BHO

House of Lords Journal Volume 37: June 1785 11-20

Pages 307-327

Journal of the House of Lords Volume 37, 1783-1787. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1767-1830.

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Citation:

Table of contents

June 1785 11-20

DIE Lunæ, 13o Junii 1785.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar.
Epus. Bath. & Wells.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Bristol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Ds. Camden, Præses.
Comes Gower, C. P. S.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Devonshire.
Dux Portland.
Dux Northumberland.
March. Lansdown.
Comes Derby.
Comes Huntingdon.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Scarborough.
Comes Abercorn.
Comes Galloway.
Comes Aberdeen.
Comes Dunmore.
Comes Hopetoun.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Effingham.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Northington.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Clarendon.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Dudley & Ward.
Viscount Mount Edgcumbe & Valletort.
Viscount Sackville.
Viscount Howe.
Ds. Sydney, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Percy.
Ds. Say & Sele.
Ds. Chedworth.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Scarsdale.
Ds. Boston.
Ds. Hawke.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Loughborough.
Ds. Walsingham.
Ds. Bagot.
Ds. Southampton.
Ds. Rawdon.

PRAYERS.

Bills passed by Commission.

The Lord Chancellor acquainted the House, "That His Majesty had been pleased to issue a Commission to several Lords therein named, for declaring His Royal Assent to several Acts agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament."

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Then Three of the Lords Commissioners being in their Robes, and seated on a Form placed between the Throne and the Woolsack, the Lord Chancellor in the Middle, with the Lord Archbishop of Canterbury on his Right Hand, and the Lord Sydney on his Left, commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to signify to the Commons, "The Lords Commissioners desire their immediate Attendance in this House to hear the Commission read."

Who being come, with their Speaker;

The Lord Chancellor said,

My Lords, and Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

His Majesty not thinking fit to be personally present here at this Time, has been pleased to cause a Commission to be issued under the Great Seal, and thereby given His Royal Assent to divers Acts which have been agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament, the Titles where of are particularly mentioned, and by the said Commission hath commanded us to declare and notify His Royal Assent to the said several Acts, in the Presence of you the Lords and Commons, assembled for that Purpose; which Commission you will now hear read."

Then the said Commission was read by the Clerk, as follows:

GEORGE R.

George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth: To Our right trusty and right well-beloved the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and to Our trusty and well-beloved the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses, and the Commissioners for Shires and Burghs of the House of Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, Greeting: Whereas We have seen and perfectly understood divers and sundry Acts agreed, and accorded on by you Our loving Subjects the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and the Commons in this Our present Parliament assembled, and endorsed by you as hath been accustomed, the Titles and Names of which Acts hereafter do particularly ensue: (that it to say) "An Act for raising a further Sum of Money, by Exchequer Bills, for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and eighty-five." "An Act for granting Annuities to satisfy certain Navy, Victualling, and Transport Bills, and Ordnance Debentures." An Act for granting to His Majesty, certain Duties on Shops within Great Britain." "An Act for better regulating the Office of the Treasurer of His Majesty's Navy." "An Act for the more easy and effectual Sale of Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments of Crown Debtors, or of their Sureties." An Act to explain, amend, and render more effectual an Act passed in the Twenty-third Year, of His present Majesty's Reign, intituled, "An Act for authorizing the Treasurer of the Navy, to pay to the Garrison and Naval Department at Gibraltar, the like Bounty for destroying certain Spanish Ships of War, as is allowed to the Officers and Men on board any of His Majesty's Ships of War, taking or destroying Ships of War belonging to the Enemy." "An Act for more effectually preventing Frauds and Abuses, committed by Persons employed in the Manufactures of combing Wool, Worsted Yarn, and Goods made from Worsted, in the Counties of Bedford, Huntingdon, Northampton, Leicester, Rutland, and Lincoln, and the Isle of Ely." "An Act for vesting in Archibald Earl of Dundonald, his Executors, Administrators, and Assigns, the sole Use and Property of a Method of extracting or making Tar, Pitch, Essential Oils, Volatile Alkali, Mineral Acids, Salts, and Cinders from Pit Coal throughout His Majesty's Dominions for a limited Time." "An Act for vesting in Edward Bancrost Doctor in Physic, his Executors, Administrators, and Assigns, the sole Property of his Invention or Discovery of the Use and Application of certain Vegetables for dyeing, staining, printing and painting certain valuable Colours throughout that Part of His Majesty's Kingdom of Great Britain called England, the Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed for a limited Time." "An Act for draining, preserving, and improving certain Low Grounds and Carrs in the several Parishes of Saint John in Beverley, and of Skidby in the East Riding of the County of York." "An Act to enable the Company of Proprietors of the Navigation from the Trent to the Mersey, and the Company of Proprietors of the Navigation from Birmingham to Fazeley, to make a navigable Canal from the said Trent and Mersey Navigation on Fradley Heath in the County of Stafford, to Fazeley in the said County, and for confirming certain Articles of Agreement entered into between the said Trent and Mersey, the Oxford, and the Coventry Canal Navigation Companies." "An Act to repeal Part of an Act passed in the Sixth Year of His present Majesty, for the Relief and Employment of the Poor of the Parish of Richmond in the County of Surrey, and other Purposes in the said Act mentioned, and for making new Provisions for the Relief and Employment of the Poor, for the Repairs of the Highways, the paving, cleansing, lighting, and watching the Streets, and other Places in the Town and Parish of Richmond aforesaid; for the Removal and Prevention of Annoyances, Obstructions and Encroachments therein; for enclosing certain Commons or Waste Lands within the said Parish for the Use of the Poor, and to enable the Vestrymen of the said Parish to erect a Workhouse thereon, and to purchase Land for a Burial Ground; and also to enable His Majesty to shut up a Lane within the said Parish called Love Lane." "An Act for repairing, new pewing, seating, and erecting Galleries; and making other Alterations and Additions in and to the Parish Church of Kidderminster in the County of Worcester." "An Act for rebuilding the Bridge across the River of Ayr at the Town of Ayr." "An Act for the better preserving and maintaining the Piers and Harbour of Cromarty in North Britain." "An Act for paving the Footways in the Borough of Reading, in the County of Berks, for better repairing, cleansing, lighting, and watching the Streets, Lanes, Passages, and Places in the said Borough; and for removing Encroachments, Obstructions, and Annoyances therefrom, and preventing the like for the future." "An Act for taking down the Market House in the Borough of Bridport in the County of Dorset, and rebuilding the same, together with a Session or Court House in a more convenient Situation; for removing the Shambles or Butcher Row; for better paving, cleansing, lighting, and watching the said Borough; for removing and preventing Nuisances and Annoyances; and for prohibiting the covering of any new Houses or Buildings, within the said Borough, with Thatch." "An Act for better watching, lighting, and cleansing such Parts of the Precinct of Saint Catherine near the Tower of London, in the County of Middlesex, as are not included in the Provisions of certain Acts passed in the Seventh and Ninth Years of His present Majesty's Reign, and for preventing Nuisances and Annoyances therein." "An Act for continuing the Term and altering and enlarging the Powers of an Act of the Fourth Year of His present Majesty; for repairing and widening several Roads leading from the Town of Bideford in the County of Devon." "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of an Act made in the Fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act for widening and repairing the Road leading from Ashborne in the County of Derby, over Belpar Bridge, to the present Turnpike Road from Sheffield and Chesterfield to Derby, at or near a Place called Openwood Gate, and from Belpar Bridge to Ripley in the County of Derby." "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of an Act made in the Fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty for repairing and widening the Road from Scott's Dyke in the County of Dumsries, by or through the Villages of Langholm and Hawick to Haremoss in the County of Roxburgh." An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of an Act made in the Fourth Year of His present Majesty's Reign, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair several Roads leading from the Town of Cardiff, and several other Towns and Places in the County of Glamorgan;" and for making, altering, repairing, and widening certain other Roads within the said County." "An Act to enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act passed in the Fourth Year of His present Majesty's Reign, for repairing and widening the Roads from the High Bridge in Spalding to a certain Place called Tydd Goat in the County of Lincoln, and from Sutton Saint Mary's to Sutton Wash in the said County." "An Act for amending and keeping in Repair the Road from Whitechapel Church, in the County of Middlesex to Shenfield, and the furthermost Part of the Parish of Woodford towards Epping, and from the Causeway in the Parish of Low Layton to the End of the said Parish of Woodford next Chigwell, and through the Parishes of Chigwell and Lambourn in the County of Essex, and for lighting and watching the said Road from Whitechapel Church to the Four Mile Stones in the Rumford and Woodford Roads." "An Act for exchanging Part of the settled Estate of Heneage Earl of Aylesford in the County of Kent, for another Estate of greater Value in the same County to be settled in Lieu thereof." "An Act for vesting a Cottage or Tenement used as and for a School House, and other Hereditaments in or near the Town of Milton, in the County of Dorset, in Joseph Lord Milton and his Heirs, in Lieu of or in Compensation for a Messuage or Tenement and Garden situate and being in the Town of Blandford Forum of greater Value." "An Act for vesting Part of the settled Estates and such of the Estates of the Right Honourable Sir John Shelley Baronet, deceased, which upon his Death descended to his Son Sir John Shelley Baronet, an Instant, as his Heir at Law, in Trustees, for the Purposes within mentioned." "An Act for better regulating the Charity of John Shaftoe of Nether Warden in the County of Northumberland, Clerk, deceased." "An Act for vesting certain detached Parts of the settled Estates of Henry Hippesley Coxe Esquire, in Somersetshire, in Trustees, to be sold, and for laying out the Purchase-Money in other Estates to be settled to the same Uses; and for enabling the Tenants for Life to grant as well Leases of the Coal Mines as other Leases." "An Act for vesting Part of the settled Estates of John Cotes Esquire, in the Counties of Montgomery, Salop, and Stafford, in Trustees, to be sold for raising Money for Payment of Debts and Incumbrances affecting the same Estates, and for other Purposes therein mentioned." "An Act to effectuate a Partition of the Estates of Job Hanmer Esquire, the Reverend Erasmus Warren, Clerk, and Sir Thomas Charles Bunbury Baronet, in the Counties of Suffolk and Essex." "An Act for vesting Part of the Estates of John Topp Esquire deceased, in the Counties of Salop and Montgomery, in Trustees to be sold for Payment of his Debts and Legacies, and the Costs of Suit, pursuant to the Directions of the Court of Chancery, and for discharging Part of the Estates so vested, from a perpetual Yearly Rent Charge, and for subjecting Part of the said John Topp's devised Estates, to the Payment thereof." "An Act for empowering the Judges of the Court of Session in Scotland, to sell such Parts of the Estates of Barnbarroch and Sheuchan, lying in the County of Wigton and Stewartry of Kircudbright, belonging to Robert Agnew Esquire, as shall be sufficient for Payment of the Debts affecting either of those Estates, and for vesting the Remainder in Feetail to the same Heirs, and under the same Limitations, as are mentioned in the Deed of Entail thereof, bearing Date the Twenty-ninth Day of December, One Thousand seven hundred and fifty-seven." An Act for vesting the Estate of Drummodie and others, lying in the County of Wigton, in Sir William Maxwell of Munrieth Baronet in Fee-tail, and for vesting in the said Sir William Maxwell, his Heirs and Assigns in Fee-simple, the Estate of Little Killantrae and others lying in the same County, in Lieu thereof." An Act for vesting the undivided Moiety of the Freehold and Copyhold Estates of William Clarke Esquire deceased, devised by his Will for the Benefit of his Daughter Mary Forbes and her Issue, in Trustees for the Purposes within mentioned." "An Act to enable the Honourable Wilbraham Tollemache, and the several other Persons therein mentioned, to grant Building Leases of certain Parts of Lands, and Hereditaments in the County Palatine of Chester (devised by the Will of the Right Honourable Lionel late Earl of Dysart), upon the Terms and Restrictions therein mentioned." "An Act for vesting Part of the settled Estates of James Walwyn Esquire, in the County of Hereford, in the said James Walwyn in Feesimple; and for settling other Estates of the said James Walwyn, in the said County of greater Value in Lieu thereof." "An Act for Sale of a sufficient Part of the Estates of Hugh Parnell a Lunatic, for Payment of his Debts and Incumbrances, under the Direction of the Court of Chancery." "An Act for dividing, and enclosing the Commons, Waste Grounds, and Moss, within the Hamlet or Township of Forton, in the County of Lancaster" "An Act for dividing, and enclosing certain Open Common Fields, Meadows, Pastures, Ings, and other Commonable Lands and Waste Grounds, within the Parish of Donnington upon Baine, in the County of Lincoln." "An Act for dividing, allotting, and enclosing, the Open and Common Fields, Common Crofts, and Common Meadows, and for draining and improving certain Common Moors, within the Parish of Wimborne Minster, in the County of Dorset." "An Act for dividing, enclosing, and improving certain Lands, Grounds, Carrs, and Common Pastures in Woodmansey, Thearne, Weal, and Skidby, all in the Parishes of Saint John in Beverley, and of Skidby in the East Riding of the County of York." "An Act for dividing, and enclosing, an Open Waste or Common, in the Parish of Sidlesham, in the County of Suffex." "An Act for dividing, and enclosing a certain Open Tract of Land, called Rothwell Haigh, within Rothwell, in the West Riding of the County of York." "An Act for naturalizing William Henry Collignon." "An Act for naturalizing Barnard Levi." And albeit the said Acts by you Our said Subjects the Lords and Commons in this Our present Parliament assembled, are fully agreed and consented unto, yet nevertheless the same are not of Force and Effect in the Law without Our Royal Assent given and put to the said Acts; and forasmuch as for divers Causes and Considerations, We cannot conveniently at this Time be present in Our Royal Person, in the Higher House of Our said Parliament, being the Place accustomed to give Our Royal Assent to such Acts as have been agreed upon by you Our said Subjects the Lords and Commons, We have therefore caused these Our Letters Patent to be made, and have signed the same, and by the same do give and put Our Royal Assent to the said Acts, and to all Articles, Clauses, and Provisions therein contained, and have fully agreed and assented to the said Acts; Willing, that the said Acts, and every Article, Clause, Sentence, and Provision therein contained, from henceforth shall be of the same Strength, Force, and Effect, as if We had been personally present in the said Higher House, and had openly and publickly, in the Presence of you all, assented to the same: And We do by these Presents declare and notify the same Our Royal Assent, as well to you the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and Commons aforesaid, as to all others whom it may concern; Commanding also, by these Presents, Our right trusty and well-beloved Counsellor, Edward Lord Thurlow, Our Chancellor of Great Britain, to seal these Our Letters Patent with Our Great Seal of Great Britain; and also commanding Our most dear Son and Our faithful Counsellor George Prince of Wales; the most Reverend Father in God, Our right trusty and well-bebeloved Counsellor John Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate and Metropolitan of all England; Our said Chancellor of Great Britain; Our right trusty and well-beloved Counsellor Charles Lord Camden, President of Our Council; Our right trusty and right well-beloved Cousin and Counsellor Granville Earl Gower, Keeper of Our Privy Seal; Our right trusty and right entirely beloved Cousins and Counsellors James Duke of Chandos, Steward of Our Household; Charles Duke of Richmond; George Duke of Montagu, Master of Our Horse; Our right trusty and right well-beloved Cousins and Counsellors James Earl of Salisbury, Chamberlain of Our Household; William Earl of Mansfield, Our Chief Justice assigned to hold Pleas before Us; Our right trusty and well-beloved Cousins and Counsellors Thomas Viscount Weymouth, Groom of Our Stole; Richard Viscount Howe, First Commissioner of Our Admiralty; and Our right trusty and well-beloved Counsellors Francis Lord Osborne, one of Our principal Secretaries of State; and Thomas Lord Sydney, one other of Our principal Secretaries of State; or any Three or more of them, to declare and notify this Our Royal Assent, in Our Absence in the said Higher House, in the Presence of you the said Lords and the Commons of Our Parliament, there to be assembled for that Purpose; and the Clerk of Our Parliaments to endorse the said Acts with such Terms and Words in Our Name as is requisite and hath been accustomed for the same, and also to enroll these Our Letters Patent and the said Acts in the Parliament Roll; and these Our Letters Patent shall be to every of them a sufficient Warrant in that Behalf: And finally, We do declare and will, that after this Our Royal Assent given and passed by these Presents, and declared and notified as is aforesaid, then and immediately the said Acts shall be taken, accepted, and admitted good, sufficient, and perfect Acts of Parliament, and Laws, to all Intents, Constructions, and Purposes, and to be put in due Execution accordingly; the Continuance or Dissolution of this Our Parliament, or any other Use, Custom, Thing or Things to the contrary thereof notwithstanding. In Witness whereof, We have caused these Our Letters to be made Patent.

Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Thirteenth Day of June, in the Twenty-fifth Year of Our Reign.

By the King Himself, signed with His own Hand.

"Yorke."

Then the Lord Chancellor said,

In obedience to His Majesty's Commands, and by virtue of the Commission which has been now read, We do declare and notify to you the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons in Parliament assembled, That His Majesty hath given His Royal Assent to the several Acts in the Commission mentioned, and the Clerks are required to pass the same in the usual Form and Words."

Then the Clerk Assistant having received the Money Bills from the Hands of the Speaker, brought them to the Table, where the Deputy Clerk of the Crown read the Titles of those, and the other Bills, to be passed, severally, as follow; (videlicet)

1. "An Act for raising a further Sum of Money by Exchequer Bills, for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and eighty-five."

2. "An Act for granting Annuities to satisfy certain Navy Victualling and Transport Bills, and Ordnance Debentures."

3. "An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Duties on Shops within Great Britain."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant in these Words; (videlicet)

"Le Roy remercie ses bons Sujets, accepte leur Benevolence, et ainsi le voult."

4. "An Act for better regulating the Office of the Treasurer of His Majesty's Navy."

5. "An Act for the more easy and effectual Sale of Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments, of Crown Debtors or of their Sureties."

6. "An Act to explain, amend, and render more effectual, an Act passed in the Twenty-third Year of His present Majesty's Reign, intituled, "An Act for authorizing the Treasurer of the Navy, to pay to the Garrison and Naval Department at Gibraltar, the like Bounty for destroying certain Spanish Ships of War, as is allowed to the Officers and Men on board any of His Majesty's Ships of War, taking or destroying Ships of War belonging to the Enemy."

7. "An Act for more effectually preventing Frauds and Abuses, committed by Persons employed in the Manufactures of combing Wool, Worsted Yarn, and Goods made from Worsted, in the Counties of Bedford, Huntingdon, Northampton, Leicester, Rutland, and Lincoln, and the Isle of Ely."

8. "An Act for vesting in Archibald Earl of Dundonald, his Executors, Administrators, and Assigns, the sole Use and Property of a Method of extracting or making Tar, Pitch, Essential Oils, Volatile Alkali, Mineral Acids, Salts, and Cinders, from Pit Coal throughout His Majesty's Dominions, for a limited Time."

9. "An Act for vesting in Edward Bancrost Doctor in Physic, his Executors, Administrators, and Assigns, the sole Property of his Invention or Discovery of the Use and Application of certain Vegetables, for dyeing, staining, printing, and painting, certain valuable Colours, throughout that Part of His Majesty's Kingdom of Great Britain called England, the Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick-uponTweed, for a limited Time."

10. "An Act for draining, preserving, and improving, certain Low Grounds and Carrs in the several Parishes of Saint John in Beverley, and of Skidby in the East Riding of the County of York."

11. "An Act to enable the Company of Proprietors of the Navigation from the Trent to the Mersey, and the Company of Proprietors of the Navigation from Birmingham to Fazeley, to make a Navigable Canal from the said Trent and Mersey Navigation on Fradley Heath, in the County of Stafford, to Fazeley in the said County; and for confirming certain Articles of Agreement entered into between the said Trent and Mersey, the Oxford and the Coventry Canal Navigation Companies."

12. "An Act to repeal Part of an Act passed in the Sixth Year of His present Majesty, for the Relief and Employment of the Poor of the Parish of Richmond, in the County of Surrey, and other Purposes in the said Act mentioned, and for making new Provisions for the Relief and Employment of the Poor, for the Repairs of the Highways, the paving, cleansing, lighting, and watching, the Streets and other Places in the Town and Parish of Richmond aforesaid, for the Removal and Prevention of Annoyances, Obstructions, and Encroachments therein, for enclosing certain Commons or Waste Land, within the said Parish, for the Use of the Poor; and to enable the Vestrymen of the said Parish to erect a Workhouse thereon, and to purchase Land for a Burial Ground, and also to enable His Majesty to shut up a Lane within the said Parish called Love Lane."

13. "An Act for repairing, new pewing, seating, and erecting Galleries, and making other Alterations and Additions in and to the Parish Church of Kidderminster, in the County of Worcester."

14. "An Act for rebuilding the Bridge across the River of Ayr, at the Town of Ayr."

15. "An Act for the better preserving and maintaining the Piers and Harbour of Cromarty in North Britain."

16. "An Act for paving the Footways in the Borough of Reading, in the County of Berks, for better repairing, cleansing, lighting, and watching, the Streets, Lanes, Passages, and Places, in the said Borough, and for removing Encroachments, Obstructions, and Annoyances therefrom, and preventing the like for the future."

17. "An Act for taking down the Market House in the Borough of Bridport, in the County of Dorset, and rebuilding the same, together with a Session or Court House in a more convenient Situation, for removing the Shambles or Butcher Row, for better paving, cleansing, lighting, and watching the said Borough, for removing and preventing Nuisances and Annoyances, and for prohibiting the covering of any new Houses or Buildings within the said Borough with Thatch."

18. "An Act for better watching, lighting, and cleansing, such Parts of the Precinct of Saint Catharine near the Tower of London, in the County of Middlesex, as are not included in the Provisions of certain Acts, passed in the Seventh and Ninth Years of His present Majesty's Reign; and for preventing Nuisances and Annoyances therein."

19. "An Act for continuing the Term and altering and enlarging the Powers of an Act of the Fourth Year of His present Majesty, for repairing and widening several Roads leading from the Town of Bideford in the County of Devon."

20. "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of an Act made in the Fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act for widening and repairing the Road leading from Ashborne in the County of Derby, over Belpar Bridge to the present Turnpike Road from Sheffield and Chesterfield to Derby, at or near a Place called Openwood Gate, and from Belpar Bridge to Ripley in the County of Derby."

21. "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of an Act made in the Fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for repairing and widening the Road from Scott's Dyke in the County of Dumfries, by or through the Villages of Langholm and Hawick to Haremoss in the County of Roxburgh."

22. "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of an Act made in the Fourth Year of His present Majesty's Reign, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair several Roads leading from the Town of Cardiff, and several other Towns and Places in the County of Glamorgan;" and for making, altering, repairing, and widening certain other Roads within the said County."

23. "An Act to enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act passed in the Fourth Year of His present Majes ty's Reign, for repairing and widening the Roads from the High Bridge in Spalding to a certain Place called Tydd Goat in the County of Lincoln, and from Sutton Saint Mary's to Sutton Wash in the said County."

24. "An Act for amending and keeping in Repair the Road from Whitechapel Church in the County of Middlesex, to Shenfield and the furthermost Part of the Parish of Woodford towards Epping, and from the Causeway in the Parish of Low Layton to the End of the said Parish of Woodford next Chigwell, and through the Parishes of Chigwell and Lambourn in the County of Essex, and for lighting and watching the said Road from Whitechapel Church to the Four Mile Stones in the Rumford and Woodford Roads."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant in these Words; (videlicet)

"Le Roy le veult."

25. "An Act for exchanging Part of the settled Estate of Heneage Earl of Aylesford, in the County of Kent, for another Estate of greater Value in the same County, to be settled in Lieu thereof."

26. "An Act for vesting a Cottage or Tenement used as and for a School House, and other Hereditaments, in or near the Town of Milton in the County of Dorset in Joseph Lord Milton and his Heirs, in Lieu of or in Compensation for a Messuage or Tenement and Garden, situate and being in the Town of Blandford Forum, of greater Value."

27. "An Act for vesting Part of the settled Estates, and such of the Estates of the Right Honourable Sir John Shelley Baronet, deceased, which upon his Death descended to his Son, Sir John Shelley Baronet, an Infant, as his Heir at Law, in Trustees for the Purposes within mentioned."

28. "An Act for better regulating the Charity of John Shaftoe of Nether Warden in the County of Northumberland Clerk, deceased."

29. "An Act for vesting certain detached Parts of the settled Estates of Henry Hippisley Coxe Esquire, in Somersetshire, in Trustees to be sold, and for laying out the Purchase-Money in other Estates to be settled to the same Uses, and for enabling the Tenants for Life to grant as well Leases of the Coal Mines as other Leases."

30. "An Act for vesting Part of the settled Estates of John Cotes Esquire, in the Counties of Montgomery, Salop, and Stafford, in Trustees, to be sold for raising Money for Payment of Debts and Incumbrances affecting the same Estates, and for other Purposes therein mentioned."

31. "An Act to effectuate a Partition of the Estates of Job Hanmer Esquire, the Reverend Erasmus Warren Clerk, and Sir Thomas Charles Bunbury Baronet, in the Counties of Suffolk and Essex."

32. "An Act for vesting Part of the Estates of John Topp Esquire, deceased, in the Counties of Salop and Montgomery, in Trustees, to be sold for Payment of his Debts and Legacies and the Costs of Suit, pursuant to the Directions of the Court of Chancery, and for discharging Part of the Estates so vested from a perpetual Yearly Rent Charge, and for subjecting Part of the said John Topp's devised Estates to the Payment thereof."

33. "An Act for empowering the Judges of the Court of Session in Scotland to sell such Parts of the Estates of Barnbarroch and Sheuchan, lying in the County of Wigton and Stewartry of Kirkcudbright, belonging to Robert Agnew Esquire, as shall be sufficient for Payment of the Debts affecting either of those Estates, and for vesting the Remainder in Feetail to the same Heirs and under the same Limitations as are mentioned in the Deed of Entail thereof, bearing Date the Twenty-ninth Day of December One thousand seven hundred and fifty-seven."

34. "An Act for vesting the Estate of Drummodie and others, lying in the County of Wigton, in Sir William Maxwell of Munrieth Baronet, in Fee-tail, and for vesting in the said Sir William Maxwell, his Heirs and Assigns, in Fee-simple, the Estate of Little Killantrae and others, lying in the same County, in Lieu thereof."

35. "An Act for vesting the undivided Moiety of the Freehold and Copyhold Estates of William Clarke Esquire, deceased, devised by his Will for the Benefit of his Daughter Mary Forbes and her Issue, in Trustees, for the Purposes within mentioned."

36. "An Act to enable the Honourable Wilbraham Tollemache and the several other Persons therein mentioned, to grant Building Leases of certain Parts of Lands and Hereditaments in the County Palatine of Chester, devised by the Will of the Right Honourable Lionel late Earl of Dysart, upon the Terms and Restrictions therein mentioned."

37. "An Act for vesting Part of the settled Estates of James Walwyn Esquire, in the County of Hereford, in the said James Walwyn in Fee-simple, and for settling other Estates of the said James Walwyn, in the said County, of greater Value, in Lieu thereof."

38. "An Act for Sale of a sufficient Part of the Estates of Hugh Parnell, a Lunatic, for Payment of his Debts and Incumbrances, under the Direction of the Court of Chancery."

39. "An Act for dividing and enclosing the Commons, Waste Grounds, and Moss, within the Hamlet or Township of Forton, in the County of Lancaster."

40. "An Act for dividing and enclosing certain Open Common Fields, Meadows, Pastures, Ings, and other Commonable Lands and Waste Grounds within the Parish of Donnington-upon-Baine in the County of Lincoln."

41. "An Act for dividing, allotting and enclosing the Open and Common Fields, Common Crofts, and Common Meadows, and for draining and improving certain Common Moors within the Parish of Wimborne Minster in the County of Dorset."

42. "An Act for dividing, enclosing and improving certain Lands, Grounds, Carrs, and Common Pastures in Woodmansey, Thearne, Weal, and Skidby, all in the Parishes of Saint John in Beverley and of Skidby in the East Riding of the County of York."

43. "An Act for dividing and enclosing an Open Waste or Common in the Parish of Sidlesham in the County of Sussex."

44. "An Act for dividing and enclosing a certain Open Tract of Land called Rothwell Haigh, within Rothwell, in the West Riding of the County of York."

45. "An Act for naturalizing William Henry Collignon."

46. "An Act for naturalizing Barnard Levi."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant in these Words; (videlicet)

"Soit fait comme il est desiré."

Then the Commons withdrew.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Romsey Roads Bill.

The Lord Scarsdale reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of an Act made in the Fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for repairing and widening the Roads from the End of Stanbridge Lane near a Barn in the Parish of Romsey, to the Turnpike Road at Middle Wallop, and from the Turnpike Road between Stanbridge Lane aforesaid and Great Bridge to the Turnpike Road at Stockbridge, and from the Garden of Henry Hattat at Awbridge to the Garden Wall of Denys Rolle Esquire, at East Tuderley, and from Lockerley Mill Stream to East Dean Gate, and from the said Garden Wall to the Turnpike Road leading from Stockbridge aforesaid in the County of Southampton to Salisbury," was committed: "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Schrieber to take the Name of Lateward, Bill.

The Lord Scarsdale made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable John Schrieber Esquire, and the Heirs of his Body, to take and use the Surname and Arms of Lateward," was committed.

Ordered, That the said Bill be engrossed.

Debtors Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to be put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for preventing unnecessary Imprisonment of Debtors on mesne Process, and for the more effectual Recovery of Debts by obliging Debtors to make a Discovery of, and deliver up their Estates and Effects for the Benefit of their Creditors, and for the Relief of insolvent, and Punishment of fraudulent Debtors;" and for the Lords to be summoned:

Ordered, That the said Order be discharged.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Friday next; and the Lords summoned.

Ireland, several Petitions against the Resolutions respecting, referred to Committee.

A Petition of the Tanners, Curriers, Manufacturers of and Dealers in tanned Leather of the City of Bristol and Parts adjacent, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, was presented and read, setting forth, "That the Petitioners have observed, with great Alarm and Apprehension, that certain Propositions for a commercial Treaty with Ireland are now depending in this Right Honourable House, by which, the Petitioners conceive, if passed into a Law, their Trade and Manufacture will be very materially injured, if not entirely ruined; that the Petitioners cannot believe that the Wisdom and Justice of this House will give Effect to Measures tending to destroy the legislative Support which has long been given to their Trade and Manufacture, to enable them to stand in Competition with the Traders and Manufacturers in the same Branches in Ireland, and leave the natural Advantages possessed by the rivalled Kingdom to operate without Controul, to the great Detriment and probable Ruin of the British Trade and Manufacture; the Petitioners therefore humbly hope to be allowed to lay before this House the Nature of their Case, and the particular Hardships threatened to them and their Interest by the Propositions in their present State; and that they may be heard by themselves or Counsel against the same; and that they may receive such Protection and Relief as to this House shall seem meet."

Moved, "That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon."

Ordered, "That the said Petition be referred to the said Committee, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon.

A Petition of the Manufacturers of Shoes and of tanned and wrought Leather in the Town of Stafford and Neighbourhood, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, and of their Factor in London, was presented and read, setting forth, "That the Propositions now depending in Parliament for regulating and establishing a commercial Intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland, have excited in the Petitioners' Minds well grounded Fears and Apprehensions that the Manufacturers of Shoes, and of tanned and wrought Leather, must be eventually ruined, should the Resolutions be carried into Effect; that the British Legislature hath heretofore considered the tanned and wrought Leather Manufacturers of so great Importance that the Importation of them from other Countries hath been either totally prohibited or permitted only under such Duties as were a virtual Prohibition; that if these Prohibitions are removed with Regard to the Irish Manufacturers of Leather, the Petitioners, labouring under a very heavy Burthen of Taxes from which their Sister Kingdom is free, have not the smallest Hope left of being able to maintain themselves and Families in this Country in Opposition to so formidable a Rival;" and therefore praying, "To be heard by their Evidence against those Propositions passing into a Law."

Moved, "That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by their Evidence thereupon."

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the said Committee, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by their Evidence thereupon.

Upon reading the Petition of the Commercial Committee, and other Merchants and Manufacturers of the Town of Birmingham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, setting forth, "That the Petitioners are informed there are under their Lordships' Consideration certain Resolutions of the House of Commons of this Kingdom relative to a lasting Treaty of Commerce between Great Britain and Ireland: that the Petitioners humbly conceive that if a Compact should be made upon the Terms set forth in those Resolutions, it would prove highly detrimental to the Trade and Manufactures of Great Britain in general, and of this Town and Neighbourhood in particular; that some of the Revenue Laws act as a great Bounty to cause Manufacturers to remove from Great Britain to Ireland, and have already had that Effect in the Glass Trade, and the Petitioners humbly represent that unless material Alterations are speedily adopted, many People who manufacture other Articles for Exportation to foreign Countries, will probably emigrate from this Neighbourhood; that the Petitioners apprehend that the Duties on all Articles used in Manufactures, when imported from foreign States into Great Britain and into Ireland, should be precisely the same; and that in particular, as the Duty upon Bar Iron imported into this Kingdom cannot be reduced without great Injury to the making of it at Home, which it is very much to the Interest of this Country to encourage, the Duty on that Article, when imported into Ireland, should be equal to the Duties paid upon it in this Kingdom; that the Petitioners have long hoped for a favourable Opportunity to entreat His Majesty's Ministers to take the State of the Hardware Trade into Consideration as an Object of National Importance; and it is therefore with great Concern they observe that it is proposed as an unalterable Condition, that the Importation of Articles from foreign Countries should be regulated on such Terms as shall effectually favour the Importation of Linen from Ireland, although the same may be bought much cheaper from other Countries, and may not only be bartered for by the Labour of our People, but may also occasion other Commercial Advantages to this Kingdom; that from the Observations the Petitioners have made as Merchants and Manufacturers, they have Reason to believe it is impossible for human Prudence to foresee or obviate the many important and perplexing Circumstances which may arise in Consequence of any unalterable Regulations that can be settled for Commercial Contingencies, and they humbly apprehend that the only Expedient which can firmly and lastingly unite the Interest of the Two Kingdoms in Commercial Matters, is a complete Union of the Two States; that the Petitioners humbly represent, that if these Propositions should pass into a Law contrary to the general Sentiments of the manufacturing Part of the Nation, and of those who from experimental Knowledge of Trade are most likely to foresee the Effects they are afraid the Consequence will be injurious to our Commerce and fatal to our Internal Peace;" and therefore praying, "That their Lordships will defer a final Determination on this most important Subject until the next Session of Parliament, or until the pro bable and possible Effects may be better understood, and the Dangers to which our Manufactures, Commerce, and Tranquillity are exposed, may be more effectually-guarded against:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Upon reading the Petition of the principal Merchants, Traders, and Manufacturers of the Town of Woolverhampton, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, That the Inhabitants of this Town and very populous Neighbourhood are chiefly employed in manufacturing Iron Wares: That whilst the Commercial Arrangements between Great Britain and Ireland were pending in the Honourable House of Commons, they humbly represented to that House the Hardships their Trade would labour under, unless more equal Duties were imposed in both Kingdoms on the Importation of Bar Iron, the Duties in this Kingdom being £2. 16s. 14/26 d per Ton, and in Ireland between Nine and Ten Shillings per Ton only, English Money: That they also humbly represented further, That in the Year One thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight, Liberty was given to export Iron Wares to America, provided a Duty of £3. 3s. 11d. per Ton was imposed thereon, as an Equivalent for the Difference in the Duties then paid in Britain and in Ireland upon the Importation of Bar Iron, and that since that Time a farther Duty of Seven Shillings and Sevenpence per Ton has been laid on Bar Iron in Great Britain, so that the true Equalization Duty should now be £3. 16s. 3d. per Ton; yet, by America having since that Time become independent, Ireland may now export Iron Wares free of Duty to that Country, which has been long our principal Mart for them: That their humble Petitions not having procured them that Redress which they thought they were entitled to in the Arrangement of a Compact in which Equalization was the Object proposed, they now think it their indispensible Duty most humbly and most earnestly to pray for the Protection of this Right Honourable House, that they may be heard by their Evidence or Counsel at the Bar of the House in support of their Claims upon its Justice: They beg Leave most humbly to represent to their Lordships, that the Dangers they apprehend are great and numerous to the Trade of this Kingdom, from the Resolutions of the House of Commons in their present Form; and that a Treaty so perfectly new as the present requires the most cool and dispassionate Deliberation, more especially as by the Nature of the Compact the Conditions may not be alterable; on these Accounts they humbly conceive that more Time is necessary to be taken to investigate its probable Effects before it is finally closed, as those Persons most conversant in Commercial Concerns see most clearly the great Inconveniences that may arise by an unalterable System adopted for the Regulation of Matters in their Nature so liable to Contingencies;" and therefore praying their Lordships, " That a final Decision on this most important Business may be deferred until the next Session of Parliament, or until the full Effects of it may be better understood; or that such Relief may be granted in the Premises as to this Right Honourable House may seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House, appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Ships Insurance Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Harvey and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for regulating Insurances on Ships, and on Goods, Merchandizes, or Effects;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Scotch Convicts Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Attorney General and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual Transportation of Felons and other Offenders in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland, and to authorize the Removal of Prisoners in certain Cases;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

D. Northumberland's Exchange Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Lord Arden and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable His Majesty to grant the Inheritance of certain Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments, situate in or near North Scotland Yard, in the County of Middlesex, in Exchange for the Inheritance of certain Buildings or Barracks and Land adjoining thereto; and also of certain Ground contiguous to Tinmouth Castle in the County of Northumberland, belonging to the Duke of Northumberland; or for such further or other Compensation as shall be a full Consideration for the same; and also to empower the said Duke to make such Exchange;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Lambeth Water Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Joseph Mawbey and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for supplying the Inhabitants of the Parish of Lambeth, and Parts adjacent, in the County of Surrey, with Water;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Clapham Lighting Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Joseph Mawbey and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for lighting and watching the Village of Clapham, and certain Roads leading thereto, in the County of Surrey;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Five Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Fosfont Enclosure Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for dividing and allotting the Open and Common Lands and Grounds within the several Parishes of Fosfont, Swallowclift, Ebesborne, Wake, Broadchalk, Bowerchalk, Alvedeston, Bishopston, and Fifield, in the County of Wilts."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Cheltenham Roads Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for amending the Roads from a Place called Piff's Elm, in the Tewkesbury Turnpike Road through Cheltenham to Elston Church and from thence to Coombend Beeches, in the Road from Cirencester to Gloucester, and from the Market House in Cheltenham to the Burford Turnpike Road, at a Place called Pewsdon Ash, and from Cheltenham to the Road from Gloucester to London, at or near a House called Kilkenny, and from the Direction Post in Bembridge Field through Birdlip, to join the Road from Gloucester to Bath, at or near Painswick, and at a House called The Harrow, all in the County of Gloucester."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to the Two preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Pepys and Mr. Thomson:

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Ireland, House in Committee on Resolutions of H. C. respecting.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to resolve itself again into a Committee upon the Resolutions come to by the Commons, relative to an Adjustment of the Commercial Intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland; and for the Lords to be summoned:

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee thereupon.

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Scarsdale reported a further Progress.

Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Irish Commercial Resolutions be adjourned till Tomorrow; and the Lords summoned.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Martis, decimum quartum diem instantis Junii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Martis, 14o Junii 1785.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar.
Archiep. Ebor.
Epus. Bath. & Wells.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Bristol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Ds. Camden, Præses.
Comes Gower, C. P. S.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Grafton.
Dux Portland.
Dux Northumberland.
March. Lansdown.
Comes Derby.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Sandwich.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Morton.
Comes Abercorn.
Comes Dunmore.
Comes Hopetoun.
Comes Effingham.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Nottingham.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Clarendon.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Dudley & Ward.
Viscount Sackville.
Viscount Howe.
Ds. Sydney, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Howard de Walden.
Ds. Say & Sele.
Ds. Elphinstone.
Ds. Chedworth.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Grantham.
Ds. Scarsdale.
Ds. Hawke.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Loughborough.
Ds. Walsingham.
Ds. Rawdon.

PRAYERS.

Arundel Paving Bill.

The Lord Scarsdale reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the better paving, cleansing, and lighting the Streets, Lanes, Ways, and Passages within the Borough of Arundel, in the County of Sussex; and for removing and preventing Encroachments, Obstructions, and Annoyances therein," was committed: "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Schrieber to take the Name of Lateward, Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable John Schrieber Esquire, and the Heirs of his Body, to take and use the Surname and Arms of Lateward."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Pepys and Mr. Thompson:

To carry down the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence thereto.

Romsey Roads Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of an Act, made in the Fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for repairing and widening the Roads from the End of Stanbridge Lane near a Barn in the Parish of Romsey, to the Turnpike Road at Middle Wallop, and from the Turnpike Road between Stanbridge Lane aforesaid and Great Bridge, to the Turnpike Road at Stockbridge, and from the Garden of Henry Hattat at Awbridge to the Garden Wall of Denys Rolle Esquire, at East Tuderley, and from Lockerley Mill Stream to East Dean Gate, and from the said Garden Wall to the Turnpike Road leading from Stockbridge aforesaid, in the County of Southampton, to Salisbury."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers:

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

D. Northumberland's Exchange Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable His Majesty to grant the Inheritance of certain Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments, situate in or near North Scotland Yard, in the County of Middlesex, in Exchange for the Inheritance of certain Buildings or Barracks and Land adjoining thereto, and also of certain Ground contiguous to Tinmouth Castle, in the County of Northumberland, belonging to the Duke of Northumberland, or for such further or other Compensation as shall be a full Consideration for the same, and also to empower the said Duke to make such Exchange."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Monday next.

Cordage Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually preventing Deceits and Frauds in the Manufacturing of Cordage for Shipping; and to prevent the illicit Importation of Foreign made Cordage."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Scotch Convicts Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual Transportation of Felons and other Offenders in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland; and to authorize the Removal of Prisoners in certain Cases."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Ships Insurance Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for regulating Insurances on Ships, and on Goods, Merchandizes, or Effects."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Lambeth Water Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for supplying the Inhabitants of the Parish of Lambeth and Parts adjacent, in the County of Surrey, with Water."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

Ld. President.
Ld. Privy Seal.
D. Richmond.
D. Grafton.
D. Portland.
D. Northumberland.
M. Lansdown.
E. Derby.
E. Westmorland.
E. Sandwich.
E. Carlisle.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Morton.
E. Abercorn.
E. Dunmore.
E. Hopetoun.
E. Effingham.
E. Fitzwilliam.
E. Northington.
E. Radnor.
E. Clarendon.
V. Townshend.
V. Stormont.
V. Dudley & Ward.
V. Sackville.
V. Howe.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Abp. York.
L. Bp. Bath & Wells.
L. Bp. Lincoln.
L. Bp. Bangor.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Sydney.
L. Howard de Walden.
L. Say & Sele.
L. Elphinstone.
L. Chedworth.
L. Sandys.
L. Walpole.
L. Grantham.
L. Scarsdale.
L. Hawke.
L. Brownlow.
L. Harrowby.
L. Loughborough.
L. Walsingham.
L. Rawdon.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Monday next, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Bp. Bangor or Lord Penrhyn's Estate Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Parry and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act for vesting certain Messuages, Lands, and Hereditaments, in the Parish of Llandegay, in the County of Carnarvon, belonging to the Trustees of the Free School of Beaumaris, in the Right Honourable Richard Lord Penrhyn of the Kingdom of Ireland, and his Heirs, upon certain Terms and Conditions therein mentioned;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Imhoff's Naturalization Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Major Scott and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act for naturalizing Charles Imhoff;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Ireland, several Petitions against Resolutions respecting, referred to Committee.

Upon reading the Petition of the Tanners in Kendal, in the County of Westmorland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, setting forth, "That from the local Situation of the Petitioners in a barren Country, little adapted to grazing, and where the Slaughter is very inconsiderable, the Petitioners are obliged to import the greatest Part of the Raw Hides and Skins for their Manufacture from Ireland: That the incidental Expences of buying and curing the same in Ireland for Exportation, with the Freight and Land Carriage from the nearest British Port to Kendal, amount to upwards of Ten per Cent. on the Value, exclusive of the Export Duties which the Petitioners pay thereon, and which altogether give an Advantage to the Irish Tanner of at least Fifteen per Cent. in the Price of the Raw Material alone: That so far from this Advantage being counterbalanced by any high Price paid in Ireland, for the Bark imported from this Country, the Petitioners beg Leave to state to this Right Honourable House what they well know to be true, that the best British Bark is sold in Dublin and other Ports in Ireland, on a fair Average at more than Ten per Cent. less Price than what is actually paid by the Petitioners for the Bark used by them in their Manufacture, owing to the heavy Land Carriage of such Part thereof, (which is inconsiderable,) as they are able to procure in the County of Westmorland or the adjoining Counties, and the very expensive Freight and Carriage of such Part as they import from Chester, Wales, and other Parts of this Kingdom, the Petitioners being obliged to hire Vessels for that Purpose, which not being able to procure any Cargoes or Lading back, are obliged to return in Ballast, and that on this Account, such Freight and Carriage amount to much more than the Freight would amount to from the same Places to Dublin, or other Ports in Ireland, where the Vessels would have a Certainty of procuring with Ease, Cargoes back to England: That the Tanning Manufacture hath been immemorially carried on at Kendal, and for more than a Century past to about the same Extent as at present, and that the annual Duties paid thereon by the Petitioners, exceed Two thousand Pounds: That the Petitioners' Trade hath always been principally carried on and supported by the Demand for their Manufactures, to be wrought up for Exportation to the West India, and other Foreign Markets, but that such Demand hath greatly diminished, the Petitioners' Trade been in a declining State, and the Price of Tanned Leather falling for the last four Years, owing, as the Petitioners are convinced, to the Exportation of Tanned Leather from Ireland, which has been gradually and rapidly increasing during that Period, and must continue increasing to the utter Annihilation of the Tanning Manufactures of this Kingdom, if not timely remedied by the Interposition of Parliament; for if the manifest Advantages already stated should not be thought more than sufficient for the Purpose, the Duties payable by the Petitioners, and of which no Drawback on the Exportation is allowed, save a Drawback of a Penny Halfpenny per Pound on some Species of Wrought Leather, and which is in fact little more than One Third of the Duty before paid by the Petitioners on the same Article, the Duty paid by the Petitioners being paid on the Weight of the whole Hide or Skin when tanned, and before dressing, currying, or being cut up, and the Drawback allowed for no more than the Weight of the Article when wrought and finished therefrom, whilst the Irish Manufacture is subject to no Duty whatever, save a trifling Export Duty, and the Difference in Price of Labour, which is confessedly not less than Twenty per Cent. in favour of the latter, effectually cut off from the Petitioners as well as the whole Body of British Tanners, all Hopes of supporting a Competition with the Irish Manufacturers: That the Petitioners have hitherto forbore to complain of the great Disadvantages under which they labour in the confidence that Parliament would in a short Time fee the Necessity of interposing in their Behalf, and give a Check to the Exportation of Bark, or adopt such other Measures as the Wisdom of Parliament should deem best calculated to put the Petitioners on an equal Footing with the Irish Manufacturers; but when instead thereof they find themselves, by the Resolutions which have been introduced into this Right Honourable House for the Adjustment of the Commercial Intercourse between this Kingdom and Ireland, threatened with the Ruin of all those Hopes, and the utter Preclusion for ever of every possible Assistance and Support, should the Power of giving a Check to the Exportation of Bark be given up, and the Admission of Irish Tanned Leather let into the British Market, with a Power to Ireland to exclude the British Manufacturers from the Purchase of Raw Hides and Skins in Ireland, whilst the Parliament of Great Britain are for ever precluded from the Power of affording any Relief to the Manufacturers of this Kingdom, the Petitioners cannot refrain throwing themselves on the Justice of this Right Honourable House, and deprecating the adopting such Measures as strike at once at their Existence as a Manufacturing Body, without leaving them a Possibility of recovering their Trade;" and therefore praying, "The House will be graciously pleased to take the Premises into Consideration, and to afford to the Petitioners such Protection and Relief as to the House shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Manufacturers, and Traders in Wool and Woollen Goods in and near Halifax in the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, setting forth, "That the Petioners, however unwilling to give Trouble respecting the Irish Propositions in general, the Consequences whereof they pretend not to anticipate, being deeply interested in the Woollen Trade of this Kingdom, cannot forbear remarking, that if the Tenth Article of such Propositions pass in its present State, they fear the present Laws (which they hold most valuable) against the Exportation of Wool would be understood to be thereby virtually repealed, and their Fears are somewhat encreased from the Fourteenth Article of the same Propositions;" and therefore praying, That the Prohibition of the Exportation of Wool may not be left to doubtful Interpretation, but may be clearly recognized in the said Propositions, and the valuable Rights and Interests of the Petitioners and of this Country in general, be thereby guarded and secured by explicit, unequivocal Expressions, as being the only Means of preventing the Ruin of the Woollen Manufactures of this Kingdom:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Upon reading the Petition of the Tanners, Curriers, Sadlers, Shoemakers, and Dealers in Tanned Leather in the City of Chester, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, setting forth, "That the Petitioners are fully assured that the manufacturing of Tanned Leather in this Neighbourhood will be most enormously injured by the present Propositions offered for regulating the Commercial Intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland: That the numerous Restrictions which the English Manufacturers of Tanned Leather are said under more than the Irish Manufacturers are liable to, render the Petitioners' Endeavours impossible to cope with the Irish in any Market on equal Terms: That many Disadvantages have been said before the House by other Dealers in this Article, particularly in the Exportation of Tanned Hides and Leather, the former of which are subject to an Excise and Duty of nearly One Penny per Pound Weight on Exportation, whereas the Irish have not any Excise or Duty on the Article, by which Means they have gained the Exportation Trade of Tanned Hides from this Kingdom to the Amount of Forty to Fifty Thousand annually, whereof Twenty Thousand were exported from the Port of Chester only, and of late not One Thousand have been exported within the Year: That preserving a Power of laying a Duty on Bark for Exportation, allowing the Drawback of the whole Excise Duty on Tanned Leather here, or laying an equal Duty in Ireland on Exportation, present the most conducive Expedients to counteract the still more favourable Circumstances of the Irish Manufacturer: That this County furnishes a large Quantity of Oak Bark to the Irish Manufacturer at very little more Expence than to the Inhabitants, and on account of its Vicinity to Ireland the Price is much advanced to the Manufacturers of this Neighbourhood: That the Petitioners pray the Attention of the Right Honourable House to investigate the Premises so as to prevent nearly an Annihilation of the Trade of this heretofore esteemed, staple, and valuable Article of Commerce and Resource in this Kingdom, the Protection of which being the Interest of every Individual, claims the Candour and mature Consideration of the Right Honourable House:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

A Petition of the Manufacturers of Silk, in the Town of Manchester, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, was presented and read, setting forth, "That the Petioners have, within a few Years, established a very considerable Manufacture of Silk Handkerchiefs, Silk and Cotton Handkerchiefs, and Stuffs made of Silk and Cotton, and Silk and Linen mixed, to the great Increase of His Majesty's Revenue, and by which many Thousands of industrious People are now employed in this Town and Neighbourhood: That the Duty on Silk imported from all Foreign Countries into Great Britain, is upon unthrown Four Shillings and Six Pence upon the Pound of Twenty-four Ounces, and in Ireland only One Shilling, and upon thrown Silk is Seven Shillings and Four Pence upon the Pound of Sixteen Ounces, and in Ireland only Two Shillings and One Halfpenny: That from the List of Prices established by the Irish Parliament, and now paid in Ireland, the Petitioners find that the Price of weaving the same Kind of Goods in Ireland is nearly one-fifth less than in Manchester: That many of the Goods manufactured by the Petitioners pay an Excise Duty amounting to about Eight Pounds per Centum on the Value, from which the Irish are totally exempt: That the Petitioners are very apprehensive that so many accumulated Advantages in Favour of the above recited Manufacture in Ireland, must, from the Nature of Things, be very productive of smuggling an Article of such great Value, and so portable on Account of its small Bulk: That for the above Reasons the Provision made in the Twelvth Resolution entered into by the Honourable the Commons of Great Britain, respecting the Irish Commercial Regulations for equalizing the Duty on the Raw Material, by subjecting Irish Manufactures imported into Great Britain to Burdens adequate to those which the Manufacture composed of the like Material is subject to here, appears to the Petitioners to be extremely unsafe and inadequate, and will, they fear, in the Event be greatly detrimental to, if not totally destructive of, the Branch of Business the Petitioners are engaged in: That the Petitioners did in the present Session of Parliament chearfully and readily submit to pay a large additional Duty, over and above the Duties then charged on the Raw Material, which must (in its Nature) increase the Danger of Smuggling from all Countries: That notwithstanding the several Disadvantages and Inconveniences above stated, the Petitioners beg Leave to assure this Right Honourable House that they do not, by thus addressing their Lordships, wish to incommode, or in anywise obstruct the Measures of Government, but only to express their Fears, and at the same Time to declare that they have not any the least Objections to Ireland participating with them in their Business, provided that Silk imported into Great Britain and Ireland be made subject and liable to the same Duties, and that Ireland partake of the Burdens under which this Country labours;" and therefore praying, "The House will take their Interests under its Protection, and grant them Liberty to be heard by themselves or Counsel, and to give them such other Relief as their Lordships in their Wisdom shall seem meet."

Moved, "That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House, appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon."

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the said Committee, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon.

Upon reading the Petition of the Tanners, Curriers, and wholesale Shoemakers of the Town of Northampton, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, That, with great Deference to their Lordships' Wisdom and Judgement, the Petitioners think it a Duty they owe to themselves and Families to apprize their Lordships of the universal Decline of the Leather Manufacture of this Kingdom, and in particular of their respective Trades and Callings, heretofore in a flourishing State, whereby many of their Dependants are deprived of the Means of a Livelihood, and the Revenue of this Country materially injured; the Cause whereof the Petitioners apprehend arises from the superior Advantages Ireland now enjoys; and their Fears are still more considerably increased by the apparent Consequences of the Propositions for settling the Trade between Great Britain and Ireland, now before their Lordships, which, if passed into a Law, are, they conceive, of such a Tendency as must totally ruin this valuable Branch of Trade;" and therefore praying, "That the final Settlement of the above Propositions may be postponed for the present; that sufficient Time be given to devise such Methods as tend to revive and preserve the above Manufactories from Decay and Ruin; and that such further Relief may be given in the Premises, as in their Lordships' Wisdom shall seem most meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

A Petition of several Persons, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, on Behalf of themselves and other Makers and Importers of Bar Iron and Manufacturers of Iron Wares, was presented and read; setting forth, "That the Petitioners are informed that Resolutions for an Adjustment of a Commercial Intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland, are under the Consideration of this Right Honourable House, and apprehending that they will be very injurious to the Iron Trade of this Kingdom in general, and to the Petitioners in particular, if passed into a Law in their present State;" the Petitioners therefore pray, "That this House will grant Leave to the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel against such Parts of the Resolutions as they conceive will immediately affect them, and to afford them such other Relief as to this House shall seem meet."

Moved, "That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon."

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the said Committee, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon.

Upon reading the Petition of the Nail Ironmongers in Dudley, in the County of Worcester, and others concerned in the manufacturing of Iron Wares in and near that Place, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, "That the Petitioners observe by the Votes of the House of Commons, that a Plan for settling a Commercial Intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland has passed that House: That the Petitioners employ many thousand Persons in the making of Nails and other Iron Wares, the greatest Part of which is exported to the United States of America: That the Duty upon Foreign Bar Iron imported into this Kingdom is Two Pounds Sixteen Shillings and One Penny per Ton, and into Ireland Nine Shillings and Two Pence only, English Money; That in the Year 1778 an equalizing Duty of Three Pounds Three Shillings and Eleven Pence, was laid upon all Iron Wares exported from Ireland to our then American Colonies: That by the United States of America having become Independent of Great Britain, the Petitioners now find that the Irish thereby acquire a Liberty of exporting Iron Wares to those States free of the above equalizing Duty: That the Difference of the Duty upon Bar Iron, imported into this Kingdom, and Ireland, being Two Pounds Six Shillings and Eleven Pence, per Ton, and the great Advantages that will arise from removing Workmen to Ireland, and establishing the Iron Manufactures there being now publicly known, the Petitioners have too much Reason to fear, that unless some speedy and effectual Measures are taken to prevent it, a considerable Part of the Iron Trade will be lost to this Country;" and therefore praying their Lordships, "That they will be pleased to take into their Consideration the present Sate of the Iron Trade in this Town and Neighbourhood with respect to Ireland; and that the Iron Trade of Great Britain and that Country may be put upon an Equality, which the Petitioners most humbly conceive can only be done with Effect by equal Duties being laid upon Bar Iron imported into both Kingdoms:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Upon reading the Petition of the Tanners residing in that Part of the Hundred of Lonsdale, North of the Sands in the County of Lancaster, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, "That from the Situation of the Petitioners in a Country no way adapted for grazing, and where the Slaughter is so inconsiderable, that the greater Part of the Petitioners would not think it worth their Attention to pay for a Licence to carry on their Trade, if they had not the Privilege of importing their Raw Hides and Skins for their Manufacture from Ireland; and since the Law passed a few Years ago in favour of Ireland, granting to that Kingdom a free Export of all its Manufactures to any Foreign Market, the Leather Trade in general has greatly declined in this Kingdom, and the Receipt of the Revenue in that Particular, with respect to the Trade of the Petitioners, from that Time much diminished, insomuch that if the Resolutions now depending before Parliament pass into a Law, several of the Petitioners who now pay from One hundred Pounds, to Four hundred or Five hundred Pounds a Year Duty, the Trade will so far decay, that such Dealers would not pay Twenty Pounds a Year to the Revenue, and the lesser Sort of Tradesmen must quit the Business: That the present Charge of buying and curing the Raw Materials in Ireland for Exportation, with the Expences thereof, to and from the nearest British Port to the Petitioners, including the Export Duties, already give an advantage to the Irish Tanner of at least Twenty Pounds per Cent. on that Article: That it is needless for the Petitioners here to state the many other Advantages that would manifestly result to the Irish Tanners, Traders, Dealers and Manufacturers, over the British in all the Branches of the Leather Trade, by the Commercial System proposed and adopted to be passed into a Law between the two Kingdoms, from the several Artificers therein having a more extensive Liberty in exercising their several Occupations in Ireland, and being exempt from any restrictive Laws of Excise under which the British Manufacturer and Trader here are prohibited from doing and using under the most severe Penalties: That the Petitioners most humbly beg Leave to refer to the many other Reasons that will be set forth to this Right Honourable House, by the several Collective Bodies concerned in the said Trade for other particular and many Disadvantages that they will labour under and feel with the Petitioners, from the present unequal System of Commerce proposed by the said Resolutions, as far as regards the Leather Trade and Manufacture, which, after attentively and impartially considering, the Petitioners cannot but observe to be very inadequate;" and therefore praying, "This House will be graciously pleased to postpone the passing of the said Resolutions into a Law this present Session, that they may not be a Hindrance to a more equitable and indissoluble Union with Ireland, in which, as our Political Interests are the same, they may be also united with that Kingdom as one People in Commercial Interests and Legislation:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Manufacturers Petition against said Resolutions:

A Petition of several Manufacturers, Members of the General Chamber of Manufacturers of Great Britain, and others whose Names are thereunto subscribed, was presented and read; setting forth, "That the Petitioners see with Concern an Assertion in the Second of the Irish Resolutions as they now stand, videlicet, "That it is consistent with the essential Interests of the Manufactures, Revenue, Commerce and Navigation of Great Britain, that a full Participation of Commercial Advantages should be permanently secured to Ireland, whenever a Provision equally permanent and secure shall be made by the Parliament of that Kingdom toward defraying, in Proportion to its growing Prosperity, the necessary Expences in Time of Peace, of protecting the Trade and general Interests of the Empire;" which was introduced there whilst the Resolutions were under the Consideration of the House of Commons, but too late for the Petitioners to have an Opportunity of controverting by themselves or Counsel, a Proposition which appears to them not only void of Foundation, but likely to produce the most pernicious Consequences, if believed by the Legislature of this Country; the Petitioners are fully persuaded, on the contrary, that if these Resolutions are adopted, their Property will thereby be in some Instances directly invaded, and in others very much diminished in its Value, and that the manufacturing Interests of this Kingdom in general will receive a deep, if not a deadly Wound, from these Resolutions passing into a Law;" and therefore praying, "That they may be heard by themselves or Counsel against the said Resolutions, as they wish to have the Damages and Inconveniences they are likely to sustain laid before this House in a clearer and more comprehensive Manner than they themselves are on many Accounts able to do; confiding in the Wisdom and Justice of this House, that after their Case has been so stated, their Lordships will thereby be induced to give such Relief in the Premises, as to this House shall seem meet."

Moved, "That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions, and that the Petitioners be at Liberty to be heard by themselves or Counsel before the said Committee."

Which being objected to;

An Amendment was proposed to be made to the said Motion, by leaving out the Words ("that the Petitioners be at Liberty to be heard by themselves or Counsel.")

After long Debate,

The Question was put, "Whether the Words proposed to be left out, shall stand Part of the Motion?"

It was resolved in the Negative.

Referred to Committee:

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the said Committee.

House in Committee on said Resolutions.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to resolve itself again into a Committee upon the Resolutions come to by the Commons, relative to an Adjustment of the Commercial Intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland; and for the Lords to be summoned:

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee thereupon.

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Scarsdale reported a further Progress.

Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Irish Commercial Resolutions, be adjourned till Tomorrow; and the Lords summoned.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Mercurii, decimum quintum diem instantis Junii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Mercurii, 15o Junii 1785.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Ebor.
Epus. Bath. & Wells.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Bristol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Ds. Camden, Præses.
Comes Gower, C. P. S.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Queensberry.
Dux Portland.
Dux Northumberland.
March. Lansdown.
Comes Derby.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Winchelsea & Nottingham.
Comes Sandwich.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Scarborough.
Comes Morton.
Comes Abercorn.
Comes Galloway.
Comes Hopetoun.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Northington.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Clarendon.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Dudley & Ward.
Viscount Mount Edgcumbe & Valletort.
Viscount Sackville.
Ds. Sydney, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Say & Sele.
Ds. Chedworth.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Scarsdale.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Rivers.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Foley.
Ds. Loughborough.
Ds. Walsingham.
Ds. Bagot.
Ds. Rawdon.

PRAYERS.

Dudley Canal Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Foley and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for extending the Dudley Canal to the Brimingham Canal, at or near Tipton Green in the County of Stafford;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Public Accounts Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Rose and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for better examining and auditing the Public Accounts of this Kingdom;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Insolvent Debtors Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Alderman Sawbridge and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors; and for the Relief of Bankrupts in certain Cases;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Courts of Conscience Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons by Mr. Taylor and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for reducing the Time for the Imprisonment of Debtors, committed to Prison upon Prosecutions in Courts of Conscience, in London, Middlesex, and the Borough of Southwark, to the same Periods in each Court; and for abolishing Fees paid by those Debtors to Gaolers or others, on account of such Imprisonment;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Indemnity Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Taylor and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to indemnify such Persons as have omitted to qualify themselves for Offices and Employments, and to indemnify Justices of the Peace or others who have omitted to register or deliver in their Qualifications within the Time limited by Law, and for giving further Time for those Purposes; and to indemnify Members and Officers in Cities, Corporations, and Borough Towns, whose Admissions have been omitted to be stamped according to Law, or having been stamped, have been lost or mislaid, and for allowing them Time to provide Admissions duly stamped; to give further Time to such Persons as have omitted to make and file Affidavits of the Execution of Indentures of Clerks to Attorneys and Solicitors, and for indemnifying Persons who have acted as Trustees of Turnpike Roads in certain Cases, and declaring their Proceedings valid;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Five Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Arundel Paving Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the better paving, cleansing, and lighting the Streets, Lanes, Ways, and Passages within the Borough of Arundel in the County of Sussex, and for removing and preventing Encroachments, Obstructions, and Annoyances therein."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Pepys and Mr. Thomson:

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

Cordage Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually preventing Deceits and Frauds in the manufacturing of Cordage for Shipping; and to prevent the illicit Importation of foreign made Cordage."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Scarsdale reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Scotch Convicts Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual Transportation of Felons and other Offenders in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland; and to authorize the Removal of Prisoners in certain Cases."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Scarsdale reported from the Committee, That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Ships Insurance Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for regulating Insurances on Ships, and on Goods, Merchandizes or Effects."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Scarsdale reported from the Committee, That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Ireland, Petitions against Resolutions respecting, referred to Committee.

A Petition of the Makers, Importers, and Manufacturers of Iron in London, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, was presented and read; setting forth, "That the Petitioners are informed that sundry Resolutions of the Irish Parliament, intended as the Basis of a final and unalterable Treaty of Commerce between Great Britain and Ireland, have passed the Honourable House of Commons, and are now under the Consideration of this Right Honourable House; that notwithstanding the said Resolutions have undergone great Alterations, it appears that the very important Manufactures in which the Petitioners are engaged are in great Danger of being very materially injured, if not totally ruined, should the said Resolutions pass into a Law, which will distress many Thousands of industrious Manufacturers and their Families to whom this valuable Branch gives Employment;" and therefore praying, "That they may be heard by themselves or Counsel against the said Resolutions passing into a Law, or that this Right Honourable House would give them such Relief in the Premises as they in their Wisdom shall think meet."

Moved, "That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish commercial Resolutions, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon."

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the said Committee, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon.

A Petition of the Manufacturers of Earthen Ware in Staffordshire, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, was presented and read; setting forth, "That the Petitioners are materially interested in the commercial Arrangements now forming between Great Britain and Ireland; that notwithstanding the many Alterations which, on a further Investigation, one Branch of the Legislature has found it necessary to make in the Propositions of the Irish Parliament, the Petitioners are apprehensive, upon the most deliberate Consideration, that the Resolutions, as voted by the House of Commons, are still of a very dangerous and alarming Tendency, and if passed into a Law in their present Form, will eventually prove productive of the most injurious Consequences to the general Interests of Great Britain, as well as to those of that Manufactory in which the Petitioners are more immediately engaged;" and therefore praying, "That they may be heard by themselves and their Counsel at the Bar of this Right Honourable House, against the Resolutions of the House of Commons, relative to the Arrangement of a Commercial Intercourse with Ireland, passing into a Law in their present Form."

Moved, "That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon."

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the said Committee, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon.

Upon reading the Petition of the Landholders and Commissioners of Supply of the County of Aberdeen, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, setting forth, "That on the Introduction into the Honourable House of Commons of the Propositions for a Commercial Intercourse with Ireland in their original Form, the Commissioners of Supply of this County, under the deepest Sense of the destructive and dangerous Tendency of these Propositions, did, in the firmest though most respectful Terms, signify to the Public their Sense of that important Measure in a Resolution unanimously adopted at a Meeting called for that special Purpose on the Twelfth of March last: That the Commissioners of Supply being afterwards advised that the only Constitutional Mode of submitting their Grievances on this Occasion to the Consideration of Parliament was by presenting Petitions to both Houses, did accordingly at their Annual General Meeting, on the Thirtieth of April last, resolve on and prepare a Petition to the House of Commons, praying, "That these Propositions might not pass into a Law," which was signed by the Præses in Name, and by Appointment of the Meeting; but the Petition was refused to be received on account of its not being signed by each individual Commissioner: The Petitioners however are happy to see that the general and decided Voice of the Commercial and Manufacturing Interest of Great Britain, confirmed by the Evidence which has been given at the Bar of the House of Commons in Support of the numerous Petitions which were presented from other Counties and Corporations, have induced that House to make such Amendments and Alterations upon the Propositions originally presented, as appear to have a Tendency to correct in some Degree the ruinous Consequences with which they must have been attended both to the Commercial and Landed Interest of these Kingdoms; at the same Time the Propositions as now amended, embrace Objects of so vast Magnitude, so nice Disquisition, and so essential Importance to the Prosperity of the whole Realm, that the Petitioners have not hitherto been able in the short Time that has elapsed since the amended Propositions were made, to form a proper Judgement how far they ought to be adopted; and as the Commercial Treaty to be framed on these Resolutions will be for ever binding on both Kingdoms, so that no Alteration can be made thereon, the Petitioners are humbly hopeful that full Time will be given to the Subjects of both Kingdoms to deliberate on and investigate this important Subject; and therefore that the final Adjustment of this Treaty will be postponed to the next Session of Parliament:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

House in Committee on said Resolutions.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to resolve itself again into a Committee upon the Resolutions come to by the Commons relative to an Adjustment of the Commercial Intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland, and for the Lords to be summoned:

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee thereupon.

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Scarsdale reported a further Progress.

Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Irish Commercial Resolutions be adjourned till Tomorrow; and the Lords summoned.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Jovis, decimum sextum diem instantis Junii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Jovis, 16o Junii 1785.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Bristol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Ds. Camden, Præses.
Comes Gower C. P. S.
Dux Queensberry.
Dux Portland.
March. Lansdown.
Comes Derby.
Comes Huntingdon.
Comes Sandwich.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Scarborough.
Comes Morton.
Comes Abercorn.
Comes Galloway.
Comes Hopetoun.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Northington.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Chatham.
Comes Ailesbury.
Comes Clarendon.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Dudley & Ward.
Viscount Mount Edgcumbe & Valletort.
Viscount Sackville.
Ds. Sydney, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Elphinstone.
Ds. Chedworth.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Scarsdale.
Ds. Hawke.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Foley.
Ds. Loughborough.
Ds. Walsingham.
Ds. Bagot.
Ds. Southampton.
Ds. Rawdon.

PRAYERS.

Cordage Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for effectually preventing Deceits and Frauds in the Manufacturing of Cordage for Shipping; and to prevent the illicit Importation of foreign made Cordage."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Scotch Convicts Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual Transportation of Felons and other Offenders in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland, and to authorize the Removal of Prisoners in certain Cases."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Ships Insurance Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for regulating Insurances on Ships, and on Goods, Merchandizes, or Effects."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to the Three preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Pepys and Mr. Thomson:

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Courts of Conscience Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for reducing the Time for the Imprisonment of Debtors committed to Prison upon Prosecutions in Courts of Conscience in London, Middlesex, and the Borough of Southwark, to the same Periods in each Court; and for abolishing Fees paid by those Debtors to Gaolers or others on Account of such Imprisonment."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Indemnity Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to indemnify such Persons as have omitted to qualify themselves for Offices and Employments, and to indemnify Justices of the Peace or others who have omitted to register or deliver in their Qualifications within the Time limited by Law, and for giving further Time for those Purposes; and to indemnify Members and Officers in Cities, Corporations, and Borough Towns, whose Admissions have been omitted to be stamped according to Law, or having been stamped have been loft or mislaid, and for allowing them Time to provide Admissions duly stamped; to give further Time to such Persons as have omitted to make and file Affidavits of the Execution of Indentures of Clerks to Attornies and Solicitors; and for indemnifying Persons who have acted as Trustees of Turnpike Roads in certain Cases, and declaring their Proceedings valid."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Monday next.

Dudley Canal Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for extending the Dudley Canal to the Birmingham Canal, at or near Tipton Green, in the County of Stafford."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

Ld. President.
Ld. Privy Seal.
D. Queensberry.
D. Portland.
M. Lansdown.
E. Derby.
E. Huntingdon.
E. Sandwich.
E. Carlisle.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Scarborough.
E. Morton.
E. Abercorn.
E. Galloway.
E. Hopetoun.
E. Ferrers.
E. Fitzwilliam.
E. Northington.
E. Radnor.
E. Chatham.
E. Ailesbury.
E. Clarendon.
V. Stormont.
V. Dudley & Ward.
V. Mount Edgcumbe & Valletort.
V. Sackville.
L. Bp. Lincoln.
L. Bp. Bangor.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Sydney.
L. Elphinstone.
L. Chedworth.
L. Sandys.
L. Walpole.
L. Scarsdale.
L. Hawke.
L. Brownlow.
L. Harrowby.
L. Foley.
L. Loughborough.
L. Walsingham.
L. Bagot.
L. Southampton.
L. Rawdon.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet To-morrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Ireland, House in Committee on Resolutions of H. C. respecting:

The Order of the Day being read for the House to resolve itself again into a Committee upon the Resolutions come to by the Commons, relative to an Adjustment of the Commercial Intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland; and for the Lords to be summoned:

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee thereupon.

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Scarsdale reported a further Progress.

Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Irish Commercial Resolutions be adjourned till Tomorrow; and the Lords summoned.

Manufacturers of Small Wares Petition against said Resolutions referred to Committee.

A Petition of the Manufacturers of Small Wares in the Town and Neighbourhood of Manchester, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, was presented and read; setting forth, "That the Petitioners, justly alarmed at the ruinous Consequences that would unavoidably ensue to the Manufacture of Small Wares in this Town and Neighbourhood, if the Irish Propositions were passed into a Law, humbly petitioned the Honourable the Commons of Great Britain, on their Introduction into that Honourable House, that further Time might be granted for the more mature Consideration of the same, as in the Opinion of the Petitioners they would not tend (even in their altered State) to establish that Reciprocity so essentially necessary to the manufacturing Interests and future Prosperity of both Nations: The Petitioners humbly beg Leave to state to this Right Honourable House the manifest Advantages which Ireland will enjoy over England, from her local Situation, the Cheapness of Provisions, the Difference in the Price of Labour, the almost total Exemption from internal Taxation, comparatively with England; that the Raw Materials which constitute the chief Part of the Petitioners' Manufacture are the Produce of Ireland; that for these Raw Materials (videlicet) Linen and Worsted Yarn, the Petitioners pay upon some of them on their Importation into this Kingdom Eighteen per Cent. and upon an Average of the whole not less than Twelve and a Half per Cent. more than the Irish Manufacturer in Freight, Insurance, Commission, and sundry other Charges. The Petitioners humbly hope, when this Right Honourable House considers the very great Advantages which the Irish Manufacturers will enjoy over the English, their Lordships will either reject the whole System as it now stands, or make such Provisions in the same as will effectually secure to both Nations a fair and equitable Treaty, founded upon such Principles as will for ever preclude each Country from every just Cause of Complaint; but such Treaty the Petitioners are of Opinion there is not Time sufficient to establish at this very advanced Period of the Session;" and therefore praying their Lordships, "That they may be heard by themselves, or Counsel, at the Bar of this Right Honourable House, against the said Propositions; and that their Lordships will be pleased to grant them such Relief as this Right Honourable House shall seem meet."

Moved, "That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon."

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the said Committee, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Veneris, decimum septimum diem instantis Junii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Veneris, 17o Junii 1785.

Domini tam Spirituals quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar.
Epus. Bath. & Wells.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Bristol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Ds. Camden, Præses.
Comes Gower, C. P. S.
Dux Portland.
Comes Derby.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Sandwich.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Morton.
Comes Abercorn.
Comes Aberdeen.
Comes Hopetoun.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Effingham.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Cornwallis.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Clarendon.
Viscount Dudley & Ward.
Viscount Sackville.
Ds. Sydney, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Percy.
Ds. Howard de Walden.
Ds. Chedworth.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Scarsdale.
Ds. Hawke.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Loughborough.
Ds. Walsingham.
Ds. Bagot.
Ds. Grantley.

PRAYERS.

Young against Brown and Co:

After hearing Counsel this Day upon the Petition and Appeal of Alexander Young, sometime Linen Draper at Dalquharn; complaining of an Interlocutor of the Lord Ordinary in Scotland of the 24th of February 1785; and also of an Interlocutor of the Lords of Session there of the 5th of March 1785; and praying, "That the same might be reversed, varied, or amended; or that the Appellant might have such other Relief in the Premises as to this House, in their Lordships' great Wisdom, should seem just;" as also upon the Answer of Messieurs Brown and Company, Merchants in Glasgow, put in to the said Appeal, and due Consideration had of what was offered on either Side in this Cause:

Interlocutors affirmed with Costs.

It is Ordered and Adjudged, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Petition and Appeal be and is hereby dismissed this House, and that the said Interlocutors therein complained of be and the same are hereby affirmed: And it is further ordered, That the Appellant do pay or cause to be paid to the said Respondents the Sum of One Hundred Pounds for their Costs, in respect of the said Appeal.

Courts of Conscience Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for reducing the Time for the Imprisonment of Debtors, committed to Prison upon Prosecutions in Courts of Conscience in London, Middlesex, and the Borough of Southwark, to the same Periods in each Court, and for abolishing Fees paid by those Debtors to Gaolers, or others, on account of such Imprisonment."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Scarsdale reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Saram Council House, &c. Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hussey and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for the Removal and rebuilding of the Council Chamber, Guildhall and Gaol of the City of New Sarum; and for ascertaining the Tolls of the Market, and regulating the Chairmen within the said City;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Bristol Church, &c. Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Brickdale and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for rebuilding the Parish Church of Christ Church, otherwise the Holy Trinity, within the City of Bristol, and for widening the Streets adjacent thereto;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Shoreditch Paving Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Mainwaring and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending Two Acts of the Eighth and Sixteenth Years of His present Majesty for opening certain Passages, and for paving the Streets and other Places in the Parish of Saint Leonard Shoreditch, and such Part of Hog Lane as lies within the Liberty of Norton Falgate, in the County of Middlesex; and for preventing Annoyances therein;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Three Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Scudamore and others:

Osborne's Bill.

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable Elizabeth Osborne, William Symonds, Thomas Symonds Powell, and John More Green, their Heirs or Assigns, to convey certain Lands and Hereditaments in the Parish of Clehonger, in the County of Hereford, and which are now subject to the Trusts of the Will of the late John Smith Esquire, in Exchange for other Lands in the same County, of greater Value, to be conveyed to, and held by them, respectively, upon the Trusts of the said Will of the said John Smith;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Aylesbury Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Taylor and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act passed in the Tenth Year of His present Majesty's Reign for amending the Road from Aylesbury, in the County of Buckingham, through Thame and Little Milton, to the Turnpike Road between Bensington and Shillingford in the County of Oxford; and for amending the Road from the Turnpike Road at Thame to the Oxford Turnpike Road between Postcomb and Tetsworth, in the said County of Oxford;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Inglis' Divorce Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Anstruther and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of John Inglis Esquire, with Ann Stewart his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again, and for other Purposes therein mentioned;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Bankrupts Creditors Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Attorney General and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for the Relief of the Creditors of Bankrupts, and for regulating the Time of Issuing Commissions of Bankrupt;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Ordered, That the said Bill be printed.

Dudley Canal Bill.

The Lord Scarsdale reported from the Lords Committees to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for extending the Dudley Canal to the Birmingham Canal, at or near Tipton Green, in the County of Stafford," was committed: "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Clapham lighting Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for lighting and watching the Village of Clapham, and certain Roads leading thereto, in the County of Surrey."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

Ld. President.
Ld. Privy Seal.
D. Portland.
E. Derby.
E. Westmorland.
E. Sandwich.
E. Carlisle.
E. Abingdon.
E. Morton.
E. Abercorn.
E. Aberdeen.
E. Hopetoun.
E. Ferrers.
E. Effingham.
E. Fitzwilliam.
E. Cornwallis.
E. Radnor.
E. Clarendon.
V. Dudley & Ward.
V. Sackville.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Bp. Bath & Wells.
L. Bp. Lincoln.
L. Bp. Bangor.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Sydney.
L. Percy.
L. Howard de Walden.
L. Chedworth.
L. Sandys.
L. Walpole.
L. Scarsdale.
L. Hawke.
L. Brownlow.
L. Harrowby.
L. Loughborough.
L. Walsingham.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Monday next, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Graumann's Naturalization Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Taylor and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act for naturalizing Hermann Graumann;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Ireland, Petitions against Resolutions respecting, referred to Committee.

Upon reading the Petition of the Tanners and others interested in the Leather Trade, in the Town and Neighbourhood of Manchester, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, "That the Petitioners, greatly alarmed at the very destructive Tendency which the Irish Propositions would have on the Manufactures, and others interested in the Leather Trade of this Town and Neighbourhood, they therefore humbly petitioned the Honourable the Commons of Great Britain, to deliberate seriously, and defer coming to any Determination upon so momentous a national Concern, until sufficient Time had been allowed for the due Consideration of the Consequences likely to result from such a Measure to the Manufacturers of Leather in this Kingdom; but as the said Propositions have passed through that Honourable House, notwithstanding the Reasons which have been so forcibly urged and proved of the destructive and ruinous Tendency the said Propositions would have on the manufacturing Interests of this Country: The Petitioners beg leave to state to this Right Honourable House, that the Consequences likely to ensue from this System, will be that the very valuable Manufacture of Leather will be nearly destroyed, and consequently those immense Sums which the Revenue derives from that Branch of Manufacture, must be for ever lost to this Nation, unless this Right Honourable House will grant them such Relief, either by rejecting the Propositions in toto, or by making such Provisions for the Manufactures, as will preserve to them that just Reciprocity so essentially necessary to the Prosperity of this Nation: The Petitioners beg Leave to inform this Right Honourable House, that very great Disadvantages are to be dreaded by this Kingdom from the local Situation of Ireland, in respect to the Leather Trade, the Difference in the Price of Labour, the Cheapness of Provisions, and all internal Taxes, which the British Manufacturer is paying daily, and from which the Irish Manufacturer is almost free;" and therefore praying their Lordships, "That they may be heard by themselves and Counsel at the Bar of this Right Honourable House, against the said Propositions, and that their Lordships will grant such Relief as to this Right Honourable House shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House, appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Upon reading the Petition of the Check Manufacturers of the Town of Manchester, in the County of Lancaster, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, "That the Petitioners, justly alarmed with the injurious Tendency of the Propositions moved in the Irish House of Commons on the Seventh of February last, humbly petitioned the Honourable the Commons of Great Britain, upon their Introduction into that Honourable House, and humbly expressed their great Regret at so dangerous and destructive a System. As several Alterations had been made in the proposed System, the Petitioners most humbly entreated that Honourable House, not to come to any determinate Vote upon them, until Time had been allowed to consider the Tendency of such Alterations, which were to be the Basis of an eternal and irrevocable Treaty between England and Ireland: Therefore the Petitioners most humbly implore this Right Honourable House, that they will adopt such Measures and point out such Principles upon which may be founded a fair, reciprocal, and permanent Treaty of Commerce, which will for ever hereafter preclude the most distant Idea of even Distrust, and much less of Discord between the Sister Kingdoms. As such a System, they humbly submit to this Right Honourable House, will necessarily involve in it the Landed as well as Commercial Interests of this Kingdom, the same can only be the Result of the most mature Deliberation, as well as of the most weighty Attention, for the effecting of which the Petitioners with all Humility presume, there is not Time at this advanced Period of the Session;" and therefore praying their Lordships, "To delay the final Settlement of the Propositions on which such an unalterable Treaty is to be founded, and by which such a Variety of Interests are to be protected, to the next Session of Parliament:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House, appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

A Petition of the Merchants, Manufacturers, and others of the Town and Neighbourhood of Manchester, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, was presented and read; setting forth, "That the Petitioners, justly alarmed at the injurious Tendency of the Propositions moved in the Irish House of Commons by Mr. Orde, humbly petitioned the Honourable the Commons of Great Britain, upon their Introduction into that Honourable House, that they would be pleased to reject the same as unjust, unwise, unreasonable, and impolitic, not having either Equity, Equality, or Reciprocity, for their Basis, nor do they conceive, notwithstanding the many and great Alterations which they have undergone in that Honourable House, that that Reciprocity is by any Means established which can alone make them permanent; because as far as the Petitioners are able to comprehend the Principles upon which they are founded, are by no Means either equal or equitable, as not affording a sufficient Protection to the Manufacturers of this Country, in Proportion to the very heavy Burthens with which they are loaded, and from which those of Ireland are so nearly exempted, added to which Linens, the Staple Manufacture of Ireland are for ever to be admitted Duty free into this Country, whilst not only the Staple but also every other Manufacture of Great Britain, except that of Linen, is to be charged with a Duty of Ten and an Half per Cent. upon their Importation into Ireland, at the same Time that the Amount of Irish Linens imported into Great Britain is nearly equal in Value to the whole of the British Manufactures exported to that Country. The Petitioners humbly beg Leave to state to this Right Honourable House the Disadvantages they labour under now, and have for some Time suffered in their Foreign Markets, through the partial, not to say impolitic Laws, in favour of Irish Linens, to the Exclusion of Foreign Linens from our Market, and the Depression of the British Linen Manufacture. In Russia there is now existing an Impost of Thirty per Cent. ad Valorem upon some of our English Manufactures, and in Germany a prohibitory Edict has either already taken Place or is upon the Point of so doing, and which in all Probability the Determination of the British Legislature on the Irish Propositions, will tend to annul or for ever confirm, if therefore, instead of leaving an Opening for a Commercial Regulation, with those States who are so able and have hitherto shewn themselves so willing, upon the true Principles of Reciprocity, to increase in a very considerable Degree the Consumption of British Manufactures, the Legislature of this Country should preclude themselves from the Power of hearkening to fair and advantageous Offers, and should for ever bind themselves from doing so, it may merit the most serious Consideration of this Right Honourable House, what Measures the Petitioners, as Subjects and Manufacturers of this Nation, are to expect from Powers so circumstanced. But the Petitioners do not confine their Views to the Danger arising immediately and directly from these Propositions, as affecting the Manufactures of the Town and Neighbourhood of Manchester only, but feel themselves equally entitled, as Subjects of this Country, to protest against all the Propositions taken aggregately as a new and destructive System of Policy, which, by universally undermining the Commercial Interests of Great Britain, must consequently affect every Interest, Trade, and Manufacture within it, the Prosperity of which depends evidently upon the general Wealth, Commerce and Prosperity of the whole Nation: The Petitioners humbly beg Leave to observe to this Right Honourable House, that if the Propositions had passed in the State in which they were originally introduced into the British House of Commons, it is evident, from the Alterations which that Honourable House has since judged it expedient to make in them, the most fatal Consequences must have ensued to the Landed, Funded, and Commercial Interests of Great Britain, and though something has been done, much more remains to be effected, and which the Petitioners hope for, from the Wisdom, Integrity, and Independence of their Lordships: The Petitioners are fully convinced that no System but what prescribes a Participation of Burthens as well as Advantages, can either be fair, equitable, or permanent, and therefore they are of Opinion that a complete Union in Commerce, Policy and Legislation, is the most probable Means of establishing a lasting Harmony and good Will between the Two Nations, and preventing that Jealousy and Discord which the present Propositions are so very likely to promote and encourage, but such System they humbly apprehend can only be the Result of the most mature Deliberation, and which the Petitioners presume there is not Time to establish at this advanced Period of the Session;" and therefore praying their Lordships, That they may be heard by themselves, or Counsel, at the Bar of this Right Honourable House against the said Propositions; and that their Lordships will grant them such Relief, as to this Right Honourable House shall seem meet."

Moved, "That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House, appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon."

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the said Committee, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon.

Upon reading the Petition of the Tanners in the County of Cumberland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, "That from the local Situation of their Lordships' Petitioners in a barren Country, little adapted to grazing, and where the Slaughter is very inconsiderable, their Lordships' Petitioners are obliged to import the greatest Part of the Raw Hides and Skins for their Manufacture from Ireland: That the incidental Expences of buying and curing the same in Ireland for Exportation, with the Freight and Land Carriage, amount from Eight to Ten per Cent. on the Value, exclusive of the Export Duties which their Lordships' Petitioners pay thereon, and which altogether give an Advantage to the Irish Tanner of at least from Thirteen to Fifteen per Cent. in the Price of the Raw Material alone: That so far from this Advantage being counterbalanced by any high Price paid in Ireland, for the Bark imported from this Country, their Lordships' Petitioners beg Leave to state to their Lordships what they well know to be true, that the best British Bark is sold in Dublin and other Ports of Ireland, on a fair Average from Five to Ten per Cent. less Price, than what is actually paid by their Lordships' Petitioners for the Bark used by them in their Manufacture: That their Lordships' Petitioners Trade hath always been principally carried on and supported by the Demand for their Manufactures, to be wrought up for Exportation to Foreign Markets, but that such Demand hath greatly diminished, and their Lordships' Petitioners Trade been in a declining State, and the Price of Tanned Leather falling for the last four Years, owing, as their Lordships' Petitioners are convinced, to the Exportation of Tanned Leather from Ireland, which has been gradually and rapidly increasing during that Period, and must continue increasing to the utter Annihilation of the Tanning Manufactures of this Kingdom, if not timely remedied by the Interposition of Parliament; for if the manifest Advantages already stated should not be thought more than sufficient for the Purpose, the Duties payable by their Lordships' Petitioners, and of which no Drawback on the Exportation is allowed, save a Drawback of a Penny Halfpenny per Pound on some Species of Wrought Leather, and which is in fact little more than One Third of the Duty before paid by their Lordships' Petitioners on the same Article, the Duty paid by their Lordships' Petitioners being paid on the Weight of the whole Hide or Skin when tanned, and before dressing, currying, or being cut up, and the Drawback allowed for no more than the Weight of the Article when wrought and finished therefrom, whilst the Irish Manufacture is subject to no Duty whatever, save a trifling Export Duty, and the Difference in Point of Labour, which is consessedly not less than Twenty per Cent. in favour of the latter, effectually cut off from their Lordships' Petitioners as well as the whole Body of British Tanners, all Hopes of supporting a Competition with the Irish Manufactures: That their Lordships' Petitioners have hitherto forbore to complain of the great Disadvantages under which they labour, in the confidence that Parliament would in a short Time see the Necessity of interposing in their Behalf, and give a Check to the Exportation of Bark, or adopt such other Measures, as the Wisdom of Parliament should deem best calculated to put their Lord ships' Petitioners on an equal Footing with the Irish Manufacturers; but when instead thereof they find themselves, by the Propositions introduced into their Lordships' Honorable House for the Adjustment of the Commercial Intercourse between this Kingdom and Ireland, threatened with the Ruin of all those Hopes, and the utter Preclusion for ever of every possible Assistance and Support, should the Power of giving a Check to the Exportation of Bark be given up, and the Admission of Irish tanned Leather let into the British Market, with a Power to Ireland to exclude the British Manufacturers from the Purchase of Raw Hides and Skins in Ireland, whilst the Parliament of Great Britain are for ever precluded from the Power of affording any Relief to the Manufacturers of this Kingdom, their Lordships' Petitioners cannot refrain throwing themselves on the Justice of their Lordships' Honourable House, and deprecating the adopting such Measures as strike at once at their Existence as a manufacturing Body, without leaving them a Possibility of recovering their Trade;" and therefore praying, That their Lordships will be graciously pleased to take the Premises into Consideration, and to afford to their Lordships' Petitioners such Protection and Relief as to their Lordships shall seem meet."

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

House in Committee on said Resolutions.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to resolve itself again into a Committee upon the Resolutions come to by the Commons, relative to an Adjustment of the Commercial Intercouse between Great Britain and Ireland; and for the Lords to be summoned:

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee thereupon.

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Scarsdale reported a further Progress.

Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Irish Commercial Resolutions, be adjourned to Monday next; and the Lords summoned.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Lunæ, vicesimum diem instantis Junii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Lunæ, 20o Junii 1785.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar.
Archiep. Ebor.
Epus. Bath. & Wells.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Bristol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Ds. Camden, Præses.
Comes Gower, C. P. S.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Portland.
Dux Northumberland.
Comes Derby.
Comes Huntingdon.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Scarborough.
Comes Morton.
Comes Abercorn.
Comes Galloway.
Comes Breadalbane.
Comes Hopetoun.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Northington.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Clarendon.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Wentworth.
Viscount Dudley & Ward.
Viscount Mount Edgcombe & Valletort.
Ds. Sydney, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Say & Sele.
Ds. King.
Ds. Chedworth.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Hawke.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Loughborough.
Ds. Walsingham.
Ds. Bagot.
Ds. Grantley.
Ds. Rawdon.

PRAYERS.

Lambeth Water Bill.

The Lord Sandys reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for supplying the Inhabitants of the Parish of Lambeth and Parts adjacent, in the County of Surrey with Water," was committed: That they had considered the said Bill and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Clapham lighting Bill.

The Lord Sandys made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for lighting and watching the Village of Clapham, and certain Roads leading thereto, in the County of Surrey," was committed.

Dudley Canal Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for extending the Dudley Canal to the Birmingham Canal, at or near Tipton Green in the County of Stafford."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Courts of Conscience Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for reducing the Time for the Imprisonment of Debtors committed to Prison upon Prosecutions in Courts of Conscience in London, Middlesex, and the Borough of Southwark, to the same Periods in each Court; and for abolishing Fees paid by those Debtors to Gaolers or others on account of such Imprisonment."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to the Two preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by Holford and Mr. Anguish:

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Banbury Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enlarge the Term, and explain and amend the Powers of an Act, passed in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act for repairing and widening the Road from the Turnpike Road in Banbury, in the County of Oxford, through Daventry and Cottesbach, to the South End of Mill Field in the Parish of Lutterworth, in the County of Leicester."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

Ld. President.
Ld. Privy Seal.
D. Richmond.
D. Portland.
D. Northumberland.
E. Derby.
E. Huntingdon.
E. Carlisle.
E. Scarborough.
E. Morton.
E. Abercorn.
E. Galloway.
E. Breadalbane.
E. Hopetoun.
E. Ferrers.
E. Fitzwilliam.
E. Northington.
E. Radnor.
E. Clarendon.
V. Townshend.
V. Stormont.
V. Wentworth.
V. Dudley & Ward.
V. Mount Edgcumbe & Valletort.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Abp. York.
L. Bp. Bath & Wells.
L. Bp. Lincoln.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Sydney.
L. Say & Sele.
L. King.
L. Chedworth.
L. Sandys.
L. Hawke.
L. Brownlow.
L. Harrowby.
L. Loughborough.
L. Walsingham.
L. Bagot.
L. Grantley.
L. Rawdon.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet To-Morrow at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Shoreditch pavi

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for amending Two Acts of the Eighth and Sixteenth Years of His present Majesty, for opening certain Passages, and for paving the Streets and other Places in the Parish of Saint Leonard Shoreditch, and such Part of Hog Lane as lies within the Liberty of Norton Falgate in the County of Middlesex, and for preventing Annoyances therein."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Sarum Council House, &c. Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the Removal and rebuilding of the Council Chamber, Guildhall, and Gaol of the City of New Sarum, and for ascertaining the Tolls of the Market, and regulating the Chairmen within the said City."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet, on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Aylesbury Road Bill

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act passed in the Tenth Year of His present Majesty's Reign, for amending the Road from Aylesbury in the County of Buckingham, through Thame and Little Milton to the Turnpike Road between Bensington and Shillingford, in the County of Oxford, and for amending the Road from the Turnpike Road at Thame, to the Oxford Turnpike Road between Postcomb and Tetsworth, in the said County of Oxford."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Ireland, Petition of Tanners of Stamford against Resolutions respecting, referred to Committee.

Upon reading the Petition of the Tanners and others, Dealers in tanned Leather, residing at Stamford in the County of Lincoln, and in the Neighbourhood thereof, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, That the Petitioners, from the best Information they have been able to obtain, are extremly apprehensive that the Propositions for adjusting a Commercial Intercourse with Ireland, now before this Right Honourable House, if passed into a Law, must evidently tend to distress and injure the Manufacture of tanned Leather in this Country, which already labours under great Disadvantages. The Petitioners confiding in the Wisdom of this Right Honourable House, that such Measures will be adopted as to secure to the Leather Manufacture of this Country Terms of Equality and Reciprocity, pray that they may be heard by themselves or Counsel, against such Part of the Propositions as seem big with Evil to this Branch of Manufacture passing into a Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Duke of Northumberland's Exchange Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable His Majesty to grant the Inheritance of certain Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments, situate in or near North Scotland Yard in the County of Middlesex, in Exchange for the Inheritance of certain Buildings or Barracks and Land adjoining thereto, and also of certain Ground contiguous to Tinmouth Castle in the County of Northumberland, belonging to the Duke of Northumberland, or for such further or other Compensation as shall be a full Consideration for the same, and also to empower the said Duke to make such Exchange."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Sandys reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Indemnity Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to indemnify such Persons as have omitted to qualify themselves for Offices and Employments, and to indemnify Justices of the Peace or others who have omitted to register or deliver in their Qualifications within the Time limited by Law, and for giving further Time for those Purposes; and to indemnify Members and Officers in Cities, Corporations, and Borough Towns, whose Admissions have been omitted to be stamped according to Law, or having been stamped have been lost or mislaid, and for allowing them Time to provide Admissions duly stamped; to give further Time to such Persons as have omitted to make and file Affidavits of the Execution of Indentures of Clerks to Attornies and Solicitors; and for indemnifying Persons who have acted as Trustees of Turnpike Roads in certain Cases, and declaring their Proceedings valid."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Sandys reported from the Committee, That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Ireland, Petition of Manufacturers of Iron against the Resolutions respecting, referred to Committee.

A Petition of the Manufacturers of Iron in London and Parts adjacent, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, was presented and read; setting forth, "That the Petitioners are informed that certain Propositions of the Irish Parliament have passed the Honourable House of Commons, and now under Consideration of this Right Honourable House: That the Petitioners are exceedingly apprehensive that the said Propositions, if carried into a Law, will be highly prejudicial and injurious to the Trade, Manufactures, and Revenue of this Kingdom, to the Manufacture of Iron, and the Petitioners in particular: That the Petitioners depending on the great Wisdom of this Right Honourable House, humbly hope for such Relief in the Premises as to this Right Honourable House may seem reasonable; and that this Right Honourable House may have all necessary Information;" and therefore praying the House, "That they may be heard by themselves, their Evidence or Counsel against the said Propositions being carried into a Law."

Moved, "That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon."

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the said Committee, with Liberty for the Petitioners to be heard by themselves or Counsel thereupon.

House in Committee on said Resolutions:

The Order of the Day being read for the House to resolve itself again into a Committee upon the Resolutions come to by the Commons relative to an Adjustment of the Commercial Intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland; and for the Lords to be summoned :

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee thereupon.

After some Time, the House was resumed.

Peele to attend.

Ordered, That Robert Peele do attend this House forthwith.

Then the House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put again into a Committee.

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Hawke reported a further Progress.

Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Irish Commercial Resolutions be adjourned till Tomorrow, and the Lords summoned.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Martis, vicesimum primum diem instantis Junii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.