BHO

Folios 127b - 113b

Pages 256-281

Calendar of Letter-Books of the City of London: B, 1275-1312. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1900.

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Folio 127 b [facieinversa.] (iii).

The Roll of the Crown of the lord the King temp. Ralph le Blund and John Horn, Sheriffs of the City of London, the fourth year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Henry [A.D. 1275-6], Sir Gregory de Rokesle being then Chamberlain in the same City, beginning in the month of March. From the Feast of St. Michael preceding up to that time answer was made at the Iter. (fn. 1)

Ward of Thomas de Basinge. (fn. 2)—On Thursday the morrow of St. Edward, K., in March [18], 4 Edward I. [A.D. 1275-6], Gregory de Rokesle, the Chamberlain, and the Sheriffs were given to understand that one John Fuatard lay dead of another than his rightful death in the house of John de "Blechinggele," in the parish of St. Michael de Candelwykestrate, in the Ward of Thomas de Basinge. On hearing which the said Chamberlain and Sheriffs went there, and, calling together the reputable men of the Ward and of the Ward of John Horn, (fn. 3) made diligent inquisition how this happened.

The jurors say, on the fealty in which they are bound to the lord the King, that when the said John Fuatard and a certain John the Clerk were playing together with their tiles (tegulis), (fn. 4) on Sunday before the Feast of St. Gregory [12 March] in this year, in the churchyard of St. Mary de Suthwerk, the said John the Clerk of St. Mary Magdalen de Suthwerk, when throwing his tile at the goal, unwillingly and altogether against his wish struck the said John Fuatard with his tile on the right side of the head, inflicting a wound two inches in length and penetrating to the brain. And so languishing he lived from the Sunday aforesaid until St. Edward's Day aforesaid, when by reason of the said wound he died. And the body was viewed, on which no other wound, hurt, nor bruise appeared. Being asked what became of the said John afterwards, they say that he went forthwith to the church of St. Mary Magdalen de Suthwerk, but was never afterwards seen in the City. Being asked as to his chattels, they say that he had no goods nor chattels.

And the aforesaid John de "Blechingele" was attached by Anger (Auger?) le Pestur de Chestennesham; (fn. 5) and Stephen le Treere and Sarah his wife by Richard de Depham, "bracour"; (fn. 6) and Odo de Dorkynge, woolmonger, and John de "Longa Menede," residing in the same house, by Richard Dygun, woolmonger, and Robert de Merthone, "wayder."

And the four nearest neighbours were attached.

The first neighbour, Henry de Lyre, "pessoner," by the above Odo de Dorkynge and Richard de Depham.

The second neighbour, Robert le Long, "pessoner," by Walter le Whyte, "stocfismongere," and John le Jovene, "stocfismongere."

The third neighbour, Roger de Bedewelle, "peleter," by Richard Dygun, woolmonger, and Odo de Dorkynge, woolmonger.

The fourth neighbour, Alan de Enefeud, "webbe," by Ralph le Paumer, "stocfismongere," and Robert le "Woder" de Merthone.

Folio 127 [facieinversa.] (iij b).

Ward of Castle Baynard.—Monday before the Annunciation B. M. [25 March], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs of the death of Henry de Flegge, found drowned in Castle Baynard dock. Inquest thereon. And because it was presented by the jurors (drawn from the above Ward and the Ward of Simon de Hadestoke (fn. 8)) that the body was first found near the wharf of Baldewyn le Buscher, and was removed thence and carried by Henry Lapewater and Roger le Folur to the dock aforesaid, without leave of the Chamberlain, (fn. 9) the said Henry was attached by John Wyther, carpenter, and Adam Apsolon, "ceinturer," and the said Roger by Henry Smith (Faber) and Robert de Everesham, "teynturer."

And the four nearest neighbours were attached, two neighbours where the body was first found, viz., Robert de Neddinge, "buscher," by Nicholas le Moneur and Henry de Hamme, and Baldewyn le Buscher by Henry de Hamme, "buscher," and Robert de Neddinge.

And the two neighbours where the body was viewed by the Coroner, viz., Thomas de Hales by Richard Resun and William Dibel, and Alan de Castell by Nicholas le Moneur and William Dibel.

The horse (the cause of the death) was appraised at 1 mark, for which, &c.

Ward of William de Hadestoke. (fn. 11)—Monday after the Feast of Ascension [14 May], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs of the death of Gervase le Noreys in the King's highway in the parish of "Berkyngcherche," in the above Ward. Inquest thereon. The jurors find that he came by his death in a quarrel with William de Lindeseye, who struck him with a knife, and afterwards took refuge in the chapel of St. Mary de "Berkingecherche." His chattels appraised.

And the four nearest neighbours were attached, viz., Alan le Hurer by Benedict de Hakeneye and John de la "Thour"; Robert le Affete by Geoffrey [le] Hurer and Roger le Poter; Richard le Noreys by John de la "Tour" and Geoffrey le Hurer; and William Orpedeman by Geoffrey Horn and Roger de Scolon.

On the Wednesday following the said William, acknowledging before the Chamberlain and Sheriffs and other reputable and trusty men, within the church aforesaid, that he had committed the felony aforesaid, in their presence abjured the realm. (fn. 12) And the port of Dover was assigned to him whence to set sail within three days, &c. Chattels he had none, except those previously mentioned. (fn. 13)

Folio 126 b [facieinversa. (iiij).

Ward of Henry de Frowyk. (fn. 14)—Sunday before the Feast of St. Barnabas [11 June], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that a certain William de Wodestoke lay dead of another [than his rightful] death in the house of Robert le Plastrer, in the parish of St. Laurence in the Jewry, in the above Ward. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from that Ward and the Ward of Symon de Hadestoke (fn. 15)) say that on the preceding Thursday the said William was standing upon a certain schaffot (fn. 16) [composed] of a door (hostium) and two boards, between the first and third hour, for the purpose of his work in the service of John Wade, when by accident the said door revolved (volvit), causing the said William to fall on the pavement on his right side, and so languishing he lived until the following Saturday, when he died at the ninth hour. Being asked if they knew or understood that any one was guilty of the death, they say they do not. And the body was viewed, on which no wound, except a bruise caused by the fall, appeared.

And the door was appraised at 8 pence.

And Robert le Plastrer, in whose house he died, was attached by Symon de Dullingham and Symon le Emplastrer; and John Wade, in whose service he was, was attached by John le Meriner and Adam Passemer. And the four nearest neighbours were attached, viz., Robert de Blithe by John de Farnham and John de Hornsete; Nicholas de Westone by Humfry Scheil and Henry de Karlel; William le Joynur by Peter de Lyndes' and John de Burgo; Richard le Armerer by Elyas Pipethes' and Hugh Woleward.

Folio 126 [facieinversa.] (iiij b).

Ward of Castle Baynard.—Sunday before the Feast of St. Botolph [17 June], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs of the death of Henry Grene, watercarrier (portitor aque), found drowned in the Thames in Castle Baynard dock, in the parish of St. Andrew, in the above Ward. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and the Ward of Symon de Hadestoke) find that he fell out of a boat whilst drawing water in a tankard, and was drowned.

The boat appraised, with the whole of its tackle (cum toto atilo) and the tankard, at 5s. 6d., as to which, &c.

And the two neighbours nearest to the spot where the accident happened were attached, viz., Hugh de Totenham, "teynturer," by Walter Turpyn and Robert le Buscher; and John Craye by John Haddek and William Galyoch.

And the two neighbours nearest to the spot where he was found dead, viz., Nicholas le Moneur by Adam de Brok and Richard Reysun; and Alan de Castell by William Dibel and Walter de Chabeham.

Porsoken.—Thursday the morrow of St. John Bapt. [24 June], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs of some one, name unknown, lying drowned in the foss under the City wall near the Tower, in Porsoken. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the Ward of Porsoken and the Ward of William de Hadestoke) find that he was accidentally drowned whilst bathing, &c.

The two nearest neighbours were attached, viz., Robert Fuatard by Osbert de Hakeneye, "waterlader'," (fn. 17) and William de Colecestre, carter; and Alexander le Treye by Hamo le Tewler and William Brodhok.

Folio 125 b [facieinversa.] (v).

Ward of Henry de Coventre. (fn. 18)—Sunday before the Feast of Exaltation of H. Cross [14 Sept.], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Adam Schot, servant of Ponce de More, lay dead in the house of the said Ponce in the above Ward, in the parish of St. James de Garlecheythe. Inquest thereon. The jurors say that on Wednesday after the Nativity B. M. [8 Sept.] last the said Adam fell from a pear tree in the garden of one Laurence, in the parish of St. Michael de Paternostercherche, owing to the breaking of a branch, and died on the following Saturday from the effects of the fall.

And the pear tree was appraised at 5s., for which John Horn, the Sheriff, will be responsible.

And the two nearest neighbours were attached, viz., Robert le "Barber" by Peter le "Barbur" and Richard de Pelham; and Peter de Gisors by Laurence Duket and Walter le Cornewaleys.

And Ponce de More, master of the house where he was found dead, was attached by Robert de Camera and Hugh de St. Paul; and all dwellers in the house were attached, viz., Peter Gillame by "Nutus" de St. Paul and Richard le Barbur; Robert of the Chamber (de Camera) by [blank]; Hugh de St. Paul by [blank]; Robinet Delisle by [blank].

Folio 125 [facieinversa.] (v b).

Ward of Anketil d'Auvergne. (fn. 19)—Wednesday after the Feast of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the same year, information was given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that John le Sautreor (fn. 20) lay dead of another death, &c., in the house of William le Cuver (fn. 21) in the above Ward, in the parish of St. Bride. Inquest thereon. The jurors find that his bed caught fire from a candle, and that he was burnt whilst in a state of intoxication, and in consequence died.

The two nearest neighbours attached, viz., Richard de Newerk by Gerard the Cordwainer and Richard de Dunstaple, tailor; and Robert Maynard by Robert Wyberd and William de Fynchengfeld, "cuver."

And William le Cuver, in whose house he was burnt, was attached by Arnold the Tailor and Symon le Braeler. (fn. 22)

And Fynea, the wife of the above William, was attached by Richard de Watford, "chapeler," and Nicholas le Barber.

And Remund, son of the above William, was attached by Richard le Cornur and Arnold the Tailor.

Folio 124 b [facieinversa.] (ix).

Roll of the Crown of the lord the King temp. Robert de Araz and Ralph le Fevere, Sheriffs of the City of London, the fourth year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Henry [A.D. 1276], Sir Gregory de Rokesle being then Chamberlain in that City.

Ward of William de Hadestoke.—Thursday after the Feast of St. Michael [29 Sept.], 4 Edward I. [A.D. 1276], information given to the above Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Hugh de Rotherherde, clothed in an old coat of russet, lay drowned at the water-gate towards the Tower of London. Upon hearing which the said Sheriffs proceeded thither, and summoning reputable men of the two nearest Wards, viz., the Ward of William de Hadestoke and the Ward of Wolmar de Essex, (fn. 23) they diligently inquired how it happened. The jurors say on their oath made to the lord the King, and on their fealty with which they are bound, that on the Monday preceding the above Feast the said Hugh and other strangers, whose names they know not, embarked at St. Botolph's Wharf on a certain small boat, which was in bad repair and laden with draff (drachia), (fn. 24) and sailed as far as the middle of the Thames, and that owing to the roughness of the water and the overlading of the boat by the cargo and men the boat was swamped, and the said Hugh and the rest were drowned, but only Hugh was found. They know nothing further. The body was viewed, on which was found no wound, hurt, or bruise.

The boat appraised at 2s.

The two nearest neighbours were attached, viz., William Attestone by Gilbert Purte and John de Ware; and John le Noreys by John de Try and John le Barber.

Ward of Henry le Waleys.—Sunday the Feast of St. Lucia [13 Dec.], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Roger Caury, "bollere," (fn. 25) was lying dead in the King's highway opposite the house of William le Maceler. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the above Ward and the Ward of Chepe) find that the said Roger had been seized with the falling sickness (morbo caduco) on the preceding Saturday on leaving the tavern of Thomas Box, where he had been drinking until curfew; and that by reason of that disease, and through his own drunkenness and the extreme cold, he had died there by misadventure.

The two nearest neighbours were attached, viz., William le Maceler by Laurence le Gaunter and Geoffrey Russel; and Robert de Assendone by Robert de Hakene and Richard le Callere.

And the aforesaid Thomas, in whose house the deceased had been drinking, was attached by Roger le Botoner and Geoffrey le Botoner.

Folio 124 [facieinversa.] (ix b).

Ward of William de Hadestoke.—Saturday the eve of All Saints [1 Nov.], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Richard de Parys, "chaloner," lay dead, &c., in the house of Roger le Chaloner in Martelane, in the above Ward. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the above Ward and the Wards of Nicholas de Wynchester (fn. 26) and John de Northamptone, (fn. 27) the nearest Wards) find that on the preceding Sunday night a certain Richard Moys endeavoured to effect an entrance into the house of John le Chaloner, next to the house of Agnes de Essex, near Fancherch, in which house lodged Robert de Munteny and Arnulph his son. On his refusing to desist from making a noise, the said Robert and Arnulph and all of the household came out, viz., John de Munteny, son of the aforesaid Robert, John Fauntilun, Robert de la Rokele, Henry de Ginges, John Curtays, John de Hakene, John le Wyte, Hugh de Hoddone, Hachard de Garbodesham, and Robert de "le Lo," who pursued the said Richard with arms into the house of Alice le Officiale, where many persons were drinking, and among them the deceased, who was mortally wounded by the aforesaid Arnulph. All were taken and imprisoned, except those who took to flight. None had goods or chattels except Robert de Munteny and Arnulph, who had six horses, three beds, a falcon, and three greyhounds (leporarios), which were appraised at 20 marks.

The two nearest neighbours where the deceased lay dead were attached, viz., Robert "Fyffnadlere" by Nicholas de Aula and Richard Attehernehuse; and Robert the Cobbler (Sutor) by William de Araz and Robert "Fyfnadlere."

And the two nearest neighbours where he was wounded, viz., William de Hadle by Richard de Law[v]are and John de Cestrehunte; and Thomas de Rothinge by William de Lawevare and John de Cestrehunte.

And the two neighbours near the hostel whence they issued were attached, viz., John le Chaloner by Ralph le Chaloner and John called "Clerk"; and John de St. Giles by William le Chaloner and Adam le Wolmongere.

And Agnes de Essex, in whose house the misdoers were domiciled, was attached by Roger de Suffolk and Adam le "Simfanur"; (fn. 28) and Alice her servant by John de St. Alban and Thomas le Mustarder.

And all those who were in the house where he was struck were attached, viz., Alice le Officiale, the mistress of the house, by William de Lawevare and William de Len; Cecilia her daughter by Richard de Lawevare and William de Hadle; Johanna Saliwymman by Hugh de Stebenethe and Gilbert le Chaloner; Henry Page by John de Codintone and Nicholas le Chaloner; John, brother of the said Henry, by William de Araz and John de Cestrehunte; Ralph de Lenne by Nicholas Atte Solar (ad solarium) and Robert de "Calche," (fn. 29) baker.

And Richard Moys, by whom the affray was caused, by John le Chaloner and Hugh le Chaloner.

And Roger le Chaloner, master of the house where the deceased died, and Alice, wife of the same, by John de Parys and Symon de Lytlebrock.

Folio 123 b [facieinversa.] x).

Ward of Nicholas de Wynchester. (fn. 30)—Sunday after the Feast of St. Nicholas [6 Dec.], 5 Edward I. [A.D. 1276], information given to the aforesaid Chamberlain and Sheriffs that William Page lay dead, &c., in the house of Ralph de Lenne, in the above Ward. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and the Wards of William de Hadestoke and John de Northampton) find that the deceased came by his death in the affray last mentioned.

[The persons attached are nearly the same as in the last inquest.]

Folio 123 [facieinversa.] (x b).

Ward of A[nketil] d'Auvergne.—Friday after Ash Wednesday [9 Feb.], 5 Edward I. [A.D. 1276-7], information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Matilda, wife of Henry le Correur, (fn. 31) lay dead, &c., in the house of the said Henry in the parish of St. Nicholas Shambles, in the above Ward. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and the Ward of John de Blakethorn (fn. 32)) find that the said Matilda came by her death from a fall in the street opposite the church of St. Martin, (fn. 33) whereby she sustained a fracture of the leg (tibia), when in a state of intoxication.

The two nearest neighbours attached, viz., Hugh le Plomer by Walter le Marescal and Hamo le Tayllur; and John le Kyng by Robert de St. Giles and Richard de Bock.

And the aforesaid Henry, in whose house she died, was attached by Richard Attegrene and Roger le Waleys, butcher.

Ward of Chepe.—Monday the morrow of Clausum Pasche, (fn. 34) 5 Edward I. [A.D. 1277], information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Symon de Wynchester, taverner, lay dead, &c., in the parish of St. Martin, in Ismongerelane in the above Ward, in the house of Robert le Surigien de Frydaystrate, in which house the said Symon kept a tavern. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the above Ward and the Wards of Bassieshawe and of Henry de Frowyk (fn. 35)) find that the deceased met his death in December last at the hands of his servant, Roger de Westminster, who cut off his head and secreted the body in a coal cellar, and after a while left the house, depositing the key with Hamo the Cook, a neighbour; that on the last day of the year John Doget, a taverner, and Gilbert de Colecestre called at the house and took away certain casks, with the assistance of Henry Wyting, William le Waleys, Ralph le "Yreis," Hugh Noteman, and Stephen de "Ryminge," porters, (fn. 36) and then left the house, the said John Doget taking the key with him; that the house remained empty until Tuesday before Palm Sunday, when Master Robert aforesaid came and broke open the door, and enfeoffed Michael le Oynter thereof, who discovered the body.

The four nearest neighbours attached, viz., Robert Schevehod (fn. 37) by Eadward le Mercer and Robert le Lung, mercer; John "Navereathom" (fn. 38) by William de Langele, "oynter," and John le Lung, "pessoner"; Theywyn le Bokeler by Martin le Bukeler and Warm le Oynter; William de Reygate, clerk, by John le Lung and Martin le Bukeler.

And John Doget was attached by Thomas Abel and Richard Curtays; Gilbert de Colecestre by Richard Scharp and Geoffrey Horn; Master Robert by Nicholas le Convers and Hugh de Gisors; Michael le Oynter by Nicholas de Nottone and Adam le Tayllur; Hamo the Cook by William de Donestaple, "feliper," and Eadward le Mercer; Henry Wyting, Barem', by Richard de Oxford, cordwainer, and Adam le Seinturer; William le Waleys by John Monede, cordwainer, and Symon le Pipere; Ralph le "Yreys" by Richard le Lung, Barem', and Geoffrey Noteman; Hugh Noteman by Walter Skypp' and Adam le Counter (?); Stephen de "Rominge" by John Bonholte and William de Wolcherchehawe.

Folio 122 [facieinversa.] (xj b).

Ward of J[ohn] "Adrien." (fn. 39)—Friday before the Feast of SS. Philip and James [1 May], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that William le Clerk lay dead, &c., in the church of St. Stephen upon Walebrock, in the above Ward. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from that Ward and the Ward of Chepe, being the nearest Ward) find that he came by his death from a fall whilst ascending the belfry of the said church to look for a pigeon's nest.

The beam on which he fell appraised at 4d.

The two nearest neighbours attached, viz., Rustikill Thedbald by John le Retundur and Robert de Wytcherch; and Walter le Ferun by Hugh de Hamslap', " peleter," and Geoffrey "Godbeherinne." (fn. 40)

Folio 121 b [facieinversa.] (xij).

Ward of Symon de Hadestoke. (fn. 41)—Thursday before the Feast of H. Trinity [23 May], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Robert Fauk' de Leuesham lay dead, &c., in Queenhithe, near the wharf of Nicholas de la Garderobe, in the parish of St. Michael. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the above Ward, where the deceased was discovered, and the Ward of Henry de Coventre (fn. 42)) say that on the preceding Friday the said Robert was standing upon the croft of the quay (super croftam kay), and wishing to enter a boat lying there he placed his foot upon the gunwale (walam), when the boat moved, and by accident he fell into the water and was drowned. No one suspected; the body viewed, &c.

The two nearest neighbours attached, viz., Adam Pollede by Robert le Messager and John Cock; and Hugh de Greneford by William de Cartwell and Richard de Willingford.

The boat valued at 4s., for which Ralph le Fevere, the Sheriff, will answer.

Ward of A[nketil] d'Auvergne. (fn. 43)—Sunday after the Translation of St. Thomas the Martyr [7 July], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Richard Dawe lay dead, &c., in Crockerelane in the above Ward, in the parish of St. Dunstan. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the above Ward only) find that the said Richard was in a boat with Gilbert le Whyte sailing towards Westminster, when the oar with which the said Richard was propelling the vessel slipped, and he accidentally fell into the water and was drowned. The said Gilbert hastened with the boat to Foleham, within the jurisdiction of the Bishop of London, nor had he been seen since in the bailiwick of the Sheriffs.

The boat and oar appraised at 10s., for which the bailiff of Foleham will answer.

The two nearest neighbours attached, viz., William Kaldel by Roger le Fevere and Roger le Fener (Fever?); and William le Cuver by Richard le Corner and Walter le Chaundeler.

Ward of Castle Baynard.—Monday before the Feast of St. Margaret [20 July], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Robert de Kenilworth lay dead, &c., in the above Ward. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the above Ward and the Ward of William de Hadestoke (fn. 44)) find that on Saturday before the Feast of St. Barnabas [11 June] last a quarrel arose between the said Robert and John de Verdun in the house of the Abbot of Colecestre touching some straw, when the said John took a sheathed sword with which to strike the said Robert; but the sheath accidentally falling off, he struck the deceased with the sword on the head, inflicting a wound three inches long and two inches broad and penetrating to the brain, from which wound the said Robert subsequently died. The said John fled to the Isle of Ely and had not returned. No chattels. The jurors further say that one Roger, the guardian of the house aforesaid, was alone present.

The two nearest neighbours where he was struck attached, viz., Nicholas de St. Dyonis by Martin Lupus and Adam Geraud; and William Cole by Richard le Resser' and Alan le Hurer.

And the two neighbours where he died attached, viz., Stephen de Suffolk by William de Hales and Richard Reysun; and William de Templo by Gilbert le Buscher and William Dybel.

And the aforesaid Roger by Eadmund le Weder (Woder?) and Alexander Fresharing, fishmonger; and Richard Drynkepany, in whose house he died, by Geoffrey Attewater and William de Hales.

Folio 121 [facieinversa.] (xij b).

Ward of Castle Baynard.—Monday the eve of St. Bartholomew [24 Aug.], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Thomas de "Ewesham," "teynturer," lay dead in a house which he had hired of Adam de "Apselon" in the parish of St. Benedict Attewodewarwe, (fn. 45) in the Ward of Castle Baynard, viz., then [the Ward] of Peter de Eddelmethone. (fn. 46) Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the above Ward and the Ward of Symon de Hadestoke (fn. 47)) find that on the preceding Friday the said Thomas was standing near a tank full of boiling water, and whilst attempting to draw some of it with a bowl (cum quadam Gata), for the purpose of cleansing a gutter, his foot slipped on a board, and he fell into the water up to his middle and was scalded, so that he died on the evening of the following day, &c.

The tank, the bowl which he held in his hand, and the board on which he stood appraised at 6d.

The two nearest neighbours attached, viz., Henry "Faber" by Hugh de Totenham, "teynturer," and Robert de Neddinge, "buscher"; and John de Oxford, "teynturer," by Symon Bilimer, "bleter" (?), and Adam "Apsolon," "teynturer."

And there was attached Alice de Pelham (?), wife of the above Thomas de "Euesham," by Richard de Oxford, "teynturer," and Roger de Nasinge.

Folio 119 b [facieinversa.] (xv).

Ward of Byllingesgate.—Wednesday before the Feast of St. Martin [11 Nov.], 5 Edward I. [A.D. 1277], information given to Gregory de Rokesle, the Chamberlain, and to Walter le Cornewaleys and John Adrien, the Sheriffs, that Lucy de Dotlinge lay dead in the house of John le Breton in the parish of St. Mary "attenhull," in the Ward of Wolmar de Essex of Billingesgate, &c. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and the Ward of John de Blakethorn (fn. 48)) find that on Wednesday the Feast of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.] last there came William de Lychefeud, smith (faber), late at night to the house of the said Lucy in the above Ward, and knocked for admittance, and when admitted a quarrel arose between them, and the said William caught the said Lucy by the hair and inflicted a wound with his sword on the top of her head three inches long, two inches wide, and penetrating to the brain, whereof she eventually died. The body viewed, &c. The said William captured and put in prison. No chattels.

And the aforesaid John, in whose house it was, was attached by William Barache and Alan de Suffolk, cordwainers; the said John had no servant.

And Clarice, the servant of the deceased, was attached by Peter de Bredstrate and Robert de Catenham, "sceler."

And the four nearest neighbours, viz., two where the said Lucy was wounded, and two where she died, viz., John Oyselet by William de Wautham and Symon le Mazun; and William de Euesham by "Sauericus" de Beverley, goldsmith, and Philip, son of Fitz John, goldsmith; and Michael le Furner by Bartholomew le Teynturer and Walter Payn; and Nicholas de Berkynge by Henry de "Stebeneche" and Stephen le Paumer.

Folio 119 [facieinversa.] (xv b).

Ward of Henry de Frowyk. (fn. 49)—Sunday before the Feast of St. Nicholas [6 Dec.], the same year, information given to the same that Roger de Laufare lay dead, &c., in the house of Matilda Page in the above Ward, in the parish of St. Alban de Wodestrate. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the above Ward and the Ward of Colemanestrate) find that on Thursday after the Feast of St. Andrew [30 Nov.] last the said Roger was drawing water from a well in the house of Matilda aforesaid, when he was seized with the falling sickness, with which he often suffered, and fell; and the bucket slipping from his hand, the windlass (wyndasius) revolved and the transverse (transverseus) struck him on the top of the head, so that he fell into the well and was accidentally drowned. The body viewed, &c.

The windlass, cord, and bucket, together with the transverse, appraised at 12d., for which the Sheriffs will answer.

And Matilda Page was attached by "Pente" de Hereford, "peleter," and Adam de Storteford, cordwainer. She had no servant.

And the two nearest neighbours were attached, viz., "Pent'" de Hereford by Andrew the Goldsmith and Gregory le Lorimer; and Reginald Sone by Robert le Fener (Fever?) and Henry le Rous, "poleter." (fn. 50)

Ward of John Adrian. (fn. 51)—Monday the Feast of St. Nicholas [6 Dec.], 6 Edward I. [A.D. 1277], information given to the same that Henry Sekersteyn, cixtor, (fn. 52) lay dead, &c., in his house, hired of Robert le Weyder, in the above Ward, in the parish of Abbecherche. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the above Ward and the Wards of Thomas de Basinge and Nicholas de Wynchester (fn. 54)) find that on the preceding Sunday, about the hour of curfew, a quarrel arose between the said Henry and Nicholas de Wrotham, his servant, touching the latter's agreement for service, when the said Nicholas feloniously assaulted the said Henry with a knife, striking him to the heart, so that he immediately died. Being asked if they suspected any one else as guilty of the death, they say that Cecilia, the wife of the said Henry, consented to his death, being present at the time, and neither cried out nor showed any desire to inform the neighbours or bailiffs of the felony. No one else was present. Being asked what became of the said Nicholas after the felony, they say he went to the house of Richard de Halgstede. His chattels were appraised at 16d., for which John Adrien will answer, &c.

And the said Nicholas and Cecilia were arrested and put into prison.

Richard de Halgstede attached by [blank].

And the four nearest neighbours were attached, viz., Robert de St. Eadmund, "weyder," (fn. 55) by Walter Payn and Thomas de Mertone, weaver (tixtorem); John de Chelse, "oynter," by Ralph de Assindone, "quernbetere" (?), (fn. 56) and William de Derntone, "seler"; Richard Pope by Roger de Marsh, weaver (textorem), and Robert de Writele, weaver; and John Moriz by Thomas le Noreys, "webbe," and John de "Stoke atteneylonde." (fn. 57)

Folio 118 b [facieinversa.] (xvj).

Friday the morrow of SS. Fabian and Sebastian [20 Jan.], 6 Edward I. [A.D. 1277-8], information given to Gregory de Rokesle, Chamberlain of London, and to J[ohn] Adrien and Walter le Engleys, Sheriffs of the same, that William le Paumer, skinner, lay dead in Westchepe near the Conduit, in the Ward of Chepe. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and the Ward of Henry de Frowyk, where he dwelt) find that on the aforesaid Friday the said William was passing through Westchepe, having been let blood (fleobotamatus) the previous day, and owing to the loss of too much blood fell and suddenly died. The body viewed, &c.

And Johanna, wife of the deceased, was attached by Walter de St. Eadmund, skinner, and Jordan Borliman, cordwainer.

And the two nearest neighbours where he lived, viz., Ralph Mabbe, skinner, by John de Aldremannebire, cobbler, and John called Baker, skinner; and Walter de Byri by John de Schoredych and Henry Frere, tailor.

Also the two neighbours nearest the conduit where he was discovered dead, viz., Adam le Keu by Peter le Barbur and William de Coudre (Condre?), "cotiler"; and Henry de Wylesdene by William Hardy and Adam le Chaundeler.

Folio 118 [facieinversa.] (xvj b).

Sunday the morrow of St. Gregory [12 March], the same year, information given to the aforesaid Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Matthew de Hekham, servant to a certain clerk in the house of Sir William de Middelthone, lay dead, &c., in the house of Richard le Clerk upon (super) Lothebire, in the Ward of William Bukerel. (fn. 59) Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and the nearest Wards of Chepe, Bassishawe, and Colemanestrate) find that on Sunday after the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.] the said Matthew was met in the street by certain Jews named Abraham de Dorkynge, Isaac de Canterbury, and Cresse, son of Isaac de Lyntone, when the said Isaac struck him with an anelace in the loins, inflicting a wound of which he subsequently died. They further find that the aforesaid Abraham and Cresse were consenting to the felony. The body viewed, &c.

The aforesaid Richard, in whose house the deceased died, was attached by William Det, "bukeler," and Roger le Coffrer. Also Juliana, wife of the said Richard, by Roger le Batur and William de Cycestre, cordwainer. There were no more in the house.

And the two nearest neighbours where he was struck, viz., Alan de Colcherche by Martin le Bukeler and Theynot le Bukeler; and Thomas le Fundur by Thomas de la Cornere and Thomas le Batur.

Also the two nearest neighbours where he died, viz., Ralph Faber by Roger Balle and William Maydenelove; and John de Balesham, "seler," by Walter Franceys, "oyler," and Adam le Batur.

Folio 117 b [facieinversa.] (xvij).

Thursday the Feast of St. Dunstan [19 May], 6 Edward I. [A.D. 1278], information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Gilbert "Csloke" lay dead on the wharf of John of the Tower (de Turri) in the Ward of William de Hadestoke, (fn. 60) in the parish of Berkyngecherche. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and from the Ward of Bridge) find that the said Gilbert, being non compos mentis, was on the preceding Wednesday standing on London Bridge, when he fell asleep, and accidentally fell over into the water and was drowned. They say also that Nicholas le Flemeng and William de Hamme, seeing him floating and hoping to save him, took him into a boat and brought him to the wharf aforesaid.

The said Nicholas attached by John State and John le Noreys; and William de Hamme, "batiler," (fn. 61) by John de Hatfeud and Geoffrey Cork, batilers.

The two nearest neighbours where he fell into the water were attached, viz., John le Noreys, 'cotiler," by Bartholomew le Gaunter and Richard Scot, "cotiler"; and John de Storteford by Thomas le Cotiler and Nicholas Brente.

And the two nearest neighbours where he was found, viz., Richard le Byndere by John de Turry and Nicholas Fitz Godwyne; and Symon de Orpinton by Henry de Orpinton and Thomas Elyot.

The same day information was likewise given that Henry de Laufare lay dead in the house of Sibil Feron in the Ward of Chepe, in the parish of Colcherche. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and the Wards of John de Blakethorn (fn. 62) and Henry de Frowyk (fn. 63)) find that the said Henry, whilst keeping guard over Richard de Codesfeld, who had taken sanctuary (fn. 64) in the church of St. Mary de "Stanigeslane" on account of being charged with robbery by William de London, a cutler, received a wound in the head from a lance at the hands of Thomas the Clerk of the said church, who struck him through a window of the church, so that he afterwards died.

The said Thomas was taken and imprisoned in Newegate, and afterwards delivered before Hamo Haweteyn, Justice of Newegate.

And the said Richard keeps himself within the said church. No one else suspected. The body viewed, &c.

And the two nearest neighbours where he was struck were attached, viz., John le Retundur by Eadward le Mercer and David Perseval, fishmonger; and Thomas de Stanes by William de Parys and Richard de Bekles.

And likewise the two nearest where he died, viz., Geoffrey de St. Alban, "oynter," by William de St. Alban, "oynter," and John Russel; and Hamo le Ferun by Roger le Avener and William le Furbur.

And the said Sibil, in whose house he died, was attached by John Patryck, "cutiler," and John de Eddelmethone, "cuteler." She had no servant.

Folio 116 b [facieinversa.] (xviij).

Roll of Felonies committed and Misadventures that happened in the City of London temp. Matthew de Columbers, Chamberlain (fn. 65) of the lord the King in the same, and Walter le Cornewaleys and John Adrien, then Sheriffs of the same City [A.D. 1278].

Thursday the morrow of St. Laurence [10 Aug.], 6 Edward I. [A.D. 1278], information given to the above Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Henry de Ambelcowe, a foreigner, lay dead, &c., in the Ward of William de Hadestoke in the highway leading to the Tower of London, in the parish of St. Mary de Berkyngecherche. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the above Ward and the Ward of Wolmar de Essex, (fn. 66) being nearest) find that on the preceding Tuesday, whilst the said Henry was proceeding towards his ship at the Tower, he being a sailor, he was suddenly struck by death and fell opposite the house of Richard le Teynturer. No one suspected. The body viewed, &c.

The two nearest neighbours attached, viz., Richard de Westone, "seynturer," (fn. 67) by Alan le Hurer and William de Chelesfeld, "hurer"; and Hamo le Tyneler by Walter Saule, "laner," and Ralph de Stebenhethe, "cuver." (fn. 68)

The same day information was likewise given that William Cole lay dead, &c., in the Ward aforesaid, in the parish of St. Dunstan towards the Tower. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the above Ward and the two nearest Wards, viz., the Ward of Wolmar de Essex and the Ward of Nicholas de Wynchester (fn. 69)) find that he was badly beaten by one John, parish clerk of Stratford, Richard, chaplain to the Prioress of Stratford, and John de Scheld in the fields of Stratford—where the deceased grew corn, some sheaves of which had been removed by the said John—so that he shortly afterwards died. The jurors suspect no one except the before-mentioned Richard the Chaplain and John de Scheld. The felons escaped after taking sanctuary. Asked as to their goods and chattels, the jurors say they know nothing thereof, the felons being foreigners.

The four nearest neighbours attached, viz., Roger de Stebenethe by Martin le Lou and John de Canterbury; Richard de Bixle by Nicholas de St. Dyonis and Jordan Pejon (?); the same Nicholas by Walter Saule and Alan le Hurer; and Hugh de Chesewyk by [blank].

Folio 116 [facieinversa.] (xviij b).

Sunday the eve of the Assumption B. M. [15 Aug.], the same year, information given to the aforesaid Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Thomas de Notingham lay dead, &c., in the Ward of John Adrien, in the house of Jakemin de Troys in the parish of St. Mary de Abbecherche. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and the nearest Ward of Douegate) find that on the preceding day after dinner, about midday, the aforesaid Thomas stripped himself of his clothes except his shirt and breeches, and descended a well in the cellar of the house of the aforesaid Jakemin, being of the depth of six casks (doleorum), to recover a bucket (bukettum) that had fallen into the said well, and that in descending he placed his feet upon the hoops of the said casks and held on by his hands; but the hoops, being old and rotten, gave way, and he accidentally fell into the well and was asphyxiated by the bad air. No one suspected. The body viewed, &c.

The two nearest neighbours attached, viz., John de Plumpstede by Thomas de "Capuneshors" (fn. 70) and John Miles; and John de Canterbury, "buriler," by Geoffrey de Burdeus, "retundur," and Gerard de la Vile.

Also Jakemin de Troys, the master of the house, by Walter Herwy and William de Bosco, draper.

Also Avice, wife of the said Jakemin, by Henry le Plomer and John de Plumstede. Also Katherine, her servant, by John de Canterbury and Geoffrey de Brachyngge; Juliana, another servant, by Thomas de Capuneshors and John Miles; and Matilda de Greyneford, another servant, by Geoffrey Le and Michael de Aungre. They had no other servants.

Folio 115 b [facieinversa.] (xix).

The following Tuesday information given that John de "Aldinele," apprentice to Stephen de Harewes, and John Putoys, lay dead, &c., in the house of William de "Hocstede," which he hired of the aforesaid Stephen, in the Ward of William de Durham, (fn. 71) in the parish of All Hallows de Bredstrate. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and the two nearest Wards, viz., the Ward of Chepe and the Ward of Henry le Waleys (fn. 72)) find that on the day named the said John de "Aldenele" descended by a ladder a certain well—which the said Stephen de Harewes had caused to be made within the courtyard of his house, for the purpose of a privy (cloacam), of a depth of five casks, in which new wine had been kept— for the purpose of recovering a board which had dropped out of the bottom of one of the casks; and that when he had descended to the depth of three casks he was overcome with the bad air and fumes of the casks and fell down dead; that his companion John Putoys on seeing this called out to him, and receiving no answer soon went to his assistance, descending the well by the same ladder, and when he had descended to a like depth or more he likewise fell suddenly dead from off the ladder by misfortune. Being asked who witnessed the accident, the jurors say no one was present except a poor mason, whose name they know not, whom the said Stephen had that day hired, and he on seeing the mishap took fright in terror and had not since been found. No one suspected. The bodies viewed, &c.

The four nearest neighbours attached, viz., John de Vaux (de Vallibus) by William Hewe, taverner, and John de Gatesdene, cook; William Hewe by William de Beverley and Reginald de Fridaystrate; Laurence de Paris by Walter de Gloucester, cordwainer, and Symon de Senliz (Sancto Licio); and the same Walter by Osbert de Suffolk and Symon de Senliz.

William de Okeste, residing in the said house, by Stephen de Harewes and William de Gloucester; and Johanna, wife of the same, by Geoffrey de "Hotsted," cordwainer, and John de Gotely, "barbur." They had no servant.

Also Richard le Sawier', who came on the scene soon after the second man had fallen, by William de Gloucester, "gaunter," and Richard de Reyns:

Also Stephen de Harewes, whose house it was, and who likewise came on the scene, by Reginald de Frydaystrate and William de Harewe.

The ladder appraised at 4d., for which Walter le Cornewaleys will answer.

Folio 115 [facieinversa.] (xix b).

Thursday the Feast of St. Giles [1 Sept.], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Godfrey de Belstede lay dead, &c., in the house of John de Salle in the parish of St. Michael le Quern, in the Ward of Ralph le Fevere. (fn. 73) Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and the two nearest Wards, viz., the Ward of William de Durham (fn. 74) and the Ward of Castle Baynard) find that the said Godfrey died from wounds received from certain London carters whom he met on the road whilst riding in company with Richard le Lacir from Cestrehunte to London.

John de Salle, in whose house he died, attached by William de Woxebrigge and Ralph le Paumer; and Sarah his wife by John de Wilesdone, barber, and Reginald de Bury, "paternostrer."

And the two nearest neighbours were attached, viz., William de Kaustone by Robert le Cheyner and Richard le Bryd, "paternostrer"; and Robert de Bury by Gilbert le Armerer and John Gretheved, "paternostrer."

And the said Richard le Lacir, the companion of the said Godfrey on the journey, by Henry de Bury, glover, and Richard le Eschot, cutler.

Sunday after the Feast of Decollation of St. John Bapt [29 Aug.], the same year, information given to the Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Walter de Waleham, of co. Leicester, lay dead, &c., in the hostel of St. Bartholomew de Smethefeud. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the Ward of Ralph le Fevere and the two nearest Wards, viz., the Ward of John de Blakethorn (fn. 75) and of Castle Baynard) find that on Friday after the Feast of St. Bartholomew [24 Aug.] Roger le Cordewaner, late servant of John Aubyn, Ralph, late servant of Reginald de Lawevare, and Thomas de Hakene, a broker, assaulted the said Walter by night, having quarrelled about brokerage on the sale of a horse, and beat him to such an extent that he died on the following Friday evening. Ralph, one of the felons, was taken and imprisoned in Newegate; the others made their escape, and had not since been found. No one else suspected. The felons had no chattels.

The four nearest neighbours attached, viz., John le Chaucer by John Fyfher and John de Suffolk, "buriler"; William Uggel by Warin de Lagrave, skinner, and Robert le Combere; Thomas Hod by Walter le Pynnere and Geoffrey de "Fynthingfeud"; [the fourth omitted].

Folio 114 b [facieinversa.] (xx).

Friday after the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.] information given to the aforesaid Chamberlain and Sheriffs that Katherine, daughter of Thomas de Brackele, of the age of nine years, was found drowned under the wharf of Peter Cusyn in the parish of All Hallows at the Hay, (fn. 76) in the Ward of Douegate. Inquest thereon. The jurors (drawn from the said Ward and the nearest Ward of Henry de Coventre (fn. 77)) find that late on the preceding Tuesday the said Katherine went to a certain common bridge situate near the aforesaid wharf, and descended the steps of the said bridge for the purpose of washing her feet, and whilst stooping down to raise water with her hand she by accident fell into the water and so was drowned. The body viewed, &c.

The two nearest neighbours attached, viz., Robert Cusyn by William le Engleys, tailor, and John le Joynur; and Robert Denmars by John de Scheld and Thomas de Pelham.

Edward by the grace of God, &c., to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London greeting. Whereas our beloved servant Matthew de Columbariis, our Chamberlain and taker of our wines throughout England, to whom the office of Coroner in our City of London by reason of the Chamberlainship aforesaid appertains, (fn. 78) is busied with divers of our affairs in divers parts of the realm at our command, so that he is at this time unable to find leisure for attending personally to that office of Coroner: we command you that you admit John Horn, whom we adjudge fit to execute that office by assignment thereto of the said Matthew, whensoever ye be requested by the said Matthew, (fn. 79) accepting, however, previously from the same John a certain oath that he will well and faithfully bear himself in that office so long as he be therein. Witness myself at Wyndesore, 26th day of November the eighth year of our reign [A.D. 1279].

A note to the effect that the above writ was delivered at the Iter at the Tower, anno 14 Edward II., (fn. 80) by the hands of N[icholas] de Farndone, Mayor, &c.

Folio 113 b [facieinversa.] (xxj).

Wednesday after the Feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June], 25 Edward I. [A.D. 1297], in the presence of John le Bretun, Warden of the City, Richard de Gloucestre, John le Blunde, John de Canterbury, William de Betoyne, Adam de Fulham, "major," Adam de Roquesle, Richard Asswy, Nicholas de Farndone, Thomas Romayn, Walter de Roquesle, and Henry le Bole, Aldermen, it was agreed that Robert Aubyn should receive an annual rent of 40s. issuing from a certain tenement held by John Joce in Fletestrete, and formerly the property of the said Robert, for life. Moreover the said Joce would pay the said Robert 1 mark in respect of arrears, and in the month......

Fly-leaf.

Reymund de Rykre, taverner, of the Ward of Chepe, was admitted to the freedom of the City for 40s., before Henry le Galeys, Mayor, and the other Aldermen, on Monday before the Feast of Ascension [18 May], 12 Edward I. [A.D. 1284], on condition that he procure letters testimonial from Tullos' (fn. 81) within the quinzaine of the Feast of St. John Bapt. [24 June], the same year, or other security, to satisfy the said Mayor and citizens that the citizens of London would not be molested in parts of Tull' or elsewhere beyond the sea; otherwise the said sum of 40s. to be forfeited and he to be expelled from the freedom.

Footnotes

  • 1. Here, at what according to the modern pagination is the end of the Letter-Book, are copies of Coroners' Rolls for the years 1275-1278, the original Rolls being apparently lost. Selections from these Rolls having been already printed at the commencement of Riley's 'Memorials,' little more has been attempted here than to supply omissions and correct misreadings.
  • 2. The Ward of Candlewick Street.
  • 3. Bridge Ward.
  • 4. Probaby rounded, for the purpose of throwing, like quoits (Riley).
  • 5. Chestisham (?), co. Cambridge.
  • 6. Brewer.
  • 7. A woad merchant. Called infra Robert le "Woder" de Merthone.
  • 8. Queenhithe Ward.
  • 9. Opposite to this there is the following marginal note in a different hand, viz.: Nota quod idem fuit hoc tempore Maior et Camerarius London' et coronator regis.
  • 10. By way of deodand; theoretically a gift to God, but actually a forfeiture to the King, for which the Sheriffs were responsible.
  • 11. Tower Ward.
  • 12. After forty days "sanctuary," a felon had to confess his guilt and abjure the realm, or take the consequences.
  • 13. Set out in 'Memorials,' p. 5.
  • 14. Cripplegate Ward.
  • 15. Queenhithe.
  • 16. Scaffold.
  • 17. Water carrier. The charge for carrying water to houses from Castle Baynard and Dowgate to Chepe by "carters called water-leders" was fixed by the civic authorities in 1350 (Letter-Book F, fo. 181; 'Memorials,' p. 254). The ordinances of the Fellowship (whose patron saint was St. Christopher), "founded and ordeyned in the Frere Augustyns of London, and acknowledged before Thomas Brent, Doctor of Law and Commissary of London, the See then being void, 20 Oct., 1496," are printed in the 'Transactions,' London and Middlesex Archæol. Soc., for 1871.
  • 18. Vintry Ward.
  • 19. See 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 11n.
  • 20. Misread "Hancrete" in 'Memorials' (p. 8).
  • 21. A tub maker, or cooper.
  • 22. A maker of "braels," or braces.
  • 23. Billingsgate Ward.
  • 24. Possibly brewers' grains, unless it mean "drag" (dragium), a coarse kind of corn.
  • 25. A maker of bowls. Riley misreads it "collere," and conjectures it to mean a seller of coal, or "collier."
  • 26. Langbourn Ward.
  • 27. Aldgate Ward.
  • 28. Or "Symphanur."
  • 29. Or "Chalk."
  • 30. Langbourn Ward.
  • 31. Currier. Riley misreads it "Coffeur."
  • 32. Aldersgate Ward.
  • 33. St. Martin le Grand.
  • 34. The Sunday after Easter.
  • 35. Cripplegate Ward.
  • 36. Barem'; perhaps for baremannos, biermen (Riley). The term, as applied more especially to the wine trade, appears to have given the name of "Bermancherche" to the church of St. Martin in the Vintry.
  • 37. A lane known as "Sevehodeslane" was situate in the Jewry, where the murderer was supposed to have taken the property he had stolen from his master. As to its etymology, see 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 12 n.
  • 38. Never-at-home.
  • 39. Walbrook Ward.
  • 40. God-be-herein.
  • 41. Queenhithe.
  • 42. Vintry.
  • 43. See 'Cal. Letter-Book A, p. 11n.
  • 44. Tower.
  • 45. At the wood wharf, i.e., St. Bennet, Paul's Wharf.
  • 46. In the Lansdowne MS. 558 (cited by Mr. W. J. Loftie in his 'Hist. of London,' Appendix L.) "Paynus de Edelmeton" appears as Alderman of Castle Baynard; but the date is not given.
  • 47. Queenhithe.
  • 48. Aldersgate.
  • 49. Cripplegate.
  • 50. Poulterer.
  • 51. Walbrook.
  • 52. Probably for tixtor = weaver.
  • 53. Candlewick.
  • 54. Langbourn.
  • 55. Woad monger.
  • 56. A quern = a hand-mill used for grinding pepper, mustard, &c.
  • 57. Stoke-by-Nayland, co. Suffolk.
  • 58. Cripplegate.
  • 59. Broad Street Ward, formerly known as the Ward of Lothbury (Letter-Book C, fo. vi).
  • 60. Tower.
  • 61. Boatman.
  • 62. Aldersgate.
  • 63. Cripplegate.
  • 64. As to watching fugitives in sanctuary, vide supra, p. 215, note 4.
  • 65. According to an entry in the 'Liber Custumarum' (Rolls Series, i. 239), Matthew de "Columbariis" was Chamberlain and also the King's Butler from 5 May, 6 Edward I. [A.D. 1278], until the close of his life on 19 March, 29 Edward I. [A.D. 1300-1].
  • 66. Billingsgate.
  • 67. Girdler.
  • 68. Cooper.
  • 69. Langbourne, or Langeford Ward.
  • 70. A tenement of this name was situate in Candlewick Street, in the parish of St. Mary Abchurch. Cf. Hust. Roll, 35 (77), 53 (76), 59 (94).
  • 71. Bread Street Ward.
  • 72. Cordwainer Street.
  • 73. The Ward then known as the "Ward of Ludgate and Newgate within and without," recently the Ward of Anketind'Auvergne, on whose death (circa 1277) it came to Ralph le Fevere. See 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 11n.
  • 74. Bread Street.
  • 75. Aldersgate.
  • 76. All Hallows the Great, or by the Hay Wharf. "Cosin lane," near Dowgate, was so called after the family. Stow, 'Survey' (Thoms's ed.), p. 87.
  • 77. Vintry Ward.
  • 78. Cf. supra, p. 257, note 5; 'Liber Cust' (i. 296): "Et nota quod Botellarius domini Regis et Camerarius domini Regis et Coronator idem sunt'.
  • 79. According to the 'Liber Cust.' (i. 239), Matthew de Columbariis was Coroner from the Feast of St. Bartholomew [24 Aug.], 6 Edward I. [A.D. 1278], until Innocents' Day [28 Dec.], 7 Edward I. [A.D. 1278], when he appointed John Horn to be Coroner in his place. But the list of Mayors, Sheriffs, Chamberlains, and Coroners from 4 Edward I. to 14 Edward II. is (as already seen) not always to be trusted.
  • 80. The memorable Iter, lasting from January, 1321, until the following July, particulars of which are set out in 'Liber Cust.' (i. 285, et seq.). The writ and note are later insertions.
  • 81. Toulouse.