BHO

House of Lords Journal Volume 17: 9 February 1704

Pages 421-430

Journal of the House of Lords: Volume 17, 1701-1705. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1767-1830.

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Citation:
Page 421
Page 422
Page 423
Page 424
Page 425
Page 426
Page 427
Page 428
Page 429
Page 430

In this section

DIE Mercurii, 9 Februarii.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Arch. Ebor.
Epus. Wigorn.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Cestr.
Epus. Lich. & Cov.
Epus. Norwic.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Cicestr.
Epus. Oxon.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. St. Asaph.
Ds. Custos Magni Sigilli.
Comes Pembroke, Præses.
Dux Devonshire, Senescallus.
Dux Somerset.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Northumberland.
Dux Bolton.
Dux Newcastle.
Comes Lindsey, Magnus Camerarius.
Comes Carlisle, Marescallus.
Comes Derby.
Comes Bridgewater.
Comes Manchester.
Comes Rivers.
Comes Peterborow.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Winchilsea.
Comes Kingston.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Thanet.
Comes Sunderland.
Comes Scarsdale.
Comes Essex.
Comes Anglesey.
Comes Feversham.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Berkeley.
Comes Nottingham.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Portland.
Comes Torrington.
Comes Scarbrough.
Comes Bradford.
Comes Orford.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Say & Seal.
Ds. Bergevenny.
Ds. Lawarr.
Ds. Ferrers.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Pagett.
Ds. North & Grey.
Ds. Grey W.
Ds. Lovelace.
Ds. Poulett.
Ds. Mohun.
Ds. Byron.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Culpeper.
Ds. Lucas.
Ds. Rockingham.
Ds. Berkeley.
Ds. Cornwallis.
Ds. Craven.
Ds. Osborne.
Ds. Ossulstone.
Ds. Ashburnham.
Ds. Herbert.
Ds. Sommers.
Ds. Halifax.
Ds. Granville.
Ds. Gernsey.
Ds. Conway.
Ds. Harvey.

PRAYERS.

African Company versus Dockwra.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed, for hearing of the Cause wherein the Royal Affrican Company are Appellants, and William Dockwra and others Respondents:"

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That this House will hear the said Cause, by Counsel, at the Bar, on Friday the Eighteenth Day of this Instant February, at Ten a Clock in the Forenoon.

Parker versus Stillingfleet.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed, for hearing of the Cause wherein Sir Henry Parker is Appellant, and James Stillingfleete Respondent:"

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That this House will hear the said Cause, by Counsel, at the Bar, on Saturday the Nineteenth Day of this Instant February, at Ten a Clock in the Forenoon.

Sir J. Astley's Bill.

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable Sir John Astley Baronet to make a Settlement, upon his Marriage, during his Minority; and to enable him to buy in any Rent Charge, or other Incumbrance upon his Estate."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, with the Amendments, shall pass?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Mrs. Packer's Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for making some Provision for, and settling the Fortune of, Anne Packer, in Trustees, for the Purposes therein mentioned."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, with the Amendments, shall pass?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with it; and Sir J. Astley's Bill.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Robert Legard and Dr. Edisbury:

To carry down the abovesaid Two Bills, and desire their Concurrence to them.

Burchett to attend Hores Committee, concerning Abuses in victualing the Navy.

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That Mr. Burchet, Secretary to the Admiralty, do attend the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Petition of Charles, James, and Richard Hore; shewing, "That they are ready to make out several Abuses in the Victualing of Her Majesty's Navy," on Friday next, at Ten a Clock in the Forenoon; and give their Lordships an Account what Time the Complaint of the Victualing was made, and the Survey ordered thereupon; and also an Account of the Survey of Provisions, taken at Portsmouth, upon Sir Cloudesley Shovell's Return Home.

Increase of Seamen, and manning the Navy, Bill.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the more regular and speedy manning the Royal Navy, and Increase of Seamen."

ORDERED, That the said Bill be read a Second Time To-morrow, at Eleven a Clock.

Messages from H. C. with Bills.

A Message from the House of Commons, by Mr. Onslow and others:

Who brought up a Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable George Evelyn Esquire to raise Portions for his Brotheres and Sisters, according to his Father's Will;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

A Message from the House of Commons, by Sir John Mordaunt and others:

Who brought up a Bill, intituled, "An Act for settling the Manor of Creech, in the County of Somerset, in Trustees, to enable them to renew Leases, for the Maintenance of the Younger Sons of William Keyt Esquire, deceased, during their Minority;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Keyt's Bill.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for settling the Manor of Creech, in the County of Somerset, in Trustees, to enable them to renew Leases, for the Maintenance of the Younger Sons of William Keyt Esquire, deceased, during their Minority."

Message from H. C. with a Bill.

A Message from the House of Commons, by Mr. Dreyden and others:

Who brought up a Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable the Lord High Treasurer of England, or Commissioners of the Treasury for the Time being, to compound with John Ferrar Esquire for a Debt due from him, as Surety for John Mason Gentleman, late Receiver General for the County of Cambridge and Isle of Ely;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Cawdron's Bill.

The Lord Lawarr reported from the Lords Committees, the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable Robert Cawdron Esquire to settle Part of his Estate (which he has improved), for raising Portions for his Younger Children," as fit to pass, without any Amendment.

Mathews versus Philips.

Upon reading the Petition of Chichester Philips Esquire, Thomas Browne and his Wife, Henry Johnson, and others, Respondents to the Appeal of George Mathews Junior; praying "the Enlargement of their Time for answering to the said Appeal, their Papers and Solicitors being in Ireland:"

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Petitioners have hereby Time allowed them for answering thereunto, until Monday the First Day of March next, at Ten a Clock in the Forenoon.

Monks versus E. of Bath's Bill.

Upon reading the Petition of Katherine Monk and Elizabeth Monk, Infants under the Age of One and Twenty Years, by Mathew Hungerford Gentleman, their Grandfather and prochein Amy; praying to be heard, by their Counsel, against any Part of the Bill now depending in this House, on the Behalf of William now Earl of Bathe:

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Petitioners shall be heard, as desired, on Friday next, at Eleven a Clock in the Forenoon.

Loader versus Burrough.

Whereas this Day was appointed for hearing of the Cause wherein Isaac Loader is Appellant, and Joseph Burrough Respondent:

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That this House will hear the said Cause, by Counsel, at the Bar, on Saturday the Twelfth Day of this Instant February, at Ten a Clock in the Forenoon.

Savage versus Sir W. Humble.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed, for hearing of the Cause wherein Diana Savage is Appellant, and Sir William Humble and others are Respondents (who have not yet answered thereto):"

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That this House will hear the said Cause, by Counsel, at the Bar, on Saturday the Fourth Day of March next, at Ten a Clock in the Forenoon; and that the Respondents may answer in the mean Time, if they think fit.

Committee for the Journal.

The House being moved, "That the Lords Subcommittees, appointed to consider of and inspect the Journals of this House, may meet often; and that the said Committee may be enlarged:"

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Committee do meet on Monday next, at Nine a Clock in the Forenoon; and that all the Lords present this Day (who are not of the said Committee) be added thereunto: And it is hereby recommended to the said Committee, that they do meet often.

Scottish Conspiracy.

Then the House (according to Order) took into Consideration the Papers relating to the Scottish Conspiracy.

Whereupon the Packet delivered in by the Earl of Nottingham, 3d February 1703, was opened, and read, as followeth:

"Mr. Ferguson's First Narrative, delivered to the Lords of the Cabinet Council, N° 11.

Ferguson's Narrative.

"I do solemnly declare, That, so far as concerns either my Knowledge or my Belief, there is not a Nonjuror, or any called a High-flying Church of England Man, or One reckoned a Jacobite, engaged in a Plot, or that will be, against Her present Majesty and the Government.

"Yea, it is so far from giving them Uneasiness that Her Majesty is on the Throne, that they heartily bless God the Monarchy is preserved against the Designs of the Republicans; and that One of the Serene Family of the Stewarts possesseth the Sovereignty, in Despight of all the Endeavours of such as would have either supplanted Her had the late King William lived, or would have brought either the Princess Sophia of Hanover, or the Prince her Son, to England or to Scotland, during Her Reign, since His Decease.

"And that it is not to be denied but that there are those in Her Majesty's Dominions who will not swear to serve Her against the Prince at St. German's; yet, since they are willing to live quietly under Her Majesty's Authority, it is hoped they will be distinguished from Traitors and Rebels.

"And, should the Weight of Foreign Affairs bring Her Majesty into a Necessity of capitulating with France, there are none in these Kingdoms who will be either more careful for the Security of the Protestant Religion, and of the Church of England as by Law established, or of Her Majesty's enjoying the Royal Dignity during Her Life, as was anciently stipulated in this Kingdom; First, between Henry IId, the Son of the Empress Maud, and King Stephen; and, Secondly, betwixt Richard Duke of York and King Henry VIth; than they who are branded and stigmatized for Jacobites will.

"Nor are French Plots against Her Majesty to be much dreaded, while the Ministers of that King know not better how to chuse their Tools for promoting them, than to employ Captain Frazer in Scotland upon such a Design, who is both so obnoxious to the Laws of that Nation, and accounted infamous by all Men for the vilest and most abominable Crimes.

"Neither can it be reasonably imagined, that his Grace the Duke of Queensberry, who not only protected the said Frazer in Scotland, but obtained a Pass, by a sham Name, of the Right Honourable the Earl of Nottingham here, for conveying him Abroad again, would be in a Conspiracy with the Court of France against Her Majesty and the present Government.

"And it ought to be held ridiculous, that either my Lord Stairs, who was the Author of the Massacre in Glenco, or Mr. William Carstairs, who was deeply engaged both in the intended Assassination at the Rye-House, and in all the treasonable Designs as well against King Charles the Second as against the late King James while on the Throne, should now become embarqued in the Service of those at St. German's, and co-operate with those who are said to be carrying on the exalting the Prince of Wales to the Thrones of his Ancestors.

"Nor will it pass upon any Man of common Sense, that the Duke of Queensberry's Confidence in, Kindness to, and singular Care for the covering and protecting, Captain Frazer, should be merely in Hope of Frazer's getting his Grace's Pardon, in case of a Revolution, as the said Frazer was pleased to say, both to myself and, as I have been told, to others; and not rather to be that Duke's Intelligencer from Abroad, as his said Grace is reported to have affirmed.

"And what Sort of Informations his Grace had contracted with him about, may be partly conjectured from the Rumours which have obtained for some Time, about this Town, of a Plot carrying on in Scotland against Her Majesty; wherein not only the Duke of Athol, but divers others of the First Quality of that Kingdom, were criminally concerned.

"But as the more exact Knowledge, what Tidings Frazer was to convey to the Duke of Queensberry from the other Side were to be, will be learned from intercepted Letters hither and thither; so both my own getting the Duke of Athol acquainted how such Letters might be laid hold of, and his Grace's laying it before Her Majesty, are an undeniable Evidence, that both the said Duke of Athol and myself are far from being in any Conspiracy against Her Majesty and Her Government.

"Nor can it escape the Observation of Her Majesty, and of the Honourable Lords of Her Privy Council, how precarious the Lives, as well as the Liberties and Fortunes, of all such must needs be, against whom either Frazer doth entertain Resentments and bear Revenge (as he is known to do, in Reference to the Duke of Athol, and to many more of the First Rank in Scotland), or the Duke of Queensberry himself shall harbour the least Grudge.

"And, seeing it will contribute to the giving farther Light to this Matter, to have those strictly examined, who, either here or in Scotland, have had secret Conversation and Transactions with Captain Frazer, it is my humble Opinion, that, besides what may be learned from the Laird of Locheal, and from other Heads of the Highland Clans in Scotland, all whose Names are in great Probability known to his Grace the Duke of Queensberry, it having been under his Grace's Protection, as well as his Advice, that Frazer went to them; so much more may, in the Use of proper Methods, be gained from Mr. Keith and Lieutenant Campbell, who, of all Men, seemed to be most in Frazer's Confidence, and on his Secrets, than they have yet declared; and, in my humble Opinion, it will be one of the most effectual Courses to prevail with them to deal openly, and without Reserve, if they shall be threatened with the being sent to Scotland, in order to be proceeded against.

"Nor is it unlikely but that something considerable in this Affair may be wrested out of Mr. Carstairs, in that he, having procured of the late King William a Pardon for Frazer, with respect to his having levied War, and he being still reckoned by Frazer for One of his special Friends, which also was told to myself by the said Frazer, it is not to be supposed but that one endowed with the insinuating Faculty and Art, for which Mr. Carstairs is so much valued by his Party, as he is known to be, would wind himself as much as he could into the Knowledge of what Frazer came to transact in Scotland, especially when he could not avoid the having a Prospect of rendering the being let into it serviceable to the Interest of the Kirk.

Dec. 24th, 1702.

"Robert Ferguson."

"Smeaton's Letter to Thomas Clarke, and those enclosed, Dec. 4th, 1703.

"[Note, By Smeaton is meant Frazer.]

Frazer's Letters to Clarke and others.

"To Mr. Tho. Clarke, Apothecary, in Watlingstreet, over-against St. Austin's Church, near St. Paul's Church Yard, London.

"Dear Friend,

"I have sent you this to tell you, that Mr. Corbusiere has done me, by not considering, more Harm than, I fear, I will be able to get over. Well, I am forced to stay still here, squeezed Twenty Guilders a-day, and made known to Twenty Scots here; and some will certainly inform against me, when they go for England; and, if I am not soon gone, I am afraid of the Worst. After reading, send the enclosed Gazette to Mr. John Seaton, at The Half Moon at Durham; and write, "that his Friend is safe here." Give the enclosed to Mr. Keith and my Black Friend, and let them read the Gazette. We have the Rumour of bad News here, "that Prince Lewis of Baden is beat;" if it holds, it will ruin the Empire. They say, that the German's King will command in Flanders the next Year; so we will see how the new Kings behave. Direct to me, "To Mr. John Smeaton, to the Care of M. Vincent Neerinx, Merchant, at Rotterdam." I am, Sir, your real Friend,

"Jo. Smeaton."

"Enclosed, One to Colin Campbell, and One to Mr. Hill, as follows:

"To Mr. Colin Campbell, next Door to The Hampshire Hog, Charles-street, Westminster.

"Rotterdam, 4th Dec. 1703.

"My dearest Cus,

"I have sent this to let you know, that, to my Loss and Trouble, I am here yet; because that little Devil Corbusiere forgot to give me a Letter of Advice, to answer my Bill; and, for Want of it, I cannot get a Farthing, and lives here at the Rate of Twenty Guilders a-day; and I could not set out my Nose, but Twenty Scots People knew: Some of them are going to England; I believe they will give Account of me. I made them all believe that I am going on the present Expedition to Portugall. I desire you tell the Duke this; and send me an Answer to my last. Write all to me freely; and direct, "To Mr. John Smeaton, to the Care of Mr. Vincent Ncerinx, Merchant, in Rotterdam:" He will send it safe to me, wherever I am. My Dearest, let me hear from you often. I ever am

"Yours eternally.

"Your Brother is Groom of the Bedchamber.

"You may tell the Duke, that I saw a Man from France; but I will not tell him what I hear, till I hear from him; only, they say, the St. Germain's King will command in Flanders next Year. Adieu, my Dear."

"To Mr. John Hill, at The Marine Coffee House, in Piccadilly.

"[Note, By John Hill is meant Will. Keith.]

"My most dear Friend,

"This is to give you Account of my unlucky Stay here; cursed Corbusiere not giving me a Letter of Advice. I spend much here, I lose my Time, and I am unluckily known by many Scots: I persuade them, I am going to Portugall. I believe, they will inform against me; so acquaint me, my Dear, of all you'll hear. Direct to me, "To Mr. John Smeaton, to the Care of Mr. Vincent Neerinx, Merchant, at Rotterdam;" and it will be sent very safe to me, wherever I am. I met here with one Dalaville, that has a Pass to carry Eight Horses to France: He says, "That the Court of St. German's expects to succeed to Queen Anne; that they will make no Disturbance while She lives." They say, that their young King is to command in Flanders next Year; so we will see what the Two pretended Kings will do in the Field. My Dear, write all Things to me, by Edinburgh, very freely. I am

"Eternally yours.

"Tell John to march Day and Night.

"Adieu, mon cher Ensant.

"Write often this Way; for it's safe, till we have another."

"Smeaton's Letter to Thomas Clarke, with One enclosed to Mr. Smith, One to Colin Campbell, and One to Corbusiere.

"To Mr. Tho. Clarke, Apothecary, in Watlingstreet, over-against St. Austin's Church, near St. Paul's Church Yard, London.

"Affectionate Friend,

"The Packet is at last come in this Day, and I get Money in Two Pennies Pieces To-morrow; and I go the next Day after. I met with a great many here that knew me, whom I persuaded that I was going with the King of Spain to Portugal. I entreat you, let me know if you received my last Two Letters. Deliver the enclosed Letters to my Friends: After you read Mr. Seaton's Letter, which is all the News we have at this Time, seal it, and send it, enclosed in a Letter of your own, forward to Durham. Direct to me, as I told you in my last, "To Mr. John Smeaton, to the Care of Mr. Vincent Neerinx, Merchant, in Rotterdam." Give my Service to all my Friends, particularly to Mr. Mackartny and to your Uncle. I forgot to tell you, that there are Thirty Thousand French on the Frontiers of Portugal already, and Twenty Walloons and Flemish upon their March to Spain; so that King Philip will have Sixty Thousand, the most of them Strangers, this Winter in Spain, ready to go to the Campaign the Beginning of the next Year, to defend His Pretensions. Let me know, by the First, what your Parliament is doing; and an Account of all the Sea and Land Forces that are to go to Portugal with the King of Spain. This, with my Service to your Family, is all from

"Your affectionate Friend and Servant,

Rotterdam, the 7th Dec. 1703.

"John Smeaton."

"Enclosed, One to Mr. Smith, One to Colin Campbell, and One to Corbusiere, as follows:

"To Mr. Smith, at The Marine Coffee-house, in Piccadilly.

"[Note, by Smith is meant Keith.]

"My most dear Friend,

"Since I wrote my last, I have seen several that knew me; I have made them all believe that I go for Portugal. We are down in the Mouth here, with the News we have of Prince Lewis of Baden's being defeat: It has left us no Hopes, but what we have in the Supplies of your English Parliament: Pray let me know fully what they are doing; and send me the Detail of the Land and Sea Forces ordered for Portugall. Seal the enclosed, and send by the very first; and write to Robin, to send an Express with it, whereever John is. My Dear, do not fail to let me hear from you. Direct to me, "To Mr. John Smeaton, to the Care of Mr. Vincent Neerinx, Merchant, in Rotterdam;" and he will send it safe to me wherever I am, if it was all full of Heresy; there is no Fear of it. I am uneasy till I hear from you. I ever am your own, while

Rotterdam, 7th Dec'r, 1703.

"John Campbell,

"And eternally after.

"I go forward To-morrow, God willing, a dangerous Journey; but it must be ventured. Adieu."

"To Mr. Colin Campbell, next Door to The Hampshire Hog, in Charles-street, Westminster.

"Rotterdam, the 7th Dec'r, 1703.

"My dearest Cus,

"This Day the Packet Boat came in; and I get my Money To-morrow, and goes away next Day. I have been known here by a great many Scots; I persuaded them all that I go for Portugal with the King of Spain; which you may improve, if you hear any Thing of me there. I wrote to you so fully in my Two last Letters, that I have nothing to add now; but to entreat of you to write to me often. Direct, "For Mr. John Smeaton, to the Care of Mr. Vincent Neerinx, Merchant, in Rotterdam." You may write fully to me; for it will come very safe to me, wherever I am. Let me know what my Friends do for you and me. I pray God may still preserve and prosper you. My Duty to my dearest Aunt: Her Son is now Groom of the Bedchamber, and fonder of his Fair-one than ever, which is the Height of his Ambition; so that he is lost to us all. My Dear, let not this trouble you; but let you and me take Example, and let us do brave, gallant Things, while we live. I hope Thom. will not disappoint me. Adieu, my dearest of all the World.

"Farewell.

"I bless God, I am very well in my Health; and I strive to recover from my Melancholy every Day; and I entreat and conjure you, as you love your Soul, Body, Honour, and Friends, strive against Melancholy; for, if any Thing ruin me, it will be Grief; so forsake, my Dear."

"To Mr. John Corbusiere, Merchant in London.

"Dear Sir,

"I got yours just now, which I longed for with all my Soul; for the Want of the Letter of Advice has exposed me here to a Hundred Inconveniencies, besides the Loss of my Journey and Expences; but I only attribute that to my own Ignorance, and your Forgetfulness only in not sending a Letter of Advice with me. As for the Loss of the Bill, I am sorry you should have One uneasy Thought about it, for I don't value it, nor was Money ever my Master; in the mean Time I am persuaded, that it is no Profit to you, but that that Fellow made you believe that Things were other than they are. It is not Ten Pistoles lost there, and Twenty here, that I regret; but (fn. 1) by my Loss of Time; for I had been well pleased had my Bill answered when I came; but keeping me here Twelve or Fourteen Days for it, has done me a great deal of Hurt; but I admire, but you know me better than to think that you should refund a Farthing of that Nature to me, if it was a Thousand Pound. I give you hearty Thanks for your Service, and does not blame you for Accidents. The Fellow has not paid the Bill yet, and is positive he will give me no Money but Duplikies, the Two Penny Pieces here. Pray let me hear from you. Mr. Neerinx has been very civil to me. I still am,

"Your real Friend and Servant,

"John Campbell."

"The following Letter was enclosed to Mr. Smith, in the foregoing Letter to him of December the 7th.

"To Captain John.

["Note, by Captain John is meant John Murray.]

"My Dear John,

"I have sent this Express, to let know, that though, to my Loss, I have been obliged to stay here till now, yet I am glad upon your Account that I have stayed; for, by good Luck, I met one Mr. Delaville here, who has a Pass for Eight Horses and Four Men. He says, "He knows you very well." I told him, after Four or Five Days Acquaintance, "That I believed you would come shortly this Way, and go forwards." He told me, "to write to you immediately, to tell you, that he would wait here a Month for you, to bring you safe where you would be." So, my Dear, make all the Haste you can to London; come from that here by your Nephew's Direction; and when you come to Rotterdam, inquire for one Mr. Vincent Neerinx, Merchant, on The Vine-haven. Delaville lodges with him; and though Delaville should be gone, Neerinx, who is a mighty honest Man, will do your Business well enough. After I have considered all the Ways, I think this absolutely your best; so I advise you to take it. I wrote this Day to our Friends by a sure Way. We are confounded here, that we lost Thirteen Thousand Men at the Battle of Spires, and that we have private Letters that Prince Lewis of Baden is beat in Germany, which ruins us all. I entreat you, make all the Dispatch possible; and let me hear from you by your Nephew. My kind Service to all your Family, which I will always reck on myself a Part of. I said a great deal of you to my Friend in my Letter: I wish we may make good our Words; and I hope we will do more. I ever am,

"Yours sincerely and eternally."

Rotterdam, 7th Dec. 1703.

"Smeaton's Letter to Tho. Clarke, with One enclosed to Colin Campbell, and One to your Brother, Dec. 11th 1703.

"To Mr. Tho. Clarke, Apothecary, in WatlingStreet, over against St. Austin's Church, near St. Paul's Church-Yard, London.

"My Dear Clarke,

"The Post is just going off; so that I have only Time to tell you, that I received yours, and that I am mighty glad to know you are well; and to assure you of my constant Friendship and Gratitude for your many Services. I will write by the next to you and to your Uncle, whose Letter I can hardly read, it is so blotted; but I will work a whole Day at it, or get it read. Tell Keith, whom I beg you may find out as soon as you can, "that I am angry that I did not hear from him, and that I expect a full Letter by the First." Deliver the enclosed as soon as can be. Pray let me know, in your own Write, what our Parliament is a-doing. I have endeavoured to banish my Melancholy; but I have this Minute, and all Day, a Fever, by drinking bad Wine. I wish I was out of this unwholesome Country. Saturday's Storm lost Two English Men of War, and ruined Two Dutch, and all the Transport Ships, where the King of Spain lost all His Baggage, Plate, Cloaths, and several Officers drowned, many other Men and Women; all this in One Place, but the Loss is universal in Holland. Adieu. I still am,

Rotterdam, 11th Dec. 1703.

"Your real Servant,

"Jo. Smeaton.

"Let me hear often from you, about my Health; which I'll fear still till I am in a better Air, for this Country will soon kill me. My Duty to your Uncle, who will hear from me often."

"Enclosed, One to Mr. Colin Campbell, and One to your Brother, as follow.

"To Mr. Colin Campbell, next Door to The Hampshire Hog, in Charles Street, Westminster.

"My Dearest of all Cousins,

"I am glad to hear and know by your Letter, that you are well. I am unluckily here still; but Tomorrow or next Day, I go off to a most dangerous and impracticable Journey; but it must be ventured. My Service to my dear Duke, and my dearest Friend Fr. the E. if he be come there; and tell them, "that I am entirely their Servant, and that I wonder they did not honour me with a Line." I am confounded to know that your Brother is Prisoner; I am afraid they will keep him so; however, his only Business is, to give them fair Words till he be in The Highlands, for I rather see him shot and damned than that he should do an ill Thing; since his Lady is with him, he and she must be humoured till he be once in Grey Steels Bounds, and when I return, I hope we will manage him. Our Master's Business must carry; for nothing happens every Day but melancholy Misfortunes to the other Party every Day. However, my Dear, since he knows nothing but what she will know, and then her Father who is a Knave, you must not let your Brother know what passed in Scotland but in fair Generals, as I have done in the enclosed. But, my Dear, keep him from engaging with either Party if he can; but if he has Resolutions of making any Engagements, let it be to our Friends, and not to our Enemies; but let him consider, not to lose his Fourteen Years Service; and let him not be prepossessed with a Pique, for he will never make any Thing but by that Means. However, if nothing will keep him from the Government, conjure him to some of your Friends and mine. Let me hear from you; for I will wait for it to know what he does. I am yours eternally, more than all the World.

"John Smeaton.

"I have endeavoured to banish my Melancholyevery Day; but I have the Fever just now, by drinking bad Wine last Night. Adieu, my Dear. Tell Keith, "that I am very angry he did not write to me, and that I expect a full Letter by the first." Ten Thousand good Adieus to you, my Dear. Let me know what's done in your Affair; and let Tom do good Things, for, if I live, I will see him. Johuy and the Majors give you their kind Service."

"To your Brother.

"[Note, by your Brother is meant Sir John Macleane.]

"Rotterdam, 11th Dec. 1703.

"My dear Cus,

"I am glad to hear that you are alive; but I am surprized to hear that you are Prisoner: And I cannot understand how you came to throw yourself in an open Boat, and afterwards give yourself up to the Government; when, in my humble Opinion, your Business was to go quietly Home; where you might either serve your Master, or make an honourable Capitulation for yourself and Friends. However, my Dear, since you are in their Hands, my Advice is, positively, that you give them fair Language in every Thing that will procure your Liberty; and then make the best of your Way Home, where you will meet with Friends that will stand by you. My Dear, I know I need not bid you keep firm to your Master's Interest, which is the only Thing to preserve your Honour and Interest: And the making of an ill Step now would so ruin your Reputation, that, though I love you entirely, I rather see you buried, than that you should be guilty of it. So, my Dear, I conjure you, as you will be answerable to GOD and your Honour, to keep firm to your Master, that you may receive the Rewards that you and your Family deserve. Our Master's Affairs are in extreme good Condition; I have pushed them so, that all His Friends are ready to obey upon reasonable Grounds, which the Bearer, who is the Man upon Earth you should be most guided by, knows. He is not only your Brother, but a tender one, and the prettiest young Fellow alive of his Generation; and who will raise himself and serve his Friends: And all I conclude is, that you are infatuate if you do not follow his Advice, for he is brave and solid. Let me immediately hear from you, and let me know upon what Terms you come away, and how you left Matters there; for I will wait your Answer here. Take Care, for Christ's Sake, that no Condition may make you or your Friends tell a Word of the main Business to any body. Many Things may be said, that are true and probable, that may do you Service, without touching the Main; which Torture should not oblige to discover. My Dear, pardon my Freedom, since I reckon myself but a Part of yourself: And, as I told you many Times, if you bid me, and go along with me, I'll return To-morrow, and hazard my Courage and all mine to get you your own; and will do the same if I was settled To-morrow at Home. I give my kind Service to your Lady: I wish her and you much Joy of your Son Sir Hector; I wish and hope you may do such great Things as will make him great. Adieu, my most dear Cousin; and remember your Honour, and our many Days Resolutions. If you will stand by me, we will force our Enemies to give us our own.

"I ever am, yours,

"Jo. Campbell.

"Be full in all that passed since I saw you."

"Smeaton's Letter to Tho. Clarke, and several Letters therein enclosed, Dec. 14th, 1703.

"To Tho. Clarke, Apothecary, in Wetling-street, over against St. Austin's Church, near St. Paul's Church-Yard, London.

"My dear Friend,

"I have nothing to acquaint you with since my last, but that you may see in your Uncle's Letter; which I desire you may read and seal, and afterwards give it to him. I entreat you, send the enclosed forward for Edinburgh; and deliver the enclosed to Mr. Keith and my Cousin as soon as possible. I resolve to go out of this Town on Sunday, GOD willing. I got a great Cold here, and I am afraid for the Ague, for which I resolve to go to a better Air as soon as possible. I entreat you let me hear frequently from you, with a full Account of what your English Parliament is doing, and how the King of Spain's Business goes on there; with a Consultation always from my good Physicians concerning my Health, which I hope a better Air than this will recover. This, with my kind Service to yourself and Family, is all from

"Your affectionate Friend and Servant,

Rotterdam, the 14th Dec'r, 1703.

"John Smeaton."

"Enclosed, One to Colin Campbell, One to Colonel Walter Corbett, One to Alexander Frazer from Lovat; in which is enclosed, One to all the Gentlemen of the Name of Frazer of the Lord Lovat's Family, and One to Captain Thomas Frazer from Lovat, One to Mr. Smith from Smeaton, One to Mr. Ralphson from Smeaton, a Rotterdam Gazette, as followeth:

"To Mr. Colin Campbell, next Door to The Hampshire Hog, in Charles-street, Westminster.

"Retterdam, Dec'r 14th, 1703.

"My dearest Cus,

"I am still here. I was persuaded by my Friends, that I could not any Manner of Way pass the Frontiers without The States Pass: I have sent Money to the Hague for it; and whether I get it or not, I will venture on Sunday: I must venture, for my Health, out of this Country, for I have a Fever and Looseness. Give my Service to my great Friend the D. and to my D. L.; if they prevail, I hope they will remember me. I met one Alexander Campbell, a Son of Craigness, who persuaded me to write a Letter to Argyle and to his Brother, but in very general Terms, only that I told him, "if he was Friends with Athol, he must lose me and many more." For GOD'S Sake, my Dear, push your own Affair now briskly, that the Month is come in; and put my great Friends in Mind, that I told them, "that I would take their doing for you as a Demonstration of their Friendship for me;" and if they do not for you, I am sure, I will never do for them, which will be of Loss to them. Give my Service to your Brother, if you see him, and tell him to remember what I wrote in my last; I rather see him dead, than do an ill Thing; but, if he join any Party, persuade him to join our Friends, without which he never will do any Thing in the Government; since he is fully bewitched by that Woman, I think it is best not to be rude to her till the Plantation Time of Year come in. For God's Sake, my Dear, let not him, or any body except the Colonel, know what is and was 'twixt you and me: Your Brother will tell her all, and there it goes. Keep this Letter in a sure Place, or burn it, that he or she may not see it: Tell him, "That I pressed you to make him send me a full Account how he came away, and how he left Matters there, and how my Friends stood for me." My Dearest, if I escape this Journey, you will see me in Summer, if I am alive in Health; and then I'll do or die upon the Head of it: But I doubt not of doing great and glorious Things, if I keep my Health. I pray GOD preserve and prosper you. My dearest Cousin, I hope to see you enjoy a great Reputation, and a plentiful Estate. Your Cousin James, Sir Normand's Son, is dead, and buried last Wednesday. Pray let me hear frequently from you; and believe that you are the Creature in the World I love most: Let Tom do good Things. Adieu, my Dearest.

"I am,

"Yours for ever,

"John Smeaton."

"To the Honourable Colonel Walter Corbet, First Major of Her Majesty's Regiment of Foot Guards, at Edinburgh, Scotland.

"By Walter Corbet is meant Captain Macleod.

"My dear Cousin,

"I received both your Letters last Night; in this Town Quarters I am now almost Twenty Days, being kept unluckily, by my English Bills and other Inconveniencies, till now. One of your Letters was dated the 11th, and the other the 13th: In the First, you give me an Account of your Receipt of a Letter from London: In the Second, you tell me of my Friend L. his going up Post to London; which my Friend Q. told me before I left London. I had a Letter from that the last Night, which gives me Hopes that they will prevail; which I would be very glad of. You writ to me to recommend Charles Mekeenon to my Lord Lorn; I believe you do not know, that it is Reason enough for my Lord Lorn not to do for him, that he served his Father. I can recommend you and him effectually to my Friends Q. and L. which I will do: but, if you and Charles reflect on what I told you, your First and best Preferment will be that Way; and now I advise you, as you wish your own Risings, you abstract from that till that Time, at least till I acquaint you. I intend to go To-morrow, or next Day, up the Country, a most dangerous Journey; but must be ventured. I have settled a Correspondence, that you may write to me wherever I am; so that you may direct One of Two Ways; "For Mr. John Smeaton, to the Care of Mr. Thomas Clarke," as formerly; or, "To the Care of Mr. Vincent Neerinx, Merchant, in Rotterdam;" and that Mr. Vincent Neerinx will send them to me wherever I am. I have sent the enclosed Letters to you, that you might take Care to send them North; send them, under your own Cover, to Donald Frazer Postmaster at Inverness, if he is alive in that Post; if he is not, send them to a safe Hand, that will deliver them to Culduthell, or to One of his Brothers. Send the other Line to Thom. and let me know what he is doing by the first: You may expect to hear from me Once a Month, or a Fortnight, while I am in this Side. Give my most kind Service to your discreet Lady, to honest Charles Mekinnon, and tell him, "to be as good as his Word, and I am sure he will not have Occasion to repent it." My Service to my Cousin Mr. Alexander, and tell him, "I have on Sight of his Brother Normond Heir, and that he is well; and that his Brother James was buried Yesterday, at Bomell." They have no News this Side, but that the Empire is every Day more and more in Danger of utter Ruin; and the Storm of Saturday last has done greater Damage to Holland and England, than if they had lost Three Battles. I desire you write frequently to me; and believe, wherever I am, you have the Friend in the World that loves you best, and will continue unalterably

"Your affectionate Cousin and Servant,

Rotterdam, the 14th Dec'r, 1703.

"John Smeaton.

"My Brother and the Major gives you and your Lady their Service."

Lord Lovat's Letters, &c. to the Frazers.

"To the Honoured Alexander Frazer Younger, of Culduthell; in his Absence, to John of James Frazer, his Brothers.

"Most dear Cousin;

"I have sent you this, to assure you that my Love for you is as much this Day as the Day we parted; and that I hope to make you and your Family, and Father's Children, happy very soon. I hear you are married; if it is so, I wish you much Happiness: and if you are not, I hope to get you a good Marriage before a Twelvemonth be over. Let no Man's Saying discourage you; for, if we live both a Year, you will, by GOD's Help, see me the greatest Lord Lovat that ever was; I am so already out of my Country; and I hope to be so in my Country very shortly. If you think that it will not be hurtful to your present Condition, I desire you go about with the enclosed; if it will, send One of your Brothers with it, that will give me a faithful Account of what every particular Man's Answer to it will be. You may propose their sending me a Letter, to try their Pulses; for, by signing or not signing it, I would know who is my Friend, and who not. I refer all this to your Management; and whatever Word you have for me, send it to Captain Macleod, and I will get it safe wherever I am. Believe that

"I am,

"Dear Saunde,

"Your affectionate Cousin and Chief,

Rotterdam, 17th of Dec'r, 1703.

"Lovat.

"My kind Service to all your Relations, and all my other Friends. Adieu."

"To the Honourable all the Gentlemen of the Name of Frazer, of the Lord Lovat's Family.

"My dear Cousins,

"Since I design not to go Home this Winter, but make a Journey up the Country, I thought fit to send you this Letter, to let you all know, that, I bless God, I am in very good Health, and in extraordinary good Expectations of my Business; so that the next Summer I hope will see me as my best Friends would wish me; since there is no Pleasure or Preferment, though I have now both very considerably, is capable to hinder me from venturing my Life, and all that's dear to me, to make you happy, and to keep you from being dispersed and banished from the Lands of your Fathers. I hope you will reflect on your foolish Divisions, and abhor them: And, as I never did revenge myself against the particular Persons that appeared against me, because I hated mortally to dip my Hand in my own Blood; so I do heartily and sincerely forgive all and one of them by this; since I believe they did not see their Error, till they see their Door Neighbours like to take their Bread from them; and as I do pass by and entirely forgive all by-gone Injuries, so I hope they will join and concur with me, to keep out our Enemies, and to preserve my Family, and their own Name and Kindred; which if they do not, when I come to my Country, I declare solemnly, that I will treat them as my worst Enemies, and cut them off as monstrous Members, who are like to destroy the Body whence they have their Birth; and I can assure you, I will have Power to do it, and be fit sides with all my Enemies, if I live a few Months. So, if you should not hear from me till I see you, let this Letter be a faithful Advertisement to you, that I never resolve to quit my Birth-right, and preserving of you, while I live; and let it be a convincing Exhortation to you, to be united as One Man, to keep the Possessions of your Fathers, and resolve to die bravely together, rather than survive your Honour, and the Mackensies domineering over you, and transplanting you; which none of you is so ignorant, but you must see is their Design and Endeavour: But they never will do it while I live, and I hope to turn the Chance on some of them before it be long. So, begging of you all to believe that you never had a more affectionate Relation, or a more tender-hearted Chief,

"I ever am,

"My dear Cousins,

"Your affectionate Cousin and Chief,

Rotterdam, 15th Dec'r, 1703.

"Lovat."

Frazer's Letters, &c.

"To Captain Tho. Frazer. These.

"Rotterdam, 14 Dec. 1703.

"Dear Tom,

"I wonder I do not hear from you; I hope you are well, and that you do brave Things. To-morrow I begin the dangerous Journey that we made last Year; if I were over that, I hope to be soon with you: For God's Sake, do gallant Things, and do not fear to see me very soon.

"I am,

"Yours,

"Lovat."

"To Mr. Smith, at The Marine Coffee-house, in Piccadilly.

"[Note, by Smith is meant Keith.]

Rotterdam, 14 Dec. 1703.

"My dear Will,

"I believe you are not in the Land of the Living, or John Smeaton could not be so soon forgot by you. I have been very unlucky; but never so miserable as I would be by being neglected by you and your Uncle, the only Two Friends I have in the World. I believe all the Witches of my Enemies Country have conspired to keep me here. I was kept Twelve Days by my Bills: When I got them, the Storm came to ruin me as well as King Charles the 3d, who lost all His Plate, Cloaths, and Equipage, many of His Men and Officers; the Loss is universal, and so great, that The States conceal it as much as they can. For, as unlucky as I am, I think the poor King of Spain is yet more unlucky; for He has not only the French that fight against Him, but the Heavens and Seas seem to fight against Him: But we hope that a hard Beginning may be a good Beginning. I hear Sir John Macleane and his Wife are come to London; pray see him, and conjure him to do brave just Things to his Creditor, and all of us. As I conjure you to do this, so I advertise you to tell him no more than what you would tell for a Shilling to any body. I would have gone away Seven Days ago; but my Friends told me, "That it was something impossible to pass without the Passport of The States." I sent Money for it to The Hague, to procure it; and whether I get it or not, I go after To-morrow to attempt this confounded dangerous Journey. If you love me, let me hear from you, with a full Account of every Thing, English and Scotch. I have a Fever this Two Days; and I rather be hanged in any other Country, than die in this. I need not write to John, but send him this; by which I conjure him to come immediately to London: His Friend and mine, the Knight Errant Sir David Lindsay, is at London: I hope you will find out his new Poetic Fancy. I can get no Account of Muravius Tulliberdinus, that betrayed the Scots to the English at the Water of Cairn (if he went not to France by Calais). I give my kind Respects to all the dear Family of your Grandfather. Adieu, my most dear Friend.

"I am, yours,

"John Smeaton.

"I thought fit to send the enclosed Gazette, where you may see the Fall of the Roman Empire; and desire you send both this, and the Gazette enclosed, to John, or to Robert to be sent John. Adieu."

"To Mr. Ralphson, at London.

"[Note, by Ralphson is meant Ferguson.]

"SIR,

"I received the Honour of yours the Twenty-sixth of November; for which, I give you my hearty Thanks; I met with such Hinderances here, that I could not as yet begin my Journey, as yet to my Garrison; and the Roads are so full of Parties, that it is a most dangerous Attempt; I resolve to venture it To-morrow or next Day. You may be assured, that I will do you all the Justice imaginable with our General and Superior Officers. I will be sure to lay your Demands before them in the most advantageous Terms I can; yet I could wish I had something material from you to tell them; for what you told me of the public Proceedings of Parliament is in the printed Votes and Gazettes, which they have by every Post, for One of my Friends here sends it punctually; so I would be thought very barren, if I have no more Information from you to give them than what is in the public Papers. As to what you writ, of my taking Care of being transported to particular Resentments, in Prejudice of my General's Interest; I do assure you, that you need not be afraid of it, for I always did and will prefer my Honour, and my Superiors Interest, to my own private Concerns; but I know most certainly, that those you call my Enemies, as well as those you call my Friends, have equally a Dislike to my General, and that they will both serve him at the same Time, that is, never till they are forced to it; and as I do design to give a real Account to those that you call my Friends, that is, that my General need expect no Favour from them; so I would wish that you, and all those that are his good Friends, might not be deluded by the sneaking Pretences of those, who have no other End or Design, than to make a Party in the C. Army, to force Pensions and Places from the Government. We have no fresh News here, but the Account we have from Germany, of the dismal Account that the Empire is in; all Hungary under the Rebels; Augsburgh besieged by the Duke of Bavaria; Philipsburgh and Mayance exposed to the French, and no Appearance of any Succour or Assistance to recover them of their Loss. The Duke of Vendosme is Master of the best Part of Piedmont, and the Mareschall de Thesse Master of all Savoy. The Loss of the last Storm occasions a great Lamentation here, and has been very universal. Pray let me hear from you; if you give it to the Bearer, it will come safe to my Hands. I give my kind Service to all your Family; and believe that I am,

"Sir,

Rotterdam, 14th Decem. 1703,

"Your affectionate humble Servant,

"John Smeaton."

"Smeaton's Letter to Tho. Clarke, with One enclosed to Colin Campbell, in which enclosed One to E. L. One to Mr. Keith, and One to Colonel Walter Corbet.

"To Mr. Tho. Clarke, Apothecary, in Watling-street, over against St. Austin's Church, near St. Paul's Church Yard, London.

"My dear Friend,

"This is to let you know, that I am come safe here, but in bad Health: I hope to recover soon, for I am in good Hands. I am greatly received. I hope Matters will go right, as you Would wish. Pray deliver the enclosed letters right; and if my Cousin Campbell be gone for Scotland, send my Letter after him: I am sure he has left a Direction; if not, send it with a Cover to Colonel Corbet. Pray let me hear from you, with a full Account of the Parliament, and when King Charles goes away. I ever am

P. the 3d January 1703/4;. "Yours,

"John Smeaton,"

"Enclosed, One to Colin Campbell; in which is enclosed, One to E. L. One to Mr. Keith, and One to Colonel Walter Corbet, as follows:

"To Mr. Colin Campbell, next Door to The Hampshire Hog, in Charles Street, Westminster.

"My dearest Cus,

P. 3d January, 1704.

"This is to let you know, that I am come alive here, and that's all; for I am very ill with a Swelling and Pain in my Knees and Legs: I cannot go Abroad for a Fortnight. Every Thing will go right here. Tell my great Friend, "that I will do effectually what I promised for him;" I hope he will give you the Hundred Pounds I was obliged to borrow. Let me know how Matters goes with yourself; I hope Thom. will do brave Things, for I will assure him of Relief. Pray let me know what your Brother does: I fear he will be sent back; but if they order him, let him slip privately down, and he will see me before the Spring is past, if I be in Health: I can't be full in this, because I have not yet seen the great Folks, only heard from them. Pray let me hear from you; and direct, "To Mr. John Smeaton, to the Care of Mr. Vincent Neerinx, Merchant, in Rotterdam." My Dearest, while I breathe,

"I am yours,

"Jo. Smeaton.

"Give the enclosed to my steadfast Friend L. who will help you to get the £. 100. from his Friend the D."

"To E. L.

"My dear L.

"I have presumed to trouble you with this, to let you know that I am alive here, but very ill in my Health; however, I hope to recover in a Month, for I have an able Physician that attends me. I am greater here than ever; so that you may assure your Friend, "that I will do what he asked of me very effectually." Those People carry on Things here just as I told him; and that great Person he serves, is much infatuated to trust them. I hope you will not forget me, nor let your Friend forget me; since I am most entirely,

P. 3d January, 1704. "Your own,

"Jo. Campbell."

"To Mr. Keith, at The Marine Coffee-house, in Piccadilly, in London.

"My most dear Friend,

"This is to let you know, that I am come alive here, but very ill; I will be a Month in Mac Gier's Hands, before I can be well. I hope all Things go well; for my Friends are still my Friends. Your Nephew is impatiently expected; so send him this, by which I conjure him to make no Delay. My Dear, you have been very unkind, not to write to me since I left you; pray send me a long Letter, and let me know, when the King of Spain goes from England. Direct to me, "To Mr. John Smeaton, to the Care of Mr. Vincent Neerinx, Merchant, at Rotterdam;" and it will come safe to my Hands. Let John come his Way, and he will put him right. Pray let me know how all Matters goes with our great ones, and with the E. P. I will long extremely to hear from you. I ever am,

Edinburgh, 3d Jan. 1704.

"Yours sincerely, without Alteration,

"John Smeaton."

"To the Honourable Colonel Walter Corbet, First Major of Her Majesty's Regiment of Foot Guards in Scotland.

"[Note, by Walter Corbet, is meant Captain Macleod.]

"My dear Cus,

"I have sent you this, to let you know that I am come alive here; but that's all; for I am ill in my Health; if that was well, I hope all other Things will go right. I hope T. has done good Things since; I will be sure to relieve him: I cannot yet tell how long I may stay here, but I will not be idle; and keep you right and Charles, as I spoke to him. My kind Service to your Lady, and to the Infanta; I ever am

P. the 3d Jan. 1704.

"Your own,

"Jo. Smeaton."

Papers about the Conspiracy to be considered.

The House this Day having opened and read the remaining Papers, in relation to the Scottish Conspiracy:

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That this House will take all the said Papers into Consideration on Monday next, at Twelve a Clock.

Adjourn.

Dominus Custos Magni Sigilli declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Jovis, decimum diem instantis Februarii, hora undecima Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Footnotes