BHO

Roll A 1b: (ii) Nov 1327 - July 1328

Pages 37-65

Calendar of the Plea and Memoranda Rolls of the City of London: Volume 1, 1323-1364. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1926.

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Membr. 7 (9) b

16 Nov. 1327

Memorandum that on Monday after the Feast of St Martin (11 Nov.), Robert de Ely, against whom complaints had been made by William Haunsard and other fishmongers of London, for injuring their trade at Little Yarmouth, came in person to the Husting and brought various letters from merchants of Southampton, Salisbury and Lynn, the Hanse of Almaine, the Cinque Ports, Bayonne and Bordeaux, who attended the last Fair at Great Yarmouth, testifying that the said Robert was guiltless of the charges brought against him. Whereupon the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty held him as excused. (L)

12 Nov. 1327

Another letter from the Mayor etc. of London to the Mayor and Barons of Winchelsea, acknowledging their reply. As regards the toll taken at Southwark, that bailiwick had only been in the hands of the City a little more than six months, and there were other lords having rights there, such as the King, the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Earl of "Garenne (fn. 1)." Careful inquiry would be made as to whether the toll on fish had been exacted by the latter. Dated at London, the morrow of St Martin [11 Nov.] 1327. (F)

No date

The King's writ to the Commonalty of Great Yarmouth commanding them to cease from detaining the ships and merchandise of Little Yarmouth and Gorleston, and from blockading them from the sea, since those towns would ultimately, on the death of the Earl of Richmond (fn. 2), revert to the King. The Commonalty is ordered to send two burgesses with full powers to treat, so that the matter may be settled in the King's Council. (L)

15 Nov. 1327

Letter from Stephen (de Gravesend), Bishop of London, acknowledging receipt of letters from the Mayor and promising to pay the City a visit, after he had transacted certain business which called him into Essex. Dated at Wykham, 15 Nov. (F)

No date

Reply from the Bailiffs and men of Great Yarmouth to the Mayor etc. of London as regards alleged opposition to London merchants. They deny that such opposition had been offered and complain that the London merchants had prevented other merchants from entering Great Yarmouth by armed force. The trouble had arisen because a toll was taken at the entrance of the port for the upkeep of the town. (F)

Membr. 8 (10)

4 May 1327

Pleas of Land held in the Husting of London on Monday after the Feast of SS. Philip and James [1 May] A o 1 Edw. III [1327]

Writ to the Sheriffs of London that they take into the King's hand a certain messuage and shop in the suburb of London, claimed by William Frankeleyn and Alice his wife in the Bench at Westminster (fn. 3) against George de Percy and Margaret his wife, whom they are to summon to appear at the next Husting to hear judgment. Dated 20 Oct. Ao 20 (Edw. II) [1326].

The Sheriffs returned that the parties appeared and essoined, as appears in the Roll of Essoins. (L)

Marginal note: Parvum cape (fn. 4) retornabile in Hustengo per Justiciarios de Banco.

At this Court, Thomas, son of William de Bekles, was adjudged of full age to receive the sum of £15 from the executors of Wymond Brocher, who are to be summoned to appear on Wednesday before the Chamberlain to hand over the money. (L)

10 March 1327

Charter of Edward III to the Girdlers of London (fn. 5). Dated 10 March Ao 1 Edw. III [1326-7]. (F)

17 March 1327

Memorandum that on Tuesday after the Feast of St Gregory Pope [12 March] Ao 1 Edw. III [1326-7] came John Broud, sheather, into the Husting of Common Pleas with a petition praying the Mayor and Commonalty to assent to the following articles: That no one of the mistery work by night, or on Sundays, or on the great Feast-days of the Apostles, Martyrs and Confessors; that no servant or "vallet" be received to work until he had covenanted with his master to remain the full term of his service; and that no one of the mistery receive a stranger to work, unless the latter had sufficient security for his good behaviour, or had been enfranchised of the City (F). Thereupon the Court ordered that the better and more sufficient men of the mistery be summoned for the following Monday, on which day the above-mentioned articles were confirmed, subject to appropriate penalties. (L)

At this Court came good men of the mistery of Pouchmakers with certain articles (fn. 6) designed to prevent deception and false work in their trade and prayed that they might be confirmed (L). They complained that foreigners, by conspiracy with false workers of the City, were selling sheepleather scraped on the back in counterfeit of roe-leather (quir de Roo), and that such false leather, when used on plate-armour or on plate-gauntlets, would not last two days if it was wetted. They prayed that no leather-dyer should be allowed to dye such work, and that it should be confiscated and burnt. Foreigners also were accustomed to sell to other foreigners by night pouches, laces (layners) and breechgirdles (braels) stuffed with old linings (escauberks), hog's hair and flocks, which goods were spread throughout the country as being of London manufacture, to the great scandal of the City. The said foreigners likewise haunted brew-houses by night and seduced apprentices and servants to hand over to them the goods of City pouchmakers. The pouchmakers prayed that foreigners imprisoned for such offences should not be delivered until they had made restitution, and that they should not be allowed to sit at their stalls on Sundays and Feast days, or peddle their goods through the City (F). The above articles were accepted and confirmed by the Court. Certain dyers of leather-goods appeared in court and agreed to observe them in all points, after which Ralph Gandre, Walter atte More, Robert de Flete, and Pagan le Purser were elected and sworn, on behalf of the mistery, to ensure that the articles be observed and that offenders be presented before the Mayor and Aldermen. (L)

Membr. 8 (10)b

26 May 1327

Agreement (fn. 7) made between men of the trade of Saddlers of London on the one part and men of the trades of Saddlebow Makers (fustarii), Painters, and Loriners of copper and iron of the same City on the other part, on Tuesday after the Feast of the Ascension [21 May] 1327. (L and F)

Membr. 9 (11)

2 May 1327

Writ dated at Nottingham, 29 April (L), with a covering letter under the Privy Seal, 2 May 1327 (F), calling on the City of London to provide the King with an armed contingent (fn. 8), mounted on horses of the value of 30s or 40s, for service against the Scots. The army is to concentrate at Newcastle-on-Tyne on Monday before the Feast of the Ascension [21 May], (L)

The names of one hundred horsemen, provided by the Wards in different proportions, who mustered at West Smithfield, whence they proceeded to "la Barnette" for Newcastle-on-Tyne, each man receiving 100s. (L)

Membr. 9 (11)b

9 July 1327

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty to the King, announcing the dispatch of 100 horsemen and 100 footmen (fn. 9) to Newcastle, their wages being paid until their arrival there. Some delay had occurred in the matter owing to reports that the King and the Scots had made peace, or at least a long truce. They pray that this aid may not be drawn into precedent. Dated Thursday after the Translation of St Thomas [7 July]. (F)

Membr. 10 (12)

6 Oct. 1326

Letter from Isabella (fn. 10), Queen of England, Lady of Ireland and Countess of Ponthieu, and Edward, Duke of "Guyene," Earl of Chester, Ponthieu and Monstroile to the Commonalty of London reminding them of former letters notifying their arrival in England and praying their assistance, to which no reply had been made. They demand their help again, so that they may not have cause to punish the City, and they assure them that their object is to advance the interests of the realm. The citizens are requested to arrest Hugh le Despenser, whenever opportunity occurs. Dated at " Baudak (fn. 11)," 6 Oct. (F)

No date

The same to certain " Seignours" and other good men of the Commonalty of London (fn. 12), thanking them for having held the City and the Tower of London, and requesting them to safeguard the Tower and its contents. The Queen and Prince promise their favour, and remind them that Hugh le Despenser, the younger, had assumed Royal power, so that the King was in subjection to him, and had oppressed and disinherited loyal men, to the danger of the Church, the Crown and the people. The citizens are desired to prevent any attack on the Bishop of London, and to send Sir John, the King's son, and other prisoners, with the exception of Sir John de la Beche, under safe conduct to them, and also to protect the ships in which the Queen and her adherents had come. (F)

Reply to the above from the Mayor and Commonalty, assuring them of the City's sympathy, and promising compliance with their wishes, but begging that Sir John may remain with the citizens. (F)

Membr. 10 (12)b

13 Nov. 1326

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City, referring to a former promise to uphold the Queen's cause sent by the hands of the Queen's messenger, Sir John Giffard. They point out that Hildebrand Sotherman of Almaine, whom the Queen had recommended to them, was an enemy of the City, and beg her not to continue her favour to him. Dated 13 Nov. Ao 20 Edw. II [1326]. (F)

Membr. 11 (13)

25 Feb. 1326

Letter from the Mayor and Commonalty of London to King Edward II (written at the request of Richard de Hakeneye), desiring him to write to the town of Lübeck for the restoration to the said Richard of a quantity of wool, which John le White and Arnald his brother, merchants of Almaine, had carried away, leaving part of the purchaseprice unpaid. Dated 25 Feb. Ao 19 Edw. II [1325-6]. (L)

9 March 1326

Letter from the King to the Burgomasters, Echevins, Aldermen and Commonalty of Lübeck in accordance with the above. Dated at Leicester, 9 March Ao 19 Edw. II [1325-6]. (L)

Membr. 12 (14)

26 Nov. 1324

Record of proceedings in the Husting of Common Pleas on Monday after the Feast of St Katherine [25 Nov.] Ao 18 Edw. II [1324] and before the Mayor and Aldermen, on a writ of 16 Nov. 1324, against Adam Hurel, John Saleman and Andrew his son for assaulting Master Ralph de Norton, Dean of the Arches, and James de Hurle, his Commissary. The accused persons were mainprised to keep the peace, but owing to a subsequent offence, a jury was summoned, which found them guilty of assaulting the plaintiffs by the door of Robert de Farnham's tavern in Cheap. Afterwards the parties came to an agreement out of court. (L)

Membr. 13 (15)

1 May 1326

Writ dated at Kenilworth, 1 May Ao 19 Edw. II [1326], ordering the Sheriffs to publish the King's ordinance (fn. 13) fixing the Staples of wool, leather and woolfells at Newcastle-onTyne, York, Lincoln, Norwich, London, Winchester, Exeter, Bristol, Dublin, Drogheda, Cork, Shrewsbury, Carmarthen and Cardiff; and of tin at Lostwithiel, Truro and Ashburton. [The text follows.] (F)

21 May 1326

Letter from the King to Hamo de Chykewell, Mayor, acknowledging the receipt of his letter informing the King of the fact that Flemings, Brabanters and other foreigners had been buying all the teasels, bure, madder, woad and fuller's earth and other materials for making cloth that they could lay their hands on, in order to subvert the Staple, and that he (the Mayor) had arrested 20 tuns which had been shipped for abroad. The King commends his action and charges him to prevent the exportation of such materials in future. Dated at Saltwode, 21 May Ao 19 Edw. II [1326]. (F)

30 May 1326

The King's writ (fn. 14) to the Mayor and Sheriffs prohibiting the export of "taseles" and fuller's earth... [30 May 1326]. (L)

Membr. (16)

Proceedings against bakers, for stealing dough from moulding-boards (fn. 15). A drawing of the pillory follows. (L)

Cedula attached

Charter (fn. 16) of Edward III to the Girdlers of London. Dated 10 March Ao 1 Edw. III [1326-7]. (F)

Membr. 14 (17)

9 Nov. 1327

Common Pleas held in the Husting, London, on Monday before the Feast of S t Martin [11 Nov.] A o 1 Edw. III [1327]

4 Nov. 1327

The King's writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs with regard to disturbers of the peace. The King has heard that evildoers have formed unlawful confederacies in the City since the beginning of his reign, and have been engaged in beating, wounding and killing citizens and others, robbing persons of their goods, and holding to ransom those who visit the City and suburbs on business. The Mayor and Sheriffs are ordered to hold inquiries, by the oaths of good and lawful men of their bailiwicks, as to the truth of the above reports, and to commit to prison until further orders all persons indicted before them for such offences, or such as they may find perpetrating them. Dated at Nottingham, 4 Nov. Ao 1 Edw. III [1327]. (L)

8 Nov. 1327

Writ (fn. 17) to the same forbidding the carrying of swords, clubs, cross-bows, and bows for discharging stones and clay pellets (pelotas terreas) in the City. Offenders are to be committed to prison until further orders. This prohibition does not apply to the sergeants-at-arms of the King and Queen Isabella, nor to the servants (valettis) of earls and barons of the realm, viz. each earl and baron is allowed to have his servant carrying his sword in his presence. Dated at Nottingham, 8 Nov.

Note that a similar writ was sent to John de Grantham, Mayor, on 18 Nov. Ao 2 Edw. III [1328]. (L)

8 Nov. 1327

Writ (fn. 18) to the same ordering them to punish such bakers, taverners, millers, cooks, poulterers, fishmongers, butchers, brewers and cornmongers as are found to be lax in their work and misteries, and to discourage by corporal punishments and other severe measures, those evildoers who go about the city by day and night with swords, clubs, bucklers, and other arms, beating and ill-treating individuals, either out of wantonness or by the instigation of others. Dated as above. (L)

8 Nov. 1327

Writ to the same. The King is given to understand that vintners and their taverners, selling wine by retail in the City and suburbs, mix weak and corrupt wine with other wine and sell the mixture at the same price as good and pure wine, not allowing their customers to see whether the wine is drawn in measures from casks or otherwise, to the great scandal of the City and in corruption of the bodily health of the purchasers. The Mayor and Sheriffs are ordered to make a proclamation in the City forbidding these practices, and to exact from offenders fines for the King's use. Dated as above. (L)

8 Nov. 1327

Writ to Hamo de Chigwell, Mayor, ordering him to punish by imprisonment or otherwise persons who are rebellious and disobedient to him and his officers, in matters relating to the custody of the City, and also all others dwelling in the City or repairing thither, who are notoriously suspected. The Mayor's proceedings in this matter are not to be called in question except before the King himself (coram nobis) or by his orders. Dated as above.

Note that similar letters patent were sent to John de Grantham, Mayor, on 28 Nov. Ao 2 Edw. III [1328]. (L)

Membr. 14 (17) b

9 Nov. 1327

Petition (F) of Brother Hildebrand Burdon, Prior of the Order of Preaching Friars (fn. 19), to the Mayor and Aldermen for permission to rebuild a gate erected circa 1309, so as to enclose a lane which extended from the gate of the Prior of Okeburn on the east to the Fleet on the west. A year ago a mob had broken into their close, destroyed the gate and stolen the lead from the turrets; two thieves being captured with the mainour of lead upon them. The petitioner recites the original licence (F) of 14 May Ao 2 Edw. II [1309], granted by Nicholas de Farndon, Mayor, to John de Wrotham, then Prior, and the King's confirmation (L) dated 21 May of the same year. By this licence the Friars were permitted to enclose the above lane, yet so as to preserve the citizens' right of access to the Wall, and right of way thereby from Ludgate to the Thames.

Permission was granted by the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty, subject to the terms of the above licence.

4 Nov. 1327

Pleas before the Mayor on Wednesday after the Feast of All Saints [1 Nov.] A o 1 Edw. III [1327]

Note: This plea was also entered in the Rolls of Common Pleas of Monday before the Feast of St Martin [11 Nov.].

Record of proceedings against John le Kyng, who had claimed a tenement in the parish of St Nicholas Shambles when the will of Hugh de Garton was proved in the Husting, for having unlawfully taken possession of the said tenement, and for having raised the hue and cry against the Sheriffs, when the latter wished to enter in order to execute the terms of the will. The defendant was found guilty by a jury and adjudged to pay the Sheriff 20 marks damages. (L)

Membr. 15 (18)

2 June 1327

Letter from the Bailiffs, Mayor and Echevin of Wissant (fn. 20) to the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London, acknowledging the receipt of their letter, which informed them that on Good Friday a ship belonging to Adam Hurel and John Genge, citizens of London, had been seized by Frenchmen. The writers declare that no one under their jurisdiction was concerned in the matter. Dated at Wissant, 2 June. (F)

28 Nov. 1327

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of London to the Mayor and Barons of Winchelsea, acknowledging their letters which promised to do justice to Adam Lucas. They agreed that he should go with Henry de Gisors, Nicholas Pyk, Thomas de Lodelawe and Thomas de Duston to meet representatives of Winchelsea at a certain place, there to discuss matters touching his claim and the points in dispute between London and Winchelsea. Dated Saturday before the Feast of St Andrew [30 Nov.]. (F)

25 Nov. 1327

Letter from the Mayor etc. of London to Robert de Walkefare, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, and to John Haward, praying their assistance to recover certain moneys due to Adam de Salesbury, Alderman, on recognizances from John de Wridewell. Dated the Feast of St Katherine [25 Nov.]. (F)

26 Nov. 1327

The same to the Mayor, Bailiffs and Echevins of Boulogne, desiring them to assist Adam Hurel and John Genge to recover their ship called "La Blithe" and its cargo of wool etc., which on Good Friday last was seized by men of Boulogne, Calais and "Whytesand," during a truce between the Kings of England and France. Dated the morrow of St Katherine [25 Nov.]. (F)

A note to the effect that a similar letter had been sent to Calais. (L)

27 Nov. 1327

Letter from the Mayor and Commonalty of the City of London to the "President" and Convent of the Abbey of St Edmunds, thanking them for their notification that merchants of London might attend the Fair at Bury St Edmunds as formerly without hindrance. Dated on Friday after the Feast of St Katherine [25 Nov.]. (F)

Membr. 15 (18)b

9 Dec. 1327

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of London to the Mayor and Barons of Winchelsea, notifying them that Adam Lucas was about to visit Winchelsea with a view to prosecuting his suit. Dated 9 Dec. (F)

26 Dec. 1327

Letter from Hamo de Chigwell, Mayor, and the Commonalty of London to John (Hotham), Bishop of Ely, the King's Chancellor, praying him to command the custom-collectors at Hull to let the merchandise of Simon Fraunceys pass free of the tax on wool, inasmuch as citizens of London were by the King's orders quit of such tax. Dated on Saturday after Christmas. (F)

1 Jan. 1328

Letter from the Mayors and Echevin of Boulogne to the Mayor etc. of London, certifying that no one within their jurisdiction had any part in the seizure of the ship and goods belonging to Adam Hurel and John Genge. Dated the Feast of the Circumcision [1 Jan.]. (F)

11 Dec. 1327

Writ for the election of members to represent the City in the Parliament to meet at York on Sunday after the Feast of the Purification B.M. [2 Feb.] when the conditions of peace between the King and Robert de Brus would be discussed. Dated at Coventry 11 Dec. Ao 1 Edw. III [1327]. (L)

Membr. 16 (19)

Memorandum that among certain liberties granted by Edw. III (fn. 21) to the citizens of London, it is contained that the citizens should have Infangenthef and Outfangenthef and the chattels of felons of all those tried before them within the liberty of the City aforesaid, and of all those of the said liberty to be tried at the Gaol of Newgate, by virtue of which grant, deliveries were afterwards made before the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen at the Guildhall of prisoners taken with the mainour, at the suit of certain persons as appears below etc., and those that were convicted were hanged at the King's gallows, viz. at "le Elmes" near Tybourne. (L)

[All the cases which follow for the first year of Edw. III (with the exception of the last) are entered in Letter Book E fos. 234-234 b. See Cal. of Letter Book E, pp. 276-8.]

17 Nov. 1327

Delivery of Infangenthef at the Guildhall before Hamo de Chigwell, Mayor, Henry Darcy and John Hauteyn, Sheriffs, Gregory de Norton, and certain aldermen [named] on Tuesday after the Feast of S t Martin [11 Nov.] A o 1 Edw. III [1327]

John atte Gate of Chalgrave, co. Beds, attached at the suit of Joan de Reynham, with the mainour of a tunic and hood stolen from her within Newgate on Thursday after the Feast of St Michael, put himself on his country. The jury found him guilty and valued the mainour at 10d. The prisoner was remanded to prison for eight days and then set at liberty. (L)

Anno 2 Edw. III

1 March 1328

Delivery of Infangenthef at the Guildhall on Tuesday after the Feast of S t Mathias [24 Feb.] the same year

Walter le Wyght (Walsh?), William de Cornewaill, John le Fourbour, and Richard de Saunford were attached at the suit of John Emelyn of Braunfeld, with the mainour of a gown (colobium) of bluet and 18s 6d in cash, stolen from him in the tavern of Thomas Drinkwater on London Bridge. The aforesaid Walter declared himself a clerk, and as he was found by the Ordinary (fn. 22) to be a clerk, he was committed chaplain, who was later called by the same name. Indicted persons who claimed benefit of clergy were tried with a jury at Newgate in order to to Newgate until the next sessions. The other prisoners were found guilty by a jury and were hanged. No chattels. (L)

Membr. 16 (19) b

9 Aug. 1328

Delivery etc. on Tuesday the eve of S t Lawrence [10 Aug.] A o 2 Edw. III [1328]

Joan la Lavender prosecuted Alexander le Nedelere for the felony of a "Worthstede" tunic stolen from her on Saturday last outside Newgate. The case was adjourned for lack of jurors. Afterwards the prisoner was found guilty and the tunic valued at 10d. And because the value was less than 12½d, the said Alexander was committed to Newgate for 40 days, and the prosecutor recovered her tunic. (L)

30 Dec. 1328

Delivery etc. on Friday in Christmas week the same year

Robert de Hennewod prosecuted Adam de Salopia for stealing a silver cup value 7s on Wednesday last in the tavern of William de Bodelee in Friday Street. The case was adjourned for lack of jurors. On the morrow the jury found him not guilty. Judgment that he go quit, and that the above Robert be taken into custody for withdrawing from the prosecution. The cup to remain with the Sheriffs. (L)

13 July 1329

Delivery etc. on Thursday before the Feast of S t Margaret [20 July] A o 3 Edw. III [1329]

Geoffrey de Wynchecombe, Maud de Oxford and Roesia de Burton were attached at the suit of William de Leyghton, porter, with the mainour of five cups of mazer stolen on Tuesday after the Feast of St Barnabas [11 June] the same year in St Lawrence Lane. The above Geoffrey declared himself a clerk and was remanded to prison. The jury found the prisoner Maud guilty, and she was hanged. Roesia was acquitted. Order was given to take the prosecutor into custody till he pay a fine for his false appeal against her. Note that this appeal was made before Henry de Combemartyn (fn. 23). (L)

Membr. 17 (20)

19 Nov. 1327

The King's writ to the Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, enjoining him to make proclamation in the towns of Great Yarmouth, Little Yarmouth and Gorleston, that the hostilities in which the inhabitants had been engaged must cease. He is ordered to arrest offenders. The King had previously given orders for those towns to send representatives to him with a view to composing their differences, but the town of Great Yarmouth had failed to comply. Their bailiffs must appear within fifteen days to answer for their contempt. Dated at Clipston, 19 Nov.. Ao 1 Edw. III [1327]. (L)

29 Nov. 1327

The King's writ to Geoffrey de Scrope and his brother Justices of the King's Bench, ordering them to inquire as to the validity of a charter granted by Edw. I to Great Yarmouth, in virtue of which the burgesses of that town had obtained a writ of forstalment to the prejudice of the inhabitants of Little Yarmouth and Gorleston. Dated at Clipston, 29 Nov. Ao 1 Edw. III [1327]. (L)

30 Jan. 1328

Petition (fn. 24) to the King by the merchants of the City of London trading round Yarmouth, complaining that the men of Great Yarmouth had interfered with their freedom of trade in Little Yarmouth, where they had their houses for salting herrings, and had prevented them from buying fresh herring, except from certain men of Great Yarmouth, who were forestalling fish, with the result that prices had greatly risen. They pray a remedy. (F)

Covering letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty to the King, desiring that the above petition may be brought before his Council. Dated 30 Jan. Ao 1 Edw. III [1326–7. Query: 1327–8?]. (F)

12 Jan. 1328

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty to the same, notifying that the City had elected Richard de Betoyne, Robert de Kelsey, John de Grantham and John Priour, junior—three or two of them—to attend Parliament at York on Sunday after the Feast of the Purification B.M. [2 Feb.]. Dated 12 Jan. Ao 1 Edw. III [1327–8]. (L)

27 Jan. 1328

Letter from the Mayor and Commonalty of the City of London to the Mayor and Bailiffs of the town of Bristol, praying that the wool—viz. eight large sacks of lambswool of the Swansea clip (de la coilette de Swynesaye), each sack weighing full three weys by the Winchester tron (fn. 25)—due to Walter le Foundour under a bond dated Ao 6 Edw. II from the Mayor, Bailiffs and Commonalty of Bristol for the time being, may be delivered to him. Dated Wednesday before the Purification B.M. [2 Feb.] A.D. 1327[–8]. (F)

26 Jan. 1328

Letter from the Mayor and Bailiffs of Oxford (fn. 26) to the Mayor and Aldermen of London, asking for advice in a case where a certain Philip de Wormenhal devised tenements to his son Thomas, which tenements he and his wife Alianore had jointly purchased. The wife, as executrix, refused to surrender the tenements to the son. Dated 26 Jan. (F)

Note that the letter was returned to Oxford with an indorsement by the Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs, to the effect that the wife had the free disposal of tenements jointly purchased by her and her husband. (L)

30 Jan. 1328

Letter from John de Grantham and John Priour, who had been sent to represent the merchants of the City at York on the question of removing the Staple out of England, to the Mayor and Commonalty of the City of London, reporting that the whole "commonalty" of merchants of England were in favour of the Staple being established abroad (fn. 27) and had given a verdict to this effect before Master Henry de Clif, who had been assigned by the King to take their opinion. The merchants estimated that the change would benefit the commonalty of the realm to the extent of 20s a sack, and they had chosen two merchants as their attorneys to pursue the matter in Parliament. On the other hand, the writers, representing London, and the merchants of York, Lincoln, Winchester and Bristol were opposed to the removal of the Staple. In order not to incur the enmity of the King and his Council by their disagreement, and because they wished to be further advised by the City, they had prayed that their answer might be delayed until the meeting of Parliament, which would take place on Monday after Candlemas. Accordingly they request that the "Commune" might be summoned, and the result of their deliberations sent by letter to York on the aforesaid Monday. As regards news from the North, the writers had none to communicate. Written at York on Saturday before the Purification B.M. [2 Feb.]. (F)

4 Feb. 1328

The City's reply to the above. They had unanimously agreed that it was best that the Staple should remain in England and this was to be strenuously urged by John de Grantham and John Priour. Rather than that the Staple should be removed across the sea and a Mayor of the Staple appointed there, it was better that every merchant should be allowed to trade where he liked. A letter had been sent to the Mayor and Commonalty of York to uphold the City's representatives and to prevent the removal of the Staple, and another letter had been despatched to Richard de Betoyne, enjoining him to do nothing against their assent and the assent of the Commonalty of the City. Dated on Thursday after the Purification B.M. [2 Feb.]. (F)

Membr. 18 (21)

5 March 1327

Letter from Raymond de Landiras, Archdeacon of Bordeaux, to the Bishop of London and the Dean and Chapter of St Paul's, reciting two Bulls of Pope John XXII, appointing Gerald de Cantalauza to a Canonry and the next vacant Prebend in the Cathedral (fn. 28). Dated Bordeaux 5 March 1326[–] (L). Marginal note: Copia bulle misse Episcopo & Decano & Capitulo Londoniarum pro Gerardo de Cantalauza pro quo negocio Anketinus de Gisorcio & alii maxime fuerunt culpati.

Membr. 18 (21)b

25 March 1327

Notarial instrument recording the appointment of Peter de la Monga, Peter Boneti, Gerald de Porta and Bernard de Drohario as proctors by the above Gerald de Cantalauza. Dated 25 March 1327. (L)

Membr. 19 (23)

29 Jan. 1328

Letter from the Mayor and Commonalty of York to the Mayor, Sheriffs, Aldermen and Commonalty of London, complaining of Richard de Betoyne's attitude at the Council of York in advocating the removal of the Staple beyond the sea, he himself claiming to be Mayor of the Staple (fn. 29) beyond the sea. They could not believe that his conduct met with the approval of the City, since they found John de Grantham and John Priour of a different opinion. They pray the City to let them know their feelings in the matter. Dated 29 Jan. [1328]. (F)

4 Feb. 1328

Answer to the above. The City was strongly in favour of keeping the Staple in England and had notified its wishes to Richard de Betoyne, who had acted throughout entirely on his own account, and not with the assent of the City. Rather than that the Staple should be removed they were in favour of merchants taking their goods where they liked, without any Staple or Mayor of the Staple. Dated on Thursday after the Purification B.M. [2 Feb.]. (F)

4 Feb. 1328

Letter from the Mayor etc. to Richard de Betoyne, bidding him do nothing at the Council of York against the wishes of the citizens. Dated as above. (F)

14 Feb. 1328

Letter from the Mayor and Commonalty of the City of London to the Mayor and Barons of Winchelsea, praying for an inquiry into an alleged attack made on Andrew de Modyng ham, apprentice of William Cros, while on a visit to Hastings at Christmas time. The said Andrew was sitting in the house of John Roger of Hastings, when Henry Alard came with three companions and began asking him questions as to whence he came and whether he knew Adam Lucas of London. Upon his saying he did know the person named, he was villainously abused by Alard and his companions, who afterwards lay in wait for him outside the town and maltreated him. By beating his hack (son hakeneye) he was fortunately able to escape back to Hastings, where he remained badly wounded until friends helped him to take a safe road home. Dated 14 Feb. (F)

18 Feb. 1328

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs and Commonalty to Stephen (de Gravesend), Bishop of London, praying a remission of the penance imposed by the Dean and Chapter of St Paul's on Anketin de Gisors and Henry and Richard his brothers, Francis Beaufleur and John de Hynton, for having desecrated the Church of St Paul's (fn. 30). Dated 18 Feb. (F)

18 Feb. 1328

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of London to the Mayor and Bailiffs of the town of Bedford, desiring them to restore to Robert de Hakeneye the toll of 4 sacks of wool which they had taken of his goods, contrary to the franchise of the City. Dated 18 Feb. (F)

15 Feb. 1328

Letter from the same to the Mayor, Echevins and good men of the town of Rouen in Normandy, praying them to assist John de Wrotham and Adam Hurel to recover money entrusted to Massiot le Mariee of the town of "Ducleer sur Seyne" to trade therewith. Dated 15 Feb. (F)

A note to the effect that a similar letter was sent to the town of " Ducleer " in Normandy. (L)

Membr. 19 (23)b

18 Feb. 1328

Reply from the Mayor etc. of London to the letter from the Mayor and Echevins of Boulogne. The writers had heard that the ship of Adam Hurel and John Genge had been seized by men of Boulogne, serving on board the "Oliver Daveys" of Whytsand, of which Peter Freet was master, who had carried her to Boulogne and had there sold both ship and merchandise. They pray that inquiry may be made into the matter. Dated 18 Feb. (F)

13 Jan. 1328

Letters from the same to the Mayor, Bailiffs, Echevins and good men of Whytsand on the same subject. Dated 13 Jan. and 18 Feb. (F)

18 Feb. 1328

The same to the Mayor etc. of Calais. Dated 18 Feb.(F)

12 Feb. 1328

Letter from John de Grantham and John Priour, junior, to the Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs and Commonalty of London, reporting that they had done their best to carry out instructions at York, but the will of the King and his Council were independent of the advice of the people. The writers understood that the City believed, on the strength of a letter from the Mayor of York, that Richard Betoyne (fn. 31) had advocated the removal of the Staple abroad, and claimed by a charter the office of Mayor of the Staple overseas. They wish to testify that the said Richard attended an assembly of the "Commune" of merchants in the Chapter House at York, at which the writers and Richard de Edelmeton, William atte Pole and other merchants from 28 towns were present, when they discussed the Staple, as they were instructed to do by the Chancellor. The merchants had put it to Richard de Betoyne that he was their Mayor and he had denied it (susmistrent au dit Richard de Bettoyne estre lour metre et il respoundit qe noun), whereupon they answered him that he ought to go and lay down his mayoralty in the place where he took it up, and surrender the charters, which had cost them dear. To this he replied that John de Charletone (fn. 32) had the charter of their franchises and detained it, but that he had himself, four years ago, caused a transcript to be made, which he was ready to surrender if they wished. At this point, the Mayor of York suddenly appeared, hand in hand with John de Charletone, with three or four others of their party and several members of the Commune of York, on which Richard de Betoyne said he would not stay in any place where John de Charletone was taken into counsel, and he got up and left and did not return to the Council of the merchants. For this reason Richard de Edelmeton and the rest were angry with him. This was all that happened, and the writers have no knowledge of any misconduct on the part of Richard de Betoyne, and are grieved that stories to his discredit should have been reported by the Mayor of York. On the contrary they had found the said Richard always zealous to carry out the wishes of the City.

As regards news, they report the arrival of the French envoys, who had not given any answer. The Scottish envoys were on the way, and the Council was sitting daily to promote an agreement among the magnates. Letters had come to the King and Queen, announcing the death of the King of France. Dated at York, 12 Feb. (F)

Membr. 20 (24)

12 Feb. 1328

Letter from Richard de Betoyne to the same, reporting that he had done his best to carry out the duty entrusted to him, but he had been much hurt by the accusations made against him to the City of London by the Mayor of York. He had only been in the company of the merchants at York on one occasion, when they put it to him that he was Mayor of the Staple (mistrent sur que ieo fu meire de les Estaples) and wished to have counsel with him, and he had answered that he did not consider himself their Mayor, and had not come to counsel them, but that John de Graham (fn. 33) and John Priour were present, in accordance with the writs, to deal with the matter of the Staple. The merchants then charged him by the oath he had taken overseas that he should go abroad and lay down his mayoralty in the place where he had received it, together with their charters and muniments, which had cost them dear. He had replied that he had left the charters on the other side of the sea with their other things on his departure thence, except their charter of the franchises of the Staples, purchased from the late King, which was in the hands of John de Charleton, who detained it, but he had had a copy made at Dover in the 18th year of King Edward, the King's father, when the latter was at that place; and he offered it to the merchants. He encloses a copy for the information of the City of London. As a proof of the ill-will entertained towards him by the men of York, he mentions that the Mayor of York appeared maliciously and without warning, with four or five of his livery, and led in his enemy, John de Charletone, dressed in their livery as a burgess of York, and with them were a great many of the Commune of York. As soon as the writer saw him, he told the Mayor that he would neither sit nor remain in the place where John de Charleton was, and he rose and went out, for he would certainly never make peace with the said John without the consent of the commonalty of London. He had not been in the company of the merchants since and had no certain knowledge what answer they made to the King's Council. Accordingly he prays the City to put aside its anger against him. Dated at York, 12 Feb.

In a postscript he adds that the Mayor of York and several other burgesses of York came to his lodging on the eve of the Purification and accused him of having come to York only to spy on their fellow-burgess, John de Charletone, in order to do him harm, all of which he had denied. The writer considered that this insult (vileynie) was directed not only against himself but also against the City, whose messenger he was. (F)

20 Feb. 1328

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of London to Richard de Betoyne, accepting his explanations and approving his conduct. Dated 20 Feb. (F)

No date

The same to the Mayor and Commonalty of York, certifying that Richard de Betoyne had been found guiltless of the charges brought against him in their letter, and expressing astonishment that untrue statements should have been made under the Common Seal of their town. They are requested to treat Richard de Betoyne with courtesy as the accredited representative of the City of London. (F)

24 Feb. 1328

Letter from Stephen (de Gravesend), Bishop of London, acknowledging receipt of the letter from the Mayor etc., in which they prayed him to remit the penalty imposed on Anketin Gisors, Henry and Richard his brothers, James Beauflour and John de Hynton. Up to the time of writing, James Beauflour alone had submitted himself to the Bishop, who had in accordance with the Mayor's wishes dealt leniently with him, as he promises also to deal with the others. Dated at Orsete, 24 Feb. (F)

No date

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of London to Queen Isabella, begging her good offices in the coming Parliament. (F)

Membr. 20 (24)b

1 March 1328

Writ to the Sheriffs of London, reciting that on the occasion of the aid for the war in Scotland, permission had been given for merchants to buy and sell wool, hides and woolfells both within and outside the Staple towns, and to export the same from ports where the King's custom-collectors were stationed, until last Christmas, notwithstanding the Ordinances of the Staple. The King now directs the Sheriffs to publish his intention of carrying out the ordinances made by the late King, and orders them to ensure that they are inviolably observed in their bailiwick (fn. 34). Dated at York, 1 March Ao 2 Edw. III [1327-8]. (L)

5 March 1328

Writ to the Sheriffs of London for the election of two members to represent the City in the Parliament to be held at Northampton three weeks after Easter. Members are enjoined not to bring a retinue of armed men, as had been done by divers magnates on previous occasions. Dated at York, 5 March Ao 2 Edw. III. (L)

11 April 1328

Writ to the Sheriffs of London to see that no injury or insult be offered to Scottish merchants or others, peace having been made between the two kingdoms. Dated at Saunford (fn. 35), 11 April Ao 2 Edw. III [1328]. (L)

20 April 1328

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of London to the King, notifying the election of Richard de Betoyne and Robert de Kelseye to represent the City in the Parliament at Northampton. Dated 20 April Ao 2 Edw. III [1328]. (L)

20 April 1328

The same to the same, praying speedy execution of writs issued in Chancery to give redress to Stephen Aleyn, citizen of London, against merchants of Hainault, who had robbed him to the extent of £200 on the sea-coast near "Ravenser Rode," over against the town of Saltfleteby (fn. 36). Dated 20 April. (F)

22 April 1328

The same to Geoffrey le Scrope, thanking him for the assistance he had given the City in the past, and especially in the matter of Yarmouth. Dated 22 April. (F)

A note to the effect that a similar letter was sent to Sir Walter de Norwich (fn. 37), with the exception of the clause relating to Yarmouth. (L)

Membr. 21 (25)

15 March 1328

Letter from the "Eskevyn" of the town of Calais to the Mayor etc. of London, acknowledging letters touching the seizure of the ship "La Blithe" belonging to Adam Hurel and John Genge, and certifying that no one under their jurisdiction was concerned in the matter. Dated Tuesday after Mid-Lent [13 March]. (F)

16 March 1328

A similar letter from the Mayor and Echevins of Whissand. Dated Wednesday after Mid-Lent [13 March]. (F)

16 March 1327

Letters (fn. 38) patent regulating the trade of the Goldsmiths of London, pursuant to a petition presented by them to the Parliament held at Westminster after the Feast of the Purification last. Complaint had been made that merchants, foreign and native, had been bringing into the country counterfeit sterling worth only sixteen shillings of true sterling; that goldsmiths of the City were keeping shop in obscure lanes, where they bought vessels of gold and silver without inquiry and melted them down into plate for export, or made out of them coronals, buckles and rings set with glass counterfeited to represent stones, and that they put too much alloy in their silver articles, which they sold to mercers; and further that the cutlers plated tin with silver, so that the two could not be separated, and sold this plated tin as silver. It was now ordained that merchants no longer import false money, but only fine plate of silver, and that no gold or silver work or silver plate be sold to merchants for export, but that all such goods be sold either at the Exchange or in open shop in the Goldsmith's quarter (orfeverie) in Cheap. Searchers of work were to be elected to present offenders to the Mistery. The same ordinances were to apply to all goldsmiths throughout the country, and every city and town was required to send representatives to London to obtain their touch of gold (lour certeyne touche door), and the stamp (pounceon) of the Leopard's Head, wherewith to mark their work. Dated at Westminster, 16 March (fn. 39) Ao 1 Edw. III [1326-7]. (F)

2 May 1328

Letter from the King to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London with regard to Dominyk Baret, factor of the Lady Isabella the King's mother, who had been arrested with all his goods on the charge of purchasing gold and silver plate for exportation. They are ordered to produce him safe and sound before the King's Council without delay, and with all the goods and chattels in his possession at the time of his arrest. Dated at Northampton, 2 May Ao 2 Edw.III [1328]. (F)

4 May 1328

Letter from Queen Isabella to the same on behalf of "Domynkyn" Baret, her merchant. Dated at Nottingham, 4 May. (F)

28 Jan. 1328

Acquittance from the Mayor, Aldermen and citizens of London to Henry Darci and John Hauteyn, Sheriffs, for £43 12s 5d out of the farm and issues of the City of London and County of Middlesex, in part repayment of £1000 lent to the late King. Dated 28 Jan. Ao 1 (fn. 40) Edw. III [1326-7].

Note that the acquittance was placed in the coffer with the Common Seal of the City. (L)

6 May 1328

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty to the King, praying that justice may be done to Adam Hurel and John Genge, whose ship "La Blithe" had been seized and carried into Boulogne harbour, where the cargo was sold. Dated 6 May. (F)

Membr. 21 (25)b

6 May 1328

The same to the same on behalf of Stephen Aleyn, who had been robbed by merchants of Hainault, praying that the writ of arrest against the latter, the execution of which had been delayed by Hugh le Despenser and Robert de Baldok, might be renewed and enforced. Dated 6 May. (F)

6 May 1328

A similar letter on behalf of Henry le Palmere and other citizens, who had been robbed by Flemish merchants to the value of £518 6s 8d. Dated as above. (F)

7 May 1328

Letter from the same to the King, in reply to one supra, explaining that Dominyk Baret, on the complaint of the goldsmiths, had been arraigned in the Husting, and had been found guilty by a jury of having exported gold and silver plate contrary to one of the provisions of the recent charter granted to the Goldsmiths of London. Dated 7 May. (F)

10 May 1328

Letter from the same to the Mayor, Bailiffs and good men of the town of Henley, with regard to an exaction of toll on the goods of Walter Neel, Hamo le Barber, John Housebond, Alan de Tycchewell, Thomas de Chigwell, Gilbert Pavy and Martin de Chigwell against the liberties of London. Dated 10 May. (F)

14 May 1328

Further letter to the same on the same subject. Dated 14 May. (F)

Membr. 22 (26)

15 June 1328

Writ to the Sheriffs of London for the election of two members to represent the City at the Parliament to be held at York on Sunday after the Feast of St James [25 July]. Dated at Worcester, 15 June Ao 2 Edw. III [1328]. (L)

26 July 1328

The Mayor, Sheriffs and Commonalty of London to the King, certifying the election of Richard de Betoyne, Robert de Kelseye and James Beauflour—or two of them—to represent the City in the Parliament at York. Dated 26 July. (L)

1 July 1328

Writ (fn. 41) under the Privy Seal to the Sheriffs of London to receive the Coronation Stone from the Abbot of Westminster, and to convey it to the Queen-Mother in whatever part of the North of England she may happen to be. Dated at Bordesleye, 1 July Ao 2 Edw. III [1328]. (F)

24 June 1328

Letter from Hugh de Audele (or Daudele) touching wharfage dues exacted at Henley from the ships of Walter Neel and other citizens of London, and pointing out that as lord of Henley for the lifetime of his wife (fn. 42) he was entitled to such dues, which had originally been paid in the time of the Earl of Cornwall (fn. 43), and would in course of time pass to the King with the reversion of the manor, although of late they had been allowed to lapse. He promises to give further explanations when he comes to London. Dated at Tonbridge, the Feast of St John the Baptist [24 June]. (F)

4 July 1328

The City's reply to the above, desiring Sir Hugh de Audele to give orders to his bailiffs to cease exacting toll until his arrival in London to discuss the matter. Dated 4 July. (F)

4 July 1328

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of London to Sir William, Count of Hainault, Holland and Zeeland, and Seigneur of Friesland, on behalf of Stephen Aleyn, citizen of London, who had sued the Count's subjects before the late King and his Council for a robbery of £200. A writ of arrest had been sent to the various sheriffs, as appears by process made in the Rolls of Chancery, but the execution of the writs had been delayed, because of the negotiations between the King and the Count. The Count is prayed to make restitution to the said Stephen in accordance with the messages (maundementz) ordained by the King and his Common Council under the Great Seal at the Parliament at Northampton. Dated 4 July. (F)

4 July 1328

The same to the Burgomasters, Echevins and Commonalty of Bruges, on behalf of Henry le Palmere and other citizens of London, who had sued the men of the Seignory of the Count of Flanders before the late King and his Council for a robbery of £518 6s 8d, as appears by process made in the Rolls of Chancery. Writs were sent to the Sheriffs to arrest the goods and chattels of the said merchants, but the execution of the writs had been delayed, because negotiations were taking place between the King's Council and the Count's envoys. The latter had returned home without giving satisfaction to the plaintiffs, as appears more fully in the abovementioned process. The writers are sending a copy of the process by the bearer, and beg that the plaintiffs may receive their claims, according to the messages ordained by the King and his Common Council at the last Parliament and sent to the Count. An answer is requested by the bearer. Dated as above. (F)

27 July 1328

Letter from the Aldermen, Sheriffs and Commonalty of the City of London to the King, praying him to assist Hamo de Chigwell and his colleagues to obtain redress from the Flemings for a grievous trespass committed in the eighth year of the reign of Edw. II, with regard to which proceedings had taken place in Chancery. Dated 27 July. (F)

26 July 1328

Letter from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty to Matthew de Bassingbourn, Sheriff of Cambridge, on behalf of Richard de Welleford and Geoffrey de Weston (fn. 44), citizens of London, who had been robbed in the hundred of Stowe in the county of Cambridge, with regard to which proceedings had been begun before the Sheriff by a writ of the King. Dated the morrow of the Feast of St James [25 July]. (F)

Membr. 22 (26)b

25 July 1328

Note that on Monday the Feast of St James [25 July] Ao 2 Edw. III [1328] Henry Russel, Stephen de Coumbe and Richard le Sealer, of the City of New Sarum, appeared before the Mayor and Aldermen and claimed to be free from the payment of murage and pavage in the City of London, in proof of which they proffered a writ directed to the Mayor and Sheriffs, and a charter recently acquired. Their claim was allowed. (L)

12 July 1328

Writ to the Sheriffs of London that they make proclamation in the City for all claims against the Flemings to be laid before the King and his Council at York on the Feast of St Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.], with a view to an understanding between England and Flanders. Dated at Bridgnorth, 12 July Ao 2 Edw. III [1328].

Marginal note that the above was cancelled for the reason that due notice had not been given to the Flemings. (L)

No date: circa July 1328

Reply of John Hauteyn and Henry Darci, Sheriffs of London, to the King's writ bidding them receive the Coronation Stone from the Abbot of Westminster and carry it to the Queen-Mother in the north of England. They report that the Abbot and Convent refused to give up the Stone until they had treated of the matter with the King and his Council. (F)

Footnotes

  • 1. John, Earl of Surrey and Sussex, called Earl of Warenne as being Count of Warenne in Normandy.
  • 2. Sc. John de Dreux, youngest son of John de Dreux, Duke of Brittany, and Beatrice, daughter of Henry III. The Earldom of Richmond, held by his father, was granted to him by patent of 15 Oct. 1306. He died unmarried 1334.
  • 3. In proceedings for recovery of lands by writ of Right Patent, the defendant or tenant might vouch to warranty a person having no tenements in the City, by which he could be forced to attend the Court. In this case, the plaintiff or demandant could have the record taken before the Court of Common Pleas at Westminster, at which the vouchee could be forced to appear. The action was then sent back to the Husting for judgment. See Lib. Alb. 1, p. 183; 11, p. 19, and Husting Rolls, Pleas of Land, 43.
  • 4. If the defendant, after making his three permitted essoins or excuses, failed to appear, a parvum cape was issued against him. Ibid. 1, p. 181.
  • 5. Printed in Riley's Memorials, p. 154.
  • 6. These articles were repeated and confirmed in 1372. A translation of the ordinances of that date is printed in Riley's Memorials, pp. 364-5, from the text in Letter Book G, fo. 288 b.
  • 7. Recorded also in Letter Book E, fo. 176, and Husting Rolls of Common Pleas, No. 51, and printed in Riley's Memorials, pp. 156-162.
  • 8. See above, p. 22, n. i.
  • 9. These men were under the command of John de Bedeford, who had also in his company 20 men-at-arms and 160 archers receiving nothing from the City. In 1350 John de Bedeford was still claiming from the Exchequer moneys disbursed by him for pay. See V. B. Redstone, "Some Mercenaries of Henry of Lancaster" (Trans. Royal Hist. Soc. 3rd Series, VII); Cal. of Letter Book F, p. 206; P.R.O. Exchequer K.R. 18/7.
  • 10. The French Chronicle tells us that Isabella and Mortimer arrived at Harwich and Orwell on Wednesday, 24 Sept. 1326, and on Monday, 29 Sept. she and her son sent letters to the commons of London, asking them to assist in destroying the enemies of the land, but received no answer, through fear of the King. Another letter (evidently the present letter dated 6 Oct.) was sent and was fixed at daybreak on the Cross at Cheap, and a copy on the windows elsewhere, on Thursday the Feast of St Dionis [9 Oct.]. A week later, 15 Oct., the Commonalty flocked to the Guildhall and forced Hamo de Chigwell, then Mayor, to declare for the Queen. French Chronicle, pp. 51-2.
  • 11. Baldock, co. Herts.
  • 12. Either on 15 or 16 Oct. the commons of the City went armed to the Tower, where the Constable agreed to deliver to them Sir John de Eltham, the King's younger son, and the adherents of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, who had been imprisoned after the latter's defeat and death. The released prisoners took an oath to make common cause with the City. The present letter appears to have been written as soon as the Queen received news of the rising in her favour, and of the danger which threatened Stephen de Gravesend, Bishop of London. Ibid.
  • 13. This ordinance had been drawn up at a Council held by the King at Westminster shortly after Easter 1326, and was proclaimed in the City on 12 May. Chron. of Edw. I and Edw. II, i, p. 312. Cf. Letter Book E, fo. clxvii, where the ordinance and the two following writs are also enrolled. The terms of the ordinance are printed in Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1324-7, p. 269, and more fully in ibid. 1327-30, pp. 98-99.
  • 14. Printed in Riley's Memorials, p. 150, from Letter Book E, fo. clxviii.
  • 15. Printed in Riley's Memorials, p. 162, from the version given in the City's Assisa Panis, fo. 79b.
  • 16. A duplicate of that enrolled on membr. 8.
  • 17. Set out in Rymer's Foedera, vol. ii, pt. ii, p. 723, from the Patent Rolls.
  • 18. Cf. Cal. Pat. Rolls, A.D. 1327-30, pp. 184-5, 186, for the three following writs.
  • 19. The Dominican or Black Friars.
  • 20. "Whitesand" in the margin.
  • 21. By the first Charter of Edw. III to the City of London, dated 6 March 1327, it is granted that the Mayor shall be one of the justices to be assigned for the gaol-delivery of Newgate, and be named in every commission thereof to be made; and that the said citizens may have infangenthef and outfangenthef and chattels of felons, of all those which shall be adjudged before them within the liberties of the same City, and of all being of the liberty aforesaid, at the aforesaid gaol to be adjudged. W. de G. Birch, Historical Charters of the City of London, p. 53. This charter confirmed the City's control over criminal jurisdiction within the City, originally granted by the Charter of Henry I, but subsequently allowed to lapse. The Lord Mayor's name appears first in all commissions of Gaol-Delivery and Oyer and Terminer, taking precedence even of the Lord Chancellor, and he presides at the Sessions of the Central Criminal Court.
  • 22. The official representing the Bishop of London, not the prison discover "what kind of clerks" (quales) they were. If found guilty, they were handed over to the Ordinary as "criminous clerks." See Add. MS. 5153 membr. 14 Ao 3 Edw. I.
  • 23. Sheriff.
  • 24. The petition and covering letter are noted in the margin as having been sent to the King at the Parliament at York, which was held on 8 Feb.1328.
  • 25. The Winchester tron here mentioned was kept in the Winchester Seld in London, and was the subject of many disputes. See Lib. Cust. i, p. 115. Cal. of Early Mayor's Court Rolls, pp. 7-9.
  • 26. See p. 7, n. 3, for the relations between Oxford and London.
  • 27. An ordinance or "charter" of the Staple was issued in 1313 by letters patent (Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1307-13, p. 591) directing that in future woolmerchants should export their wool, hides and woolfells to a fixed Staple town in Brabant, Flanders and Artois, to be appointed by the Mayor and community of the merchants of the realm. A complete change of policy took place on 1 May 1326, when the foreign Staple was abolished, and the Staple of merchants of wool, woolfells and hides was established in fourteen places in England, Wales and Ireland, while that of tin was fixed at one Devonshire and two Cornish towns. Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1324-7, p. 269; 1327-30, pp. 98-99. Prof. T. F. Tout says that this change was almost universally popular. The Place of the Reign of Edward II in English History, p. 262. If so, the merchants were no longer of the same mind in Jan. 1328, for the above letter shows that they were then generally in favour of a return to the foreign Staple. Matters were at that time in a state of flux, owing to the fact that on 2 July 1327 the King had practically suspended the Staple till Christmas, on consideration of a loan made to him by the merchants for the Scottish war. See p. 32.
  • 28. See p. 55, n. i, as to the dispute which arose on this preferment.
  • 29. See Introduction to this Calendar.
  • 30. According to the Chron. of Edw. I and Edw. II, pp. 340-1, there was a contest between Master R. de Brenchesle and an alien for the Prebendal Stall of " Brondesburi" at St Paul's, vacant by the death of G. de Stone, which Stall the Bishop had given to Brenchesle, and on 24 Jan. 1328, a Gascon called I. de Puiz, with Anketin de Gisors, Alderman, Henry his brother and others, dragged Brenchesle's vicar, T. de St Albans, from the Stall and maltreated him; for which scandal Gisors and his accomplices were excommunicated. We learn from the marginal note on membr. 18 (21) of this Roll, that the alien ecclesiastic favoured by Gisors was the Pope's nominee, Gerald de Cantalauza. The account given by the Chronicle does not correspond with that of the Cathedral Records, which show that Cantalauza held the Stall of Brondesbury, until Brenchesle was preferred to it on 28 Dec. 1327, and that on 24 Jan. 1328 (the day of the fracas) Cantalauza was preferred to the Stall of Brownswood, vacant by the death of Geoffrey de Eyton. Newcourt's Repertorium, i, pp. 117, 120. On the facts, it would appear as though Cantalauza's friends attempted by force to secure for him the Stall of Brondesbury as against the Bishop's nominee, and though they failed, the Cathedral authorities thought it best to console him with another Stall, which they did the same day.
  • 31. See Introduction on the question of the removal of the Staple and the behaviour of Richard de Betoyne.
  • 32. Cf. p. 16, n. i.
  • 33. Sc. Grantham.
  • 34. This intention was not persisted in. By the Statute of Northampton, c. 9, this year, Staples were abolished. Statutes of the Realm, i, p. 259.
  • 35. Sc. Sandford.
  • 36. Cf. pp. 28, 76.
  • 37. Chief Baron of the Exchequer, A.D. 1317-29.
  • 38. Known as the first Charter to the Goldsmiths. It is recorded also in Letter Book G, fo. civ. An incorrect version is printed in Herbert's Livery Companies, ii, pp. 287-9.
  • 39. The date is given as 13 March in Letter Book G.
  • 40. An error for Ao 2, i.e. 1328. Darci and Hauteyn were not appointed Sheriffs until Sept. 1327.
  • 41. For the answer to this writ, see p. 65.
  • 42. Hugh de Audele married Margaret de Clare, widow of Piers Gaveston and daughter of Joan, who was daughter of Edward I. By right of his wife he was lord of the manor of Henley. Subsequently in 1337, the Earldom of Gloucester, formerly held by his wife's brother, was revived in his favour. His statement in this letter contradicts the assertion of Burn (History of Henley, p. 233) that the manor of Henley was granted to himself and his wife, and their heirs.
  • 43. Richard, brother of Henry III.
  • 44. see pp. 71,75,76, 77.