BHO

Folios xxi - xxx: Sept 1354 -

Pages 25-35

Calendar of Letter-Books of the City of London: G, 1352-1374. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1905.

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Folio xxi.

Scriptum Joh'is Reyn' per Will'm Fetiz et Beatricem ux'em ejus.

ijs. vjd.

Lease granted by William Fetiz, tailor, and Beatrix his wife, to John Reyner, senior, blader, of a certain tenement which the said William and Beatrix held by feoffment of Sir Thomas de Walkefare, Knt., and Elienora his wife, in the parish of St. Margaret de Frydayestrete, to hold the same for a term of seven years. Dated Monday after the Feast of St. Michael [29 Sept.], 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354].

Br'e tangens stapulam.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation for the due observance of a statute made in the last Parliament held at Westminster to the effect that no wool should be exposed or sold within three miles of a Staple under penalty, but that any one might expose and sell wool of his own growing (de propria crescencia sua) in his own house or elsewhere (fn. 1) Witness, &c., 16 Oct., 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354].

Folio xxi b.

Writ to the Sheriffs forwarding a certain Statute made in the Parliament summoned to meet at Westminster on Monday after the Feast of St. Mark [25 April] last, and ordering proclamation to be made of the same. Witness the King at Westminster, 10 Oct., 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354].

Folio xxi b-xxii b.

Copy of Statute, 28 Edward III., (fn. 2) referred to above.

Folio xxiii.

Compotum redditum per Joh'em de Stanhope exec' test'i Rog'i le Carpentere Piperar' Ric'o Vyncent executor' test'i Mazere que fuit ux' p'dicti Rog'i etc.

Pleas held before Adam Fraunceys, the Mayor, and Aldermen, on Saturday after the Feast of St. Petronilla [31 May], 27 Edward III. [A.D. 1353] :— John de Stanhope, executor of the will of Roger le Carpenter, pepperer, summoned to answer a charge brought by Richard Vincent, executor of Mazera, late wife of the said Roger, of having withheld from the said Mazera one-third of her late husband's property, to which she had a right by the custom of the City. The said John came and demanded an account. Thereupon auditors were appointed, viz., Thomas de Brandone, James Andreu, Symon de Lyncoln, Richard Grace, John Flaoun, and Robert de Hatfeld, some of whom the said John challenged, and thereupon Symon Dolsely, John Flaoun, and Robert de Hatfeld were appointed. Afterwards, viz., on Saturday after the Purification B. M. [2 Feb.], 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1353-4], there were assembled in the Guildhall Adam Fraunceys, the Mayor, Andrew Aubrey, Roger de Depham, Henry Pykard, Symon Dolsely, William Welde, William de Todenham, William de Caustone, and Symon de Worstede, Aldermen, when mention was made of the account, but nothing was done, as no auditor was present except Symon Dolsely. Afterwards, viz., on Wednesday after the Feast of St. Valentine [14 Feb.], came the said Richard Vyncent and John de Stanhope before Adam Fraunceys, the Mayor, Andrew Aubrey, Roger de Depham, Henry Pykard, John de Stodeye, William de Welde, William de Todenham, and Symon de Worsted, Aldermen, as also the auditors, viz., Symon Dolsely, John Flaoun, and Robert de Hatfeld, and delivered their account, whereby it appeared that the said John de Stanhope owed the sum of £96 8s. 6d. as the third part of the goods of Roger le Carpenter, which sum was claimed by the said Mazera and allowed.

Folio xxiii b.

Scriptum Walt'i Doget.

Indenture of grant by Adam Fraunceys, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty of the City to Walter Doget, vintner, and Alice his wife, of certain shops belonging to London Bridge and situate in the parish of St. Leonard de Estchepe, for the term of their lives and three years after their decease, at an annual rent of 5 marks, payable to the Wardens of the Bridge. Dated Tuesday before the Feast of St. Dyonisius [9 Oct.], 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354].

One indenture of the above delivered to John de Hatfeld, "chaundeler," Warden of London Bridge.

Scriptum Nich'm [sic] atte Wyke.

Indenture of grant by the same to Nicholas atte Wyke de Stratford of two mills, one a mill for Fullers (fn. 3) and the other a water mill, called "Spilemanesmelne," in Stratford, and "Sayenesmelne," in the parish of "Westhunne," (fn. 4) which mills belong to London Bridge. To hold the same for a term of twelve years at an annual rent of 12 marks, payable to the Wardens of the Bridge. Dated Monday the Feast of St. Michael [29 Sept.], 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354].

One indenture of the above delivered to John de Hatfeld, Warden of London Bridge.

Folio xxiv.

L' ra sub privato sigillo pro reparacione et mundacione fossatus juxta Turrim London'.

Writ of Privy Seal to the Mayor and Sheriffs bidding them remove the filth which had accumulated in the Tower ditch owing to the City's ditch in the vicinity not having been kept clean, contrary to former repeated orders Dated at Westminster, 14 March, 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1353-4].

Billa d' no Regi porrecta per Maiorem et co'itatem pro hospitali Sancti Egidii. .

The Mayor and Commonalty to the King and Council, showing that whereas before the time of memory and afterwards they (the Mayor, &c.) had devised lands, tenements, and rents to the value of £100 and more for the maintenance of lepers in the hospital of St. Giles for lepers only, and a certain person of the said City suffering from the disease had founded the said hospital, and ordained that two persons of the City, elected by the Mayor and Aldermen, should be Wardens of the same, to see that the issues of the said lands, tenements, and rents were properly expended for the benefit of the said lepers; and whereas the said lepers had been thus maintained up to the time of King Edward, the King's grandfather, who gave the custody of the said hospital to the Master of Burton St. Lazar, (fn. 5) who has ousted the said lepers therefrom and put in their place brothers and sisters of his Order who were not diseased, contrary to the will of the donors aforesaid and to the great danger of healthy persons intermingling with the said lepers, —they pray, therefore, the King and his Council that a remedy may be found, and that the said poor diseased folk may be restored to the said hospital according to the will of the donors of the lands, tenements, and rents aforesaid. [No date.]

Br'e Regis super dicta Billa.

Writ of certiorari to the Sheriffs touching the above, and for the Mayor and Aldermen to appear before the King in his Chancery on Monday after Palm Sunday [6 April], the Master of the above Hospital of St. Giles being summoned to appear the same day. Witness the King at Westminster, 28 March, 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354].

Folio xxiv-xxiv b.

Indenture made between the Mayor and Commonalty of the one part, and the Warden of the Hospital of St. Giles for lepers in Holbourne of the other part, witnessing that whereas the said hospital was founded exclusively for lepers by Matilda, daughter of the Empress, late Queen of England, (fn. 6) and afterwards many good men of the City had given and devised divers tenements and rents, amounting to £80 per annum and more, for the maintenance of lepers of the said City and suburbs for ever, under the supervision of two good men of the City elected by the Mayor and Commonalty, and such lepers had continued to be so maintained until the time of King Edward, the present King's grandfather, when they were ousted from the said hospital; and whereas the said Mayor and Commonalty had presented a petition to the King in Parliament in the twenty-second year of his reign (fn. 7) over England and the seventh (ninth?) over France, praying that the lepers might be reinstated, which petition was committed to the Chancellor, who was ex officio visitor of the hospital, to examine the parties; and whereas the petition was proved to be true—it is now agreed, with the assent of the King and his Council, between the Warden of the said Hospital and the Mayor and Commonalty that thenceforth the said Mayor and Commonalty shall for ever present to the Warden of the Hospital for the time being fourteen lepers of the City and suburbs, or if there be not that number in the City and suburbs shall take them from the county of Middlesex, so that the said number of lepers shall be for ever maintained in the said Hospital in manner set forth. In the event of further gifts to the Hospital by good men of the City, the number of lepers to be increased in proportion. [No date.]

Folio xxv.

Letters of protection of Pope Alexander in favour of the Hospital of St. Giles without London, confirming to the lepers (inter alia) the building with gardens, &c.; the annual rent of 60s. which Queen Matilda assigned to the Hospital out of Queenhithe; a similar sum granted to the same by King Henry [II.] out of his Exchequer at Michaelmas for the purchase of clothing, and 30s. granted by the same King out of his rents in Surrey for the purchase of lights; (fn. 8) a hide of land which Roger Fitz Hubert gave; as well as the church and land at Feltham given by Count Baldewyn de Redivers and Countess Hawysia, &c. This grant and confirmation to be duly observed under pain of excommunication. [No date].

Folio xxv b.

L'ra procurator'.

Letter of the Mayor and Echevins of Amiens notifying that the merchants of that town had appointed Andrieu called "Aideluye," burgess of Amiens, to be their proctor and attorney in the realms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and that the said Andrieu had appointed as his delegates Jean de Coquerel, Colart Cambelleuc, Jehan de St. Suscien, son of the late (jadis) Robert de St. Suscien, Johan de Tournay the Elder, and Jehan, son of the late (jadis) Jehan le Mounier. Dated Saturday after the Holy Sacrament, (fn. 9) A. D. 1333.

Folio xxv b-xxvi b.

Composicio inter cives London' et mercatores de Amyas, Corby et "Neele" .

A new agreement made between the City of London and the above proctors and attorneys, confirming and enlarging to merchants of Amiens the privileges granted to the merchants of Amiens, Corbie, and Nele in 1237, by Andrew Bokerel, the Mayor, John Tolosan and Gerveys le Cordewaner, the Sheriffs, Richard Renger, Ralph Asshewy, William Joynier, John Viel, Gerard Bat, Joce le Fitz Piers, Robert le Fitz Johan, Henry de Cokham, Jordan de Coventre, James le Blount, Waryn Fitz Nichol, Ralph Sperlyng, Roger le Blount, Philip de Leycestre, Henry le Fitz Willem, Robert de Basyng, Hamond de Chastel, John de Woubourne, and John Wacher, the Chamberlain. Dated in full Husting of London, Monday before the Feast of St. Margaret, 18 July, A. D. 1334. (fn. 10)

Indenture testifying that the towns of Corbie and Nele not having sent a deputation to the City of London as commanded, they were debarred from the privileges granted to the burgesses of Amiens until the said towns should agree to pay their share of expenses incurred and of the rents due to the City of London. Same date. (fn. 11)

Folio xxvii-xxvii b.

Ordinances promulgated by John de "Offord," Dean of Lincoln, Archbishop-elect of Canterbury, (fn. 12) and Chancellor, for the future management of the Hospital of St. Giles without the Bar of the Old Temple (fn. 13) for lepers. Dated at London, 13 Jan., A.D. 1348[-9].

Temp Thomas Leggy, Mayor, 28 Edward III.

Folio xxviii.

Br'e R' pro Priore hospital' Sancti Joh'is Jer'lm' in Angl' pro quadam kaia sup' aquam de Flete juxta gaolam ibidem mundand' Maiori et vic' directum etc.

Writ to Adam Fraunceys, the late Mayor, and William Welde and John Little, Sheriffs. The Prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem had exhibited a petition before the King and his Council in Parliament, setting forth that his predecessors, Priors of the said Hospital, had always held a certain wharf on the water of the Flete, near Flete Prison, until Symon Fraunceys, late Mayor of the City, had ousted Philip de Thame, late Prior, from the same, and had let the same wharf to butchers of the parish of St. Nicholas within Neugate for the purpose of cleaning and depositing there the entrails, &c., of cattle slaughtered by them, the said butchers rendering annually therefor a boar's head. The stench arising therefrom was so bad as to be injurious to the health of the inhabitants of the free prison (fn. 14) of the Flete and neighbourhood, and the civic authorities had ignored a petition for some remedy, on which account the matter had been brought before the King's Council in Parliament. The Mayor and Sheriffs are bidden to do speedy justice touching the said wharf. Witness the King at Westminster, 26 May, 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354].

Aliud br'e de eadem materia.

Another writ on the same matter. [No date.]

Return made to the effect that on account of complaints having been made of the noisomeness arising from butchers of the parish of St. Nicholas within Neugate throwing entrails on the pavement near the Friars Minors, the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Aldermen had ordained that in future the said butchers should carry the entrails of slaughtered beasts to a certain public place of the City extending as far as the water of the Flete, and there clean them in the water, where the Thames ebbs and flows, and that neither the Prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem nor his predecessors possessed a wharf there as suggested, nor had they ever contested the matter at law, as the City was prepared to do if they were willing to prosecute. The writ, therefore, could not be executed.

Folio xxviii b.

Custodia Joh'is Fabe.

Friday after the Feast of St. Andrew [30 Nov.], 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354]. William Horwode and Avice his wife, late widow of John atte Brome, tanner, to whom (i. e., Avice) the guardianship of John Fabe had been committed by Adam Fraunceys, late Mayor, as appears in fo. xvii [b], came before Thomas Leggy, the Mayor, Roger de Depham, William Welde, William de Tudenham, and Symon de Worsted, Aldermen, and Thomas de Waldene, the Chamberlain, and asked to be relieved of her guardianship, for the reason that neither the said William nor Avice exercised any trade or craft to teach the said John Fabe. The guardianship was thereupon transferred to John de Arlicheseye, "peautrer." Sureties, viz., Robert atte Brome, clerk, William Holbeche, draper, Richard Dyk, draper, Richard Bromme, "ismongere," and William de Spaldynge.

Custodia Juliane filie Joh'is atte Brome.

Monday before the Feast of St. Lucia [13 Dec.], 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354], the guardianship of Juliana, daughter of John atte Brome, tanner, aged seven, committed by Thomas Leggy, the Mayor, Roger de Depham, Alderman, and Thomas de Waldene, the Chamberlain, to Thomas atte Hale, together with a tenement in the parish of St. Alphege within Crepulgate and certain rents and chattels. Sureties, viz., Adam Prichet, tanner, William Neweman, "coureour," and Walter Draper, "coureour".

Scriptum Thome de Irlond per Steph'm Godwyne.

ijs. vjd.

Indenture of covenant that a certain bond entered into by Stephen Godwyne in favour of Thomas de Irlond, pepperer, shall be void on condition that the latter be allowed peaceable. enjoyment of a certain shop on Cornhull in the parish of St. Mary de Wolcherchawe. Dated 10 Feb., 29 Edward III. [A.D. 1354-5].

Acknowledged before Richard de Notyngham, Alderman, and Thomas de Waldene, the Chamberlain, Tuesday after the Feast of St. Agatha [5 Feb].

Folio xxix.

Proclamacio facta die Martis in festo Sancti Martini anno regni R' E' tercii post conq' xxviii°.

Ordinances proclaimed Tuesday the Feast of St. Martin [11 Nov.], 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354], for the government of the City to the following effect: (1) that no one wander in the City or suburbs after curfew, unless he be of good repute or the servant of such a one, and then only for good cause and with a light; (2) that no one carry arms in the City except the King's Serjeants-at-arms and others; (3) that hostellers warn their guests to lay aside their arms on entering their hostels; (4) that any one of the King's peace may arrest felons and others and convey them to the Sheriffs; (5) that no one maintain or join outlaws; (6) that victuallers and others continue to follow their trade [as before the pestilence]; (fn. 15) (7) that no taverner mix good and bad wine, and that customers be allowed to see whence their wine is drawn, &c.; (8) that brewers sell ale at prices specified; (9) that no cornmonger sell corn at Billingsgate, Queenhithe, Gracechurch, or on the pavement at Newgate before the hour of Prime; (10) that no merchant stranger sell corn by sample; (11) that no one forestall corn or other victual; (12) that no corn-meter be a broker; (13) that all filth deposited before houses be removed within a week; (14) that pigs be kept from wandering in the streets; (15) that no one forestall poultry or other victual, &c. (fn. 16)

Folio xxix b.

Carta custod' et canonicor' Capelle de Wyndesore.

Extract from a charter granted to the Warden and Canons of the Chapel of Wyndesore (fn. 17) and their tenants to the effect that they and their successors be quit of all manner of toll, custom, and services. Dated at Westminster, 6 March, 27 [Edward III.], [A.D. 1352-3].

Br'ed' ni Regis pro Rog'o Bernard.

Writ of certiorari to the Mayor and Sheriffs touching an alleged grievance of Roger Bernard, who had complained that the Sheriff of Mountevyler (fn. 18) and others had unlawfully seized and sold a cargo of merchandise which he had shipped from Newcastle-on-Tyne to the port of "Harflet" in Normandy on the 20th July last. Witness the King at Westminster, 3 Dec., 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354].

Inquisicio capta per virtutem dictibrevis.

Inquisition thereon made before Thomas Leggy, the Mayor, and William de Tudenham and Richard Smelt, Sheriffs, on Monday after the Feast of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354-5], by oath of Robert Haunsard, Richard Greylond, John Paterlinge, Andrew Pykeman, Richard de Kent, Richard Marchal, Thomas atte Blakelofte, William de Shepeye, John Wyrhale, Adam Marschal, John Sowy, and Ralph de Mortone, who found that the above Roger Bernard freighted two vessels at Newcastle-on-Tyne, named respectively "La Seinte Pere" and "La Seint Martyn," both of the port of "Hareflet" (their masters being John Peytevyne and Ralph Gyno), with "grindstones" and sea-coal, to be carried to "Harflet"; that on their arrival on the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.] last the said Roger sold the cargoes for 600 crowns (scuti), but that the Sheriff of Mountvyler, Roger Castebien, Robert de Seynt Marc, Geoffrey le Boucher, and John Poulyn of Normandy, under the jurisdiction of the King of France, finding that the said Roger was an Englishman, seized the goods and sold them for 290 crowns, and on that account certain vessels of merchandise at the towns of Hamptone and Caleys belonging to the said Sheriff and the rest had been arrested. And be it known that three letters—viz., one under the Common Seal of the town of Newcastle, another under the seal of the Mayoralty of the same, and a third under the seals of twelve merchants of the said town—had been sent to the Mayor and Aldermen of London touching the above writ, and the letters remain in a box in the possession of Thomas de Waldene, the Chamberlain.

Folio xxx.

Br'e d'ni Regis de vinis.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation for vintners and taverners to sell their wines openly and at specified prices. Witness the King at Westminster, 30 Jan., 29 Edward III. [A.D. 1354-5]. (fn. 19)

The above writ delivered to the Mayor and Sheriffs on the 31st Jan.

Proclamation made accordingly by Nicholas de Abyndone on the 1st Feb.

Folio xxx b.

Custodia Rob'ti filii Will'i de Deveneshire.

Monday after the Feast of St. Luke [18 Oct.], 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354], the guardianship of Robert, son of William de Deveneshire, aged seven, committed to Ralph Makenheved, "goldsmythe," by Adam Fraunceys, the Mayor, Symon Fraunceys, Richard Lacer, Roger de Depham, William Welde, and Thomas de Waldene, the Chamberlain Sureties, viz., William de Berkyngge, Adam de Chipstede, John Botoun, and William Aucra.

Br'e ne aliquis peregrinus transeat ad partes transmarinas.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation that no pilgrim leave the port of London for foreign parts without special licence. Witness the King at Westminster, 6 Feb., 29 Edward III. [A.D. 1354-5]. (fn. 20)

Proclamation made accordingly on Sunday after the Feast of St. Valentine [14 Feb.]. The above writ remains in the possession of Richard Smelt, Sheriff.

Br'e d' ni R' pro burgensib' Bedeford.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs that they allow the burgesses of Bedeford to enjoy their chartered rights and privileges. Witness the King at Westminster, 12 May, 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354].

Carta liberta tum burgen sium de Bede ford.

Charter of Richard I. granting to the burgesses of Bedeford the same laws and customs as those enjoyed by citizens of "Hoxeford." (fn. 21) Dated at Westminster by the hand of William de Longchamp, Bishop elect of Ely and Chancellor, 12 Nov., 1 Richard [A.D. 1189].

sol' ijs. vjd.

Thereupon the above burgesses produced two charters, viz., one granted to them by Henry III. and another by Edward III.

Footnotes

  • 1. See Stat. 28 Edward III. cap. xiv.
  • 2. See 'Statutes at Large' (ed. 1758), i. 295-8.
  • 3. In 1298 objection was raised against certain fullers and dyers for having sent cloth to the mill at Strat ford to be fulled instead of fulling it at home according to ancient cus tom. 'Cal. Letter Book C,' pp. 51-2.
  • 4. West Ham.
  • 5. Burton Lazars, co Leic. The date of the grant is given by Tanner as anno 27 Edward I. ('Not. Mon.,' i. 304).
  • 6. Maude la file lemp'ice jadys Reigne Denglet're. Probably a mistake for mother of the Empress, referring to Matilda, wife of Henry I. of England, and mother of Matilda who married the Emperor Henry V. of Germany.
  • 7. There were two Parliaments held this year, viz., one which sat from 14 Jan. to 12 Feb., and the other from 31 March to 13 April, 1348. Stubbs, 'Const. Hist.,' ii. 127.
  • 8. The grants by Henry II. are printed by Dugdale ('Mon Angl.,' vol. vi. pt. ii. pp. 635-6).
  • 9. Otherwise the Feast of Corpus Christi, which in 1333 fell on Thurs day, the 3rd June. The letter is recorded in the 'Liber Albus,' the spelling of the proper names varying, however, from that in the Letter Book. The name "Suscien" appears later as "Fucien," the form it takes in the 'Liber Albus,' where the editor of the latter (Rolls Series, i. 425) has twice printed jadys as a proper name.
  • 10. Printed in 'Liber Albus,' i. 418-424.
  • 11. Printed in 'Liber Albus,' i 426-8.
  • 12. John de Ufford, nominated to the See by Papal Bull dated 28 Sept., 1348, but died 7 June, 1349, before consecration.
  • 13. The original home of the Tem plars having been situate in Chancery Lane between Southampton Buildings and Holborn Bars.
  • 14. The prison of Ludgate was also known as libera gaola or franche prison, i. e., a prison for freemen, having been established as such, ac cording to Stow ('Survey,' Thoms's ed., 1876, p. 15), in 1378. Cf. the will of Richard Andreu ('Cal. of Wills, Court of Hust.,' i. 621), where mention is made of a small bridge (across the Flete) near le francheprison. See also 'Memorials,' p. 673.
  • 15. The words soleient faire en temps passe devant la pestilence have been struck out.
  • 16. It appears to have been not un usual for a new Mayor to issue a general proclamation of this kind soon after entering upon his year of office.
  • 17. Now known as St. George's Chapel, Windsor. The title of Warden was changed to that of Dean temp Henry IV. Dugdale, 'Monast.,' vol. vi. pt. iii. p. 1353.
  • 18. Montvilliers, near Harfleur.
  • 19. Printed in Rymer's 'Fœdera,' vol. iii. pt. i. p. 294.
  • 20. Printed in Rymer's 'Fœdera,' vol. iii. pt. i. p. 295.
  • 21. The affiliation of Bedford both with Oxford and London has been noted by Dr. Gross in his 'Gild Merchant,' i. 245.