, a joint force of 1,500 men for six months, of whom the King is to contribute 750); that Francis ought first to set his ships upon the seas in those quarters limited by the treaty, and though Henry might prove the treaty violated on his part he would not leave Francis in danger. Gardiner is temperately to remind them of the King's money now due, to see whether they wish to evade payment on refusal of their demand for aid. He is also to state that Francis in his proclamation of 16 Nov. last has made an innovation contrary to the treaties, which provide for the free mutual intercourse of merchants; for that proclamation compels the English merchants to convey such goods as they shall lade in France into England only. Has received Gardiner's private letters of advice touching the late business that has been in England. Finds either that Gardiner's "old opinion is not utterly mortified," or that he has had some advertisement from factious persons. Cannot approve of the advice to yield to his own subjects. Westm., 17 Feb. 28 Henry VIII.
Pp. 8. Signed. Endd.
17 Feb. 446. SIR JOHN DUDLEY.
See GRANTS in FEBRUARY, No. 29.
17 Feb.
Titus B. I.
390.
B. M.
447. THOMAS WYNTER to CROMWELL.
Sends this letter knowing that Cromwell, like all men of wisdom and experience, abhors a person who without regard to time and place delights in importunity; but a letter may be read at his convenience. Would like to repair to his learning, from which he has been absent 44 months. Laments the loss of time, which has only been made bearable by Cromwell's conversation and favour. 13 Kal. Mart. 1537.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal.
17 Feb.
R. O.
448. NORFOLK to HENRY VIII.
Your Highness hath as much cause to thank God as ever had prince Sir Chr. Dacre has shown himself a noble knight. He set upon the rebels when they gave the assault to Carlisle and has taken 700 or 800: how many more is not yet known for the chase was not finished when these men came away. Among others the friar of Knaresborough is taken. I have [to go] thither near 50 miles and shall make all the haste I can possible, and do such execution that others shall be afraid. Never saw so many well willing noblemen and gentlemen to atone for their former fault. Thinks there are above 4,000 tried men and the best geldings he ever saw, and if any rebellion should break out he should bring such a band out of these parts as would be fearful for enemies to look upon. Thomas Clifford has atoned for his first blunder, for when they were broken he issued out of Carlisle and followed chase at least 12 miles. Barna Castle, Saturday, 17 Feb. at 9 a.m.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
17 Feb.
R. O.
449. SIR GEORGE LAWSON to CROMWELL.
My lord of Norfolk left York towards the North parts on Wednesday last. At his abode there he kept sessions at which certain persons were condemned for treason. Hopes all will be quiet in these parts. My lord has commissioned him to repair Sheriff Hutton castle and prepare lodgings there against his return; so it will be Easter term before he can come to make his accounts for Berwick. Thanks Cromwell for his kind letter. Nothing ever comforted him more. Sheriff Hutton, 17 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
17 Feb.
R. O.
450. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
I have received your sundry letters. This day Kyne "is appointed" to see the stuff that lady Rutland promised; but now she says she can help you but with one bed. They make many promises here, and fail of performance, as those of the Wardrobe and Closet have done; but I think you will get from lady Rutland everything I write in the bill I sent last except the beds. What I said to Mr. Kingston was of my own head, as he has control of the Wardrobe in my lord Chamberlain's absence. I asked for six pieces of tapestry, and six carpets. My lady of Sussex promises to do her best for a pane. Mr. Popley has promised to see your weir rid before Easter. Mr. Coffyn advises to send your daughter over to be with my lady Sussex, that the King and Queen may see her, and he doubts not, if lady Beauchamp be your friend, you shall have your desire at the next avoidance. Mrs. Jarnyngham, who is to succeed lady Sussex, was lady Beauchamp's gentlewoman. I have the two kerseys which shall go by the first ship if you send a warrant to Bury to pay Bodley five marks. I would have sent you sprotts (sprats), but that Duckyngton said he had sent four lasts. Your caps of ermines are almost ready. Kyne wishes to know what you will do for waistcoats. They are worn here of white satin or damask lined with ermine. I find Popley will give you a cradle ready trimmed, but this is a secret. Wishes instructions about a damask nightgown for which Goodall has spoken. As to the spices, the grocer is dead, and his wife is a limb of the devil, with whom I will not deal. I beg you will be good to Sendy, and I trust he will behave well henceforth. I send the Queen's new year's gift, a pair of beads of "granatts" with gold. Ghoughe despairs of his reward. Mr. Basset is merry, but there are two dead in the lane Lincoln's Inn stands in. If I see danger I will take him away. Old Mr. Norton is dead. "And where your ladyship saith that I have good inspeculation to know that your ladyship hath a man child, I would God I were so sure of 1,000l. a year as that is true, and then should I live merrily." London, 17 Feb.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.
17 Feb.
R. O.
451. RICHARD LEE to LORD LISLE
I have received your letter, dated Calais, 11 Feb., asking me to be your solicitor concerning the priory of Fridelistock, in which you put spurs to the galloping horse. I never speak seriously to the lord Privy Seal, but head or tail touches your suit. He promises to do it as soon as he has time convenient, with as friendly words as if you were his brother. I am uncertain what works will be done this year. I cannot help people murmuring for the repairs of my house, as you write. When I return I know my purse will feel it is my expense and not the King's, for so I desired Mr. Fowler to do in my absence. It shall never be proved that Richard Lee will waste the King's goods with which he is entrusted. I desire you to notify this to all those who are so busy in my absence, for whose evil will I care no more than for the vilest person in the world. I pray God send your wife a prosperous and merry deliverance, and that you may be a glad father. London, 17 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
17 Feb.
R. O.
452. HUGH YEO to LADY LISLE.
Her tenant Wanell is dead. Ric. Poyns was at the Court and showed a copy for it of the demise of lord Gelis Dawbeney, under the seal of Ric. Coffyn, then surveyor. Has made him such an answer that he has little comfort to make any further demand for it. Lord Dawbeney has "rebylled" (rebuilt) his weir of Beauford again and so has Mr. Barth. Fortescue of Weare his. The latter has been sent for to London by privy seal upon the complaint of young Southcote of Weare. Wishes Womberlegh weir were rebuilded for the ease of the country. It were well done to move Thos. Sealer, who may do most with lord Daubeney, that there might a drift be driven with him to have the Beamount's lands out of his hands, and he to have the rents during his life, as the marquis of Exeter has Chitilhampton, and lord Dawbeney but the rent thereof. Thinks it can be won with policy, and then he can do no displeasure. Wm. Merewodd's son and heir is lately dead. Asks for a good goshawk, as he must give one for the business mentioned in his last letter. Will pay for him at her pleasure. London, 17 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add: Wife to the deputy of Calais.
17 Feb.
R. O.
453. REGENTS OF SCOTLAND to HENRY VIII.
Desiring safe conduct for one year for the abbot of Melrose and retinue of 16 persons to pass and repass to France. Edinburgh, 17 Feb.
Signed: Gawan archebischop of Glasgw, Chancellar—Willzam erll of Montrois—Robert Maxwell. Sealed with the great seal of Scotland.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
17 Feb.
Ribier I. 23.
454. PAUL III. to FRANCIS I.
Credence for John Matthew bp. of Verona, whom he sends with the Card. Legate of England. Rome, 17 Feb. 1537, anno pont. 3.
Latin.
18 Feb.
R. O.
455. SUPPRESSION OF THE MONASTERIES.
Expenses of Sir Roger Towneshend, Sir Will. Paston, Sir Ant. Wyngfeld, Sir Humphrey Wyngfeld, and Sir Thos. Russhe, Ric. Southwell, and Thos. Mildemaye, Commissioners for valuation of the lands and goods of places of religion in Norfolk and Suffolk, beginning at Carrowe, Tuesday, 10 July, (fn. 5) and ending at Eye on Tuesday, 28 Aug.* With a separate entry of costs of Fras. Southwell and his servant riding from Woodrising, Norf., to Grafton, Northt., and waiting on the Council with the certificate of Norfolk till 19 Sept.
Pp. 15.
ii. Expenses of Sir Roger Townsend, Sir Will. Paston, Ric. Southwell, and Thos. Mildemay, Commissioners for the suppression from Saturday, 22 Sept., (fn. 6) at Bokenham, to Sunday, 18 Feb., at Eye. The amounts are given each day under the heads of breakfast, dinner, supper, and lodging. On the 6 Oct. the Commissioners were at Pentney, "which was not suppressed because of the insurrection in the North parts."
Pp. 14.
18 Feb.
R. O.
456. SIR JOHN BALDWYN to CROMWELL.
On Friday last about 4 p.m. Mr. Rauf Lane, jun., came to me at Aylesbury and showed me he had heard on the Thursday before that at Buckingham there was a rumour of the pulling down of the churches, and that on the said Friday he rode to Buckingham and sent for Mr. Thomas Gyfford to investigate this. By my advice Lane was at Buckingham early on Saturday morning with Master Gyfford and your servant Edward Gyfford, the bringer hereof. There was a multitude of people by reason of the fair, and this matter was hotly talked of. Mr. Lane also informed me that the barber's boy of Aylesbury reported to him that the jewels of Aylesbury church "should be fetched away." I sent for the boy, who said he had heard it from his dame, and she said she had heard it reported at the common bakehouse, where they were to set in their bread. The clerk's wife of the church there said that her husband kept the church all that week and had no such knowledge, and with this they were satisfied; but who began the tale I cannot yet find out. I have instructed Master Lane to inquire further. Aylesbury, Sunday. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
ii. The examination of Henry Robyns of Buckingham, servant to Edward Byllyng of Buckingham, baker, taken at Aylesbury, 18 Feb. 28 Hen. VIII., before Sir John Baldwyn, Ralph Lane, jun., and Edward Gyfford.
He says he had heard many reports that Buckingham church should go down, and the lead should come to Aylesbury to the said Sir John Baldwyn; that it was a common tale in the country which he had heard first about Christmas; that he daily carried bread from Buckingham to Padbury and to 13 towns on every side of Buckingham, and that the inhabitants of these towns had often asked him if Buckingham church was put down; that there was a like rumour about Padbury church, the lead of which was also to be conveyed to Sir John Baldwyn; that John Thornton, servant to Edw. Mathewson, baker of Buckingham, who used to ride with him to those towns, had often said that if anybody went about to put down the churches, Mr. Thomas Gyfford of Twyford would send to Robert Gally to Buckingham to raise the country for eight miles round at an hour's warning. This Thornton told him in riding from Buckingham to Padbury and he has declared it to divers persons. It was said that the churches were to be pulled down on Ash Wednesday or between that and Sunday next. Signed by the justices.
Pp. 2.
18 Feb.
R. O.
457. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Has received his letters by Goodalle. Thinks that he will get a good assurance from Popley, to whom Lisle gave the rent paid by Ravon two years ago. Has not been forgetful of my lady's "weare," but has been stayed, as others are making similar suits. Has taken Sywlyard's advice in the appeal of Ansley against Skelle. It must be sued at Calais, where the murder was done. Has not received the obligation. Will communicate to Studalfe Lisle's pleasure. Has not been able to speak with Mr. Vyllers. Has got Alayne Kyng's passport. The money is ready for the Frenchman. Is expecting every hour his bill will be signed for the Priory. My lord (Cromwell) has promised the fee simple. May send at any time one horse for my lord and one for Mr. Richard, though he is not to be so quick in sending them till Hussey writes again. Has delivered Morgan's warrant. Mr. Only gapeth for his wine; so doth John Goughe for his reward. Popley will move my lord Privy Seal touching my lord Chamberlain. Some say Mr. Polle's promotions shall be given, and some nay. Bygot is taken, and shall clearly die, with divers more. All is well Northwards. My lord of Norfolk lies beyond York. The duke of Suffolk goes to Lincoln and the earl of Sussex into Lancashire. Sir John Dudley goes to sea in six days with the Queen's brother and four of the King's ships. Most part of the bishops have come, but nobody knows what is to be done. It is said that the bp. of Harford shall be made vicar-general, a high room. Coffyne would fain have a good hawk; he liked not that Stafford brought him. He is a very gentleman. Graynefyld did your errand to Walter Skynner, who is very much vexed. Hastings is in prison upon a statute taken by a very varlet. He is cruelly handled. London, 18 Feb.
Goodalle wants you to sign a bill of award for a poor man made by you and Mr. Walsingham.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.
18 Feb.
R. O.
458. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Wrote today by Goodall largely. Has since received Lisle's packet which he delivered at once to my lord Privy Seal. Will not fail to procure speedy answer. When he was at Court a messenger came from my lord of Norfolk, who lies at Barney Castle. All things quiet there, and offenders come in asking mercy, and divers have been put to death. Bigot is in prison in Carlisle. "I think his life is not long, but yet not so short as he hath dimerited. The bishops wax good men, and do preach sincerely the word of God. I have good hope it shall so continue." London, 18 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
18 Feb.
R. O.
459. JENNE DE SAVEUSES [Madame de Riou] to LADY LISLE.
I have received from Sire Nicholas Caron the two cades of sardines and half barrel of herring, which you have sent me. I thank you for your kindness. I would have written to you more frequently, but that I have been confined to bed for two months with a catarrh, which brought me to the point of death, but during the last eight days I have begun to go about the chamber. I should have been glad to have heard news in your letter about Mademoiselle Anne, as I understood she had returned to you. Mons. de Riou sends compliments to my lord Deputy and you. Pont de Remy, 18 Feb. Signed.
As soon as I recover I will send you some remembrance.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
18 Feb.
R. O.
460. ANNE ROUAUD (Madame de Bours) to LADY LISLE.
I thank you for the two salmons and barrel of herring and the two cades of sardines which you have been pleased to send me. You make me feel that you never forget me. You complain that it is a long time since you heard from me. I would have written after the messenger from Abbeville had returned from Calais and thanked you for the marmalade and woollen hose which you sent me. I am now very often unwell, but at present am in good health, and should be better still if I were near you.
Madame de Riou is writing to you her news, which will make it needless for me. I wrote five days ago by a messenger sent to you by Momorancy. I have not seen him for a long time. He does not remove from Court. The King is expected shortly at Abbeville. I return to Guischard very shortly. I shall not be long there without sending some token to Mademoiselle my daughter. (fn. 7) I send remembrances to my lord, to your sons and your daughters, I send none from Mons. Dazincourt and my daughter, because they are not here. Pont de Remy, 18 Feb. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
18 Feb.
R. O.
461. GUILLAUME DE WASME (?) to the DEPUTY OF CALAIS.
It is true that the writer's fellows have entered the English pale at the Marsh "au prez de la Couchessoir" and carried off 18 oxen, supposing they belonged to the Burgundians, which they still maintain to be the case, some being marked like those which were adjudged prizes and taken to Boulogne. The claimants believe they can make their right evident to the Deputy and have no wish to violate the English territory. Cresecque, 18 Feb. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
18 Feb.
R. O.
462. JUAN DE QUINTANA DUEÑAS to LORD LISLE.
I have received your letter, and am greatly bound by the remembrance you have of me. I have spoken to the Admiral about the wine he promised to send you. He has had it delivered to Hugh Gilles to send you, and I have seen it laden in a ship. I have also delivered to Gilles two pieces of wine of Beaune, which are laden in the same ship, sent by Olivier Parde, my companion and myself. From your house at Rouen, 18 Feb. 1536. Signed by Juan and also by Alvaro Parde.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
18 Feb.
Add. MS.
8,715, f. 339.
B. M.
463. FAENZA to AMBROGIO.
The King of Scotland, by mouth first, and afterwards by his abbot, has shown to me a great desire to see peace between Christian princes and to go in person against the Infidels, if it please God, to turn the arms, of which there is now such preparation, against them. He showed me in confidence all the practises here with the Turks, and said he desired to interpose for peace between these princes, but as yet, notwithstanding his relationship with the French king, he has only spoken generally, and begs his Holiness to direct him, of whose virtue and goodness he has as high an opinion as could be desired. So, believing that he would take care not to displease his Holiness in this, and that he would be glad to enter the practise under his Holiness' guidance, I praised his piety and assured him that if he made all efforts to bring about the peace he would both do a good work and oblige his Holiness, who would shortly send him directions by brief. Thinks the Pope should send him a very full brief, with all the points requisite; because he will be pleased and will show it in many places, and thus bear testimony of the Pope's holy desires. These Scotchmen abhor the ways of the King of England and think his Holiness should show himself against that King in every way. I made bold to let the abbot know that I had the censures in hand and he of himself has offered to get them published in England at this time; because, as these Scotchmen confirm to me, the Parliament, or rather Council, having been held in England on the 26th ult., and nothing determined as the people reasonably expected, but only order given by the King that Norfolk should go through the country, without soldiers, to induce the people to comply with his will, and to gain their chiefs by pardons and promises, the people have risen again, and Norfolk has had to retire, leaving the King's affairs worse than ever. Therefore, not to lose the occasion which God seems to send, of publishing the censures in England itself, I have given the abbot the authentic copies, and likewise [the copy] of that other bull, with its original, which the English gentleman carried, in order the more to rouse and sustain those people; and he has promised to publish them as soon as possible. His King has promised the same, pressing me not to let the French know of it. They will do it secretly, as they do not wish yet to break openly with the King of England. They say it shall be published within a day's journey from where the King of England shall be, and that one of the copies of the great bull, with the endorsement of the notary, shall be returned to me to be sent to Rome.
Now that it is evident that the King of England is running openly to his ruin and that God means to punish him, I would reverently remind his Holiness that now is perhaps the time to make use of the Cardinal of England; because, if the Cardinal came to the neighbourhood, from whence he could cross safely into the island among the insurgents, where they are now more powerful than the King, the result would be both profitable and glorious to his Holiness. I have written before of victuals that were preparing for Terouenne (Toroano), and although they may be intended for some other place, yet the vicinity of Terouenne is so full of soldiers that it will be impossible to get the censures published there. As the bull does not specify any other place in France, and as the act is to be done publicly and the fact endorsed by the notary upon the bull, which is very long, it cannot be done without the licence of the French. I would have sounded them but the Grand Master has been ill for two days of colic. I am certain, however, that they will not be displeased, but they much dread that the King of England may accept the great offers which they say the Emperor makes him. As the bull only specifies Terouenne in the dominions of the French king, and Tournay in those of the Emperor, to which one cannot pass from hence, I do not see what I can do. If his Holiness would declare by brief that the publication might be here in the places nearest to England, such as Dieppe, I think it might be done without licence of the French.
This abbot, who shows himself most anxious to serve his Holiness, makes excuse about the brief which I gave him for the intimation of the Council, saying that the time being fixed for the month of May he does not know that he will then have arrived in Scotland. However, he says if his Holiness send him another brief with the clause, that he might employ a substitute, it shall certainly be executed. This King (of Scotland) with as many words as he can say in French, again thanks his Holiness for the sword. I know it has touched his heart and to-morrow morning the ceremony shall be.
Italian. Modern copy, pp. 7. Headed: Al Sigr. Protonotario Ambrogio. Da Compienny li 18 Febbraro 1537.
Ib. f. 342 b.
B. M.
464. The SAME to the SAME.
The Turkish Ambassador.—Piedmont.—Furstemberg's lances and the Swiss captains.—News from Tuscany.—Desires to return to Rome.—The French think it to the Pope's honour to have a nuncio here, as they think it to their own to have Mons. della Vaura at Rome.
Italian. Modern copy, pp. 3. Headed: Al Sigr. Protrio. Ambrogio. Da Compienny li 18 Febraro 1537.
19 Feb.
R. O.
465. HENRY VIII. to SIR ROBERT CONSTABLE.
Commands him immediately to repair to the King's presence. Westminster, 19 Feb., 28 Hen. VIII. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Sealed. Endd.
19 Feb.
R. O.
466. THE NORTHERN REBELLION.
The sayings of John Folbery at the Rolls, 19 Feb. 28 Hen. VIII.
1. After the return of Sir Ralph Ellerker and Robert Bowes from the King, which was after the first appointment taken at Doncaster, there was a certain number warned of every wapentake to resort to York to consult upon their answer. About 800 persons assembled, and it was arranged that about 200 of them should be chosen, as it were in council, for the hearing of the said Ellerker and Bowes. John Folbery was one of those chosen. And when it was discussed whether they should have another meeting with the King's commissioners, Sir Robert Constable said if his advice were followed, as he had broken one point in the tables with the King he would yet break another and have no meeting, but have all the country made sure from Trent northwards; and then, he had no doubt, all Lancashire, Cheshire, Derbyshire and the parts thereabout would join with them. Then he said he would condescend to a meeting. 2. When it was noised that Bigod had risen again Sir Robert Constable and Aske wrote to all the country about that no man should stir. Whereof ensued that the true men who would have had their neighbours and tenants to serve the King against Bigod were answered that they would not stir. And when Mr. Rudston gathered force to go to Beverley and repress Bigod he warned the bailey of Wyghton over night with the strength of that town to meet him in the morning at Wynde Oke, or else be ready against his coming that way. The bailey went to Sir Robert Constable to ask his advice and what counsel soever he gave him the said bailey came not to the place appointed nor obeyed Mr. Rudston's command. 3. Sir Robert Constable also wrote to Bigod himself when he was at Baynton or at Beverley, and the letter was carried either by the bailey of Holme or by one Skargill, both Sir Robert Constable's servants. In which letter was contained that if he would have done well he should not have stirred till the spring. These words, it is said, caused Bigod to withdraw at that time. This report deponent heard of one Erington and others, to whom they said Bigod read the letter openly at a cross, saying he would hide nothing from them. 4. Sir Robert Constable promised to have sent his bailey with men to the aid of Sir Ralph Ellerker and Mr. Rudston; but they came not at the hour appointed.
Pp. 3. In Wriothesley's hand. Signed by the deponent in two places.
On the back are the memoranda: Constable—My Lord of Norfolk's letter concerning Levenyng—Notandum, specially the deposition of John Folbery against Const, and Aske at the new commotion of Francis Bygot.
19 Feb.
R. O.
467. THE NORTHERN REBELLION.
19. Feb. 1536: in the Tower of London, before John Tregunwell, Ric. Layton, and Thos. Legh, doctors of law, "in presentia mei Jo. Res, notarii publici, &c."
Gerald Rede, servant to Sir Thomas Percy, examined, says his master had been in long (?) Lincolnshire at my lad[y] Talboyes hunting; and returned ... and went to my lady his mother at Semer. Hearing the country was up, he, with examinate and another servant, started to go home, but were met when five miles towards Pikering by one Persey and Thos. Muddelton, who said examinate's master was "set for." Returned to my lady's and thither came one Preston, Nich. Howborne, Wm. Burwell and another, captains, and sware his master. Went to the muster on the morrow, where were 4,000 or 5,000, and then to the spoil of Mr. Chamley. As for Bygod's commotion, a chaplain of Sir Thomas Percy's came to him to Northumberland, and said Halom was taken at Hull.
John Hedley, horsekeeper to Sir Thos. Percy, says the same. Percival Gallon and Percival Yarowe, servants to Sir Ingram Percy, know nothing of note. Richard Guyll, servant to Sir Ingram Percy, seems (fn. 8) to depose that his master was at Aunw[yke ?] about to take a stay for Tyndale and Riddesdale, when a letter came from the commons of the Bishopric, in the name of "Captain Poverty," requiring him to swear their oath and remain to stay the Scots, which he did. "... Ellerton, servant to Sir Ingram Percy, &c."
In Ap Rice's hand, pp. 2, faded and worn.
19 Feb.
R. O.
468. NORFOLK to the COUNCIL.
Thanks for their last letter, with the King's approval of his proceedings. Thinks, if suffered to follow his own mind for one month, he could give his Highness satisfaction. Has so many places to punish it will require some leisure, as he must be present at every punishment and proceed by martial law; for if he were to proceed by indictments many a great offender would be acquitted as having acted against his will. There is no lord or gentleman of these two shires but his servants and tenants have been at this new rebellion. "And, good Mr. Comptroller, provide you of a new bailey at Embleton, for John Jackson your bailey woll be hanged Thursday or Friday at the furthest, and I think some of your tenants woll keep him company." You will hardly believe the trouble I have to keep the prisoners, there are so many. Carlisle, 19 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Sealed. Add. Endd.
19 Feb.
R. O.
469. NORFOLK to CROMWELL.
I perceive, to my comfort, by your letter of the 13th, that my daughter's cause shall shortly be well framed. If the King be not contented that I do not proceed with more sore justice, remind him it is for no favour I bear the offenders, but for other respects, too long to write and best perceived here. What number shall suffer here I know not, but doubtless more than should do if I would believe so many were compelled to rebellion as is showed me. I know not yet whether I will go into Cockermouth. I would make all clear as I go. The poor people of Northumberland cry out for my soon coming. I pray God I may do as much for them as they expect. I have the ill-people in such fear "that now is time for me to spur cut." I look to hear from my lord of Westmoreland and lord Coniers of the taking of certain traitors. I was never so well-beloved here as I shall be feared if I live another month. When my money fails I shall send to you for more. In haste, 19 Feb., 10 p.m.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd. Sealed.
19 Feb.
R. O.
470. DARCY to SIR ARTHUR DARCY.
I have no word from you how my lord the King's lieutenant doth since his departure from York, and therefore send the bearer, Dic. Marke, for news. Though I know your mind to serve with my said Lord is as good as possible, I beg you to be no less nigh to his person than ye would be to me. Whatever yellack that lies in me, men or money, to pledge my lands for, you shall have. This castle is fully provided with men, victuals, and fuel, and ready to come in on two or three days' warning. Pomfret Castle, 19 Feb. 28 Hen. VIII.
Hol., pp. 2. Endd.: "The copy of my lord's letter sent to Sir Arthur."
19 Feb.
R. O.
471. EUSTACE MOREL, Lieutenant of the Captain of Gravelinghes, to LORD LISLE.
This day I have received your letter of the 18th, addressed to my master the captain of this town, who at present holds his garrison at Aeyre. I have forwarded it to him. For my own part I will do my best in the matter in my master's absence. My master keeps no foot soldiers gens-d'armes under him by whom any attempt could be made on your territory. I have shown your letters to the lieutenant of the castle that he may take care that none of his men trespass. Gravelinghes, 19 Feb. 1536.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.: a Calais.
20 Feb.
Harl. MS.
442, f. 142.
B. M.
472. THE MARCHES OF WALES.
Proclamation to be published by the president and council of Wales, enforcing the statutes of 27 Henry VIII., made for Wales, and reciting the provisions for annexing certain lordships in the Welsh marches to English counties, and for the execution of justice. Westm., 20 Feb. 28 Hen. VIII.
Later copy, pp. 12.
20 Feb.
R. O.
473. NORFOLK to CROMWELL.
Detained the bearer all night in order to send Bigod's confession, with whom he has communed at great leisure, but can get no more out of him. Will nevertheless strictly examine him from time to time. Advises that he should suffer in these parts rather than in London. Carlisle, 20 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Sealed. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
20 Feb.
R. O.
474. GUISNES FOREST.
Henry VIII. to lord Lisle, deputy of Calais, and the officers of Guisnes and Hampnes, and the surveyor of woods in the forest of Guisnes ... waye and Fotamprie:—Forbidding them to fell or cut woods, except such as are appointed to the Council, viz., 10,000 fagots for the kitchen of the lieutenant of Guisnes, 3,000 fagots for ... at Guisnes Castle, and 100 fagots for each of 100 soldiers there to be spent at their watch and ward; 6,000 fagots for the lieutenant of Hampnes. Also against disturbing the game of wild swine. Westm., 20 Feb. 28 Hen. VIII.
Pp. 2. Mutilated. Signed by Cromwell. Endd.: The copy of Sext[en] is privy selle.
20 Feb.
R. O.
475. JEHAN DE TOVAR to the DEPUTY OF CALAIS.
Complains that some subjects of the Emperor who had been grazing their cattle on the English pastures, as they had been always accustomed to do, have been plundered by the French. Desires him to ascertain the facts that he may inform the Queen.
Requests him to allow some wine for his use, which has been delivered by a merchant at Calais, to pass on payment of dues. Gravelines Castle, 20 Feb. 1536. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
20 Feb.
R. O.
476. JACQUES DE COUCY [SIEUR DE VERVINS] to LORD LISLE.
In the absence of the Seneschal I have received your letters about merchandise arrested at Boulogne, of which I know nothing, because I was not here when the arrest was made. I will send your letters to the Seneschal, who I am sure will do what is reasonable, and I have offered the merchant to write by him in order to have the speedier answer. Boulogne, 20 Feb. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
20 Feb.
R. O.
477. PREBENDARIES OF ST. PATRICK'S, DUBLIN, to CROMWELL.
Have received his letter to elect Sir Edward Basnett their dean. Their church is of the King's foundation and they have always had free election of the dean and beg that they may still have it. If Sir Edward were meet for the dignity they would be glad to consent, but this they doubt, and therefore beg they may enjoy their old privilege. 20 Feb. Signed by Hen. Parker, Jas. Umfre, Simon Geffre, Barth. Fytssimon, John Vogan, and Robt. Stablis (?), prebendaries.
Pp. 2. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.

Footnotes

  • 1. Admitted B.D. in 1524, and supplicated for the degree of D.D. 4 May 1541. Wood's Athenæ, I. 66, 113.
  • 2. In the Latin version he says that Norfolk addressed him not once or twice but three times on the subject, and told him that the King had changed his mind, but at his (Norfolk's) solicitation had deferred filling up the see till he had spoken to Pole a third time.
  • 3. The Latin version says, "in porta ambulatorii secreti in domo Eboracensis, Westmonasterii (nunquam enim locum obliviscar)."
  • 4. The Latin here is as follows:— "Quem ut vidi (testor nunc tribunal Dei, apud quod, si falsa dico, me reum æternæ pænæ judico), non magis potui dicere quæ prius deliberaveram quam ea de quibus nunquam antea cogitaveram; et idem testor si aliquod humanum vinculum me retinebat ne assentirer, non aliud fuisse quam aspectum illius quem super reliquos omnes amabam; quem prodere et vendere videbar si tali causæ in qua tot ejus pericula et dedecora quorum clara species se mihi tum offerebat continebantur assensus fuissem."
  • 5. As this was in the year 1536, it is clear the dates are wrong; 10 July and 28 Aug. were both Mondays.
  • 6. Saturday 23rd, not 22nd, would be right in 1536. A similar error prevails throughout Sept. and Oct.
  • 7. Meaning Mary Basset.
  • 8. The writing here is much faded.