BHO

Weymouth

Pages 330-374

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Dorset, Volume 2, South east. Originally published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1970.

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42 WEYMOUTH (6778)

(O.S. 6 ins. aSY 67 NE, bSY 68 SE, cSY 68 NE, dSY 78 SW)

The parish of Weymouth, coterminous with the municipal borough of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, lies on the W. side of Weymouth Bay; it extends 6½ miles N.–S. and 5¼ miles E.–W. covering some 11 square miles. The parish incorporates the twin towns of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis which lie S. and N. of the harbour at the mouth of the river Wey and which were united in 1570–1, together with the greater part of the former parishes of Broadwey, Preston, Radipole, Upwey and Wyke Regis, and small parts of Bincombe and Chickerell, added between 1895 and 1933. With the exception of Preston these settlements are on or adjacent to the road between Dorchester and Portland and this road is now almost continuously developed throughout the parish. The former parishes do, however, retain much of their individuality and are listed here under separate heads.

The hinterland of Weymouth is notable for the complexity of its geology. In the S. around Wyke Regis is gently rising Kimmeridge Clay capped by an exposure of Corallian Limestone, which is succeeded to the N. by a large area of low lying Oxford Clay in the region of Radipole Lake and by two small escarpments of Cornbrash and Forest Marble. Further outcrops of these rocks occur to the N. culminating in beds of Portland and Purbeck Stone and in the Chalk Ridgeway which rises to over 500 ft. and forms the northernmost boundary of the parish. The 40 barrows which occur within these limits are mostly situated on this elevated chalk ridge.

Remains of a Roman villa and a square building, possibly a temple, occur in the vicinity of Preston and there is some evidence that a port existed at this period at Radipole at the end of a road from Dorchester.

The town of Weymouth, on the S. side of the harbour, was established at least as early as the 10th century and its first charter was granted in 1252. Until 1836 it was included within the parish of Wyke Regis, and a chapel-of-ease dedicated to St. Nicholas stood until the Civil War on high ground about 80 yds. S.W. of the present Holy Trinity church (Monument 2). The town itself lay on the narrow strip of land facing the harbour, principally along the S. side of High Street (which included the modern. Trinity Road and Trinity Street) and the S.W. end of Hope Street. Until the 18th century the latter faced a small inlet on the site of Cove Row and Cove Street which must have formed the original harbour. The restricted area of that part of the town with easy access to the harbour led to some stagnation in development, particularly after the 17th century, and consequently it lost some of its importance to Melcombe Regis which, as Coker said (Hutchins II, 419), 'standing on a flat, affordeth roome for building'.

Two mediaeval fragments have been noted (29 and 72) which may possibly derive from the former chapel-of-ease. Ten buildings listed here retained work of the 16th or 17th centuries, the most notable being No. 4 North Quay (48); this and the other principal buildings of the period were built of Portland stone with gabled roofs and stone-mullioned windows (cf. Buckler's drawing of 'an old mansion in the High Street, Weymouth'—B.M. Add. MS. 36361 f. 192). Stone buildings of the 18th century are represented by Nos. 1 and 6 Hope Street (35, 36) but the principal expansion of the town came after 1800 when brickwork, sometimes rendered with stucco, became the usual medium. Typical of controlled speculative development in the early 19th century is No. 5 Cove Row (23) built to a standard elevation with a mansard roof and one hungsash window to each floor.

Sandsfoot Castle (8) of 1541, some distance to the S. of the town, the Old Town Hall (13) at the W. end of High Street, and Belfield House (17) of c. 1780, are the only larger buildings to survive from before 1800.

The town of Melcombe Regis on the N. side of the harbour may be of more recent origin than Weymouth, but it received a charter in 1280 and, being on a level site, was free to expand at the expense of its neighbour. It was formerly included in the parish of Radipole, although a chapel-of-ease seems to have existed in the town at least as early as 1298 (Hutchins, II, 456), being superseded by a new building in 1605 which was granted parochial status in the following year.

A Dominican friary, authorised in 1418, was established in 1431, the church of which stood on or near the present site of Market Street with a cemetery on the N. side, S. of St. Alban Street. The friary was dissolved in 1538 but the church appears to have survived, converted to secular uses, until the 19th century (V.C.H., Dorset, II (1908), 92–3).

The present street pattern S. of the King's Statue (9) follows closely that of the mediaeval town, with a series of roughly parallel N.–S. streets joined by fewer streets lying E.–W. In the mid 16th century East Street formed the E. limit of the town beyond which was 'Ye Towne Myxon where all ye refuse of ye towne is caste' (copy of old map in Dorset County Museum, c. 1539–47); the N. limit was approximately on the line of Bond Street and Lower Bond Street (formerly 'Cunigar Dytche Lane').

The earliest surviving buildings date from the 16th century; these and the work of the following century are generally of stone and the best surviving examples —the 'Black Dog' in St. Mary Street (173), the 'White Hart' and adjacent buildings in Nicholas Street (152) and Lower Bond Street (105), and the 'Ship' Inn and adjacent buildings in Maiden Street (144)—have ashlar gables with moulded copings and shaped kneelers. The 'Black Dog' has one timber-framed wall facing an internal courtyard which is contemporary with the masonry front, but no other certain examples of timber construction have been found. Monument (203) may possibly incorporate this form of construction and No. 45 St. Mary Street (185) was formerly framed and apparently dated from c. 1580.

About a dozen buildings survive from the early or mid 18th century; of these 68 St. Thomas Street (215) is built of ashlar and the remainder are in brickwork, e.g. 1 Lower St. Edmund Street (169) dated 1727. They are not remarkable except in that they reflect indifferent prosperity before c. 1780.

In the latter year the Duke of Gloucester passed a winter in the town, so adding to its already developing reputation as a watering place. The Duke subsequently built for himself Gloucester Lodge (251) in a then isolated position N. of the town and separated from it by ground known as the 'Shrubbery', or, on the 16th-century map, 'ye Cuniger'. In 1789 George III took up residence at Gloucester Lodge beginning a series of visits which continued until after the commencement of the Regency in 1811. The presence of the Court resulted in a marked rise in the prosperity of the town.

Melcombe Regis is principally notable for the building developments of the late 18th and 19th centuries, and particularly for the series of terraces on the Esplanade built between approximately 1785 and 1855; this included both an extension of the town E. of East Street (Monuments 228–42) and a completely new development to the N. along the narrow isthmus connecting the old town with the mainland (Monuments 243–72). The earliest developments are seen S. of the King's Statue in York Buildings (240) and N. of Gloucester Lodge in Gloucester Row (252–3) and Royal Crescent (266); the S. end of the Esplanade was next developed with Devonshire Buildings and Pulteney Buildings (229, 230) and the N. end of this section with Johnstone Row (241), all built or begun by c. 1810.

While Gloucester Lodge remained in use as a Royal residence, the 'Shrubbery' to the S. continued to separate it from the town. The departure of the Court is marked by the building on part of this land in c. 1816–18 of Royal Terrace (244), making the development of the Esplanade continuous as far as Royal Crescent. This was then continued to the N. by Belvidere (268) begun in 1818 and at the northernmost end of the isthmus by Brunswick Terrace (271) built c. 1823–7. The next two terraces, Frederick Place (243) and Waterloo Place (270), both built c. 1834–5, indicate the final stages in the development, neither fronting directly on the bay although continuing the main line of the Esplanade to N. and S. The completion of the development came shortly after 1850 with the erection of Victoria Terrace, N. of Belvidere. This terrace was proposed and named at about the same time as the foregoing (Town Council Minutes, 11 June, 29 Oct. 1835) but work was not begun for 20 years. This delay and the slow progress made with Belvidere, which occupied 37 years, indicate that the demand for new building had been largely met before 1850 and that later developments, principally on the mainland N.W. of the town, are directly attributable to the opening of railway communication in 1857.

Throughout the early 19th century minor infilling and rebuilding took place within the old town and behind the new terraces; this generally took the form of smaller houses often similar in appearance to individual houses in the terraces and characterised by curved bow windows, or later angular bay windows, rising through two or three storeys or suspended at first floor level only. The latter is exemplified by the development of Bath Street and Wesley Street between c. 1830 and 1860 (Plate 185) and the former by a minor terrace in Crescent Street (267). Typical houses are single-fronted with the staircase placed either between the front and back rooms, or to the rear in a widening of the entrance passage.

Notable public works of the early 19th century include St. Mary's Church (1), The Guildhall (10), and the Statue of King George III (9); trade and commerce are represented by the Custom House (12), warehouses (112, 171), and the pier at the Nothe, Weymouth, and Pile pier on the Melcombe Regis side of the harbour. Although not separately described, both these piers appear to incorporate work of the early 19th century. A map published in Harvey's Improved Weymouth Guide (c. 1800) and John Wood's Map of Weymouth of 1841 show the growth of the town in the early 19th century. The extent of development by the mid 19th century is well illustrated by Pierce Arthur's Trigonometrical Map of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis (1857).

The Parish Church of Saint Mary, Melcombe Regis

Ecclesiastical

a(1) The Parish Church of St. Mary, Melcombe Regis (Plates 177, 178), stands on the E. side of St. Mary Street. The walls are of Portland stone ashlar, probably with a brick core, and the roof is covered with slates. A chapel-of-ease to the parish church of Radipole (Monument 322) was built here in 1605 and granted parochial status in the following year. The church was completely rebuilt between 1815 and 1817, the architect being James Hamilton of Weymouth, (fn. 1) and the building remains little altered except for the addition of a choir vestry on the S. side. Proximity to Maiden Street has prevented extension of the building eastward.

St. Mary's church has a monumental W. front of some distinction, but the building is of particular interest as an expression of the empiricism of a provincial architect acquainted with but possessing little knowledge of the neo-Classical style of the period. It contains interesting fittings, most notable among them being the large painting of the Last Supper by Sir James Thornhill.

Architectural Description—The church is rectangular on plan (92½ ft. by 65 ft.), consisting of a main compartment containing Sanctuary and Nave without structural division, and North and South Aisles divided from the foregoing by colonnades each of seven bays; a gallery extends over the aisles and across the W. end of the nave. The church has no chancel, the Sanctuary occupying the two eastern bays of the main compartment.

The Sanctuary and Nave (84½ ft. by 30 ft.) have end elevations that are parts of architectural compositions embracing also the ends of the aisles. The E. end is similar to the W. end next described, but without the elaboration of the colossal order, pediment and cupola. The W. end over all is a three-bay composition divided by paired and flanked by single colossal Roman-Doric pilasters. In each bay is a round-headed doorway below, and a window of similar shape above; a platband butts against the pilasters but is otherwise continuous around the building. The pilasters carry a plain architrave and cornice, also returned round the building, the cornice alone rising in a pediment over the middle bay; the tympanum contains two small round windows. The pediment projects from a plain obtusely gabled parapet wall surmounted by a cupola. This last has a square podium, containing a clock, supporting a ring of eight freestanding slender Roman Doric columns under a plain cornice carrying a lead-covered dome with ball-finial and wrought-iron weather-vane. Inside, Sanctuary and Nave (Plate 178) are covered by a plain segmental barrel vault, of plaster on timber battens, springing from a moulded cornice supported by six lofty slender stone columns on either side; the columns are quatre-foiled on plan with moulded capitals and chamfered and moulded bases; they are in the Gothic style in a building otherwise Classical. (fn. 2) They provide a bearing for the N. and S. galleries at about mid-height, and similar but truncated columns support the W. gallery.

The North and South Aisles (16 ft. wide) are alike. Outside, each has the cornice and plat-band returned from the E. and W. ends described above, a parapet wall and seven square-headed windows below and as many, round-headed, above. Inside, each has a flat plaster ceiling above the gallery and a raking ceiling below it. The gallery, which has a panelled front partly concealing the supporting columns, is approached by four staircases, two at the W. end, and one at the E. end of each aisle. The W. staircases have plain iron balusters and moulded newels, and all have ornamental cast-iron work on the landings; below, they are enclosed within vestibules.

Fittings—Bell: one, in cupola, by Thomas Mears, 1816 (Raven, 63). Benefactors' Tables: in W. entrance vestibule, two alike in paired semicircular-headed framed panels—on N. wall, with lists of contributors to church building fund, dated 1816; on S. wall, with list of charitable benefactions, early 19th-century with further inscription added 1854. Brasses and Indents: In nave at E. end, indent of rectangular plate. Fireplace: in choir vestry, of stone, with moulded shelf and reeded architrave with circular paterae, early 19th-century, reused. Mayoral Pew: see Miscellanea.

Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: in nave—on W. wall, (1) to Lieut. Robert Campbell, 3rd Dragoon Guards, 1799, white marble lozenge-shaped tablet; (2) to Capt. James Stear, 1734, white marble tablet; (3) to Mary (Pley) wife of Rev. William Colbourne, 1665, black marble tablet, 19th-century renewal; (4) to Francis Stewart, 1798, and Martha his widow, 1824, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet on black marble backing, signed Hellyer. In N. aisle—on N. wall, (5) to Bayles Wardell, 1825, and Maria his wife, 1827, white marble tablet and sculpture on black marble backing; (6) to Richard Coxwell Steward Wardell, 1843, and others, white marble tablet on black marble backing; (7) to Rev. John Hopkins, 1831, and Elinor his widow, 1848, white marble tablet with sarcophagus-shaped panel on black marble backing; (8) to Catherine Frances Small, 1821, sarcophagus-shaped tablet with urn on grey marble backing, signed Hellyer; (9) to Thomas Gear, 1814, and Mary his widow, 1822, very similar to (7); (10) to Robert Penny, 1837, and Catherine his widow, 1847, sarcophagus-shaped white marble tablet with grey backing, signed Hellyer; (11) to Thomas Henry Martin, A.B., 1835, white marble tablet on black marble backing; (12) to Henry Skinner Prisk, 1817, white marble shield-shaped tablet on black marble backing, signed Gray, Weymouth; (13) to Jane, daughter of Bayles and Maria Wardell, 1843, white marble tablet on black marble backing; (14) to Maj.–Gen. Thomas Phipps Howard, 1847, and Margaret his widow, 1854, white marble tablet surmounted by crest, on black marble backing; on W. wall, (15) to Christopher Brooks of Jamaica, 1769, white veined marble tablet in moulded stone frame; (16) to Grace, daughter of James Jeffreys and the Lady Augustus Fitzroy, 1794, white marble tablet. In N. gallery—on E. wall, (17) to Gen. Gore Browne of the 44th regiment, 1843, Jennetta his wife, 1838, and Julia Anna his daughter, 1832, similar to (4), signed Hellyer; on N. wall, (18) to Rear Adml. Richard Turner Hancock, 1846, and Jane Love (Kinnear) his wife, 1820, and Elizabeth (Harwood) his second wife, 1842, white marble tablet surmounted by urn against black marble obelisk-shaped backing, signed Hellyer. In S. aisle—on S. wall, (19) to William Henry Hamilton, 1830, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet surmounted by urn and on bracket carved with crest, on black marble backing; (20) to Mary Jane, daughter of Francis and Mary Ellis, 1831, white sarcophagus-shaped marble tablet on black marble backing; (21) to Elizabeth, widow of Rev. Thomas Hayward, Warden of New College, Oxford, 1812, and Elizabeth their daughter, 1770, white marble oval tablet on black marble backing, with white marble reeded frame; (22) to George Welsford, 1854, and Susannah his wife, 1805, white marble tablet with black marble obelisk-shaped tablet above; (23) to John Thomas Burrard, drowned 1809, white marble tablet in a wreath on black marble backing with eared corners, signed Henry Westmacott, London; (24) to John Ruddock, 1819, oval white marble tablet surmounted by urn on black marble backing, signed Raggett, Mason, Weymouth; on W. wall, (25) to Robert Camden Cope of Loughall, Co. Armagh, 1818, white marble tablet with shield-of-arms on black marble backing, signed Gray, Weymouth. In S. gallery —on E. wall, (26) to Mary (Beckwith), wife of Lt.–Col. R. F. Melville Browne, and two of their children, Louisa, 1835, and Villiers Gore, 1831, similar to (4), signed Hellyer. Floor-slabs: In sanctuary, (1) to Mary Jane, c. 1800; (2) to Fanney, wife of James Scott, 1791; (3) to Elizabeth——,early 19th-century. In nave, (4) to Judith Martin, 1797; (5) to George Scott, 1817; (6) to Samuel Scriven, 1829, and others; (7) to Thomas Henry Martin, A.B., 1835; (8) to Timothy Scriven, 1817; (9) to Fanny, daughter of William and Harriet Hollond, 1830; (10) to Timothy Scriven, 1803, and others; (11) to —— Dyer, Jane Dyer and others, early 19th-century. In S. aisle, (12) to Mary Ricketts, 1803; (13) to Rebecca Dodd, c. 1800. A number of headstones of 18th and 19th-century date are reset as paving in the nave and S. aisle, including one at the E. end of the nave to ffloyd Morgan, 'murdered 1792, erected by public subscription'.

Organ: case with three towers of pipes and Greek palmette cresting, wrought and cast-iron grille at back of organist's seat, early 19th-century. Painting (Plate 178): above reredos, large canvas, with segmental head nearly following the shape of the ceiling above, depicting the Last Supper, being a baroque variation of Leonardo da Vinci's composition, by Sir James Thornhill, with inscription 'DEO OPTIMO MAXIMO S. Jacobus de Thornehill, Eques Auratus, et Historices (sic) Pictor Regius.

The Parish Church of the Holy Trinity, Weymouth

Oppido Huic in quo Natus fuit Hanc Amoris sui Tesseram Artisque Specimen. D D D. MDCCXXI'. Panelling: In vestibules and galleries, panelled dado, early 19th-century. Pews: In gallery, with shaped ends, early 19th-century. Plate: includes cup, paten, flagon and four alms-dishes given by Martha Guppy, 1817, base of ciborium, given by Rev. Willoughby Brassey, 1824, also cup, probably of 1844, and spoon. Recess: on S. side of sanctuary, with hollow-chamfered jambs and segmental arch in square head, of 17th-century material, reused. Reredos: of wood, with four fluted pilasters supporting an entablature with dentil cornice to frame paired round-headed panels in the middle inscribed with the Ten Commandments and rectangular panels in the flanking bays inscribed with the Lord's Prayer and Creed, early 19th-century. Royal Arms: In N. aisle, over doorway in E. wall, carved in wood, of George III, after 1814. Safe: In N.W. strongroom, of cast iron with panelled doors, inscribed 'Melcombe Regis Parish 1833'. Miscellanea: In S. aisle, over doorway in E. wall, cartouche of wood with amorini supporters and carved with the arms of Weymouth (Plate 61), from the Mayoral pew previously in the nave, late 17th-century; also, freestanding, a lion holding a shield charged with a crowned Tudor rose and a unicorn holding a shield charged with a crowned thistle, both on enriched pedestals decorated one with a portcullis and the second with an Irish harp, early 17th-century.

a(2) The Parish Church of the Holy Trinity, Weymouth, stands opposite the S. end of the Town Bridge. The walls are of Portland stone ashlar and of rubble with ashlar dressings; the roofs are slate-covered. The church was built between 1834 and 1836 (fn. 3) in the Gothic Perpendicular style to the design of Philip Wyatt, being completed after his death by his nephew Mathew Wyatt; (fn. 4) it was paid for by the Rev. George Chamberlaine, rector of Wyke Regis. The parish was formed in 1836 out of the parish of Wyke Regis. The church was extended and reorientated in 1887.

The nave, aligned N. and S., is entered from the N. through a vestibule; originally it had galleries at the N. and S. ends, and, in the centre of the E. wall, at right angles to the main axis of the nave, was a shallow chancel. In the alterations of 1887 the S. gallery was removed and the altar placed at the S. end of the nave, the original chancel being extended to the S. to form a wide E. transept incorporating a S.E. chapel; a large new transept was also added to the W. side of the nave.

Holy Trinity church is of interest for the unusual relationship of chancel and nave in the original plan, of which clear evidence remains.

Architectural Description—Of the former Chancel (15 ft. by 32 ft.) projecting from the E. side of the nave, the N. and E. walls alone survive; in the latter is a seven-light traceried window in a moulded four-centred frame.

The Nave (36½ ft. by 85 ft.) includes at the S. end an original recess (20½ ft. by 5½ ft.) forming the present Sanctuary; it is divided from the nave by a late 19th-century chancel arch. E. of the sanctuary a small projection (6 ft. by 5 ft.) originally contained a spiral stone staircase to the S. gallery; the lower steps only survive. The E. and W. walls of the nave are pierced by late 19th-century arcades; at the N. end in these walls are two wide recesses each with plain splayed jambs and four-centred heads; above the E. recess is an original four-light traceried window with a four-centred head. Off the N. end is a central entrance vestibule (14½ ft. by 7½ ft.) flanked on the W. by an octagonal room, possibly a former baptistry, and on the E. by an octagonal staircase to the N. gallery. Over the outer doorway in the N. wall is an original window of seven traceried lights in a four-centred head; outside, this front has narrow paired flanking buttresses formerly terminated with pinnacles but now rising only to the top of a horizontal parapet; above the central window is a moulded gable; the N. door is approached laterally by flights of stone steps with a pierced stone balustrade.

The South-east Chapel on the S. side of the former chancel, was built in 1887 but incorporates in the S. wall a reset window of uncertain origin but of the early 19th century; in the E. wall is a reset window probably from the original building.

The nave retains an original panelled Ceiling in ten bays divided by a central rib.

Fittings—Gallery: at N. end of the nave, with panelled front; the supporting beam was formerly inscribed 'To the glory of God, and in memory of the REV. THOMAS MORTIMER, B.D., who died November 25th, 1850, aged 55 years'; the S. gallery, removed in 1887, was inscribed 'To the Honour of the Holy, Blessed and Glorious Trinity, and in memory of the REV. GEORGE CHAMBERLAINE, the founder of this church, who died October 3rd, 1837, aged 74 years' (Hutchins II, 445). Glass: In former chancel, in E. window tracery, and in nave, in N. window tracery, Evangelists' symbols, angels with scrolls, sacred monograms, Holy Dove, triangular Trinity, cup, prayer-book, floral and geometric patterns, early 19th-century, and three restored shields-of-arms, of Chamberlaine(?) impaling Long, Province of Canterbury, See of Salisbury. Monuments: In S.E. chapel—(1) to John Williams, 1847, and Elizabeth his widow, 1850, white marble tablet on veined marble backing, by Hellyer, Portland; (2) to Dame Margaret, wife of Sir Samuel Osborne Gibbes, Bart., 1847, white marble with cornice, pediment, and shield-of-arms, on white veined marble backing, signed 'I. Hellyer: Statuary'; (3) to Martha Jane (Henning) Castleman, 1848, white marble tablet with crocketed head. Paintings: in S.E. chapel, on S. wall, the Crucifixion, copy of Van Dyck's Christ on the Cross, presented by W. Western, 1836 (British Magazine, Sept. 1836). Pews: in N. gallery, with plain panelled ends and book-rests, c. 1836. Plate: includes two cups, two patens, and flagon made by Joseph and John Angel in 1835 and given by George Edward Towry in that year; also a gilt cup, paten and bottle made by John Bridge in 1824 and given in 1834; also a cup, paten and bottle made by Rawlins and Sumner in 1840.

a(3) The Church of St. Martin, Weymouth, on the N. side of Chickerell Road, 700 yds. W. of Holy Trinity church (Monument 2) is modern but contains the following: Fitting—Font, of stone, circular bowl decorated with arched fluting between plain fillets, on circular drum and coarsely moulded base, 12th-century, from North Poorton (Dorset I (1952), 180). (Removed)

For CHURCHES in former parishes which are now part of Weymouth, see the following monuments: (291) Broadwey, (302) Preston, (322) Radipole, (334) Upwey, (369) Wyke Regis.

a(4) Baptist Chapel, Bank Buildings, with walls rendered in stucco and a slate-covered roof, was built in 1813–14 (fn. 5) and enlarged or rebuilt c. 1828; the galleries were erected in 1828. (fn. 6) In 1859 a pedimented façade employing the Roman-Doric order was added to the N. front (Plate 179) and a schoolroom was built on the S.; (fn. 7) further extensions have since been made to the E.

Baptist Church

The building is rectangular (49½ ft. by 41 ft.) and contains a gallery supported by seven cast-iron columns along the N., E. and W. sides. The pulpit, and choir platform with baptistry below are at the S. end.

Fittings—Monuments: on S. wall, (1) to Thomas Butler, 1838; on W. wall, (2) to Rev. Thomas Flint, 'two years Pastor of this church', 1819, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet on grey marble backing, signed C. Cooper, Canterbury; (3) to Frances, 1833, and Jane (Turner), 1838, wives of George Welsford, marble tablet. Pulpit: of pine panelling, with staircases leading up from each side, early 19th-century.

b(5) Church Of St. Augustine (R.C.), on the E. side of Dorchester Road ¾ m. N. of the King's Statue, is of brick rendered in stucco, except the W. front which is of stone; the roof is slate-covered. It was built in the Classical style in 1833 and the W. front was rebuilt subsequently.

The church has a simple rectangular plan (74 ft. by 27 ft.), including a chancel (16 ft. deep) and a W. entrance lobby (6 ft. deep) with a gallery above. The chancel has two round-headed windows on the S. side; the nave has three square-headed windows on the N. and three on the S.

a(6) Former Chapel (Wesleyan Methodist), on the S. side of Lower Bond Street, of brick and rubble with a slate-covered roof, was built in 1805. It was licensed in October 1806 'for Dissenting Protestants'.

It is rectangular on plan (46½ ft. by 35¾ ft.) and has a flat plaster ceiling with coved cornice; a gallery at the N. end has been destroyed and a floor inserted. The brick front to the street is rectangular and has a central doorway and flanking windows with two-centred heads; above at gallery level are three windows similar to the foregoing. Between the outer doorway and the window above is a panel with pointed head carved in low relief with an urn and the date 1805 on the frame. The S. end has two pointed windows with a round window above. A Burial Ground lies to the S. of the chapel.

a(7) Friends Burial Ground, on E. side of Barrack Road, was purchased by the Society of Friends in 1719. It ceased to be used by them after the closure of the meeting house in St. Thomas Street about 1789, but interments of other dissenters continued until 1834. The meeting house was subsequently leased to the Methodists, sold in 1858, and has since been demolished.

Secular

a(8) Sandsfoot Castle (674773), a roofless ruin (Plate 146), is of Portland stone rubble with a facing of ashlar. It was built probably in 1541 as one in a series of coastal forts and, with Portland Castle, served to defend the anchorage between Weymouth and Portland. A rough map accompanying Lord Russell's 'Survey of the Dorset Coast', which is almost certainly of 1539, shows a building here compatible with the castle (B.M., Cott. Aug. I. i, 31, 33), but this may be anticipative for Sandsfoot is not mentioned in a list of the King's fortresses compiled in 1540 (L. and P. Henry VIII, xv, 221, no. 502, 2). That it cost £3887 4s. 1d. is known (B.M., Harl. MS 353, 101), and it must have been in use by 1541 when a gunner was appointed to the 'blockhouse of Weymouth' (L. and P. Henry VIII, XVI, 385, no. 781, 7).

As early as 1584 the castle was in bad repair; the sea was encroaching and undermining the E. side (P.R.O., S.P. 12/163 f.96 (41 i)). Work was put in hand to make good the damage and repair the gun platforms, also to repair the stables and the gate to the outer ward and to build a new bridge to the outer gate (P.R.O., Pipe Office, Declared Accounts E351/3570). Of these last nothing now remains.

Further repairs were undertaken in 1610–11 (P.R.O., Pipe Office, Declared Accounts E351/3582) and dilapidations were noted in a survey of 1623 when it was recommended that the upper gun platform be dismantled (B.M., Harleian MS. 1326 ff. 70–2). The armament at this time was ten pieces of ordnance, and the garrison included the Caption, the Master Gunner, four gunners and three men.

The castle was held for the King in the Civil War but was abandoned as being of no further military importance in January 1644/5. It continued in use as a storehouse, however, at least as late as 1691.

The castle comprised a tall rectangular main block of two storeys over a basement, with a taller gate-tower integral with the landward end and a single-storey octagonal gunroom adjoining the other end facing the sea. The walls remain in places to nearly the original height, but much of the facing has been robbed, while the gunroom has finally disappeared as a result of coastal erosion in recent years.

A rectangular earthwork probably of c. 1623 in its final form protected the castle on at least the landward side; only damaged remains survive.

A number of 18th-century drawings of the castle exist, including those by Samuel Buck, 1733 (B.M., Print Room) and J. H. Grimm, 1790 (B.M., Add. MS. 15538: Nos. 13–15). The history of the castle is given in Dorset Procs. xxxv (1914), 27–40.

Sandsfoot Castle, though so much ruined, is of interest and importance as a relic of Henry VIII's system of coastal defence; it provided a heavy gun emplacement, quarters for a garrison, and a magazine.

Architectural Description—The North-west Gate-Tower is centrally placed in the N.W. end of the main accommodation block of the castle and projects slightly; the entrance arch was of two chamfered orders with a four-centred head but only some dressings survive, those of the jambs being worked with a portcullis groove. Behind is a short passage with a roof of inclined stone slabs; above this were two small chambers, one on the first floor approached by a stair on the S.W. side and another above approached from the principal circular newel staircase near the N. angle of the castle. The Tudor Royal Arms now in the church at Wyke Regis (369) are said to have come from here; they may have been over the entrance archway.

The Main Block (41½ ft. by 16 ft. at basement level; 42 ft. by 32 ft. at principal floor level and above) was entered through the N.W. Gate-tower at principal floor level. The difference in internal measurements is due to the greater thickness of the side walls of the basement. The principal floor was probably divided by partitions, but no trace of them survives; small stair in the N. corner and was probably divided into four rooms of which one or both on the S.W. side formed the principal lodging; fireplaces occur in the S. end of the N.E. wall, at both ends of the S.W. wall and in the N.W. wall E. of the gate-tower. Privies are placed in each corner of this floor. In the S.E. wall is a small doorway to the platform over the gun-room. The N.E. and S.W. walls are each pierced by four square-headed window openings with wide external splays turned in four-centred arches; internally they are set in deep rectangular recesses carried down to floor level to provide standing space. Protecting each opening were five vertical fireplaces occur in the N. end of the N.E. wall and the E. end of the S.E. wall, which also contains a larger fireplace and bread oven in the W. end. In both the E. and W. corners are privies. Two staircases to the basement are placed in the N.E. wall, one being approached from the main N.E. staircase through a central doorway with a corbelled lintel. The privies and the staircases are all within the thickness of the walls. In the middle of the S.E. wall is an archway with four-centred head; this led to the gun-room. Along the S.W. side are six windows, the outer dressings of which have been robbed; remains of five less regularly spaced openings exist along the N.E. side.

Sandsfoot Castle, Weymouth

The first floor was approached from the main circular bars, set in two planes; now removed. By analogy, the wall head may have finished in a tall battlemented parapet, but no direct evidence for this survives.

The Gunroom originally formed an irregular octagon (approx. 35¾ ft. by 28 ft.) with five equal sides each containing a gun embrasure. In 1947 one only of the embrasures remained, but it has since fallen into the sea. The embrasure was rectangular with a flat lintel behind a four-centred arch; there were wide external splays and over the gun position was a vent in the thickness of the wall. The gunroom was of one storey with a flat roof, presumably forming an upper gunplatform, surrounded by a high parapet wall now known only from Grimm's drawing where it is shown with a curved profile to the outer face similar to that still remaining at Portland Castle (Portland 6). Access to both platforms was directly from the main block and communication between the platforms was provided by a staircase in the wall between the gunroom and the main block.

The Earthwork remains consist of a bank with an outer ditch at approx. 100 ft. from the N.W., N.E., and S.W. walls. From the N. corner projects an elongated five-sided earth bastion; the W. corner is destroyed. The defences probably formed bastion-fortifications, which, on comparative dating, may be assigned to c. 1623 when orders were given for repairing the castle. The survey made in that year confirms that a bank and ditch already existed; the statement that there were then only two corners ('points') leaves in question whether the earthwork defences ever completed the rectangular enclosure on the seaward side before erosion. Nothing of the stone superstructure specified in the report survives.

a(9) The King's Statue (Plate 176), monument to George III, standing at the N. end of St. Thomas Street and St. Mary Street, was set up in 1809. It was designed by James Hamilton, architect. The architectural features are of Portland stone; the sculptures are of Coade's artificial stone. The latter were painted in naturalistic colours in 1949.

The monument has a large, tall podium with moulded plinth and cornice, the die being inscribed on the N. face 'The grateful Inhabitants / To GEORGE THE THIRD / On His entering the 50th Year / Of His REIGN' and signed 'J. Hamilton / ARCHT; on the S. face is a long record of the celebrations on the occasion of the anniversary, the distribution of moneys collected and the inception of the scheme for providing the monument together with names of donors and of persons concerned with its erection. Standing on the podium is a full length statue of the King, facing N., in Garter robes, carrying a sceptre; behind him is a table supporting the royal crown and books and flanked by the flag of the Union and the royal arms (1801–16). On low bases adjoining the podium to E. and W. are a lion and a unicorn couchant.

a(10) The Guildhall (Plate 180), at the junction of St. Edmund Street and St. Mary Street, is of two storeys with walls of Portland stone ashlar. It was built in 1836–7; the design is attributed to Talbot Bury. The plan is rectangular and incorporates police offices and cells on the ground floor, with a Council Chamber and Court Room on the floor above.

The main N. front of the Guildhall is of five bays; the lower storey is rusticated and forms a classical basement projecting in the middle to carry an Ionic tetrastyle portico with a pediment. Under the portico the lower storey is pierced by round-headed archways. In the main wall above, behind the colonnade, are three rectangular double-hung sash windows, the central one under a cornice. The flanking bays have corner pilasters and each contains a round-headed window in the lower storey and a tripartite window in the first floor, the latter with pilaster strips dividing the lights and supporting a simplified entablature extending from portico to corner pilaster. At the wall head is a full entablature returned from the portico and a parapet-wall extending between pedestals. The W. return wall has main horizontal divisions similar to those described above; the ground floor originally had an open arcade of five round-headed archways with a narrow walk behind but they are now filled in; the first floor is divided by pilasters into five bays, the end bays blank and the others each containing a window.

Inside, the ground floor has a central entrance hall with a staircase on the S. and police offices and cells to E. and W. On the first floor, the Court Room (44¼ ft. by 20 ft.) has walls divided into bays by Roman Doric pilasters, a panelled ceiling and an open screen of two square columns supporting an entablature dividing off the W. end of the room (Plate 180); here on a raised dais are the magistrate's desk and chair and the jury and witness boxes; to the S.W. is a magistrate's room. The Council Chamber (17 ft. by 31¼ ft.) extends the full width of the building on the E.; it contains a concave-fronted dais carrying a long curved desk of wood with cast-iron legs.

The Guildhall contains the following fittings: Chest, in Court Room, of iron, probably 16th-century; a similar chest is preserved in the Municipal Offices. Royal Arms: In Council Chamber, two, (1) of George I (Plate 60), painted on canvas in wooden frame, dated 1721, perhaps given by Sir James Thornhill, who was elected Member of Parliament for Weymouth in that year; (2) of Victoria, carved in wood and inscribed 'presented by Mr. Alderman Hancock, A.D. 1842'. In Court Room, reset on W. wall, (3) of James I (Plate 60), in wood carved in high relief and flanked by two female figures representing Peace and Plenty reclining upon symbols of war, the whole surmounting an enriched frieze carved with four cherubs' heads and the royal motto 'Dieu et Mon Droit'. Sculpture: in niche on main staircase, white marble statue of Samuel Weston, a former mayor, died 1817, represented as seated figure holding scroll in left hand, on inscribed pedestal, signed 'Theakston, Sculp: 1821'. Miscellanea: chair, of oak, 17th-century; Constables' brass staves, seven, all numbered, set incomplete, early 19th-century; Beadle's staff of wood, late 18th-century.

Corporation Insignia and Plate etc. Maces: (i, ii) pair, 39¾ ins. long, silver-gilt, assay marks not visible but made during Commonwealth by Thomas Maundy who had the monopoly for making civic maces; maker's mark on one mace only, loyal inscriptions and Stuart arms added 1660, further alterations 1824; said to have been given by Alderman James Bower in 1824; of normal late mace form with crowned bowl-shaped head (Plate 39) linked to shaft by four figure scrolls, shaft with upper and middle knops and elaborate knop at end with acorn terminal; embossing on bowl at head in four arcaded panels containing cross of St. George twice, Irish harp, and arms of Weymouth, the last possibly replacing second harp; annular band above inscribed 'THE FREEDOME OF ENGLAND BY GODS BLESSING RESTORED 1660' (fn. 8); top beneath crown with Stuart arms and cartouches containing harps and crosses of St. George, finial of crown with cartouches containing two Irish harps and two crowned roses, the latter replacing crosses of St. George; (iii, iv) small maces (Plate 38), pair 18¾ ins. and 21¼ ins. in length, the former much repaired, of gilded silver over iron core, 17th-century, each with shallow cylindrical head engraved with Stuart Royal arms and connected to shaft by concave necking and zoomorphic scrolls, shaft with large central knop and flanged end. Mayoral Chain and Badge: (v) chain of linked silver-gilt Ss in three lengths 1 ft. 7½ ins., 3 ft., 1 ft. 7½ ins., possibly late mediaeval, joined together by three crowned trophies of emblems of England, Scotland and Ireland with royal motto, by Rundell, Bridge and Rundell, c. 1823; badge, of silver-gilt, oval 23/8 ins. long, obverse with arms in relief of Weymouth as (vii) below and inscribed 'For use of the Mayor of the Boro' of Weymouth & Melcombe Regis', reverse inscribed in gold on blue enamel field 'Presented to the Corporation of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis by William Oakley Esqr. Bailiff and Alderman 1823'.

A Map of Weymouth

Including Melcombe Regis

Seals (Plate 37): Borough—(vi) of Melcombe, half of double matrix of latten, 2 ins. diam., with intaglio of singlemasted ship, the mast flanked by shields both quarterly Castile and Leon, legend SIGILLUM: COMVNIE: DE: MELCOMA, 13th-century; (vii) of Melcombe Regis, of brass or latten, 17/8 ins. diam, with intaglio of three-masted vessel with sails furled flanked by letters ST, mainmast bearing shield Castile and Leon in first two quarters (others blank), 16th-century, remounted; (viii) of brass, 13/8 ins. diam. with intaglio of shield with escutcheon of leopards of England in chief and embattled bridge in base, legend WAYMOVTH AND MELCOMB REGIS, late 17th-century; (ix) of brass, 17/8 ins. diam. with intaglio of scrolled shield charged as (viii), legend WAYMOVTH AND MELCOMBE REGIS, mid 18th-century; (x) of brass, 1 13/16 ins. diam. with intaglio of shaped shield with an embattled bridge and in chief an escutcheon with three chevrons above the three leopards of England, legend in buckled strap TOWN COUNCIL OF WEYMOUTH AND MELCOMBE REGIS, handle inscribed 'The Gift of James Flower Esqr. Mayor 1837'. Mayoral—(xi) of Melcombe Regis, of latten, 1½ ins. diam. with intaglio of shield suspended on guige and charged with leopards of England, legend SIGILL'· MAIORATVS VILL'· D'· MELCOVB' REG', mid 14th-century; (xii) of copper, 2¼ ins. diam., with intaglio of shaped shield charged as (x), legend SIGILLVM · MAYIOR · DE · WAYMOTH · ET MELCOMBE · REGIS, 17th-century. Admiral's seal (xiii) of copper, 23/8 ins. diam., with intaglio of threemasted vessel, mainsail displaying the arms three chevrons above the leopards of England, legend SIGILLVM . ADMIRALIS . DE WAYMOTH . ET MELCOMBE . REGIS, 17th-century.

a(11) Harbour Master's Office, next S. of the Guildhall, in St. Mary Street, was built in 1839 (Town Council Minutes, 21 March, 18 Nov. 1839). It is of two storeys with walls of Portland stone ashlar.

The free sides of the building have a high plain plinth and a continuous cornice. The W. front has at the N. end an arched recess rising through two storeys and flanked by simple pilasters; it forms an architectural link between the rest of the elevation to the S., designed as a symmetrical composition, and the Guildhall adjoining on the N.; the rest has a central doorway and rounded-headed windows at each side on both floors; over the doorway is a tablet inscribed 'Harbourmaster's and Wharfinger's Office'. Windows similar to those described occur also in the S. return wall. Inside, the ground floor comprises two rooms each side of a central lobby. (Demolished)

a(12) Custom House, of three storeys with brick walls and a slate-covered roof, was built in the early 19th century; the S. elevation has a pair of bow windows on the first floor, of elliptical plan with moulded and dentilled cornices; the central doorway below is of recent date. The E. elevation is rendered in stucco and has two doorways with stone pilasters and entablatures.

The Custom House, Weymouth

The principal accommodation is on the first floor with the staircase at the E. end of a central corridor. Two rooms lay to the S. of this corridor; the western one has now been incorporated into a larger office. The eastern room has a moulded ceiling cornice and moulded dado, and the fireplace is at the E. end flanked by cupboards which take up the irregularities of the plan. The second floor originally formed a single large storage room; the roof is supported by composite king-post trusses.

a(13) Old Town Hall, standing at the junction of High Street and Chapelhay Street at the W. end of the old town of Weymouth, has walls of rubble with ashlar dressings and a tile-covered roof. A town hall at least as old as the 16th century stood here but it was largely rebuilt c. 1774 (Dorset Procs., LXII (1940), 61) and this mainly late 18th-century building was itself considerably altered in 1896 (Town Council Minutes, 8 Oct.).

The building comprises a single chamber (47½ ft. by 172/3 ft.) with a projecting porch-tower at the W. end. Only the latter remains substantially unaltered since c. 1774; it is in three diminishing stages outside and three storeys inside, the lower storey forming the porch, the middle, which is blind, contain ing a modern clock and displaying a clock face and inscribed tablet, the upper forming a bell-cote with a single bell hung in an arched opening under a pedimented stone roof. Ogee-headed windows depicted in Buckler's sketch of 1790 (B.M. Add. MS. 15538) show that some 16th-century work survived the first rebuilding.

Fittings—Bell: inscribed 'Anno Domini 1633 R.P.', said to have come from Radipole Church (Raven, 63).

a(14) Masonic Hall (Plate 179), at the corner of Frederick Place and School Street, is a single-storey structure of brick and stucco with a slated roof, erected in 1816. The E. front, a classical composition distyle-inantis based on the Greek Doric order of the 'Theseion' (fn. 9) was carried out in stucco in 1834 to the designs of C. B. Fookes (D.C.C., 10 Aug. 1834); it has a central arched doorway now disused. The S. front is of brick with a dentil cornice.

a(15) Royal Dorset Yacht Club, 200 yds. S.S.E. of the King's Statue, between Charlotte Row and York buildings, is of two storeys with cellars and attics, the walls are of brick, partly rendered in stucco, and the roofs are slate-covered; it was built in the late 18th century to house Harvey's Library and the Card Assembly (Harvey's Improved Weymouth Guide (c. 1800)).

The accommodation is in two parts divided by a courtyard, now covered; a block incorporating the principal rooms faces E. across the bay whilst a more domestic building at the rear is entered from New Street. The former is much altered internally. The front elevation has on the ground floor a colonnade of five bays, now blocked, divided by Ionic columns with double columns at the ends; the entrance now at the N. end was formerly in the central, wider bay. The first floor has a windowed arcade corresponding to the bays below and a cast-iron balcony at this level is an addition of the mid 19th century; the façade is surmounted by a moulded cornice and parapet.

a(16) Portwey Hospital, 500 yds. W.S.W. of Holy Trinity Church, on the N. side of Wyke road, is of one, two and three storeys with walls of Portland stone ashlar at the front and rubble at the rear; the roofs are slate-covered. It was built in 1836 as a Workhouse under the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834; the site adjoins that of a smaller earlier workhouse. It was designed by Thomas Dodson, one of the Guardians, and Thomas Hill Harvey, also one of the Guardians, was then appointed architect and superintendent of the building with a gratuity of £50 (P.R.O., M.H. 12/2885, and D.C.C., 28 April 1836).

Facing the street is a plain show-front with a three-storeyed centrepiece and wings in the same plane; the storeys are divided by plat-bands and the windows have keystoned heads. Behind, the main part of the building, cross-shaped on plan, includes the former dormitory accommodation and a chapel in the N. wing. Between the arms are four open courtyards enclosed by single-storey outbuildings. (Cf. Dorchester (18), Poole (22), Wareham (10).)

a(17) Belfield House (Plates 181–3), 1,500 yds. W.S.W. of Holy Trinity Church, on the N. side of Buxton Road, is of two storeys with a semi-basement and attic; the walls are of stone and brick with some stucco rendering, and the roof is slate-covered. The house was built c. 1780 to the designs of John Crunden (Weymouth Guide (1785), 52); the S.E. front was remodelled in the early 19th century.

Belfield is a house of particularly elegant design in the Classical style, with a neat plan based upon geometrical forms.

Belfield House, Weymouth

The main elevation faces N.E.; it has a central projecting portico with four Ionic columns, raised above a rusticated basement, and the central doorway at principal floor level is approached by curved flights of stairs at each side of the portico and partly concealed behind its base. The flanking walls contain single Venetian windows to the principal rooms, with minor windows above and below; the ends of the façade are terminated by wide panelled pilasters of stucco. The N.W. gable wall has three windows to each floor with a lunette in the pediment, the first-floor windows being set back in arched recesses. The S.E. wall was similar to the foregoing but was altered in the early 19th century: a wide central window and trellis-work verandah were added to the first floor and all exposed brickwork was rendered with stucco. The S.W. elevation is plain with a central projecting bay.

The plan of the principal floor comprises a central semi-circular entrance hall and staircase with an octagonal room behind, and two principal rooms, the Drawing Room and Dining Room, to the S.E. and N.W. respectively. The stairs have stone treads and a mahogany hand-rail with plain wrought-iron balusters, and the well is trimmed by a moulded plaster cornice. The upper-floor landing (Plate 182) is ornamented with paired columns with attic bases and enriched capitals supporting a moulded cornice. The Drawing Room has a reeded plaster cornice, a white marble fireplace and reeded architraves to doors and windows with paterae at the corners, all of the 19th century. The Dining Room has a moulded plaster cornice, doors and fireplace surround of the late 18th century, and a cast-iron grate of a circular shell pattern of c. 1840. The octagonal room has a moulded plaster cornice and door surrounds of late 18th-century date and contains a fireplace with yellow marble architrave between reeded white marble borders and with a central elliptical painted medallion.

Former Stables, now No. 60 Buxton Road (1, 2, 3, South Belfield), 100 yds. S.E. of Belfield House, of two storeys with stone walls and a slate-covered roof, were built in the late 18th century; they formerly comprised stables, a coach house, and a cottage.

WEYMOUTH (Monuments 18–91)

The following monuments are situated S. of the harbour in the area of old Weymouth and are described under streets in alphabetical order; those not marked on the map (opp. p. 338) are measured from Holy Trinity Church (2).

Unless otherwise stated the monuments are of two storeys with brick walls and slate-covered roofs and were built in the early 19th century.

aBarrack Road

(18) Red Barracks were erected as Cavalry barracks in 1795, but were rebuilt in 1801, after a fire, for use as Infantry barracks to accommodate 17 officers and 270 men. (fn. 10)

The principal block of three storeys lies to the S.W. of the parade ground; it is a long rectangular building with wings of minimal projection at each end. Four doorways, one blind, face the parade ground and are recessed beneath shallow semi-circular brick arches; sash windows with flat arched brick heads are used throughout; a continuous string-course joins the sills of the first-floor windows.

aBelmont Terrace

(Formerly Belmont Street)

(19) Houses, on S.W. side of the road, Nos. 1, 2, 6 and 7, were built c. 1840; Nos. 6 and 7 have attics with tiled mansard roofs.

aBuxton Road

(20) House, on S. side of the road at the junction with Old Castle Road, 800 yds. S.S.W. of (2), is of three storeys; it has a three-light bow window on the first floor.

aChickerell Road

(21) Houses, Nos. 3 and 5, on the S. side of the road (here formerly Town Lane), 400 yds. W. of (2), were built as three houses in the mid 19th century.

(22) Cottages, Nos. 98 and 104, 840 yds. and 900 yds. W. of (2), are set back some 50 yds. from the N. side of the road; No. 98 is of three storeys with a slate-covered roof and No. 104 is of two storeys with a tiled roof.

aCove Row and Cove Street

(23) Houses, Nos. 1–6 Cove Row and 1–5 Cove Street, in two terraces of six and five houses respectively, were built c. 1808; they are of two storeys and attics with brick walls and slate-covered mansard roofs, front doors are under semi-circular arched heads and each storey has a square sash window at the front.

The buildings stand on reclaimed land leased from the Corporation in 1807. The lease for No. 5 Cove Row dated March 1807 stipulated that a house be built within two years 'which said messuage shall front to the northward and be built in all respects according to the elevations or plan of the front thereof in the margin of these presents [sketch below] and particularly that the same shall be entered by 2 steps of usual depth shall be 16 feet high to the roof from the bottom of the ground floor and be 24 feet deep at the least and so as to range in a strait line and to be uniform with seven other messuages intended to be built there . . .'. This house was completed by June 1808 and the builder's name is given as William Fowler.

No. 5 Cove Row, Weymouth

The plan of No. 5 provides for two rooms on the ground floor with a staircase between and a through passage on the E. The elevation is typical of many other houses of this date in Weymouth which will be referred to as the Cove Row type.

Dorset Place see Newberry Road

aFranchise Street

(24) House, No. 1, at the corner of St. Leonard's Road.

(25) Houses, Nos. 9 and 11, are of two storeys and attics; the front doors are under semicircular heads with blind fanlights enriched with ornament in relief.

(26) Chapelhay Tavern was built as a pair of houses; the walls have been rendered in stucco.

aHigh Street

(see also High West Street, Trinity Road, Trinity Street)

S. side

(27) Fisherman's Arms p.h., No. 1, is of two storeys and attics with a mansard roof. The front elevation has two two-storey bow windows across which are carried a plain string-course at first-floor level and a moulded cornice; the front door set between the bows has a semicircular head and a similar but wider doorway to a passage stands at the W. end of the elevation. (Demolished)

(28) Weymouth Arms p.h. is of late 18th-century date with stone walls rendered in stucco. The central entrance door is flanked by two wide sash windows at either side, with five windows to the floor above; the wall is surmounted by a moulded cornice and parapet. The plan (p. 345) is L-shaped with a central passage between two rooms and a lower service wing at the rear; the first floor has two principal rooms with a smaller room between. (Demolished)

(29) House, No. 9, of the late 19th century, contains, reset in the front wall, two early mediaeval stone corbels with animal heads beneath large quadrant mouldings.

(Corbels now preserved in Public Library)

(30) House, No. 10, of two storeys and attics, with walls of squared stone, was built in the 17th century. The front wall projects 6 ft. beyond the face of No. 9 and has a simply moulded stone plinth and a door at the W. end with chamfered jambs and a four-centred head; the ground-floor windows have been altered but the separate moulded labels survive and four-light windows with recessed hollow-chamfered mullions remain at the front of the upper storey. Gables to E. and W. have moulded corbels at the eaves. The interior is ruinous but retains a first-floor fireplace in the E. wall with a corbelled four-centred head and moulded jambs. (Demolished)

(31) House, No. 11, is of similar construction and date to the foregoing; the ground floor retains an original doorway with chamfered stone jambs and lintel but no other features of this date survive. The building was heightened in the 19th century.

(Demolished)

(32) House, No. 18, has stone walls; it was built in the 17th century. The outer doorway is centrally placed and has a four-centred head; the ground floor retains one original stone-mullioned window of four lights. (Demolished)

aHigh West Street

S. side

(33) Houses, Nos. 29–31, and the Belvedere Inn are of two storeys and attics and have roofs covered with slates and tiles; with No. 32, which has been rebuilt, they formed a continuous range of varied design but all of late 18th or early 19th-century date. The earliest house is No. 30 with a plain tiled roof and rendered elevation; the other three buildings have mansard roofs and bow windows to the first-floor rooms. All except the Inn are one room in width.

N. side

(34) The Boot Inn, has walls of stone rendered in stucco, and the roof has been re-covered with slates. It was erected in the mid 17th century with a plan (p. 345) comprising two rooms on the ground floor each with a fireplace in the gable wall. The interior has been considerably altered but some moulded ceiling beams survive. The S. front has a modern central doorway, perhaps in the position of the former doorway, flanked by two five-light windows with recessed hollow-chamfered stone mullions and labels above. The first-floor rooms have three four-light mullioned windows equally spaced.

aHope Street

E. side

(35) House, No. 1, is of two storeys and attics; the walls are of squared rubble and ashlar and the roof is covered with tiles. It was built in the late 18th century. The front wall which is of ashlar has a low plinth, projecting quoins, and a moulded cornice with parapet above; the gable walls are more roughly constructed and have a stone coping to the parapet; the chimneys have been rebuilt in brick. The front elevation is symmetrical and has a central doorway, with a moulded and fluted architrave and flat cornice, flanked by two sash windows with stone architraves, and three similar windows above; in the roof are two dormer windows with casements and hipped roofs. The plan (p. 345) is approximately square with four rooms to the ground floor, a central passage and a staircase at the rear.

(36) House, No. 6, of three storeys and attics, with walls of stone and a slate-covered roof, was built in the mid 18th century; the front elevation, of ashlar, is rusticated below a first-floor plat-band and smooth with projecting quoins above; each of the upper storeys has two hung-sash windows with moulded stone architraves. The ground floor has a passage at the S. side with one room at front and back and a staircase between.

(37) Houses, Nos. 18–20, 22, are small artisans' cottages of late 18th or early 19th-century date; the walls are rendered and Nos. 18–20 have attics and tiled roofs.

(38) House, No. 21, of one storey and attics, with rubble walls rendered with concrete, was built in the 17th century. The front has an exceptionally large gabled dormer facing the street; the ground floor contains a chamfered and stopped ceiling beam and a large blocked fireplace; the roof is supported by an upper cruck truss.

(39) Houses, No. 23, 24, of three storeys with walls rendered in stucco, were built as a pair c. 1830–40. They have a central passage to the rear flanked by two doorways, all three openings having semicircular heads. Each house has a two-storey bow window of shallow projection to the lower floors with curved single-light sash windows.

aHorsford Street

(40) Houses, eight, Nos. 27–31, 35, 38, 39, on the S. side, are rendered in stucco; No. 35 has a bow window on the first floor; No. 38, 39 have two-storey bay windows.

aThe Look Out

(41) Branksea Villa is of two storeys and attics, with walls rendered in stucco. Built as a villa residence, it is set back from the road and has a symmetrical front elevation with a central doorway and brick dentil cornice.

aLove Lane

(42) House with shop, No. 1a, is of two storeys and attics and has a hipped mansard roof.

(43) Houses, four, Nos. 14–17, have similar elevations one room in width but were built independently; No. 17 has rubble walls and is of two storeys and attics with a mansard roof; the fronts of the other houses are rendered.

aNewberry Road

(Formerly Dorset Place (fn. 11) or Spring Lane)

W. side

(44) Houses, Nos. 1–5, are of two storeys and attics and have rendered walls. Nos. 1–4 have mansard roofs and elevations of the Cove Row type (Monument 23), with some bay windows added; No. 5 is similar but without a mansard roof.

(45) Houses, Nos. 9–11, of two storeys and attics with rendered walls and a moulded cornice with a parapet, were built c. 1835–40. No. 9 has a large first-floor bow window and a similar window probably occurred in No. 11 but has been replaced; each house is one room in width, with the door at the S. end of the front under a semicircular head.

(46) Houses, Nos. 12–17, are similar in date and construction to the foregoing but without original bow windows. The terrace is stepped down twice to allow for the sloping ground.

(47) Houses, Nos. 18, 19, built c. 1835–40, are of three storeys with rendered walls. No. 19 has a bow window to the middle storey; No. 18 has a later bay window.

aNorth Quay

(Formerly West Quay)

(48) House, No. 4, is of two storeys and attics, the walls are of ashlar and the roof is covered with slate. It was built in the late 16th century and is a good example of a town house of this date; the staircase is the principal feature of the interior.

Externally only the E. and N. sides are exposed, the others being covered by later building; the house was probably built against an earlier structure to the S. The roof has three gables; one to the N. with a three-light mullioned window and a two-storey bay window below, and two to the E.; at the N. end of the E. side is a two-storey projection with a parapet and heavily moulded coping. A moulded plinth is carried around both sides of the building but is higher on the E. side. All the original windows have hollow-chamfered stone mullions recessed slightly from the wall face, with moulded labels above. The bay window has been rebuilt above first-floor level. The entrance is placed centrally in the E. side and may have faced a small courtyard; the doorway has a four-centred arched lintel set in a rectangular chamfered frame and a similar external doorway occurs in the S. side of the N.E. projection for a small outside store or privy. The windows on the E. side are all set below the S.E. gable to the left of the door.

The ground floor (p. 345) was originally divided into two rooms by a plank-and-muntin partition; the entrance is directly into the hall, which has the staircase at its western end, and the parlour lies to the N.; both hall and parlour have large original fireplaces. The staircase, enclosed in a projecting wing at the back of the house, is of timber construction with short flights around an open well; the balusters and newels are moulded and the lower newel post is continued up to the ceiling (see p. 364).

The first floor has two rooms each containing an original fireplace, one with a moulded four-centred timber lintel; the N. room has a door in its E. wall opening into a small room in the N.E. projection which formed a look-out and has windows facing the entrance to the harbour. The attic floor also comprises two original rooms. (Demolished)

(49) House, No. 5, is of the mid 18th century, but the front wall incorporates a 16th-century moulded stone plinth continued from No. 4, and part of the W. wall, of stone, is probably of that date. (Demolished)

(50) House, No. 9, of three storeys, was built in the late 18th century; it has a plain stone plinth and brickwork in header bond. (Demolished)

aNothe Parade

(Formerly Hope Quay)

(51) House, No. 1, of two storeys and attics with rendered stone walls and a tiled roof, is of the late 18th century; the front windows have horizontally sliding sashes.

(52) House, No. 2, of three storeys and attics, was built in the late 18th century; the walls have a stone base beneath the ground-floor window-sills and brickwork in Flemish bond above; the roof which is hipped and tiled is concealed behind a parapet. The ground and second-floor windows have square-ended lintels with projecting keystones and the first floor has a single bay window. The plan (p. 345) is chiefly remarkable for the large, formerly detached, kitchen at the rear.

(53) Houses, Nos. 3, 5, 6, of three storeys with walls rendered in stucco, are of similar design but with minor variations in detail; each house has a single bow window to the first floor, a moulded cornice and parapet.

(54) House, No. 10a, of two storeys and attics, with rendered walls, is entered at first-floor level. The house was built in the late 18th century, possibly for the proprietor of the neighbouring shipbuilding yard.

(55) Houses, Nos. 12, 13, of three storeys with stuccoed walls, have bow windows to the first-floor rooms.

(56) Houses, Nos. 14–16, are of two storeys with mansard attics and rendered walls. No. 14 has a first-floor bow window.

aProspect Place

(57) Rising Sun Inn was built as two houses of the Cove Row type (Monument 23); the doorway to the northern house retains a decorative blind fanlight.

(58) House, No. 2, of similar design to the foregoing, is of slightly later date and without a mansard roof.

(59) Houses, Nos. 3–6, a row of four, are of Cove Row type (Monument 23) but with flat-headed doorways and crude first-floor bow windows.

aRodwell Avenue

(Formerly Spring Place)

(60) Houses, Nos. 2–14, form a terrace of seven houses; the walls are rendered in stucco and have a moulded cornice with a parapet. Each house is one room in width with a door under a semicircular arched head.

aRodwell Road

(Formerly Boot Lane or Leach Lane, and Longhill Road)

W. side

(61) Netherton House or The Old Manor House, of three storeys with ashlar walls and a slate-covered roof, is of the mid 18th century but incorporates some 17th-century work. The earlier building was of two storeys and one room in depth with a single-storey rubble-walled rear wing; this is indicated by changes in the masonry of the front and side walls and in the plan; some ceiling beams of this date survive in the S.E. ground-floor room. Mid 18th-century alterations included the addition of the present staircase at the rear of the building and of the rooms to each side, that to the N. replacing part of the earlier kitchen wing.

The E. elevation has a central pedimented porch supported by Ionic columns and flanked by two plain sash windows on each side; the first and second floors each have five windows with a narrow moulded cornice and low parapet above. The interior retains many fittings of mid 18th-century date including a fine series of wood and marble fireplaces and library shelving.

Netherton House

(62) House, No. 36, 350 yds. S.S.E. of (61), is of two storeys and attics with a mansard roof.

(63) Houses, Nos. 48, 50, 400 yds. S.S.E. of (61), semidetached and of generally similar design to each other, were built in the mid 19th century. No. 50 has a symmetrical front elevation; the front doorway has a symmetrically moulded architrave with round paterae.

(64) Houses, Nos. 56, 58, ¼ m. S.S.E. of (61), were built as a single house in the mid 19th century. The front elevation, which is rendered, is divided into three bays by intermediate pilasters.

aRodwell Street

(65) Houses, two, on the N. side, are of two storeys and attics with rendered walls and bow windows to the upper storey. Other houses of similar character were added on both sides of the street in the mid to late 19th century.

aSaint Leonard's Road

(Formerly Scambridge Hill)

(66) Houses, Nos. 10, 12, have rendered walls and tiled roofs; No. 12 incorporates a shop front of the mid 19th century.

(67) Houses, Nos. 14, 16, are a pair, of two storeys and mansard attics; the walls are rendered and the roofs tiled.

aSpring Gardens

(68) Terrace comprises 13 houses of varying design, some with attics; the fronts are rendered in stucco. It formed part of an extensive development of cheap housing dating c. 1830 on a site of approximately 3 acres between St. Leonard's Road and Rodwell Avenue and now largely rebuilt. Many of the houses are double-fronted and have doorways with glazed or blind fanlights; a notable feature is the manner in which the houses are placed at the back of their plots with lengthy gardens at the front. (Demolished)

aTrinity Road

(Formerly part of High Street)

(69) House, No. 1, of three storeys and attics with a tiled roof, was built c. 1800; the front door has a semicircular fanlight and pedimented head carried on debased consoles and the ground-floor windows have flat arched brick heads with keystones.

(70) Houses, Nos. 2, 2a, of three storeys, were built in the late 18th century as a single house with a symmetrical frontage of two storeys which was enlarged and divided in the late 19th century. The original house had a central doorway set in a depressed elliptical recess and flanked by two-storey bow windows.

(71) House, No. 3, of two storeys and attics with a mansard roof, has a first-floor bow window with a similar window inserted below at a later date.

(72) House, No. 4, of three storeys and attics, with rendered front wall, has a centrally placed bow window to the first floor.

Reset high up in a retaining wall behind the house is a triangular Stone carved on the face with the figure of an ecclesiastic holding a crozier, within a border; the reverse of the stone is inaccessible but is said also to be carved. Probably late mediaeval.

(73) House with shop, No. 5, is of two storeys and attics; the walls are of rubble to the ground floor with brick above. Built in the early 18th century of one storey and attics, it was heightened in the early 19th century and considerably altered internally.

(74) Houses, Nos. 6–8, are of two storeys and attics; the mansard roofs appear to be part of a later rebuilding; the front elevations, of which that to No. 8 has been considerably altered, include two-storey bow windows with continuous upper cornices.

(75) House with shop, No. 9, is of three storeys and attics with a mansard roof; a bow window placed centrally in the two upper storeys stands above a modern shop front.

(76) Houses, Nos. 10–12, are of three storeys, No. 12 with attics in a mansard roof; the front elevations vary in detail but all include first-floor bow windows.

(77) House with shop, No. 13, of three storeys and attics, was built c. 1800; the central entrance doorway is similar to that in Monument (70) above; a bow window has been added to the first floor.

(78) The King's Arms p.h., No. 15, of two storeys and attics, has a first-floor bow window.

(79) House, No. 16, of two storeys and attics with a rendered front wall, has a central doorway to the W. of which is a first-floor bow window.

(80) Houses, three, Nos. 20–22, form a terrace of three storeys with cellars; each house has a three-storey bow window and a door under a semicircular head; floor levels are marked by stucco plat-bands and the wall is finished with a brick dentil cornice and parapet.

(81) House with shop, No. 25, of two storeys and attics with a mansard roof and first-floor bow window, was built in the late 18th century; modern shop fronts have been added to the ground floor.

(82) Houses with shops, Nos. 26, 27, of three storeys and attics with rendered walls and a tiled mansard roof, were built possibly in the late 18th century as a single house with a symmetrical front and first-floor bow windows but have been considerably altered.

(83) House, No. 28, of two storeys and attics with a tiled mansard roof, and bow windows to the ground and first-floor rooms, was built in the late 18th century; the ground floor is rendered and has a continuous frieze and cornice at first-floor level.

aTrinity Street

(Formerly part of High Street)

(84) Houses, Nos. 2, 3, of two storeys and attics with walls of ashlar and a roof covered with stone slates, were built in the late 16th century; they appear always to have been two separate dwellings with a single room on each floor (plan, before recent restoration, below).

The street elevation has three pairs of three-light stone-mullioned windows beneath twin gables. Outer doorways at each end of the front have flat lintels and chamfered jambs; above these and the ground-floor windows is a continuous moulded string-course; the upper windows have separate moulded labels. The back wall is of rubble and has no architectural features.

The houses are divided internally by rebuilt brick-nogged timber partitions on each floor and have fireplaces in the N. and S. walls. The ground-floor rooms have wide fireplaces with four-centred heads and chamfered jambs; two ceiling beams span these rooms from N. to S. The first floor is similar, with fireplaces in the N.E. and S.E. corners.

(85) Houses, Nos. 11, 12, are of three storeys and attics and have bow windows to the first floor.

(86) Trinity House is of two storeys and attics. The front elevation is symmetrical with a central doorway having a moulded architrave and flat cornice supported by consoles; at each side is a sash window with flat arched head and above are three similar windows to the first floor.

(87) The Old Rooms, immediately next S. of the above, is of two storeys; the roof is tiled and has a verge of stone slates. The building dates from the late 16th century when it may have formed a dwelling house, although in the 18th century it appears to have been used as assembly rooms; the back of the house originally overlooked the Cove.

Lesser Secular Monuments in Weymouth

The front elevation is symmetrical with a central two-storeyed porch between two pairs of six-light mullioned windows; the ground-floor windows have been altered by the insertion of additional doorways, and the porch by the insertion in the 18th century of a doorway on the N. side with segmental head, moulded architrave and keystone. The original doorway has a flat head and chamfered jambs, and the windows have moulded labels. The porch has a gable to the street but the upper part has been rebuilt.

The ground-floor plan (p. 345) provides for two rooms divided by a through passage with timber-framed partition walls. The stairs are in the adjacent property, their original position is unknown. One room has an original fireplace with a moulded four-centred head. A carved timber fireplace surround, said to have come from the first floor of the Old Rooms, is now in Warmwell House (Warmwell 2).

(88) Houses, four, Nos. 20–23, of two storeys and attics, have been much altered; No. 20 has a first-floor bow window and a mansard roof.

aTrinity Terrace

(89) Houses, three, Nos. 11–13, were built c. 1840; the front of No. 13 has been rendered. Other houses were added to the E. after 1850.

aWyke Road

(90) Belfield Terrace, Nos. 4–14, 650 yds. W.S.W. of (2)' comprises three pairs of semi-detached houses, typical villa residences of c. 1840; the end pairs are of three storeys with basements and the central pair is of two storeys with basements and attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. The houses are of varying design; No. 4 includes a single-storey porch supported by Greek Doric columns, and Nos. 4–6 and 12–14 have wrought-iron balconies, one with a swept roof on trellis standards (Plate 55).

(91) Almshouses, range of four dwellings, immediately W. of (90), are of a single storey with rendered walls and pointed arched heads to the doors and windows. An inscribed tablet in the centre of the front records their erection in 1829; they were built by the Rev. Mr. Chamberlayne with funds accumulated from a legacy left by a Mr. Buxton (Kelly's Directory of Dorsetshire (1935)).

MELCOMBE REGIS (Monuments 92–290)

The following monuments are situated N. of the Harbour. Unless otherwise stated they are of two storeys with brick walls and slate-covered roofs and were built in the early 19th century.

Monuments (92–242)

These monuments lie S. of the King's Statue in the old town of Melcombe Regis. With the exception of The Esplanade, which is treated last (p. 353), the streets are arranged in alphabetical order.

a(92) Shaft, a square structure of limestone, stands out in the Backwater rising a few feet above the water level. It is marked on the 1841 and 1857 maps of Weymouth at the S.W. end of a 'gas tunnel'; the tunnel was built under the navigable channel in the Backwater to transmit gas to Melcombe Regis from the gasworks on the W. bank.

aBelle Vue

(Formerly Governor's Street)

S. side

(93) Houses, Nos. 1, 2, are of three storeys with basements and attics. Each has a bay window the full height of the building finished with a dentil cornice carried across the whole front.

(94) House, No. 5, is of similar design to the foregoing although slightly later in date and with the walls rendered in stucco.

(95) House, No. 6, was built in the late 18th century; it is of two storeys and attics and the walls are rendered. The original plan comprised two ground-floor rooms with the entrance directly into the W. room. The house was altered in the mid 19th century and a two-storey bay window added to the front.

N. side

(96) Houses, Nos. 9, 10, are of two storeys with mansard attics; the roofs are covered with tiles. No. 9 is double-fronted with one bow window to the ground floor and one on the first floor in the centre of the combined elevation; No. 10 is single-fronted.

In the W. gable wall of No. 9 are the remains of a late 16th-century stone gable with a corbelled kneeler, formerly part of a house standing to the W.

aBond Street

S. side

(97) Shop, on the corner of St. Thomas Street, of four storeys with walls rendered in stucco, was built in the mid 19th century; the lower two storeys are embellished with a series of Ionic pilasters without bases and with a moulded cornice above, now partly destroyed; the upper floors, which may be of slightly later date, are plain with an arcade of five arches on the N. side.

(98) London Hotel, of four storeys and cellars, was built c. 1850; the walls are rendered in stucco and have two bow windows to the first floor.

(99) House with shop, No. 3, on the S.E. corner of the junction with New Street, is of three storeys and mansard attics; the walls are rendered; the side door has a blind semi-circular fanlight in a rectangular frame. The front has a two-storey bay window above a modern shop window.

(100) House with shop is of three storeys with mansard attics and the walls are rendered. The first and second floors incorporate a two-storey bay window.

(101) Gordon House is of three storeys with semi-basement; the walls are rendered in stucco. The house is of the mid 18th century and has a symmetrical elevation five windows wide on the N. side, the windows at the E. end being blind. The central doorway has a rusticated surround of alternately plain and moulded blocks with a cornice above; the windows have keystones and projecting sills but no architraves. The walls are surmounted by a moulded cornice and parapet. To the E. is a single three-storey projecting window with canted sides replacing an earlier bow window.

The plan, typical of a building of this date, comprises a central entrance hall and staircase, flanked by one room on each side; on the upper floor a small closet occupies the space above the entrance hall. The staircase has a cut string and turned balusters with a 'Chinese' trellis balustrade in the upper section.

N. side

(102) Houses with shops, on N.W. corner by New Street, of three storeys with walls rendered in stucco, were built as a pair of houses; each has a single bow window to the first floor.

(103) Houses with shops, on N.E. corner, are of three storeys with mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. Each has a two-storey bow window to the upper floors.

aLower Bond Street

(1857: Conygar Lane)

S. side

(104) House, No. 16, immediately E. of the former chapel (Monument 6), is of two storeys; the walls are rendered in stucco. The front doorway has a semicircular head and a plain fanlight; there is a bay window to the first floor. The position of the house relative to the chapel and graveyard behind it suggests that it may have served the former as a manse.

(105) Building, No. 20, is of two storeys and attics; the walls are of limestone ashlar and the roof is tiled. It is occupied by a workshop and flat, but was originally built, in the 17th century, to provide further accommodation for the White Hart (152) which adjoins it to the E. (plan, p. 349). The N. elevation includes a stone gable with scrolled and corbelled kneelers and a moulded parapet; in the gable is a three-light window with hollow-chamfered stone mullions and a moulded label. A second moulded label survives beneath it above a late 18th-century window and E. of the gable is a small blocked window beneath the eaves.

The interior was considerably altered in the 18th century to give a central staircase between two rooms, but a 17th-century bolection-moulded fireplace survives in the W. room on the first floor. The front wall was also partly rebuilt in the 18th century and includes a first-floor bow window. The rear wall retains an original doorway with chamfered stone jambs and a blocked window with a moulded label.

N. side

(106) House, No. 5, of two storeys and attics, is single-fronted and has a bay window to the first floor; it was built in the mid 19th century.

(107) Houses, Nos. 6–8, are of two storeys and attics; the walls are rough-cast.

(108) House, now forming part of the Lamb and Flag p.h., is of three storeys and attics and has a bow window to the first floor. A wing at the rear is of two storeys, with attics in a mansard roof. (Demolished)

(109) House, No. 13, is of three storeys and attics; the front wall is rendered above a stone plinth and has a two-storey bow window to the lower floors.

aBury Street

(110) Houses, five, Nos. 12–16, on the N. side, form a row of Cove Row (Monument 23) type, but with doorways under segmental arched heads.

aCoburg Place

See Monuments (202) and (203).

aCommercial Road

(111) Store, formerly house, behind No. 35, is of two storeys with mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. There are two bay windows to the ground floor.

aCustom House Quay

(Formerly The Quay)

(112) Warehouse, of five storeys with walls of brick with stone dressings and a slate-covered roof, was built c. 1806 by George Hyde; (fn. 12) it includes offices, perhaps a former Custom House (51 St. Mary Street), at the W. end. The original building was of three storeys and has an arcaded lower storey to the S.; the upper floors on this side are divided into three bays each with stone quoins at the angles, and the side bays have Venetian windows to the first floor beneath wide relieving arches; the centre bay has a hoist opening with arched head and quoined surround enclosing doors to the first and second floors. The fenestration has been considerably affected by later alteration. The W. elevation comprises a central doorway and single-light windows above flanked on each floor by a three-light window on each side. (Demolished)

For Custom House see Monument (12).

(113) House, No. 12a, is of three storeys and mansard attics. It is the surviving western half of a house built c. 1790 with stone quoins and stone plat-bands, now destroyed, at each floor level. The windows have been largely replaced but those formerly in the centre of the elevation survive in part, and have flat arched heads of brick, with plain keystones.

(114) House, No. 14, is of three storeys with a semi-basement; the top storey is an addition. The S.E. corner of the house is curved and has a bow window to each floor; there is another two-storey bow window in the E. wall. The outer walls have a moulded cornice continuous around the heads of the bows.

(115) Houses, Nos. 15, 16, are of two storeys and mansard attics, the walls are partly rendered in cement and the roof is tiled. The doorways are placed together in the centre of the S. elevation and have semicircular arched heads with reeded architraves and ogee-moulded keystones. Each house has had a bay window added to the first floor.

aEast Street

E. side

(116) House, No. 3, is of three storeys with attics and cellars, and with walls rendered in stucco. The W. elevation comprises a central three-storey bow window with an upper cornice carried across the full width of the front; a doorway to the S. is set under a semicircular arched opening.

Houses, Nos. 5, 5a and 6, see Monument (153).

(117) House, No. 12, is of three storeys and attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. The second floor has three plain sash windows; a two-storey bow window formerly in the lower floors has been destroyed.

(118) House, No. 13, is of two storeys with mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. A two-storey bow window occupies the centre of the elevation. A similar house (No. 14), now demolished, stood to the S.

(119) House with shop, No. 15, is of two storeys with mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. The shop window is flanked by a pair of doorways with moulded pilasters; there is a bay window to the first floor.

(120) Beverley House, No. 19, is of three storeys with a cellar; the front walls are rendered in stucco and rusticated, the rear walling is rubble. The front elevation is symmetrical and has a central doorway under a semicircular arched head; the windows on the two lower floors also have semicircular heads, those to the second floor have segmental heads with projecting keystones.

(121) House, No. 20, is of three storeys and attics; the lower part of the front wall is rendered, the roof is tiled and has a verge of stone slates. The house was built in the mid 18th century. Each floor has three windows to the W. with flat heads and keystones. The ground floor plan (below) comprises a passage between two rooms, one unheated, with a kitchen and staircase at the rear; the latter has a 'chinese' trelliswork balustrade.

Lesser Secular Monuments in Melcombe Regis

(122) House, No. 21, is of three storeys and attics; the walls are rendered in stucco and the mansard roof is tiled. The lower two floors have a central two-storey bow window of which the upper part has been rebuilt.

(123) House, No. 22, is of three storeys with semi-basement and mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. The ground floor together with the lower stage of a three-storey bow window is recessed to provide for a basement area, the wall above being supported by iron columns. The outer doorway has a semicircular head.

W. side

(124) House with shop, No. 27, is of two storeys with mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. The first floor includes a bow window at the S. end of the elevation.

(125) Houses, Nos. 30, 31, immediately N. of Governor's Lane, are of three storeys, with the walls of No. 30 rendered in stucco. They are of very plain construction and have horizontally sliding sashes to the second-floor windows. (Demolished)

(126) Houses with shop, Nos. 39–41, of two storeys with semibasements and mansard attics, were built c. 1800. Nos. 39 and 40 are a pair with the front doorways placed together and each with a three-light sash window to ground and first floors; No. 41 has a shop doorway and slightly lower shop window to the ground floor with a similar window facing St. Alban Street. The first-floor level is marked by a fluted plat-band; the wall has a wooden eaves cornice with moulded dentils and terminal brackets with guttae.

(127) House, No. 43, is of three storeys with basement and mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco and the roof is tiled. The front elevation has a three-storey bay window.

(128) House, No. 44, is of two storeys with basement and attics; the front wall is rendered in stucco and has a moulded cornice with a panelled parapet.

(129) House, No. 45, is similar to Monument (127) but the roof is slate-covered and the bay window has been renewed.

Esplanade, see pp. 353–57

aGovernor's Lane

(Formerly Friary Lane)

S. side

(130) House with shop, No. 1, of three storeys, was built in the mid 19th century. The shop has a rectangular bay window of shallow projection with deep narrow glazing bars.

(131) Houses, Nos. 2–4, were each built with a shop on the ground floor; the walls are rendered in stucco. Original bowfronted shop windows remain to Nos. 3 and 4.

(132) Houses with shops, Nos. 5, 6, are of two storeys and attics. The lower floor of each has a central shop window flanked by two doors, one to the shop and one to the house.

N. side (see also Steward's Court)

(133) House, No. 8, is of two storeys and attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. (Demolished)

(134) House, No. 9, is of two storeys and attics. Fragments of a 17th-century gable remain in the W. wall. (Demolished)

(135) House, No. 10, has mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. The ground-floor windows have been renewed; the first floor retains a three-light bow window. (Demolished)

(136) House, No. 12, has mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. (Demolished)

(137) House, No. 13, is rendered in stucco. (Demolished)

aMaiden Street

E. side

(138) Houses, Nos. 23, 25, of three storeys and attics with walls rendered in stucco, were built as a pair with shops on the ground floor; each has to the ground floor a wide flat shop window and a single doorway with gadrooned ornament in place of a fanlight above, and a bow window to the first floor. The plan (above), which is small in size, provides for a staircase between the front and back rooms.

(139) Old Coopers Arms p.h., No. 27, is of three storeys with a cellar, with walls rendered in stucco. The elevation to Maiden Street is symmetrical with a central doorway between plain sash windows.

For No. 29 Maiden Street see Monument (160).

(140) Winchester House is of two storeys partly with mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco.

(141) House with shop, immediately S. of the above, is rendered in stucco. At the N. end of the front is a first-floor bow window; the shop front is modern.

(142) Houses, Nos. 39, 41, of brick and stone partly rendered and with mansard attics, were built in 1686; a tablet recording this date and the name Richard Vensont is built into the rear wall of No. 39. In the 19th century the houses were much altered and bay windows were added to the first floor.

(143) House, No. 43, of two storeys and attics with stone walls rendered in stucco, was built in the 17th century but has been considerably altered. A doorway with a four-centred head and chamfered jambs remains in the garden wall.

W. side

(144) Ship Inn, adjacent offices to N., and Duke of Cornwall p.h. in St. Edmund Street, form an L-shaped building of two storeys and attics; the walls are of ashlar and the roofs are covered with slate. It was built in the 17th century and has gables at the N. and S. ends of the E. range and at the N. end of the E. elevation. The gables have corbelled kneelers and parapets with moulded copings terminating in scrolled stops. The elevations have been considerably altered but a number of the original windows with hollow-chamfered mullions and moulded labels survive, particularly to the first floor; one doorway with a four-centred head and hollow-chamfered jambs remains in the centre of the E. side. The interiors retain no original features.

(145) Warehouse, of three storeys with a cellar, has a central hoist with two upper doorways and an entrance doorway with a semicircular head approached by a flight of steps from the street. The windows flanking the entrance have been altered but the upper part of a bow window with moulded cornice remains to the S.; the upper floors are lit by two pairs of three-light sash windows.

aNew Street

E. side

(146) House, No. 6, has mansard attics; the N. wall is of stone. The front elevation has a two-storey bow window.

(147) Houses, Nos. 10, 12, of two storeys and attics, have a central doorway to a communal passage to the rear flanked by the two front doorways. (Demolished)

W. side

(148) House, No. 3, of two storeys and attics, was built in the late 18th century; the front elevation, carried out in brickwork to Flemish bond and with a serrated eaves cornice, includes a wide doorway with a flat hood supported by shaped brackets and consoles, to the N. of which are two sash windows and to the S. one, with four to the floor above. The back wall is of stone and that to the S. is rendered. The ground floor (p. 348) is divided into two rooms, the N. room retaining a semicircular cupboard with shaped shelves.

(149) Houses, Nos. 5, 7, immediately N. of the above, have semi-basements and mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. Each house has a two-storey bay window.

aNicholas Street

W. side

(150) House, No. 5, rendered in stucco, was built in the late 18th century. It has a central entrance doorway with fluted pilasters and a flat moulded cornice above a deep frieze.

(151) House, No. 6, of two storeys and attics, later raised to three storeys at the front, was built in the mid 18th century; the front wall is in brickwork laid to header bond and the rear is of stone rubble. The front doorway has a flat hood supported by shaped brackets and consoles. The ground-floor plan comprises a through passage with two heated rooms to one side and a small room with staircase behind to the other. Some original plaster cornices survive inside.

(152) White Hart Hotel, of two storeys and attics with walls of ashlar partly rendered in stucco, was built in the early 17th century; it has gables at the N. and S. ends with scrolled and corbelled kneelers and parapets with moulded copings terminating in scrolled stops. An original two-light stone mullioned window survives in the S. wall; at the rear is a gabled staircase wing. The front elevation was completely renewed in the 19th century.

The White Hart, Nicholas Street, & No. 20 Lower Bond St.

The ground floor has been considerably altered but the first floor retains much of its original arrangement. The principal rooms have decorative plaster ceilings with moulded ribs and fleur-de-lys ornament. A stone newel staircase is placed centrally at the rear of the building, and the top of the newel has a fluted capping.

A further range of buildings adjacent to the N.W., in Lower Bond Street (Monument 105), is of similar date.

aSt. Alban Street (Plate 185)

(Formerly part of Petticoat Lane or Petit Cour Lane and St. Alban's Row)

S. side

(153) Houses with shops, No. 1a, and Nos. 5, 5a, 6 East Street, are of two storeys with cellars and mansard attics; the roofs are tiled except that of No. 6 which is covered with slate. The front to St. Alban Street has a bow window to the first floor.

(154) Houses with shops, three, Nos. 1–3, were originally of two storeys with mansard attics; a third storey has been added to No. 1. Each has a two-storey bow window and the remains of a brick cornice with paired dentils.

(155) House with shop, No. 4, is of the same build as the foregoing, but of three storeys and with a two-storey bow window to the upper floors. A modern shop window has been inserted in the ground floor.

(156) Houses with shops, Nos. 7, 8, have mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco and the E. gable wall contains some masonry of earlier date. The shop front to No. 7 had a central bow window between two doorways with flat moulded cornices, each with shaped brackets supporting a later flat canopy extending the length of the frontage. Each house has a bay window to the first floor.

(157) Shop, formerly a house, is of three storeys. It has been much altered but retains two bay windows to the first floor.

(158) Wellington Arms p.h. is of three storeys; the front wall is rendered in stucco. The ground floor has been refronted; the first floor retains an original bow window.

N. side

(159) House with shop, No. 14, is of three storeys; the walls are rendered in stucco. The ground floor has been refronted; the first floor retains a bow window with a dentil cornice.

(160) House with shop, at N.E. corner by Maiden Street, is of two storeys with cellars and mansard attics. The Maiden Street elevation has on the ground floor a central bow window with flanking doorways. The St. Alban Street elevation has two dissimilar bow windows to the ground floor.

(161) House with shop, No. 17, has mansard attics. It has a two-storey bow window, the upper and lower cornices of which are carried across the full width of the front.

(162) Houses with shops, Nos. 18, 19, are of three storeys and attics with walls rendered in stucco. No. 18 is doublefronted and has two bow windows to the first floor, No. 19 has a single bow window of similar design; both have modern shop windows to the ground floor.

(163) House with shop, No. 20, of three storeys, was built in the mid 19th century. It has a recessed and rounded corner embracing the shop doorway. Facing St. Alban Street is a bow window to the first floor; the shop windows are original.

(164) Milton House is of two storeys; the W. wall is of squared limestone rubble, the other walls are obscured or rendered in stucco. It was built in the late 16th or early 17th century but has been considerably altered; the only original detail remaining is a doorway with a four-centred head and chamfered jambs in the centre of the S. front. The plan probably comprised a heated room at the W. end and a smaller unheated one to the E.

(165) Houses with shops, Nos. 22, 23, are of three storeys with mansard attics. Each has a two-storey bow window above a later shop front.

aSt. Edmund Street

S. side

For Duke Of Cornwall p.h. see Monument (144) above.

(166) Shop is of three storeys with walls rendered in stucco. The ground floor is rusticated and has modern shop windows; the first floor has a balcony (Plate 55) with cast-iron balustrade incorporating honeysuckle ornament extending the length of the N. front and returning along the E. side.

N. side

(167) House with shop, formerly a pair of houses, Nos. 17, 18, is of three storeys with mansard attics; the walls are rough-cast. The elevation to St. Edmund Street is bow-fronted. The lower floor has modern shop windows. The upper floors have plain sash windows with a cornice and parapet above. The plan of each floor provides for one room at the front, and one at the rear flanked by the staircase.

(168) Golden Lion Hotel, of three storeys with a tiled roof, was built in the late 18th century. The S. elevation is symmetrical and has a central doorway, two bay windows on the first floor and two three-light windows above with a single-light sash window between; above the doorway is a figure of a lion on a low pedestal. The interior has been drastically rearranged.

aLower St. Edmund Street

N. side

(169) House, No. 1, is of two storeys, the walls are rendered and the roof is covered with tiles. A small stone tablet over the front door is inscribed M.I.F. 1727, the date of building. The exterior is unimpressive and all the windows have been renewed. The plan (p. 348) is irregular and originally comprised two rooms on each floor with a staircase in the N.W. corner; a wing was added at the back later in the 18th century. The principal room at the E. end of each floor has a corner fireplace; in the first-floor room of the wing is a round-headed cupboard with shaped shelves.

(170) House, Nos. 6, 8, of three storeys, was erected in the late 18th century. The outer doorway is central and has a rectangular fanlight divided by glazing bars into a series of trefoil-headed lights. (Demolished)

S. side

(171) Warehouse, of five storeys with walls of limestone ashlar, has a square tablet on the W. side at second-floor level inscribed T.J.R. 1805, the date of erection. The S. elevation has a series of hoist doorways in the centre flanked by two windows to each floor; those to the first floor are of Palladian design with fully moulded cornices and pilasters. (Demolished)

aSt. Mary Street

E. side

(172) House with shop, No. 1, has mansard attics; the ground floor has a modern shop front; on the first floor a bow or bay window has been removed.

(173) Black Dog p.h., of two storeys with cellars and attics with walls of brick, stone and timber, and a slate-covered roof with a verge of stone slates, was built as an inn in the late 16th century.

The earliest work consists of the rear wing to the N. of the courtyard; this has a stone gable wall to the E. but the remainder of the wing is largely timber-framed; the S. wall is jettied forward at first-floor level and is carried on the ends of the floor beams, the jetty being matched in the E. gable by a shaped stone corbel; the roof trusses of this wing have cambered collars.

A front range, now rendered in stucco, was added in the 17th century and stone gables of this date remain in the N. end of the W. elevation and on the N. side against the adjoining building; both gables have shaped kneelers, parapets, and plain stone copings. The W. wall has a stone plinth and a three-light mullioned window with moulded label in the gable; all the other windows on this side are of the 19th century.

The interior has been much altered. In a first-floor room at the S. end is a bolection-moulded fireplace surround, above which is a series of three small 17th-century plaster panels; the central panel bears a crowned branch with leaves and on each of the other panels, which are identical, is a formalized tree with foliage and fruit and a pair of birds in the uppermost branches. A short wing S. of the yard retains a wide fireplace to a ground-floor room.

(174) House with shop, No. 4, is of three storeys with walls rendered in stucco; above a modern shop front is a two-storey bow window. (Demolished)

(175) House with shop, No. 5, is of two storeys with walls rendered in stucco; the first-floor windows have moulded and eared architraves. (Demolished)

(176) House with shop, No. 9, is of two storeys with cellars and mansard attics and with walls rendered in stucco. It has a two-storey bow window of a flattened elliptical plan, supported from the ground by two balusters in front of the cellar window.

(177) Houses with shops, Nos. 16, 17, are of three storeys and attics; the front is six windows wide with plat-bands and a moulded cornice. The windows have triple keystones; the shop fronts and dormers are modern.

(178) Houses with shops, Nos. 19, 20, are of three storeys with walls rendered in stucco. Above modern shop fronts are five bow windows to the first floor with plain sash windows above; the wall is surmounted by a moulded cornice and parapet.

(179) Houses with shops, Nos. 21, 22, are of three storeys; they were originally similar but the walls of No. 22 have been rendered. Each has a paired brick dentil cornice and parapet; No. 21 retains a first-floor bow window with sash windows above.

(180) House with shop, No. 23, is of four storeys; the walls are rendered and the upper cornice has been destroyed but a bow window remains on the second floor.

(181) House with shop, No. 24, of three storeys and attics, retains a paired brick dentil cornice; only the second-floor windows are original.

(182) House with shop, No. 31, with mansard attics, has a bow window to the first floor with a dentil cornice carried across the front.

(183) House with shop, No. 32, of three storeys with mansard attics and walls rendered in stucco, has a two-storey bow window above a modern shop front.

(184) Houses with shops, Nos. 34, 35, of the mid 19th century, are of three storeys with walls rendered in stucco. No. 34 has a two-storey bay window above a modern shop front; No. 35 has a stucco panel at second-floor level inscribed 'Albion House'.

(185) House with shop, No. 45, of the late 19th century, replaces a timber-framed building of the late 16th century illustrated in a mid 19th-century photograph (in R.C.H.M. records). The present building incorporates four carved wooden brackets with grotesque heads reused from the earlier work where they supported the sills of bay windows on the upper floors. A pedimental door-head in Church Passage is inscribed 1580, 1883.

(186) House with shop, No. 46, has been largely rebuilt in the early 19th century but may retain some timber-framed construction of the 16th century.

(187) House with shop, No. 50, of three storeys with walls rendered in stucco, has a two-storey bow window to the upper floors.

For No. 51 St. Mary Street see Monument (112).

W. side

(188) House with shop, No. 52, of two storeys and attics with a tiled roof, was built in the second half of the 18th century. The upper windows are widely spaced and have flat-arched brick heads; early 19th-century shop windows and a first-floor bay window have been inserted at the S. end.

(189) Houses with shops, Nos. 55–59, are of three storeys; the walls are partly rendered in stucco, the S. wall is of ashlar. They are of different builds but each has a bow window to the first floor.

(190) House with shop, No. 60, of two storeys and attics with a back wall of stone rubble, was built in the 17th century. An original chamfered window jamb remains in the back wall; the interior retains a chamfered ceiling beam. The house was refronted in brick in the mid 18th century and has subsequently been much altered.

(191) House with shop, No. 66, of three storeys and attics with a tiled roof, was built in the late 18th century. The front wall is in brickwork laid to Flemish bond with glazed headers, now rendered; it has a stucco plat-band at second-floor level, a moulded cornice and parapet. A shop front and two-storey bay window above were added in the 19th century.

(192) House with shop, No. 67, is of three storeys and attics with a mansard roof; the upper part of a multi-storey bow window remains at second-floor level.

(193) Shop, No. 69, is of three storeys with tiled mansard attics. Only the upper floor remains unaltered; it has a paired brick dentil cornice and parapet.

(194) Houses with shops, Nos. 72, 75, are of two storeys with mansard attics; the front walls are rendered and each has, above a modern shop front, a bow window with a cornice carried across the width of the building. (No. 72 demolished)

(195) Houses with shops, Nos. 78, 79, are of three storeys and attics; the walls are partly rendered in stucco and have moulded cornices and parapets; No. 79 has a mansard roof. No. 78 is double-fronted and both buildings have two-storey bow windows above modern shop fronts.

(196) Shop, No. 80, is of four storeys; the front wall is rendered in stucco. Above a modern shop front is a colonnade of four half-round Roman Doric columns flanking the three first-floor windows; the upper windows are surrounded by heavy stucco mouldings of the mid 19th century.

(197) Shops, Nos. 84–86, of three storeys with walls rendered and embellished in stucco, were built in the mid 19th century. The ground storey, now partly rebuilt, with modern shop fronts, is rusticated with horizontal grooving; the window and door heads are semicircular; fascia heads at first-floor level are separated by scrolled brackets with acanthus decoration and paterae above. The two upper storeys are embraced by a single order of Corinthian pilasters in eight bays to St. Mary Street, and six to Bond Street; on the latter elevation the pilasters are paired. The capitals have pronounced volutes and support a fully ornamented cornice and balustraded parapet; in each bay is a plain sash window to each floor.

(198) House with shop, No. 93, is of three storeys; the walls are rendered in stucco and have a moulded cornice and parapet. There is a bow window to the first floor.

(199) House with shop, No. 96, of two storeys with mansard attics, was built in the late 18th century. A symmetrical early 19th-century shop front with a doorway between two bow windows has recently been replaced. The house doorway S. of the shop front has a moulded architrave with a flat cornice and plain frieze with shaped ends.

(200) House with shop, No. 103, is of three storeys with mansard attics. Above a modern shop front is a two-storey bay window with a dentil cornice carried across the whole frontage.

(201) House with shop, No. 107, is of three storeys, part with mansard attics, and the walls are rendered in stucco; it has two bay windows to the first floor.

aSt. Thomas Street

E. side

(202) Houses with shops, Nos. 4, 5 Coburg Place, of two storeys with mansard attics and walls rendered in stucco, were built as a pair of private houses; the northernmost retains an original bow window to the first floor above a modern shop front. The wall has a thinly moulded cornice and parapet.

(203) Shops, Nos. 6, 7 Coburg Place, of two storeys with mansard attics and walls rendered in stucco, retain no visible details earlier than the 19th century. The buildings have little architectural interest but, since they project into the street well in advance of the early 19th-century buildings, they may be of earlier date, perhaps 16th-century, and possibly incorporate a timber-framed structure.

(204) Duke of Edinburgh p.h., No. 3, is of three storeys and attics; the walls are rendered in stucco and have a moulded cornice and parapet. A bay window has been added to the first floor.

(205) Houses with shops, Nos. 6–8, are of three storeys and attics, except No. 8 which is of two storeys, with rendered walls; Nos. 7 and 8 have first-floor bow windows.

(206) House with shop, No. 13, of three storeys and attics, was built in the late 18th century. The ground floor has been refronted and a bay window added to the first floor; the remaining windows, three to the second floor and one below, are original and have flat-arched brick heads with keystones; the front wall has a serrated brick cornice.

(207) Houses with shops, Nos. 24, 25, are of three storeys and attics; the front wall is rendered in stucco. The elevations of the two houses are dissimilar; No. 24 has a two-storey bow window flanked on each floor by a single plain sash window above a modern shop front; No. 25 has three windows to each of the upper floors. The moulded cornice is interrupted by consoles and paterae of the mid 19th century. The plan of one room in depth is unusual for the early 19th century.

(208) Houses with shops, Nos. 26–28, of three storeys, are similar in design and were built as private houses. No. 28 remains substantially unaltered; it has a three-storey bow window to the street, flanked on the S. by the front doorway which has a rectangular fanlight with a shell pattern of glazing bars. At each floor level is a stucco plat-band and above the bow window is a continuous moulded cornice and parapet. The plan (on p. 348) provides two rooms on the ground floor with a staircase between, with minor out-buildings at the rear.

(209) House with shop, No. 29a, of three storeys and attics, with walls rendered in stucco, was built as a private house in the late 18th century. The ground-floor windows have been replaced by a modern shop front; the house doorway has a semicircular head with keystone and impost blocks, and a glazed fanlight. Each of the upper floors has three plain sash windows with keystoned heads, and a plat-band links the second-floor window sills. The front wall has a moulded cornice and parapet.

(210) The Albion p.h. and Shop, Nos. 36, 37, are of two storeys with cellars and mansard attics; the brick walls of No. 37 are in Flemish bond with glazed headers. The ground floor of No. 36 has been altered but that to No. 37 retains parts of an original bow-fronted shop window. Each has a bow window to the first floor with an independent cornice and parapet above.

(211) House with shop, No. 42, with mansard attics, retains an original shop window with fluted pilasters and a moulded cornice; the house doorway has a dentil cornice. A bay window has been added to the first floor.

W. side

(212) House with shop, No. 55, is of two storeys and attics; the front wall is rendered in stucco. The shop front has been partly altered but retains original bowed cornices to its two windows and central doorway. The house doorway is to the N.; in the upper storey is a bay window.

(213) House with shop, No. 59, is of three storeys and attics. The house and shop have separate doors; in the upper storeys is a two-storey bay window with moulded cornices.

(214) Counting House, No. 63, of three storeys with a basement, and with walls of yellow stock brick with later stone dressings, was built c. 1820–30 perhaps to incorporate a private house with a bank or similar place of business. The street frontage has a central doorway (Plate 41) with one window to each side, each of three lights with a flat-arched brick head. Bay windows were inserted into the first floor c. 1900; the other windows are plain, with hung sashes and flat-arched heads. The front wall has a low stone plinth, a plat-band at first-floor sill level and a wide moulded eaves cornice.

Counting House

The plan is square with four principal rooms and a central stair well; the stairs have stone treads with iron balusters and a mahogany handrail. Many original moulded architraves, fireplaces and cornices survive.

(215) Shop, formerly a house, No. 68, is of three storeys; the walls are of ashlar and the flat roof is lead-covered. The building is of early 18th-century date but has been drastically remodelled in the early 19th century. The front is plain with unembellished rectangular window openings and a doorway with a rectangular fanlight having latticed glazing bars; the cornice is thinly moulded and has a blocking course above.

The plan was originally L-shaped with a staircase at the back and two rooms at the front on the ground floor and three above. The second-floor rooms retain some early 18th-century panelling. The staircase is of similar date and has turned balusters and a moulded handrail.

In the yard at the back is an outbuilding of one storey over a basement, also of the early 18th century, with ashlar walls and plain window openings; the roof is supported on round stone pillars.

A stone wall of the 17th century remains on the S. side of the house; it is a fragment of a former building on the site of No. 67 and contains some blocked window openings.

(216) Shop with offices, No. 70, of three storeys with attics and a high modern mansard roof covered with tiles, was built in the late 18th century. The front elevation is in header bond with brick bands of four and three courses at the first and second-floor levels respectively. A bow window was added to the first floor in the mid 19th century.

(217) Houses with shops, Nos. 72, 73, of three storeys and attics with walls rendered in stucco, were built as a pair of houses but have since been considerably altered; No. 72 retains a bow window to the first floor. Both houses have a moulded cornice below a parapet; the cornice to No. 72 is terminated by consoles and paterae similar to Monument (207) above.

(No. 72 demolished)

(218) Auction Rooms, No. 74, is of two storeys and attics; the front wall is rendered in stucco. This building has been continuously occupied for its present purpose since 1823 and was probably built about that date. The street elevation has been modified by the insertion of a shop front and a first-floor bay window in the late 19th century, but much of the original frontage survives above first-floor level. This comprises a pair of pilasters set in antis with a frieze, moulded cornice, and parapet above. The original plan provided for a single room on each floor.

(219) Houses with shops, Nos. 78–80, are of three storeys and attics; No. 78 has a two-storey bay window over a modern shop front; the other buildings have original bow windows to the upper floors.

(220) Houses, Nos. 81, 82, N. of the above but set back from the street, are of three storeys and attics. The ground floors have been reconstructed as shops and extended to the E. but the upper floors remain, each with three windows to each floor with flat-arched brick heads; above is a moulded stone cornice and parapet.

(221) House with shop, No. 84, is of three storeys and attics, with first-floor bay windows replacing a Regency verandah.

(222) Houses with shops, Nos. 84a, 85, 86, are of three storeys; the front of No. 84a has been remodelled but the others retain original two-storey bow windows to the upper floors and a paired brick dentil cornice.

(223) Houses with shops, Nos. 87, 88, are of two storeys with mansard attics. Each has on the first floor a sash window with flat-arched head to the S. and a bow window with a dentil cornice to the N.

For Frederick Place see Esplanade, Monument (243).

aSchool Street

(Formerly School Lane)

(224) House, No. 2, on S. side, of two storeys and attics, has a narrow front door under a semicircular head and a separate passage to the rear. On the first floor is one bow window with a moulded cornice.

aSouth Parade

(225) House, No. 1, on W. side, of two storeys and attics, with walls rendered in stucco, was built in the mid 18th century. It has a central entrance doorway on the S. side formerly with a flat hood supported by shaped brackets. The windows have all been replaced and a two-storey bay window added to the E. end.

aSteward's Court

(226) Houses, Nos. 1–11, form a cul-de-sac on the N. side of Governor's Lane; they are of two storeys with tiled mansard attics and brick walls laid to Flemish bond above a plain stone plinth. The elevations are plain and of the Cove Row type (Monument 23). Some minor alterations have been made including the addition of a first-floor bow window to No. 1.

(Demolished)

aWest Street

(227) House, No. 16, on W. side, of two storeys and mansard attics, was built c. 1790. The original front doorway, 2 ft. 6 ins. wide under a semicircular-arched head, has been superseded; it is flanked by a single window with flat-arched brick head; there are two similar windows to the floor above.

aThe Esplanade

S. of the King's Statue

(228) Commemorative Stones, two, opposite the Royal Dorset Yacht Club (15), are partly worn; they are inscribed (as correlated) 'Esplanade destroyed by a tempest Nov. 23 1824' and '[Rebuilt by] T. VINING [builder April 23rd 1825]'.

(229) Devonshire Buildings (Plate 186) is a terrace of six houses facing N., of three storeys with cellars and mansard attics. It was built after 1805 but possibly not completed until c. 1819 when a house at the E. end was ordered to be taken down (fn. 13) and replaced by the present semicircular end.

The front wall has a moulded cornice and parapet. Front doors, under semicircular-arched brick heads, are flanked by two-storey bow windows; plain sash windows are used over the doors and throughout the second floor. The four houses at the centre of the terrace are one room in width; the end houses are double-fronted.

(230) Pulteney Buildings, Nos. 1–6, a terrace of six houses (Plate 184) attached to the W. end of Devonshire Buildings (229) but facing N.W., has tiled mansard roofs. The two terraces were built at a similar date but Pulteney Buildings is perhaps the earlier; the easternmost house was built last and is not bonded in to the rest of the terrace.

The houses are single-fronted and of generally similar design and construction to Devonshire Buildings, but the cornice is less elaborately moulded.

(231) Bedford House, Bank Buildings, of three storeys with cellars and mansard attics, was built c. 1810–15. In the centre of the front elevation is a three-storey bow window, to the E. of which is a doorway recessed beneath a semicircular-arched brick head in two orders, with sash windows above.

(232) Houses, Nos. 3, 4 Clarence Buildings, were built as a single house in the late 18th century; this was later divided and the S. end, now No. 3, was rebuilt in the first decade of the 19th century. The earliest portion, No. 4, is of two storeys with mansard attics and has rendered walls surmounted by a moulded cornice and parapet. The doorway stands in the centre of the combined elevation with a plain sash window above. N. of the doorway is a two-storey bow window. No. 3 is of three storeys with mansard attics and has a three-storey bow window in the centre.

(233) Houses, pair, Nos. 7, 8 Clarence Buildings, are of three storeys with mansard attics; the roof, which was originally tiled, has been partly re-covered with slate; the walls of No. 8 are rendered in stucco. Each house has a three-storey bow window at the front with a continuous upper cornice.

(234) Alexandra Hotel, Clarence Buildings, of three storeys and attics, was built as a pair of houses in the late 18th century. The front elevation, which has a moulded cornice and parapet, is divided by a broad plat-band at first-floor level and a narrower band linking the second-floor window sills; the hung-sash windows are of graduated heights.

(235) The Oxford Hotel, Grosvenor Place, comprises two distinct buildings. On the corner of St. Alban Street, (a) is of three storeys with semi-basement and attics; the walls are of stone below second-floor level and brick and stucco above. It was built in the late 18th century as a house of two storeys, and the upper storey was added in the early 19th century together with the pair of three-storey bay windows facing E. The E. elevation has plat-bands at ground and first-floor levels and a moulded stone cornice at the original eaves level. A stone doorway facing St. Alban Street has a flat moulded cornice above a pair of attached columns. N. of the foregoing, (b) is a house of the early 19th century, of three storeys with semibasement and attics; on the E. side facing the sea is a three-storey bay window.

(236) Houses, Nos. 1, 2 Augusta Place, are of similar design and construction but No. 1 has been much altered in modern times and the attic converted to an extra storey. The houses, originally of three storeys with basements and attics, were built at the end of the 18th century, perhaps as a single house. The front elevation is divided by stucco plat-bands and a moulded cornice and has a pair of three-storey bay windows.

(237) Fairhaven Hotel, No. 3 Augusta Place, of three storeys with basement and attics, was built in the late 18th century and altered in the mid 19th century with the addition of an extra storey. The front elevation has a doorway at the N. end under a wide semicircular arch; and the two ground-floor and three first-floor windows have rusticated flat-arched heads.

(238) Houses, Nos. 5, 6 Augusta Place, are of three storeys with mansard attics; each has a two-storey bow window to the upper floors with a moulded dentil cornice. The doorway to No. 6 has a semicircular head and fanlight; modern shop windows have been inserted.

(239) Charlotte Row, a short terrace of three houses of three storeys and attics with tiled roofs, was built in the early 19th century and has been much altered.

For Royal Dorset Yacht Club, see Monument (15).

(240) York Buildings, a terrace of seven houses, of three storeys with basements and attics and tiled roofs, was built in the late 18th century, probably about 1785.

The central house, No. 4 (Plate 40), projects slightly beyond the others and has a wide bow window on the upper floors decorated with flat pilasters; on the ground floor the bow is carried by a pair of columns with a smaller bow window behind flanked by a pair of doorways. The front of No. 1 has a three-light window on each of the ground and first floors, the latter with a blind semicircle over the centre light; above it on the second floor are two plain hung-sash windows, with a frieze and moulded cornice above. The other houses were similar to No. 1 but have been altered; the frieze was originally decorated with paterae, many of which are now missing. (No. 7 demolished)

(241) Johnstone Row, a terrace of seven houses, of three storeys with cellars and mansard attics, and walls rendered in stucco, was built c. 1810. Many of the ground-floor rooms have been altered and modern shop fronts added but otherwise the terrace remains in its original state. Where unaltered each house has a front door recessed beneath a semicircular-arched head of two orders, above which are two hung-sash windows, one to each floor; to the right of the doorway is a three-storey bay window.

The plan of No. 2 (p. 356) provides for two principal rooms to each floor with a staircase between. Some original fireplaces and moulded cornices remain.

(242) Statue House, and a similar building to the W., stand at each side of the N. end of St. Mary Street (Plate 40); they are of three storeys with mansard attics and walls rendered in stucco and were built c. 1815. They continue the design of Johnstone Row and form semicircular terminations to two converging blocks of building S. of the King's Statue. Statue House has suffered little alteration but the building to the W. has modern shop fronts to the ground floor. The former has a central entrance doorway on the N. side flanked by bowed shop windows with a frieze and moulded cornice above and with two-storey bow windows to the upper floors. The plan provides a central entrance hall and staircase with quadrant-shaped rooms at each side.

Monuments (243–72)

The following monuments lie N. of the old town of Melcombe Regis and comprise terraces fronting on The Esplanade, N. and W. of the King's Statue, with minor buildings to the W. They are listed generally from S. to N., with the lesser buildings immediately after the terraces behind which they lie.

Development in this area began c. 1790 with the construction of Gloucester Lodge (see Monument 251). Between Gloucester Lodge and the old town lay The Shrubbery, later the site of Frederick Place and Royal Terrace.

a(243) Frederick Place, a terrace of twelve houses each of three storeys with semi-basements and attics, was completed c. 1834.

The front wall is divided by rendered plat-bands and has a moulded cornice and parapet; the doorways are recessed under semicircular-arched brick heads in two orders, and are approached by flights of steps; ground and first-floor windows are in two-storey bays, one to each house, with a blind window on the first floor approximately above the front door; each house has two plain sash windows to the second floor. Some of the houses have been remodelled with shop fronts and additional bay windows to the second floor. The ground-floor plan of No. 8 (p. 356), with a staircase set between front and back rooms, may not be typical since Nos. 8 and 9 are deeper than the adjacent houses.

a(244) Royal Terrace comprises 17 houses, formerly 18, of three storeys with semi-basements and attics; some of the houses have been rendered in stucco. The twelve houses at the N. end (Nos. 1–12) were built c. 1816 and the remainder added soon after 1818. A house at the S. end was demolished, after 1857, in widening Westham Road (formerly Little George Street).

The terrace was symmetrical with three houses at each end of greater height and projecting slightly in advance of the intermediate twelve. The front doors, under brick semicircular-arched heads, were approached by flights of steps, now nearly all destroyed; plain hung-sash windows were used throughout. The ground-floor plan of No. 4 (p. 356) is typical, with two principal rooms, a staircase flanking the rear room, and service quarters in a lower wing behind.

The land behind these terraces, W. of Great George Street, appears to have been developed from c. 1810–20. The houses built at this time are generally of two storeys and attics with exposed brick walls and mansard roofs covered with slates and are embellished versions of the Cove Row type (Monument 23).

aCaroline Place

(245) Houses, five, Nos. 1–5, of three storeys, with cementrendered brick walls and a plain slate-covered roof, were built c. 1840–50. The outer doorways have flat segmental-arched beads.

(246) Houses, Nos. 6, 7.

aGreat George Street

(247) Houses, five, Nos. 7–11; Nos. 8 and 9 have been largely rebuilt.

(248) Houses, Nos. 23, 24, are of better quality than the foregoing and may have been built at a slightly later date, c. 1830. The walls are rendered and have a brick dentil cornice and parapet. The upper storey had two bow windows, one of which has been replaced.

aPark Street

(S. end, formerly West Parade; see also (257–63))

(249) Houses, six, Nos. 14–20, 32, 34.

(250) Houses, three, Nos. 6–10; the centre house only has a mansard roof which is at right angles to the street.

a(251) Gloucester Hotel incorporates Gloucester Lodge which was built for the Duke of Gloucester c. 1780 and occupied by George III from c. 1790; it was sold in 1820. Though subsequently much altered, it remains important as representing the royal patronage which encouraged Weymouth's development as a watering place; it is also the earliest building in the development N. from the old town of Melcombe Regis.

The Lodge was originally of two storeys and cellars with the principal rooms on the ground floor. The surviving E. and W. elevations are alike and of eight bays inclusive of two-bay terminal wings of slight projection. In each wing is a Venetian window on the ground floor and extending across the two bays. The other windows have flat-arched brick heads and hung sashes. Subsequent alterations include S. extensions and additional storeys.

a(252) Houses, four, Nos. 1–4 Gloucester Row, immediately N. of the above, were built c. 1790 to the designs of James Hamilton, (fn. 14) and used as an annexe to Gloucester Lodge when the Royal Family was in residence. They are of four storeys, the upper floor being an addition; No. 1 is unaltered, No. 2 has a modern shop front, No. 3 has been rebuilt and No. 4 is rendered in stucco.

Original round-headed doorways with moulded surrounds and key-blocks survive in Nos. 1 and 4. The windows have flat heads with two square-ended stone voussoirs and a central keystone. The windows of the second floor are approximately at the same level as those of the first floor in Gloucester Lodge.

a(253) Houses, seven, Nos. 7–13 Gloucester Row, form a terrace of three storeys with semi-basements and attics; the walls are rendered in stucco and the lower storey is rusticated. The terrace was built c. 1790 and originally consisted of eight houses, but the northernmost has been demolished.

The central pair, Nos. 10 and 11, which stand slightly higher than the rest, are unrendered in the upper storeys and have cast-iron verandahs to the first floor. Nos. 7–9 and 12–13 have doorways with fanlights under three-centred heads, between engaged columns with fluted capitals supporting entablatures; Nos. 7 and 8 are without the architrave. Nos. 10 and 11 have rounded-headed doorways and windows to the ground floor.

The area W. of Gloucester Row was developed by speculative builders from c. 1830; the houses were more simply designed and cheaply constructed than the monumental terraces facing the bay and were intended for occupation by a lower social class. The streets in which the early stages of this development, prior to 1850, are seen are Bath Street, Gloucester Street, Park Street and Wesley Street. The houses (Plate 185) are very similar to one another in character; they are mostly of two storeys and attics with rendered brick walls and slated roofs, of one room in width and with doorways under semi-circular or segmental-arched heads. All except Monument (257) have bow windows to the first floor with double-hung sashes and moulded or dentil cornices. The area also contains almshouses in Turton Street.

aBath Street

(254) House, No. 1, on S. side.

(255) Houses, Nos. 2, 3.

aGloucester Street

(256) Houses, four, Nos. 18–21, and Star Hotel, on N. side.

aPark Street (see also 249, 250)

W. side, odd numbers

(257) Houses, six, Nos. 29–39.

(258) Houses, three, Nos. 41–45; Nos. 41 and 43 have mansard roofs.

(259) House, No. 47.

(260) Prince of Wales p.h., including No. 49.

(261) Houses, six, Nos. 51, 53, 59–65, and Dolphin Hotel; Nos. 51 and 53 are of three storeys.

E. side, even numbers;

(262) Houses, three, Nos. 62–66.

(263) Houses, Nos. 68, 70.

aTurton Street

(264) Carter's Almshouses, six, of squared stone with a roof of low pitch, were built in 1835. Each cottage has a doorway to the S. with a flat-arched keystoned head and one pointed-arched window to each floor. A stone on the S. front is inscribed S. & M.C. 1835.

aWesley Street

(265) Houses, eleven, Nos. 1–11, on N. side.

a(266) Royal Crescent is a straight terrace of 15 houses of three storeys with semi-basements and mansard attics; the walls are rendered in stucco. The front elevation is similar to Gloucester Row but with taller second-floor windows. This similarity may reflect adherence by the builder to a grandiose scheme proposed about 1792 (fn. 15) for a crescent of 49 houses N. of Gloucester Lodge, a scheme which would have embraced the sites of Gloucester Row, Royal Crescent and Belvidere. The first leases of land for building in Royal Crescent date from 1792 but the terrace was still not complete in 1801.

The walls are rusticated in the lower storey and plain above; they are divided by a plat-band at second-floor sill level and have a moulded cornice and parapet; there is a light stone balcony with an iron balustrade in front of the first-floor windows. The front doors are recessed beneath semicircular-arched heads in two orders, one rusticated, one plain, flanked on the left by two windows and with three plain hung-sash windows to the upper floors. The plan of each floor comprises two rooms, the principal room at the front and a second room and the staircase at the rear.

a(267) Houses, nine, Nos. 6–12 and Nos. 33, 34 Crescent Street, behind Royal Crescent, of two storeys with mansard attics, rendered walls and moulded or angular cornices and parapets, were built c. 1800–10. Each house has one sash window to the front room on each floor set in a two-storey brick bow in the centre of the elevation; the outer doorway, under a plain semicircular-arched head, leads, through a psssage, to a staircase at the rear.

Early 19th-century Terraces in Melcombe Regis

a(268) Belvidere (Plate 184), a terrace of 16 houses, is of three storeys with semi-basements and attics; Nos. 1, 2 and 5–13 have been rendered in stucco. Building commenced between 1818 and 1823 and continued sporadically although to a uniform elevation until its completion c. 1855. The earliest houses to be built (fn. 16) were Nos. 4–6 and possibly also 7–10. A reference of 1832 (fn. 17) to new houses at the S. end of Belvidere may refer to Nos. 1–3 whilst additional houses said to have been built in 1835 (fn. 18) may be Nos. 11–13. Nos. 14–16 were still not built in 1853 when a lease was granted subject to their completion within three years. (fn. 19)

Each house has a wide doorway with small glazed panels at the sides under a semicircular-arched head; the ground-floor windows have similarly arched heads; each of the upper storeys has three windows at the front, the central window on the first floor being embellished with a flat moulded cornice and consoles. A stone balcony carried on brackets, with a cast-iron balustrade of trellis pattern, extends in front of the first-floor windows; the second-floor window sills are linked by a plat-band. The front wall is surmounted by a moulded cornice and a parapet. The two houses in the centre and two at each end project slightly in advance of the remainder. The plan (p. 356) provides two rooms on each floor with a staircase at the back next to the rear room, and a small service wing behind.

a(269) Houses with shops, Nos. 25–27 Crescent Street, behind the foregoing, were built c. 1840. No. 25 has a group of three doorways on the ground floor giving access to a house, passage and shop; the window of the last has a moulded cornice. Above the house and shop doors are rectangular fanlights with a diagonal pattern of glazing bars. No. 27 was similar but has been much altered. (Demolished)

a(270) Waterloo Place, a terrace of 12 houses of three storeys with basements and attics, was built c. 1835. The elevation is similar to that of Frederick Place (Monument 243), although on a reduced scale and lacking the blind windows over the doors.

The walls have mostly been rendered and have plat-bands at first and second-floor levels, a moulded cornice and parapet. Each house has a doorway with semicircular head and a two-storey bow window to the lower floors, with two hung-sash windows above; the bow windows of Nos. 1 and 5 have been replaced. The usual plan is followed (p. 356) with two rooms to each floor, the staircase flanking the rear room and a small service wing at the back.

a(271) Brunswick Terrace (formerly Brunswick Buildings, Place or Row), a terrace of 20 houses of three storeys and attics with walls partly rendered in stucco, was built between 1823 and c. 1827. It was erected by Morris Clarke and George Cox, and while still incomplete was named Brunswick Row by the Duke of Gloucester on 16th August, 1824. (fn. 20)

Where unaltered the elevations are very similar to Waterloo Place (Monument 270), with plat-bands at first and second-floor levels, doorways under semicircular-arched heads and two-storey bow windows; one of each pair of second-floor windows has, however, been left blind. The plan (p. 356) is also similar to the above but the accommodation is slightly smaller and basements are absent.

The S. end of the terrace is rounded and is comparable on a smaller scale to the pair of buildings (Monument 242) at the N. end of St. Mary Street. The two houses in the centre of the terrace, Nos. 12 and 13, and No. 20 at the N. end, project slightly and are higher than the remainder of the houses.

a(272) Lennox House, at the corner of Lennox Street and Victoria Street, with brick walls partly rendered and a hipped roof, was built c. 1845. It was originally detached, further houses being added to the W. c. 1850. On Arthur's map of 1857 it is named Victoria Villa and marked 'Hydrophatic [Hydropathic] baths', but no traces remain of any bathing establishment.

Lennox House

The front elevation facing S. was originally symmetrical and has a central doorway and open semicircular porch supported by two columns; the doorway was flanked by hung-sash windows, but that to the E. was replaced by a two-storey bay window c. 1860. The lower part of the wall is rusticated beneath a plat-band at first-floor level; above the band the brickwork is exposed with stucco quoins at the corners and stucco window jambs. The plan provides four rooms on the ground floor with a central passage and with fireplaces set against the outer walls.

Monuments (273–290)

The following monuments are situated on the higher ground to the N. of the Esplanade. Unless otherwise stated, the position of monuments not marked on the map (in pocket) is measured from St. John's Church, 950 yds. N.N.E. of the King's Statue.

a,bGreenhill

E. side

(273) Greenhill Hotel, No. 8, with rendered walls and a two-storey bay window facing the sea, was built c. 1840. The house is marked on Arthur's map of 1857 as 'Mr. Vinings' and included, perhaps in company with projected development at either side, under the general name of Somerset Place; it was extended to the W. after 1857.

(274) Houses, Nos. 14, 16, of three storeys and attics, were built c. 1830. They are semi-detached and together form a plain box-like structure; the walls are rendered except on the W. and have a moulded cornice.

(275) House, No. 18, is of similar date and construction to (274) but is undivided. It is marked on the 1857 map as 'Sir Ed: Johnson's' and named Greenhill. The E. front has a central doorway flanked, on the ground floor only, by wide bow windows the lights of which are separated by pilasters.

(276) Greenhill House is a large early-Victorian mansion of two storeys with attics and cellars; the walls are rendered in stucco and have a moulded cornice supported by brackets above a pulvinated frieze. On the E. side is a projecting loggia, with six Ionic columns and a moulded cornice, surmounted by a cast-iron railing to provide a balcony at first-floor level. The principal entrance on the W. is flanked by a pair of Greek Doric columns in front of which a single-storey porch appears to have been intended or demolished; above the doorway is a Venetian window. The cornices to the principal rooms are elaborately moulded; the handrail of the staircase is supported by a series of heavy balusters in the form of Roman Doric columns, one to each step.

(277) Houses, Nos. 28, 30, of two storeys with cellars and mansard attics, were built c. 1830. They are marked on the 1857 map as Gordon Place. The outer doorways are in two-storey projections to the N. and S.; the E. elevation comprises, on the ground floor, a blind arcade of four bays with, in each bay, a hung-sash window with marginal glazing bars; on the first floor, above a plat-band, are corresponding windows with cornice and parapet above.

bDorchester Road

(including Alexandra Road and Spa Road)

E. side

(278) Houses, Nos. 8, 10, 14–26, 30, 32 (even nos.), 300 yds. to 530 yds N.N.W., with Nos. 12 and 28 which have been rebuilt, formed a group of three detached and five pairs of semidetached houses built c. 1835. On Arthur's map of 1857 they are given the general name of Wellington Terrace and No. 8 is named Talavara Villa (sic). The houses are all set back from the road, and are plain in appearance with low-pitched hipped roofs, rendered walls and hung-sash windows. The surviving detached house, No. 22, has some Gothic details including moulded labels over casement windows and a battlemented central bay of two storeys with pointed windows.

(279) Houses, Nos. 34–44 (even nos.), 540 yds. to 600 yds. N.N.W., form a group of three pairs of semi-detached houses built c. 1830–40 and are marked on the 1857 map as Dorset Place. Nos. 34–40 are two identical pairs flanking St. Augustine's R.C. Church (Monument 5) with which they may be contemporary; they have rendered walls and hipped roofs with projecting eaves. Nos. 42 and 44 are similar but are of two storeys and attics with dormer windows behind a parapet.

(280) Cottages, Nos. 58, 60, 62, 650 yds. N.N.W., are rendered in stucco. They are of relatively poor construction, and as examples of speculative development they contrast remarkably with Monument (278) above, with which they are contemporary.

(281) Former Toll-House, now two cottages Nos. 158, 160, 1,350 yds. N.N.W., of a single storey with walls of roughfaced limestone ashlar, was built c. 1830. The building, which encroaches on to the present pavement, has five windows with pointed arched heads facing the road.

(282) Farmhouse, at Mount Pleasant, 1 m. 100 yds. N.N.W., stands at right angles to the road. It is a long rectangular house, with rendered walls and overhanging eaves, built c. 1850.

W. side

(283) Houses, No. 67–77 (odd nos.), 510 yds. N.N.W., a terrace of six houses of three storeys with attics and cellars, were built c. 1830; they are marked on the 1857 map as Sharraw Buildings. The walls are rendered in stucco, incised with rusticated horizontal lines up to first-floor level above which the surface is plain. The doorways and ground-floor windows have semicircular heads with plain hung-sash windows above. The four central houses project slightly and have a pedimental blocking-course above a moulded cornice.

(284) Radipole Terrace, 700 yds. N.N.W., is a long single-storey building comprising five cottages set at right angles to the road; the walls are timber-framed with a covering of mathematical tiles now much replaced, and a slate-covered roof with a ventilating slit along the centre of each slope. It was formerly a part of Radipole Barracks of which it may have comprised the officers' quarters, and is marked as 'The Old Barracks' on the 1857 map; at that date it was fronted on the S.E. by a large garden, of which part remains, and stood at the N. corner of the Barrack Square, a site now bounded by Alexandra Road and Westbourne Road. The site of the other barrack buildings is unknown although Monument (285) below may have been one.

Radipole Cavalry Barracks were built in 1798 with additions in 1800 and 1804; in 1806 they had a complement of 953 officers and men and 986 horses; by 1822 this has been reduced to 509 officers and men and 640 horses but the greatest number quartered there during the year was only 238 officers and men and 171 horses. The barracks were abandoned by 1828. (Reports in War Office Library.)

(285) Bungalow, Nos. 24, 26 Alexandra Road, formerly (1857) York Villa, 210 yds. S.W. of (284), is of a single storey with rendered timber-framed walls; the windows and other features have Gothic ornament. Together with another, Park Villa, which formerly stood to the S.E., it faced the S.W. side of the Barrack Square and may have formed further officers' quarters for the barracks. At least until 1857 these were the only substantial buildings in this area distant from Dorchester Road.

(286) Cottages, in Alexandra Road, Nos. 1, 3 (S. side) and 2, 4, 6 (N. side), immediately N.W. of (283), are terrace buildings with rendered walls and low-pitched roofs, probably erected c. 1830 soon after the closure of the barracks.

(287) Houses with shops, Nos. 119–129 (odd nos.), 740 yds. N.N.W., formerly a terrace of six houses built c. 1830–40, are marked on the 1857 map as 'Union Place'. The walls are rendered; the houses have been considerably altered and the ground-floor rooms have been converted into shops.

(288) Houses, Nos. 203–209 (odd nos.), 1,200 yds. N.N.W., are two pairs of semi-detached houses similar to (277) above, built c. 1840. The stucco front of Nos. 207–9 is ornamented with pilasters.

(289) House with shop, No. 2 Spa Road, 1,500 yds. N.N.W., was built c. 1840. The walls are rendered and have a plat-band at first-floor level; the central doorway has an elliptical-arched head, and the roof is pyramidal.

(290) Cottages, Nos. 4–16 Spa Road (even nos.), immediately W. of (289) and of similar date, form a continuous terrace; the walls are rendered.

BROADWEY

Broadwey, 3 m. N. of Melcombe Regis, was formerly a separate parish. The village extends for approximately ¾ m. on both sides of the Dorchester Road, but earlier development is principally on the W. side around the church and the site of the Manor House. (fn. 21) The hamlet of Nottington, on the site of an old settlement ½ m. S.W., is largely of early 19th-century date and is centred around Nottington Mill (Monument 299). To the E. of the hamlet is Nottington Spa (298), a small medicinal spring and bath house developed in the early 19th century.

b(291) The Parish Church of St. Nicholas (667835) stands on the W. side of the Dorchester Road in the middle of the former parish. The walls are of local ashlar except the N. wall of the N. aisle which is of coursed rubble; the roofs are slated with the exception of that to the N. aisle which is covered with lead. The church has been entirely rebuilt and enlarged in successive stages since the beginning of the 19th century but incorporates reused details of 12th, 14th and 15th-century date. The North Aisle and N. arcade were rebuilt in 1815 and the Nave soon after 1834. The remainder of the building dates from 1874 (Chancel and North Vestry) and 1902 (South Aisle of chancel and nave and S. arcade of nave).

The most noteworthy feature is the reset S. doorway.

Architectural Description—The Nave (52 ft. by 19½ ft.) has, set in the W. wall but formerly in the S. wall, an early 15th-century window of three lights with curvilinear tracery under a two-centred head; the external label has carved head-stops of a bishop and a king; on the S. jamb, internally, is a decorative niche (see Fittings). The N. arcade, rebuilt in 1815, is of four bays with square responds and octagonal piers with shallow moulded caps supporting plain round arches.

The North Aisle (10½ ft. wide) has in the N. wall two three-light windows of 1815 with two-centred heads and intersecting tracery. In the W. wall is a reset 16th-century window of two lights, each with a trefoiled head, and a flat moulded label with dropped ends.

The South Aisle (17 ft. wide) is modern, but reset in the S. wall is a 12th-century doorway with a high segmental-arched head in two orders: the inner order has a roll and shallow concave moulding on its lower edge, the outer has a similarly moulded chevron ornament with the points protruding outwards from the wall face, below a label enriched with prism and nail-head ornament. The jambs, also in two orders, have single attached columns in the outer order with moulded bases and carved capitals: the E. capital has a head between entwined strapwork and a beast; the W. has intertwined beasts. Above the jambs are moulded impost blocks.

Fittings—Corbels: two, reset in W. wall of S. aisle, carved with grotesque animal masks, 12th-century, formerly flanking chancel arch. Font: of Purbeck stone, circular, with fluted bowl, plain stem and moulded base, 12th-century. Monuments: In churchyard—on N. and S. walls of chancel, (1) to Rev. Robert Marriott, 1819, side panel from table tomb formerly on site of chancel extension, and a similar panel, later inscribed to John Furmedge, 1849, and Ann his wife, 1858; S.E. of chancel, (2) to Trumpeter Ml Melchior and Privates Jas Mussell and In° Newman of the 15th or King's Regiment of Light Dragoons, erected 1807, headstone with military emblems; (3) to John George Jannau, late Paymaster-Sergeant of the 23rd Regiment of Lancers, 1817, headstone with regimental crest, signed N. Gray, Sculp., Weym°; (4) obelisk on square moulded base, of cast iron, mid 19th-century, inscription panel missing; on S. wall of S. aisle, (5) to William Hopkins, Mary his wife, William his son, and Mary his daughter, 1643, semicircular inscription panel in frame with nail-head ornament under rectangular label. Niche: in nave, on S. jamb of W. window, with corbelled base and canopy; base has moulded platform supported by demi-angel clasping a blank shield; canopy has two faces with cusped and crocketed ogee arches between crocketed pinnacles, early 15th-century. Plate: includes cup of 1800 by Samuel Goodbehere, E. Wigan and J. Bult; flagon of 1711 given by Mrs. Katherine Baynard; paten of 1578 by Lawrence Stratford of Dorchester (see also cup at Upwey (Monument 334)) and another paten of 1757 by Edward Wakelin, given by George Gould. Pulpit: of oak, with enriched styles and rails, two tiers of panels the upper ones carved in low relief, moulded and enriched cornice, and moulded base, early 17th-century. Stoup: reset E. of S. door, with two-centred head cut from one stone, mediaeval, bowl missing.

b(292) Cottages, three, Nos. 681, 693, 695 Dorchester Road, 300 yds. to 400 yds. N. of the church, with stone walls, rendered in the first cottage, and slate-covered roofs, hipped and of low pitch to the second and third, were built c. 1830. They have symmetrical elevations.

b(293) Broadwey Mill and Dairy: The water Mill on the River Wey, 100 yds. W. of the church, is of four, formerly two, storeys with walls of coursed rubble; the windows have segmental-arched heads of stone and wooden casements; there are hoist doorways in the centre of the S. side at first and second-floor levels; above the latter is a stone tablet inscribed J. H. Tizard 1846, the date of the heightening; the earlier work is 18th-century. No machinery survives.

The Dairy (North Manor Farm), 600 yds. N.N.W. of the church, is principally of two storeys with rubble walls and a slate-covered roof; it is symmetrical and stands to the N. of a group of single-storey Outbuildings partly enclosing a farmyard; all early 19th-century. The outbuildings bear a later stone tablet inscribed J. H. Tizard 1846.

b(294) Broadwey Farm, house, 110 yds. S. of the church, on the W. side of Dorchester Road, of two low storeys and attics with a thatched roof, now replaced, and walls of rubble, was built in the late 17th century; one original first-floor timber window remains in the E. wall. A taller two-storeyed house adjoining on the N. is of slightly later date but refronted in the early 19th century and with a later extension at the N. end.

b(295) Swan Inn, 320 yds. S. of the church, on the W. side of Dorchester Road, of two storeys, with rendered walls and a slated roof, was rebuilt or substantially altered in the 18th century; some chamfered ceiling beams remain above the carriage entrance.

b(296) Lorton Farm and Cottages: The Farm (formerly Broadwey Dairy House), 450 yds. S. of the church, of two storeys with rubble walls and a slate-covered hipped roof, was built c. 1820–30. It has a symmetrical elevation with central entrance and windows with hollow-chamfered pointed tracery in rectangular frames. A Barn largely of the same date but incorporating earlier work lies to the N., and immediately N. again is a row of three two-storey Cottages with rubble walls and slated roofs; the latter incorporate a date stone of 1835.

Lorton Cottages, ½ m. S.E. of the foregoing and of similar general structure and date, but much altered, were built as one cottage. Some 100 yds. S.W. of them is a large Barn with stone walls and a thatched roof; it has porches to E. and W., the former facing a square, walled farmyard; a stone on the E. porch records the date of building, 1822.

b(297) The Old Rectory, 400 yards S.S.E. of the church, of two storeys and a basement, with yellow brick walls and a slate-covered hipped roof, was built c. 1811–12. The front elevation, which has a stone platband, is symmetrical, with a central single-storey porch flanked by rectangular windows set in elliptical-headed recesses; the upper windows have segmental heads.

b(298) The Elms, house, No. 462 Dorchester Road, 700 yards S. of the church, is of two storeys with rendered walls and roof covered with corrugated iron. The front is symmetrical and has a stone tablet inscribed JWS 1779 between the upper windows. Immediately to the S. is a large stone-built Workshop, formerly a wheelwright's shop and forge, of the late 18th or early 19th century.

b(299) Cottages at Nottington (663826), of two storeys, were built as a single dwelling c. 1676. The walls are of coursed rubble with brick chimneystacks in the end gables; the roof has been re-covered in slate. The S.W. elevation, which is unaltered, comprises a nearly central doorway with chamfered jambs and a debased four-centred arched lintel bearing the date 1676; flanking the door are two three-light windows with recessed hollow-chamfered stone mullions and moulded labels. Two windows without labels occur in corresponding positions on the floor above. The doorway opened originally into a small lobby with principal rooms at each side and a small service room between them at the rear. The windows to the N.E. have been modernised.

b(300) House, formerly Nottington Spa (663827), is of three storeys with a basement; the walls are of brick rendered in stucco and the roof is slate-covered. It was built in 1830 by Thomas Shore to the designs of Robert Vining (D.C.C., 25 Feb., 15 April 1830).

The plan is a regular octagon with external sides of 13 ft., divided internally N.–S. by a spine wall carrying the flues which emerge in a central chimney-stack; the external walls have panelled pilasters at the angles and a moulded cornice. The building enclosed a sulphureous spring and contained baths, a pump room, and other accommodation; the original pump remains in the basement. Other Houses to the E. may be of similar date and probably provided ancillary accommodation, but they are now considerably altered.

b(301) Mill, Malthouse and Cottages: 'Old Mill House', formerly Nottington Mill, a water-mill (661826), is now of two storeys with cellars and attics. It was built or considerably altered in the early 19th century and has rubble walls with a stone coping and ball finials to the gables.

Malthouse, 50 yds. S. of the foregoing, is a rectangular building of three storeys; the walls are of rubble with ashlar dressings and the roof is slate-covered. The building is dated by a stone tablet inscribed 'GNS 1834'. The E. elevation to the road has a lower range of windows and doors with a continuous stone plat-band above incorporating keystones; near the N. end are two taller semicircular-headed openings behind one of which is the site of a water-wheel. A central gable on the E. side and the two end gables have stone copings and ball finials.

Cottages, 400 yds. N.N.W. of Nottington Mill, are of two storeys with rubble walls, brick chimneys and slate-covered roofs. All were built in the second quarter of the 19th century, two being dated 1825 and 1836; they now comprise a terrace of five cottages facing E., a shorter terrace at the rear, and a separate terrace N. of and at right angles to the last.

Nottington Spa, Weymouth

PRESTON

Preston is a former parish 2½ m. N.E. of Melcombe Regis, from which it is separated by Lodmoor, a low-lying and marshy tract of land. The village of Preston stands on the Wareham road E. of the river Jordan; ½ m. further N. and W. of the river, is the hamlet of Sutton Poyntz. There were no outlying mediaeval settlements; the open fields were enclosed in 1798. The N.W. part of the old parish, including Chalbury camp and extensive strip lynchets, is now in Bincombe.

d(302) The Parish Church of St. Andrew (705829) stands at the S.E. corner of the village. The walls are of coursed rubble with freestone dressings; the roofs are covered with lead, except those over the chancel and N. porch which are slated. The church may be early 14th-century in origin, the date of the surviving tower arch and N. doorway. In the 15th century the Chancel and chancel arch were rebuilt, new windows were inserted in the Nave and the North Porch was added. In the early 16th century the S. arcade was inserted and the South Aisle added, with the re-use of the nave windows. The West Tower was rebuilt in the early 16th century. A further extensive restoration was carried out in the mid 19th century under the direction of T. H. Wyatt. The Vestry is modern.

Preston, the Parish Church of St. Andrew

Architectural Description—The Chancel (21¼ ft. by 16½ ft.) has a late 15th-century E. window of three trefoiled lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head with moulded reveals. In the N. wall is a modern doorway to the vestry. In the S. wall is an early 16th-century window of three trefoiled lights in a square head with a label. The late 15th-century chancel arch is two-centred and moulded; the outer members are continued down the responds and the innermost springs from attached shafts with moulded bases and caps, the latter carved with foliage. S. of the arch is a square-headed squint.

The Nave (44¼ ft. by 21 ft.) has in the N. wall two late 15th-century windows each of three trefoiled lights in a segmental-pointed head but with differing tracery; the eastern window has moulded reveals and a label with stops carved with a woman spinning and a huntsman; the western window has a label with returned stops and shafted splays with carved capitals; the early 14th-century N. doorway has chamfered jambs and a two-centred head. The early 16th-century S. arcade is of four bays with moulded four-centred arches springing from piers each with four attached shafts having moulded caps and bases; the responds have attached half-piers. E. of the arcade is a square-headed opening to the rood-loft.

The South Aisle (10¾ ft. wide), of the early 16th century, has an embattled parapet. The restored 15th-century E. window is of three trefoiled lights with vertical tracery in a four-centred head; flanking the window, on the N., are remains of the rood stair. The S. wall is divided externally into three bays with intermediate buttresses. In the E. and W. bays are two windows of reused material, each of three uncusped lights with plain vertical tracery in a segmental-pointed head. In the centre bay is a blocked doorway with moulded jambs and high four-centred arched head. In the W. wall is a window of three trefoiled lights with quatre-foiled tracery under a segmental-pointed head.

The West Tower (10½ ft. square) is of two stages with angle buttresses, a moulded string, and embattled parapet with moulded string and gargoyles at the corners. The early 16th-century W. doorway has double-ogee moulded jambs and a high four-centred head. Above it is a reset 14th-century window of two trefoiled lights and quatre-foiled tracery in a two-centred head. The upper stage is of two storeys: the first has narrow rectangular windows with chamfered jambs in the N. and S. walls; the bell chamber above has in each wall an early 16th-century window of two trefoiled lights and sunk spandrels beneath a flat head. The 14th-century tower arch is two-centred and of two continuous chamfered orders.

The North Porch is of the 15th century; it has an outer archway with a moulded two-centred head, the inner and outer members springing from attached shafts with caps carved with foliage and paterae, and stone benches to E. and W.

Fittings—Bells: six; 3rd by Thomas Purdue, 1671; 4th and 5th by R. Austen, 1629, but recast; 6th by R. Austen, 1629 (Walters, 110, 118; for full inscriptions see Raven, 65). Bracket: In nave—on first pier of S. arcade, moulded and resting on mutilated carved head. Font: square, tapering and panelled bowl of Purbeck marble, c. 1200, on retooled octagonal stem with moulded base and capping carved with paterae, 15th-century. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In chancel— on N. wall, (1) to unnamed vicar, 1614, recess with kneeling figure in academic dress, head and hands renewed; (2) to Octavius Piers, B.A., pastor, 1848, white marble tablet signed Raggett; on S. wall, (3) to Capt. Roger Keating, 1842, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet on black marble backing signed Hellyer, Weymouth. In S. aisle—in S. wall, (4) reset tomb recess with roll-moulded jambs springing from semi-octagonal pedestal bases and segmental-pointed head, 15th-century. In churchyard—E. of chancel, headstones, (5) to Mary Clapcott, 1672, (6) to Edoth, wife of William Clapcott, 1681, (7) to Jean, wife of John Clapcott, 1686, (8) to Susan, wife of Henry Clapcott, 1696/7; N. of chancel, (9) to Thomas Fookes, 1701, and John Thomas, 1728, table-tomb with arcaded sides and shaped ends; S. of chancel, headstones, (10) to Edward, son of Edward Bryer, 1684, (11) to Edmond Noseter, 1711. Floor-slabs: In nave, (1) to Mary, wife of John Light, minister, 166[0], (2) to John Hankins Shuttleworth, vicar, 1752, (3) to James Linton, 1730, (4) to Jane (Linton), wife of John Tibb, 1715, also to Eadeth (?), wife of James Linton, 1749, (5) to T. Batter, (6) to Richard Eayers, 17th-century, (7) to Susannah Wallis, 19th-century, (8) to Richard Wallis, 19th-century. Niche: In porch—in E. wall, trefoil-headed recess with carved spandrels, 15th-century. Plate: includes brass alms-dish, embossed, 16th-century, continental. Stoup: in porch, W. of N. door, round bowl in square-headed chamfered recess and with remains of pedestal to bowl, 15th-century. Miscellanea: loose in S. aisle—(1) fragments of glazed tiles ornamented with birds, interlace and a griffin in a shield, 14th-century; (2) octagonal stone sundial with Roman numerals, 17th-century; (3) small round-headed standing cross with the emblem roughly incised, c. 1100. The lych-gate of 1911 incorporates some 15th-century moulded timbers from the old Court House at Sutton Poyntz.

d(303) Former Wesleyan Chapel, 300 yds. N.N.W. of the church, with brick walls and a slated half-hipped roof, was built c. 1817. The doorways and windows have pointed arched heads. The original Fittings survive, including a N. gallery supported on two timber posts, facing the pulpit.

d(304) Bridges, over the river Jordan, at Preston: roadbridge, 340 yds. W.N.W. of the church, of rubble with a single segmental arch of ashlar, was built in the mid 19th century; foot-bridge, 30 yds. N. of the foregoing, is roughly constructed of rubble and has a single arch; it preceded the road-bridge but its exact date is uncertain.

d(305) Cottage, 160 yds N.W. of the church, has, built into the wall over the porch, a stone (1½ ft. high by 1 ft. wide) carved in low relief depicting the Virgin carrying the Child, standing between two kneeling censing angels, 14th-century, much worn.

Monuments (306–321) unless otherwise described are of two storeys with rubble walls and thatched roofs.

Preston Village

(306) Manor Farm, house and cottage, 70 yds. N. of the church, of two storeys and one storey and attics, were built in the 17th century as one house of T-plan with the central wing on the S. The N. part, the cottage, retains an original three-light window with recessed hollow-chamfered mullions under a moulded label. The W. gable has corbelled stone kneelers and a stone coping; behind this wall are the remains of an original wooden staircase at the side of the fireplace. The S. wing, which has near the doorway a stone inscribed R.N., was heightened to two full storeys in the early 19th century and extended to the S. to give a plan typical of this date with a central staircase hall and rooms at each side.

(N. part demolished)

d(307) Manor Cottage, 160 yds. N.W. of the church, is a rectangular building of 17th-century date built at right angles to the street; it has been much altered but retains the following original features: on the E. side, a three-light window with recessed chamfered mullions and a moulded label; internally, at the S. end, a reset fireplace with flat stone lintel and chamfered jambs with broach stops. Some stop-chamfered ceiling beams and two reset four-centred timber door-heads also remain.

d(308) Cottage, attached to N. end of (307) on W. side, was built in the late 18th century and has a symmetrical N. elevation to the street.

d(309) Cottage, 100 yds. W. of (308), was built in the mid 18th century; a rectangular tablet above the W. doorway is inscribed in four lines I/R.M./1747/May 29, with crude fleur-de-lys decoration in the two upper corners.

d(310) Cottages, two, 400 yds. W. of the church, originated as a single cottage of one storey and attics, two rooms in length with a central doorway, built in the early 18th century, to which a second cottage of two storeys was added against the N. end in the mid 18th century; the N. part of the latter has been rebuilt.

d(311) Cottage, 330 yds. W.N.W. of the church, was built in the late 18th or early 19th century.

d(312) Cottage, 230 yds. N.W. of the church, was built in the early 19th century. The S. elevation has dressed quoins, hung-sash windows in the ground floor and casements above.

b(313) Jordon House (695824), of two storeys and attics, with walls of rubble with brick dressings, rendered on the S. side, and slate-covered roofs, was built in the early 19th century; the S. elevation is symmetrical. Single-storey Farm Buildings with thatched roofs lie to the N.

Sutton Poyntz

d(314) Cottages, 820 yds. N. of Preston church, were built in the early 19th century; on the S. side is a glazed iron-framed verandah.

d(315) Cottage, 860 yds. N. of the church, was built in the 18th century.

d(316) Cottages, two, ½ m. N. of the church, of one storey with dormered attics, were built in the early 18th century; the S. cottage has a chamfered ceiling beam.

d(317) Cottages, six, 940 yds. N. of the church, of one storey with dormered attics, were built after c. 1700; the walls of two cottages at the S. end have been heightened; fragments of the original stone chimneystacks survive.

d(318) Cottages, immediately N. of the above, with a slate-covered roof, are of early 19th-century date.

d(319) Cottages, two, 1,200 yds. N. of the church, were built in the late 18th century but have since been much altered.

d(320) Water-mill, ½ m. N. of the church, of three storeys and attics, with walls of brick on a rubble plinth and a mansard roof now covered with corrugated iron, was built c. 1820; the water-wheel is of iron and drives two pairs of stones.

d(321) Mill House, immediately S. of the above, of two storeys with walls of squared rubble and slate-covered roof, was built in the early 19th century.

RADIPOLE

The borough includes the E. part of the former parish of Radipole; the larger W. part, including the village of Buckland Ripers, has been transferred to Chickerell. The village of Radipole, 1½ m. N.N.W. of Melcombe Regis on the banks of the river Wey, N. of Radipole Lake, lies to the W. of the Dorchester Road and has remained unaffected by 19th-century and later speculative development. There were also two mediaeval settlements, both very small, at Causeway and Corfe Hill.

b(322) The Parish Church of St. Ann (667813) stands on the E. boundary of the former parish. The walls are of squared rubble with dressed quoins, except the S. wall of the chancel which is of squared Portland stone; the roofs are covered with slates. The Nave was built in the 13th century; the North and South Chapels were added in the second quarter of the 14th century, and soon afterwards the Chancel was rebuilt and the chancel arch enlarged. The bell-cote was added in the early 16th century, the W. end being altered or rebuilt to carry it; but the great central buttress is a subsequent addition of the same century. The South Porch is of 1733, and the S. chapel was largely rebuilt in 1735. The church was considerably restored in the late 19th century, with the renewal of many windows. The present N. Vestry is entirely modern.

The most notable feature is the bell-cote (Plate 32) with its unusual provision for three bells.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (17¾ ft. by 12½ ft.) has a mid 15th-century E. window with two cinque-foiled lights and vertical tracery under a two-centred head with a label. The N. and S. walls each have a two-light traceried window near the centre, that on the S. being completely restored, and a single-light window with trefoiled ogee head to the W.; below the latter on the N. is a small rectangular light; the original features have been retooled. Between the windows on the S. side is a narrow 14th-century doorway, now blocked, with a chamfered ogee head. The two-centred chancel arch is of two plain chamfered orders with continuous jambs and moulded stops.

Parish Church of St. Ann, Radipole

The North Chapel (14 ft. by 17½ ft.), built largely of Ham Hill stone, has in the E. wall a 14th-century window of three trefoiled lights with tracery in a two-centred head. In the N. wall is a similar window of three lights but taller and with a label. A single buttress has been added against the W. wall at the N.W. corner. The South Chapel (10 ft. by 13½ ft.) was rebuilt in 1735 and a stone tablet with this date is set above the S. window; this last is in a debased Gothic style with three pointed lights and a single tracery light above.

The Nave (36½ ft. by 16 ft.) has in the N. wall a plain chamfered two-centred arch to the N. chapel. Near the centre of the wall are two doorways: the original N. doorway, now blocked, is chamfered on the S. side and has a relieving arch above; to the W. is a second doorway of 19th-century date. Above the doorways is a 16th-century window of two lights with four-centred heads and sunk spandrels, and at the W. end of the wall is a single-light window with an uncusped two-centred head, probably of the 13th century. In the S. wall is a plain chamfered two-centred arch to the S. chapel, of the 14th century and similar to that in the N. wall; the other openings are modern. Internally in the W. wall is a deep wall-arch with a two-centred head providing a thickening of the wall to support the bell-cote above; the wall is buttressed externally in the centre and at the angles. The Bell-cote is in two stages, the lower with two openings and the upper with one, each with cinque-foiled round-arched heads; four gar goyles are placed irregularly at the corners beneath a moulded cornice. The flat roof carries the remains of a stone finial of baluster form perhaps of the 16th century; between the lower openings on the W. is a small gadrooned corbel. The South Porch (7¾ ft. by 9¼ ft.) is of 1733; the outer doorway has narrowly chamfered jambs and a late 19th-century round-arched head; beneath the gable is a stone tablet inscribed with the date and the initials WM CW.

The Roof of the nave is carried on trusses which are probably late mediaeval, restored, the three to the E. having moulded and stop-chamfered king posts and queen posts, the two to the W. being rather plainer with die-out chamfers.

Fittings—Altar-slab(?): bordering path to S. door, on E. side, a large chamfered stone slab. Bell: inscribed Bowen Founder London 1856. (fn. 22) Brasses and Indent. Brasses: In N. chapel—on E. wall, (1) to Lieut. Bernard Westlake, 1784, rectangular plate; (2) to Mary, window of George Talbot formerly Rector of Burfield, Berkshire, 1777, rectangular plate; on N. wall, (3) to Mary Watts, 1828, rectangular plate. Indent: In chancel, in plain floor-slab, of small rectangular plate. Communion Rails: modern but incorporating seventeen 16th-century turned balusters from staircase in No. 4 North Quay, Weymouth (Monument 48). Font: loose in S. porch, 13th-century bowl, formerly square, recut to semicircular shape and moulded in 16th century, with mortices for original lock and hinges; matrices of central and four subsidiary shafts remain beneath. Gallery: in nave, at W. end, modern but replacing a 16th-century gallery indicated by the stopped chamfers of the W. wall-arch.

Monuments and Floor-slab. Monuments: In N. chapel—on W. wall, (1) to Humphrey Hardy, 1725/6, elaborately scrolled stone cartouche; in S. chapel—on E. wall, (2) to Edward Balston, 1850, and Catherine his wife, 1870, white marble monument on bluish marble base inscribed 'Westminster Marble Compy, Earl St.', surmounted by shield-of-arms of Balston; in churchyard—on W. side of pathway to S. door, (3) to Edward Bealle, 1694, headstone. Floor-slab: In chancel, two Purbeck marble fragments with cross shaft on Calvary, mediaeval. Piscinae: in N. chapel, (1) with ogee trefoiled head, chamfered jambs and quatre-foiled dishing, 14th-century; in S. chapel, (2) with pointed trefoiled head and quatre-foiled dishing, also 14th-century. Plate: includes cup made by John Carter(?) in 1774, inscribed and dated 1775. Royal Arms: on W. front of gallery, painted on canvas, of William IV. Miscellanea: In nave—beneath N. and S. ends of gallery beam, reset carved stone masks, both male, 14th-century.

b(323) Road Bridge, 340 yds. W. of the church, over the river Wey, of rubble with ashlar copings, was built in the early 19th century; the three main arches are segmental and the piers have rounded cutwaters on the W. (upstream) side only.

b(324) Bridge, at Causeway Farm, 600 yds. W. of the church, over the river Wey, carries a footpath and farm track; it is of roughly squared stone and has a single segmental arch; the keystone on the S. side is inscribed I H B 1817.

b(325) Radipole Old Manor, immediately N. of the church, is of two storeys and attics; the walls are of stone and the roofs are slate-covered. It was largely rebuilt towards the end of the 16th century by Richard Watkins but incorporates a fragment of earlier, though uncertain, date now forming the E. wing. The house has gables on the E. side with moulded parapets and carved finials, and the windows have hollow-chamfered mullions and moulded labels.

The earlier wing has in the S. wall a small blocked window on the ground floor and a two-light window above, both of the 16th century. In the S.E. angle between the wing and the remainder of the house is a porch of three storeys gabled to the E. with a doorway on the S. side with moulded jambs, and a pedimented head enclosing a cartouche with the initials R.W., for Richard Watkins. S. of the porch are two similar gables with three tiers of windows beneath, of five, four and three lights in ascending order. The S. gable wall has a projecting chimney-stack. In the W. wall is a projecting stair turret with two two-light windows to the W.; S. of the turret is a projecting stepped chimney-stack and to the N. two three-light windows on each floor.

The plan has been modified by modern alterations but in the late 16th century it comprised a screens passage, with the entrance porch at the E. end and stair turret with a stone newel stair at the W.; N. of the passage were the service quarters, which included the earlier wing, and S. of it the hall with a fireplace in the W. wall, now blocked but retaining a four-centred arched head; S. of the hall and originally smaller in size was the parlour.

b(326) Nottington House (663824), of two storeys with attics, with walls of yellow brick and a slate-covered hipped roof, was built c. 1815. The E. elevation is symmetrical and has a central brick bow of two storeys. The staircase, in a semicircular recess in the centre of the W. side, has stone treads and a moulded wooden handrail supported by a scrolled wrought-iron balustrade.

b(327) Corfe Hill, ¼ m. N.W. of the church, of two storeys with walls of yellow brick and slate-covered roofs, is a substantial house built in 1821 by Edward Balston (Hutchins II, 481); the front elevation has a central porch supported by Roman Doric columns, a stucco plinth, a plat-band at first-floor level, a moulded cornice and a brick parapet.

b(328) Cottage, 330 yds. W. of the church, of one storey and attics with rubble walls, brick chimneystacks, and a thatched roof, was built in the 18th century. The symmetrical E. elevation includes two stone-built dormer windows with hipped roofs, and low outbuildings at each end. A fragment of 18th-century limestone paving was discovered on the E. side of the cottage in 1951.

b(329) Cottages, pair, ¼ m. W.S.W. of the church, of two storeys with rubble walls and a thatched roof, were built in the late 18th century.

b(330) Causeway Farm, house, 640 yds. W. of the church, is of two storeys and attics with walls of squared and coursed rubble and slate-covered roofs. The E. elevation is symmetrical with dressed quoins and three-light sash windows with segmental-arched brick heads. Above the front doorway is a stone inscribed I H B 1804.

A large Barn E. of the house has rubble walls and a thatched roof; it bears a similarly inscribed stone to the right of the porch.

b(331) Cottages, at West End, 800 yds. W. of the church, of two storeys with rubble walls and a thatched roof now covered by corrugated iron, were built as a single house in the early 18th century; a stone above the doorway on the N. side is inscribed E B 1731.

Upwey, the Parish Church of St. Lawrence

b(332) Field Barn (665804) comprises a group of mid 19th-century farm buildings including a barn with rubble walls and thatched roof and single-storey outbuildings.

b(333) Cottages, at Nottington (661824), 100 yds. S. of the malthouse (Monument 301), with rubble walls and slate-covered roofs, form a terrace of three symmetrically-fronted cottages each with a central doorway flanked by two sash windows on each floor; the N. gable wall is rendered and bears a panel inscribed in three lines S/T-F/1819; the gable has a feathered stone coping and a ball finial at the apex.

UPWEY

Upwey is a former parish 4 m. N. of Melcombe Regis, on the upper reaches of the river Wey; it stretches up to the crest of the Ridgeway and includes most of the forty barrows in the Borough. The old settlements were Upwey itself, which now extends for ¾ m. between the church and the Manor House, the hamlet of Elwell, ½ m. S.E. of the church near the junction of the present Dorchester road with its former alignment over Ridgeway Hill, and two smaller settlements at Stottingway and West Brook.

c(334) Parish Church of St. Lawrence stands at the N.W. end of the village, in the middle of the old parish. The walls are of rubble with ashlar dressings except for the modern chancel and vestry which are of dressed Portland and Bath stone; the nave roof is covered with slates, the aisles with lead, the chancel with tiles and the N. porch with stone slates. The earliest work remaining in situ dates from the late 15th century and comprises part of the W. wall of the Nave and the N. arcade, the North Aisle and the West Tower; the North Porch is of similar date but partly rebuilt. The South Aisle and S. arcade were added or rebuilt in 1838 in uniformity with those on the N. side. A clearstorey was added in 1841. The church was 'restored' in 1891 and the W. gallery, erected in 1685, together with the early 19th-century N. and S. galleries, was destroyed. In 1906–7 the Chancel was rebuilt to a larger size, a Vestry was built to the S. and the 14th-century chancel arch re-erected at the E. end of the S. aisle.

Architectural Description—The Chancel and South Vestry are both modern. The Nave (47½ ft. by 17½ ft.) has at the E. end a modern chancel arch. The N. wall contains a late 15th-century arcade of four two-centred moulded arches carried on three moulded piers with four attached shafts with continuous moulded caps and separate bases; the capitals are enriched with running leaf ornament; the capital of the first pier is carved with the initials A B and of the second pier I P. E. of the N. arcade is an opening with a two-centred head, for access to a rood-loft. The S. arcade, built in 1838, although perhaps incorporating some 15th-century masonry, is a faithful copy of the N. arcade, the W. capital alone remaining uncarved. Four two-light clearstorey windows above each arcade were added in 1841. The W. wall of the nave has an internal chamfered plinth extending about 4 ft. N. and S. of the tower arch but hacked away at the ends probably to take timber supports for the W. gallery.

The North Aisle (10 ft. wide) has in the E. wall a late 15th-century window, of four lights under a square head. The N. wall has two diagonal buttresses and two intermediate buttresses; E. of each of the latter is a 15th-century three-light window similar to that in the E. wall but with a slightly different jamb moulding. The N. doorway, with a four-centred head and hollow-chamfered jambs, is also of this date. The wall is surmounted by a moulded and embattled parapet with moulded string-course and gargoyles. In the W. wall is a 15th-century window of two trefoil-headed lights with sunk spandrels under a square head and mouldings similar to the windows of the N. wall. The South Aisle (10½ ft. wide) was built in 1838 in conformity with that on the N. In the E. wall is rebuilt the former 14th-century chancel arch, two-centred and of one chamfered order. The S. wall has three three-light windows separated by two buttresses, the central window being placed opposite the N. porch and the others symmetrically about it; at the E. end of this wall is a modern doorway. In the W. wall is a reset 15th-century window similar to that in the W. wall of the N. aisle.

The West Tower (8 ft. by 8¼ ft.) is in two stages divided by a weathered string-course; the lower stage has diagonal buttresses and a moulded plinth; the upper stage is plain. The tower has a restored embattled parapet with continuous moulded capping and gargoyles and crocketed pinnacles at the corners. The tower arch is two-centred and has trefoil-headed stone panels to the jambs and soffit. In the W. wall of the lower stage is a window of three trefoiled lights with vertical tracery under a two-centred head; above it, in the upper stage, is a belfry window with two trefoiled lights. The S. wall has a plain rectangular window in each stage. The North Porch (7¼ ft. by 8½ ft.) has a chamfered plinth and diagonal buttresses but no parapet. The outer doorway has a four-centred head with continuous moulded and chamfered jambs.

The Roof of the nave was rebuilt in 1841; it is of four and a half bays divided by king-post trusses. The chancel roof is modern.

Fittings—Bells: six; 3rd and 4th by George Purdue, 1617, recast 1912; 5th by James Smith, 1767; 6th by William Knight, 18th-century, recast 1912. Brass: In chancel—reset externally in N. wall, to William Gould, 1681, shield-shaped plate with Latin inscription. Clock: in tower, with wrought-iron frame, early 19th-century, repaired and escapement renewed, 1912. Consecration Cross: in N. aisle—scratched on central pier of arcade, geometrical cross in circle, possibly mediaeval. Door: in N. doorway, of two thicknesses of wood, vertical and diagonal, nail-studded and with long strap hinges, mediaeval. Font: octagonal stone bowl with panelled faces decorated with paterae, on plain octagonal stem, with square base with carved spurs, 15th-century, recut. Glass: In chancel—in E. window, in centre light, fragments of 17th-century glass probably of Flemish origin; in flanking lights, figures of the Virgin, Mary Magdalene, St. Peter and St, Paul, mid 19th-century. In tower—in W. window, in situ, quarries of 'ihc' and crowns in silver stain, 15th-century.

Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In chancel—on S. wall, (1) to George Gould, 1797, Rev. George Gould his son, 1841, and others, white marble tablet surmounted by a female weeper resting against an urn and inscribed pedestal, on black marble obelisk-shaped backing, and with marble apron with shield-of-arms and crest below, signed H. Hopper, 13 Wigmore St. London. In nave—above S. arcade, (2) to Henry Sherren, 1833, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet, on black marble backing, signed Lester, Dorchester. In N. aisle— on N. wall, (3) to Sarah Floyer, widow of Anthony Floyer and daughter of John Gould, 1733, white and grey marble tablet with curved pediment with cherub's head and urn and shaped apron with lozenge-of-arms of Floyer; (4) to Anna Floyer, wife of Augustus Floyer and daughter of Warren Lisle, 1774, white alabaster tablet with floral border surmounted by a fluted pedestal bearing an urn. In churchyard—against N. wall of chancel, (5) stone table-tomb, with arcaded side, late 17th or 18th-century; N. of chancel, (6) to Gils Thorne and Jone his wife, 1669, Gils, John, Eamee and Sarah, their grandchildren, also to John and Mary Thorn, 1682, head-stone; N. of N. aisle, (7) to Mrs. Mary Freke, 1712, table-tomb; (8) to Robert Freke, 1699, table-tomb; (9) to John Stevens, 1711, Mary his wife, John and Henry Stevens, head-stone; (10) to Henry Hardy, 1713, and Barbara his wife, headstone; on S. side of S. aisle, (11) to Ralph Corben, 1696, headstone. Floor-slabs: In nave, (1) to Robort Adams, 165[5?]; (2) to James Compton, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Compton, early 19th-century; in N. aisle, (3) to [Ha]rrye . . ., 17th-century.

Paintings: In N. aisle—on N. wall, three fragments of 16th-century painted texts in borders, from Tyndale's version of the last verses of St. Matthew's Gospel and from Proverbs. Panelling: In N. aisle—at E. end, dado of oak, 17th-century. Plate: includes a cup by Lawrence Stratford of Dorchester, said to have formed a set with the Broadwey paten of 1578 (see Monument 291); a paten given by Elizabeth Scovile, 1715; an alms-dish of 1681 given by Mrs. Hussey Floyer, 1742, with the arms of Floyer impaling Gould; a flagon of 1769 given by James Gould. Pulpit (Plate 28): of oak, raised on a modern stone base, heptagonal with moulded and enriched base, sides in two heights of arched panels, with strapwork frieze and enriched cornice, mid 17th-century. Recess: In N. aisle—E. of N. door, plain rectangular recess, perhaps the site of a stoup. Royal Arms: in S. aisle, of carved wood, Victoria. Sculpture: In nave—of wood, carved figures, 3 ft. high, formerly part of a pulpit with representations of (1) St. Philip, (2) St. Peter, (3) St. Bartholomew, all more or less in contemporary dress and all standing on pedestals below puny draped canopies, 17th-century.

b(335) Former Methodist Chapel, on the E. side of Church Street, 1,000 yds. S.E. of the church, with walls of coursed squared rubble and a hipped slate-covered roof, is a plain building dated 1809. It was licensed in April 1810 'for Dissenting Protestants', probably superseding the house of George Wood, licensed October 1808. A window in the Gothic style was inserted in the W. end in the late 19th century.

c(336) School, 70 yds S.E. of the church, a single-storey building with walls of squared stone and a slate-covered roof, was built c. 1840 to an L-shaped plan and later extended. The windows have stone mullions with labels; there is a bell-cote over the S.E. gable.

c(337) School House, 30 yds. N.W. of the foregoing and of similar date, is of two storeys, with walls of coursed rubble, partly rendered, and a slate-covered roof. The S.E. elevation has a central doorway and two timber-framed three-light mullioned windows to each floor with labels above.

b(338) Upwey Manor, ¾ m. S.E. of the church, of two storeys and attics, with stone walls and roofs covered with tiles and slates, was built in c. 1639 on an irregular H-plan and extended late in the 17th century and in recent times.

The entrance was originally in the middle of the N. front, recessed between two projecting gables; in a smaller gable above the site of the doorway is a stone with the date 1639; a small loop W. of the doorway overlooks the entrance. The present entrance doorway in the adjacent W. wing is of the 17th century and has moulded jambs and a four-centred head with rosettes in sunk spandrels. Each of the gables on the N. side is surmounted by a chimney with a single flue, originally of ashlar but largely rebuilt. The E. wall contains one original three-light stone-mullioned window with an eared label; the other windows have been replaced. The S. front has two wings with the hall window recessed between them; the W. wing is the smaller and contains one original window on its E. side. The building has been very much altered internally; the hall contains a wide 17th-century fireplace with chamfered stone jambs and a restored lintel.

b(339) Westbrook House (Plate 181), 5/8 m. S.E. of the church, is of two storeys with stone walls and a slate-covered roof. According to Hutchins (II, 845) the house was built c. 1620 by Sir Thomas Freke; it was partially demolished c. 1730 by William Freke and was considerably rebuilt in the mid 18th century by William Floyer. The hall and a service wing to the N.W. survive from the earlier period; the hall is enclosed on the S., E., and W. sides by 18th-century work forming a symmetrical elevation to the S.; further alterations and additions were carried out in the late 18th or early 19th century including the building of a kitchen against the service wing at the N.W. corner. The principal features include a 17th-century decorated plaster ceiling and an 18th-century staircase.

The E. front, which is symmetrical, has a central doorway with a semicircular-arched head beneath a flat cornice supported by three-quarter-round Roman-Doric columns. The wall, of plain ashlar with two windows to the ground floor and three above, carries a parapet and has a plain string above the upper windows; the roof is hipped and has two dormer windows. The main S. front comprises a symmetrical central block with lower recessed wings; the latter are of mid 18th-century date but the former was completely remodelled or rebuilt at the end of that century with three tall first-floor windows and a cast-iron trelliswork balcony. The W. front includes a 17th-century porch of two storeys with a two-light mullioned window to the first floor; the doorway is of 18th-century date. N. of the porch is the service wing of one storey with attics; its N. wall is gabled and its E. wall includes a 17th-century doorway with a moulded four-centred head. The N. wall of the hall has a Venetian window to the ground floor.

The main entrance on the E. side opens into a passage flanked by two rooms, all entered from the E. end of the hall. In the latter is an early 17th-century plaster ceiling divided by moulded ribs to form an intricate geometrical pattern decorated with floral and heraldic motifs including a crowned Tudor rose. The dining room stands to the S. of the hall, and in a wing to the N.E. is a mid 18th-century staircase with fluted Corinthian columns as newels, turned balusters, and a panelled and enriched string.

Reset in a garden wall W. of the W. porch is a 17th-century Doorway with four-centred head. Single-storey Stables of the 18th century, with squared rubble walls and ashlar dressings, stand to the N. of the house; they have a central semicircular-arched carriage entrance flanked by windows with flat stone architraves and keyed lintels.

b(340) Upwey House, ¼ m. S.E. of the church, is of two storeys with stone walls and a slate-covered roof. It was built in the early 19th century and has since been extended to the S.W.

The house is designed in the Tudor style with labels above the windows and gables with parapets and corbelled kneelers. The entrance, in a single-storey porch on the N.E. side between two gabled wings, bears a shield-of-arms of Gould. To the N. is a third gabled wing separated from the remainder of the building by an open yard.

Stables, 200 yds. S.E. of the house, were built in the early 19th century; they comprise a central two-storey block with brick walls and a pyramidal tiled roof, flanked by single-storey wings with rubble walls.

Church Street

S.W. side

c(341) Upwey Mill, a water-mill on the river Wey, 280 yds. S.E. of the church, is of three storeys and attics; the walls are of Portland stone rubble and ashlar and the roof is half-hipped with a slate covering. The date of erection is recorded on a stone tablet inscribed IG 1802.

Weymouth. Upwey Mill.

The building is rectangular with walls 2 ft. thick and each floor is supported by four massive beams dividing the structure into five bays; this division is expressed in the main N.E. elevation by a central doorway to each floor, flanked by two windows on each side except at the N.W. end of the ground floor where a wide segmental-arched opening fronts the housing for a water-wheel. The windows have timber casements of three lights with flat stone arches above; over the central doorways is an external hoist supported by two raking struts. The end walls each have a semicircular three-light lunette window in the gable.

The mill is powered by a single overshot water-wheel of iron, 20 ft. in diameter, enclosed within the N.W. end of the building, and the drive is transferred from a vertical pit wheel to an upright shaft of wood through a system of gearing housed within a massive timber framework at the N.W. end of the ground floor; a horizontal wheel, 10½ ft. in diameter, at the base of the shaft has provision for four independent vertical drives to four pairs of millstones on the floor above; only two pairs of stones now remain. A further system of gearing at the top of the shaft provides power to belt-driven light machinery on the second floor and for an internal hoist rising through trap-doors in the centre of the building. Above the second floor is a range of grain storage bins and hoppers, with a central catwalk at eaves level.

c(342) Mill House, immediately N.E. of the above, is of two storeys and attics with stone walls, formerly stuccoed, and a slate-covered mansard roof. It was largely reconstructed in the early 19th century when it was given a symmetrical front elevation; it retains traces of an earlier building, perhaps of 18th-century date.

N.E. side

b(343) Cottages, two, Nos. 22, 24, 1,060 yds. S.E. of the church, are free-standing and of one storey and attics; the walls are of rubble and the roofs thatched. No. 24, which has been considerably rebuilt, bears a reset tablet inscribed 'UPWEY INFANT SCHOOL 1830'; it is possible that the two buildings may have been built at this date as a school and schoolhouse.

b(344) Southbrook House, 1,000 yds. S.E. of the church, of two storeys with stuccoed walls and a slate-covered hipped roof, was built in the early 19th century; it has a symmetrical front elevation, including a central doorway with decorative fanlight and a columned porch with a fluted frieze; at either side of the door is a tall three-light sash window, and three keystoned sash windows light the floor above. The staircase is centrally placed at the rear.

b(345) Cottages, Nos. 34, 36, 950 yds. S.E. of the church, and immediately N. of the former Methodist chapel (335), of three storeys, formerly two storeys and attics, with rendered rubble walls and slate-covered roofs, were built in the early 19th century; each has a symmetrical elevation with a central doorway and three-light casement windows.

b(346) Cottages, seven, 580 yds. S.E. of the church, are of two storeys with rendered rubble walls and slate-covered roofs; Nos. 96 and 98 were built in the early 19th century; in the middle of that century a third cottage, No. 94, was added to the S.E., and a separate range of four cottages was built to the N.W.

Reset above the front doorway of No. 98 is a lozenge-shaped tablet with spurred base, with the date and initials 1597 ER AB GB RB.

b(347) Primrose Cottage, No. 118, 500 yds. S.E. of the church, is of two storeys with walls of squared coursed rubble and a slate-covered roof. It has a symmetrical elevation with a central doorway and two three-light windows to the ground floor with timber frames and sliding sashes; a decayed datestone over the front doorway appears to be inscribed 1806.

c(348) Bayard Farm, house, ¼ m. S.E. of the church, of two storeys with rubble walls, was built in the 16th or early 17th century; the upper floor and roof have been rebuilt in modern times; in the front wall is a doorway with four-centred arched lintel and moulded jambs, and a four-light stone-mullioned window with recessed hollow-chamfered mullions and four-centred heads to each light.

c(349) Uplands, cottage, 220 yds. S.E. of the church, of two storeys with rubble walls and a thatched roof, may be of 17th-century origin but has been much altered.

c(350) Uplands Cottage, immediately N. of the foregoing, of two storeys with rubble walls and a slate-covered roof, was built in 1818; over the central doorway is a stone inscribed ITM 1818.

c(351) Brook House, 150 yds. S.E. of the church, of two storeys and attics, with walls of brick with stone quoins and, in part, of rendered rubble, and with a slate-covered roof, was built in the late 18th century. The S.W. elevation is symmetrical with a narrow moulded cornice and parapet; the outer doorway is flanked by two sash windows with plain stone architraves and keystones; there are three similar windows to the first floor.

c(352) Granary, 60 yds. N.E. of Brook House, of squared rubble and with a slate-covered half-hipped roof, was built in the early 19th century; the ground floor is supported by stone arches. The building incorporates reused early 17th-century mullioned windows and a doorway with moulded jambs and a four-centred head; the ears of the labels have been reversed.

c(353) Windsbatch Farm, house, 80 yds. E. of the church, of two storeys with rubble walls and a thatched roof, was built in the late 17th century. The S.W. elevation is symmetrical; the front doorway has a four-centred arched lintel and a two-light window above with recessed hollow-chamfered stone mullions, and is flanked by two similar three-light mullioned windows without labels.

c(354) Clovelly, cottage, 80 yds. N. of the church, of two storeys with walls of coursed rubble and a thatched roof, was built in the late 17th century.

c(355) Barn, on the road to Portesham, 400 yds. N.N.W. of the church, of two storeys with walls of coursed rubble and a roof now covered with corrugated iron, is of the 17th century. It is rectangular, 462/3 ft. by 21¼ ft., divided into five bays by four jointed-cruck trusses with braced collars; the curved wall-posts are joined to the principal rafters with a rebated joint secured by a single free tenon and two pegs, and free tenons are also used to secure the braces.

Dorchester Road

b(356) Cottages, two, Nos. 692, 694, on E. side ¾ m. S.E. of the church, of two storeys with rendered walls and thatched roofs, were built in the first half of the 19th century.

b(357) Toll House, immediately S. of the above, of two storeys with rendered walls and a slate-covered roof, was built in the mid 19th century. (Demolished)

Elwell Street

N. side

b(358) Cottage, 1,030 yds. E.S.E. of the church, of two storeys with rubble walls and a steeply pitched roof now covered with corrugated iron, was built in the 18th century.

b(359) Cottage, No. 14, immediately W. of the above, of two storeys, with rendered walls and a slate-covered roof, was built in the early 19th century; it has a central doorway under a semicircular-arched head.

b(360) Cottage, No. 32, 980 yds. E.S.E. of the church, of two storeys, with rubble walls and a thatched roof, was built in the early 18th century; it has a low-proportioned elevation with casement windows of three lights with wooden frames. The plan originally comprised two rooms on the ground floor with the entrance directly into the E. room. Two original plank-and-muntin partitions remain on the first floor.

b(361) Cottages, four, Nos. 74–80, 840 yds. S.E. of the church, of two storeys with rubble walls and roofs now covered with corrugated iron, are of the early 19th century; all except No. 74 are double-fronted and have central doorways.

b(362) Cottage, No. 82, immediately W. of the above, is of two storeys with rubble walls and a slate-covered roof; it was built in 1821 and incorporates a stone tablet with this date and the initials THD; the cottage was embellished in the mid 19th century.

b(363) Meadowside, house, 800 yds. S.E. of the church, of two storeys with rubble walls and a thatched roof, was built as a villa residence in its own grounds in the early 19th century. The front elevation is symmetrical with a central doorway, a two-light timber-framed window above, and three-light windows at the sides. All windows have flat-arched heads with keystones. A cast-iron verandah in front of the lower storey has been replaced.

Ridgeway Hill

b(364) Cottages, two, Nos. 22, 24, on E. side, 1,050 yds. E.S.E. of the church, of two storeys with rendered rubble walls and a hipped slate-covered roof, are of the mid 19th century.

c(365) Cottages, Nos. 26, 28, immediately N. of the above, were built as a single house of two storeys in the early 19th century; the walls are rendered and the roof has been recovered with corrugated iron. The original front doorway is in the centre, flanked by sash windows; in front of the ground floor is a plain cast-iron verandah.

Stottingway Street

b(366) Cottages, two, on N. side 1,280 yds. S.S.E. of the church, are of two storeys with rubble walls and a slate-covered roof; that to the E. is of early 19th-century date, the other, which is larger, was added slightly later and bears a datestone for 1833. In the latter cottage the outer doorway and ground-floor windows have stone lintels incised to resemble flat arches with keystones.

b(367) Manor Thatch, cottage, on S. side 1,300 yds. S.S.E. of the church, of two storeys and attics with stone walls and a thatched roof, was built in the 17th century but has since been much altered; the back doorway has moulded jambs and a shaped lintel.

b(368) Barn, at Manor Farm, 1,400 yds. S.S.E. of the church, with rubble walls and a thatched roof, was built in the late 18th century.

WYKE REGIS

The borough includes most of the former parish of Wyke Regis. As well as Wyke Regis village the parish included the original settlement at Weymouth and, at least by 1244, a small settlement at Small Mouth near the former ferry to Portland. The village itself stands on the crest of the Corallian limestone escarpment 1 m. S.W. of Weymouth on the Portland road; it contains a number of early 19th-century small terraced houses.

a(369) The Parish Church of All Saints (Plate 187) stands at the N. end of the village, in the middle of the former parish. The walls are of Portland stone ashlar, in part faced with Roman cement; the roofs are covered with lead, except that the S. porch has a stone-slated roof. The church was entirely rebuilt in the mid 15th century, being rededicated in 1455. It consists of a Chancel and Nave, structurally undivided, North-east Vestry, North and South Aisles, West Tower and South Porch, all of this date and little altered excepting their roofs. These last were renewed in the early 18th century and again in 1936. The windows have had their dressings more or less restored outside, those to the N. being faced with Roman cement.

All Saints' is a remarkable example of a church structure devised and built in the mid 15th century and remaining without reduction or enlargement since that period.

Architectural Description—All the wall-heads excepting those to the tower and porch have continuous parapets with moulded copings and moulded parapet strings with carved grotesque gargoyles. The windows, unless otherwise described, are of uniform design, with trefoiled and cinque-foiled vertical tracery in two-centred heads, the tracery subarcuations being noticeably straight-sided and not curved, presenting an angular as opposed to the more usual curvilinear effect.

The Chancel (together with nave 85 ft. by 21 ft.) has the E. wall flush with that of the N.E. vestry, a buttress dividing them. On the S.E. are inset angle buttresses. Below the low-pitched parapeted gable is an E. window of five lights with a label. The N. wall contains a small loop with asymmetrical splays to the N. and a small doorway with a two-centred head and continuous mouldings; both features open to the vestry. In the S. wall is a renewed three-light window and a small doorway with a two-centred head. High up on both side walls are attached shafts on carved corbels and cornice mouldings, all described below together with their like in the nave.

Wyke Regis, the Parish Church of All Saints

The Nave, without structural demarcation from the foregoing, has N. and S. arcades each of five bays; the responds and piers have attached shafts, with moulded caps and bases, divided by wide convex mouldings continued round the two-centred arches. At the springing on the second pier from the E. on each side are large carved head-corbels, on the N. of a man wearing a hat and on the S. of a woman wearing a wimple; these probably supported the rood beam. Between the arches are carved corbels supporting wall shafts with semi-octagonal bases and cappings formed by returns of continuous cornice mouldings enriched with volutes and paterae; these cornices run from end to end of the chancel and nave. The shafts probably supported the principals of the original roof, now replaced by a roof of lower pitch. The corbels are carved, three at the W. end as grotesques, the others as angels holding shields except as follows: N. wall, (b) pipe, (c) psaltery, (d) viol, (e) scroll; S. wall, (b) scroll, (d) lute, (e) scroll.

The Vestry (16 ft. by 11¾ ft.) was originally of two storeys; in the E. wall is a rectangular light to the ground floor and a smaller similar light to the first floor, and in the N. wall is a second rectangular light to the ground floor, all with four-centred rear arches. Corbels for the floor beams survive in the N. and S. walls but evidence of the position of the stair is lacking. The roof is heavily restored but retains the original E. truss and central moulded beam.

The North Aisle (68½ ft. by 11½ ft.) is divided from the vestry by a thin partition wall. The N. wall including that to the vestry is divided by buttresses into five irregular bays; in each of the aisle bays is a three-light window with heavily restored vertical tracery under a two-centred head; the windows have external labels with return stops except the westernmost which retains original carved head-stops. The N. doorway has an ogee head and continuous chamfered jambs. Stone corbels with stylised foliage and grotesque heads on N. and S. walls carry the roof principals.

The South Aisle (67 ft. by 11½ ft.) has an E. window of three lights with restored tracery under a two-centred arch; the S. wall is divided into five bays, one occupied by the S. porch, the others by three-light windows as in the N. aisle, and the roof is also carried in a similar manner.

The West Tower (15 ft. by 15½ ft.) is in three stages divided by weathered strings and has inset angle buttresses (Plate 187); on the N. side is a projecting semi-octagonal vice. The lowest stage is entered from the nave by a lofty tower arch with two-centred head and moulded jambs with attached shafts having moulded caps and bases. The W. doorway, now blocked, has a four-centred arch and continuous moulded jambs; the upper moulding of the plinth rises to form a label over the arch. Over the W. doorway is a restored window of three transomed lights in a two-centred head. The second stage has a small two-light window in the N. wall with a reused 14th-century head of Ham Hill stone and a door to the nave roof on the E. side. The uppermost stage has in each face an original window of two cinque-foiled lights in a two-centred head with a moulded label, the moulding being carried around the faces of the tower at the springing to form a string-course. The tower is surmounted by an embattled parapet above a moulded string-course with gargoyles.

The South Porch (10 ft. square) is gabled to the S. and has inset angle buttresses; the outer entrance is two-centred with continuous symmetrically moulded jambs; above the arch externally is a niche with ogee trefoiled head and moulded jambs. The inner doorway has a four-centred head with continuous mouldings completely retooled, and above it is a niche with cinque-foiled head.

Fittings—Bells: eight, all of 1891 (for three previous bells, see Raven, 68). Brass: In nave, to Capt. Robert Wall, husband of Martha Wall, 1726, rectangular tablet. Doors: (1) and (2) in N. and S. doorways of chancel, of uncertain date; (3) N. door, boarded vertically outside and horizontally inside and nail-studded, inner boarding restored but carved with the date 1598; strap hinges, bolts and latch also probably of this date; (4) S. door, boarded and nail-studded with strap hinges, 15th-century. Glass: in E. window of chancel, (1) including figures of the four Evangelists in niches flanking the Agnus Dei, inscribed to the memory of Joseph Swaffield, 1841, and bearing his arms; in S. window of chancel, (2) inscribed to the memory of Gilbert Munro, 1843; all mid 19th-century.

Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In chancel—on E. wall, (1) to Marriot Arbuthnot, Admiral of the Blue, 1794, oval white marble tablet; (2) to the Hon. Catherine and the Hon. Elizabeth Maude, daughters of Cornwallis Maude, Baron of Montalt, and Isabella his wife, 1793, oval white marble tablet; on N. wall, (3) to Rev. John Menzies, rector, 1847, rectangular stone tablet in Gothic frame; (4) to Mary Elizabeth Warrington, 1839, white marble tablet with pediment and chi ro on grey marble backing, signed R. Westmacott; (5) to Rev. George Chamberlaine, rector, 1837, Susanna his first wife, 1815, and Margaret his second wife, 1847, white marble tablets surmounted by an urn, on black marble backing, signed Hellyer, Weymouth; (6) to John Swaffield, 1825, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet on grey marble backing, signed Hellyer, Weymouth—see also (31) below; (7) to Mary Anne Addison, 1826, with a later memorial added below to her husband Rev. Joseph Addison, 1832, two sarcophagus-shaped white marble tablets on black marble backing; (8) to Charles Buxton, 1847, and Hannah his wife, 1855, white marble tablet on grey marble backing, signed Raggett, Weymouth; (9) to Eleanor Dupre, 1827, and her husband, Rev. John Dupre, 1834, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet on black marble backing, signed Hellyer, Weymouth; (10) to Hannah Frances Ford, 1820, oval white marble tablet on black marble backing, signed Gray, Weymouth. In N. aisle—on N. wall, (11) to Thomas Richardson, 1827, Jane his wife, also 1827, and their children Mary, 1819, and Thomas, 1831, white marble tablet with enriched cornice, on black marble backing, signed Grundy, London; (12) to Lydia Harden, 1800, white marble tablet with moulded cornice, surmounted by female figure leaning against urn, on obelisk-shaped black marble backing; (13) to Benjamin Wood, 1817, white marble tablet on grey marble backing, surmounted by fluted urn; on W. wall, (14) to Rebecca Davis, 1814, and James her husband, 1837, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet on black marble backing, signed Hellyer, Weymouth. In S. aisle—on E. wall, (15) to Catherine Jerrard, 1763, and her son John, 1766, painted lead tablet in later moulded frame; on S. wall, (16) to Samuel Weston, 1817, and Mary (Willis) his wife, 1820, large white marble wall-monument in two parts, the earlier uppermost, surmounted by draped urn in front of obelisk-shaped black marble backing with shield-of-arms, the lower marble tablet signed T. Cooke, near Fitzroy Square, London; (17) to John Andrews, 1809, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet on black marble backing surmounted by shield-of-arms and crest; (18) to Richard Henley Pelly Clarke, 1845, white marble tablet on black marble backing; (19) to Sarah, wife of John Palmer, M.P., 1807, white marble tablet framed and surmounted by obelisk-shaped panel of black marble; (20) to William Wolstenholme and Elizabeth his wife, both 1810, white marble tablet surmounted by black marble slab with segmental head with shield-of-arms and oak leaves; (21) to Priscilla Awdry, 1814, white marble tablet surmounted by reeded urn, on black marble backing, signed Gray, Weymouth; on W. wall, (22) to Elizabeth, daughter of Giles and Elizabeth Russell, 1724, white marble scrolled cartouche; (23) partly defaced to . . . and Taver Penny Esq., 1841, and another, white marble tablet formerly surmounted by obelisk-shaped stone, signed Hellyer, Weymouth. In churchyard—S. of chancel, headstones reset against S. boundary wall include: (24) to Edeth, wife of Henry Leaver (?), 1686, headstone with scrolls and hourglass; (25) to Margaret Dottrel, 1623, plain rectangular headstone. Adjacent to S.W. corner of S. porch, reset fragments of headstones including, (26) to Robert Pit, 1601. On W. wall of N. aisle, externally, (27) large wall-tablet in the Greek style (Plate 176) commemorating the wreck of the ship 'Alexander' in West Bay on a voyage from Bombay to London, 1815, erected by Charles Forbes, M.P., and 'the other owner of the ship', signed J. Hamilton, Architect, restored by 'Appleby and Childs of Weymouth, 1896'. N.W. of tower, (28) to Mary, wife of John Maynard, 1712, and her children, headstone; (29) to Elizabeth, wife of Henry Wall, 1681, and her husband, 1686, headstone with scrolled top embellished with animal heads and symbols of mortality. N. of N. doorway, (30) to Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph and Edeth Wilkens, 1702, headstone. N. of the church is a large assembly of 18th and 19th-century headstones, many carved with arms, swags, cherubs' heads etc., all of Portland stone; the most notable is (31) to John Swaffield, 1825, headstone with shield-of-arms, see also (6) above. Floor-slabs: In chancel, (1) to Mary, mother of John Cutting, rector, 1777; (2) to Susanna Leycester, daughter of Ralph Leycester, 1794; (3) to [Fra]nces Scot, 18th-century, fragmentary; (4) to David Festing, 1764; (5) to Rev. Samuel Payne, A.M., rector of Wyke Regis and Portland, 1801; (6) to a 'citisen and mason of London', 1695; (7) to Nicholas Jones, 1595, small stone slab, crudely lettered (no longer visible); (8) to Mary, widow of Morice Greene, 1767; (9) to Rev. John Cutting, 179[?]. In nave, (10) to William Schollar, 1783, and Mary, daughter of William and Mary Schollar, 1791, mutilated; (11) to William . . . . . ., 1813, mutilated. In N. aisle, (12) to Heneretta, daughter of Hene[ry?] and Alse Cvtta . . ., 1689/90, fragmentary. In S. aisle, (13) to Anna, wife of William . . . . . ., daughter of John Pyke, [1719]; also other fragments of 18th-century date in nave and N. and S. aisles. Piscinae: two, one in chancel and one in S. aisle, each with moulded cinque-foiled head with sunk spandrels, original stone shelf and dishing cut back. Plate: includes cup given by Rev. G. Chamberlaine and J. Swaffield in 1822, with dateletter for 1819; three patens, inscribed, with name of rector and churchwardens and date, July 1828; flagon of unusually squat proportions with enriched surface, by John Deacon, date-letter for 1772. Royal Arms: in chancel, (1) Tudor, rectangular stone panel (Plate 60) carved in high relief with lion and dragon supporters, the garter surmounted by a crown without a helm, said to have come from Sandsfoot Castle, Weymouth (8); over S. door, (2) of George III, before 1800, painted, in square frame. Stoup: E. of S. doorway, with trefoiled ogee head, octagonal bowl and back.

Monuments (370–392) unless otherwise stated are of two storeys and attics with brick walls and slate-covered roofs and were built in the early 19th century.

Wyke Regis

a(370) Westdowne, on the S. side of Chickerell Road, 1,200 yds. N. of the church, is of two storeys with rendered walls. It is a substantial villa residence of the early 19th century with some recent additions. The central doorway has a pedimented porch with fluted Roman Doric columns; the staircase, which is at right angles to the entrance hall, is of stone with a scrolled ironwork balustrade.

a(371) Wyke Manor Farm, of one and two storeys with attics, is of Portland stone ashlar. The house was begun in the late 16th century, partly rebuilt or extended in the mid 17th century and considerably refurbished in the early 19th century.

Wyke Manor Farm

The plan is approximately rectangular and comprises two distinct blocks, that to the S. being the earlier work, of one storey with an attic above. The N. block projects 3 ft. beyond the face of the former and contains an additional storey; here the windows, including two of four lights on the E. side, (fn. 23) have been largely replaced but continuous moulded stone string-courses remain at first-floor level and at the wall head; the gables have stone parapets and moulded kneelers.

The 16th-century block was entered through the S. gable wall alongside the fireplace of the hall, now the kitchen; this room has a ceiling divided by beams into nine panels and is lit by a four-light window in the E. wall, with hollow-chamfered stone mullions. The 17th-century extension to the N. includes a separate entrance on the E. side probably in its original position, and a hall with large external chimney-stack on the N. flanked by two-light mullioned windows; W. of the hall is a long, narrow, room which may formerly have been sub-divided. The present staircase and two-storey bay window were inserted in the early 19th century.

a(372) Wyke Castle, of one and two storeys, with walls of Portland stone rubble and ashlar, was built in the first half of the 19th century. The building is of unusual design and its original purpose is uncertain. The principal feature is a two-storey circular stone tower with a domed interior and narrow window openings surmounted by a panelled stone parapet above a plat-band ornamented with small hemispheres. From the tower project two low wings without embellishment, terminating in rectangular towers with plain corbelled parapets.

a(373) New Close Farm, house, 700 yds. S. of the church, of one and two storeys with rubble walls partly rendered in stucco, was built in the late 18th century and extended in the mid 19th century; on the N. side is a porch of plain Portland stone ashlar, circular on plan, and with a shaped conical head.

a(374) Former Rectory, of three storeys with rendered walls, is L-shaped on plan; on the S. side is a two-storey bow window to the upper floors.

aChamberlaine Road

N. side

(375) Houses, Nos. 2, 4, 6, are of three storeys and attics, with round-headed ground-floor windows and bow windows above; No. 6 has been refronted.

(376) House, No. 8, has a mansard roof and two-storey bow window.

(377) House, No. 10, with walls of coursed rubble, was built in the early 17th century; it retains in the rear wing a fireplace of this date with a corbelled four-centred head and chamfered jambs. The windows were replaced early in the 19th century.

(378) House, No. 16, has a mansard roof and a two-storey bow window.

(379) Houses, pair, Nos. 26, 28, of two storeys with rendered front walls, have a double porch with cast-iron trellis standards.

(380) Hamilton House, of three storeys with rendered walls, has a symmetrical elevation with a central doorway beneath a semicircular-arched head with blind fanlight.

(381) House, No. 44, is of two storeys; the front wall is rendered and has a central doorway with semicircular head.

S. side

(382) Houses, Nos. 7, 9, 11, are of two storeys with rubble walls; the roofs of Nos. 7 and 9 are tiled.

(383) Houses, pair, Nos. 19, 21, are of two storeys; the front doorways have blind fanlights.

aHigh Street

W. side

(384) Houses, three, Nos. 6–10; Nos. 8 and 10 are doublefronted and of two storeys; the walls of No. 10 are rendered.

(385) Houses, Nos. 12, 14, are of three storeys with rendered walls.

(386) House, No. 60, is of two storeys; over the front door is a blind fanlight.

E. side

(387) Houses, pair, Nos. 3, 5, have rendered walls and tilecovered roofs; the doorways have fanlights under arched heads.

(388) House, No. 23, is double-fronted and of two storeys; the gable wall includes some rubble masonry.

(389) Houses, Nos. 25–31, have mansard roofs and rendered front walls.

(390) Houses, Nos. 37 and 39–43 are double-fronted and of two storeys with stone quoins.

aPortland Road

(391) Church Cottage has a tiled mansard roof; the elevation is symmetrical with a central doorway, two ground-floor sash windows and three above, with a brick dentil cornice and parapet.

(392) Wyke Cottage has a mansard roof and windows with flat-arched brick heads and a serrated brick cornice; it was built in the late 18th century and altered in the early 19th century when two first-floor windows were replaced by a large central bow.

Earthworks, Etc

Mediaeval and Later Earthworks

b(393) Strip Lynchets, formerly in Radipole parish, remain as follows: one tread, 22 yds. wide, W. of Corfe Hill Farm (66078193 to 66138187); another, 8 yds. wide, S. of Causeway Farm (66088133 to 66248113) and adjacent to 8 acres of disturbed strip lynchets, now destroyed, shown by air photographs to run up and down slopes of about 9°. (R.A.F. V.A.P. CPE/UK 1821: 4460.)

c(394) Strip Lynchets, formerly in Upwey parish, remain in three areas. (a) Strips (663853), of contour type and fragmentary, extend over 15 acres E. of Upwey Church, arranged in three end-on furlongs up to 160 yds. long. (b) Strip lynchets (652858 to 659860) of contour type, almost destroyed, covered about 35 acres divided between West and East Fields on the Tithe Map (1840), N. of the road to Waddon. (c) Strip lynchets of up-and-down type covered 12 acres partly over 'Celtic' fields about 656856, and a further 12 acres at 657854 are almost destroyed; these groups lie S. of (b), W. and E. of South Field on the Tithe Map.

b(395) Strip Lynchets (698835; Fig., Pt. 1, p. 24), ½ m. N.W. of Preston Church and formerly in Preston parish, cover 9 acres; they probably belonged to the settlement of Sutton Poyntz (see also Bincombe 11). Fragmentary remains of contour and up-and-down types include some with reversed-S curves. Adjacent recessed angles in hedges indicate former strip fields. (R.A.F. V.A.P. CPE/UK 1821: 4452.)

Earthworks at Sandsfoot Castle, see Monument (8).

Other Earthworks and Allied Monuments

(396–435) Round Barrows, p. 455

(436) Cross-ridge Dyke, p. 519

(437–449) Roman Villas, Temple (?), Burials and other Remains, p. 614

Ancient Field Groups (7, 10), p. 627

Footnotes

  • 1. A competition for the design, with a premium of £20, was announced in the Salisbury Journal 5 Dec. 1814; tenders for the building were invited on 3 July 1815 (ibid.) and the church was opened 23 March 1817 (ibid. 31 March 1817).
  • 2. Similar columns, but of pine, are in the parish church of St. James, Poole (Monument 1).
  • 3. The foundation stone was laid 1 September 1834 (Weymouth and Melcombe Regis New Guide (c. 1835), 33). The joint contractors were Messrs. Fawn and Fooks, and the work was supervised by John Mulholland, D.C.C., 4 Sept., 13 Nov., 1834). The church was consecrated in August 1836 (British Magazine, September, 1836).
  • 4. D.C.C., 28 July 1836.
  • 5. Town Council Minutes, 21 June 1813.
  • 6. D.C.C., 21 August 1828.
  • 7. Sherren, Illustrated Guide to Weymouth (1887).
  • 8. Llewellyn Jewitt, The Corporation Plate and Insignia of Office of the Cities and Towns of England and Wales, ed. W.H. St. John Hope (1895), 181, where it is stated that the inscription recording the gift in 1824 is exposed and that the 1660 inscription is beneath the removable head. This last was not removed by R.C.H.M., but presumably the statement is in reverse.
  • 9. This temple is now identified as the Hephaesteion.
  • 10. 4th Report of the Commission of Military Enquiry (1807).
  • 11. The name Dorset Place appears to have been applied at first to Nos. 8–19 only, as indicated on John Wood's map of 1841.
  • 12. Town Council Minutes 1806.
  • 13. Town Council Minutes, 25 June, 1819.
  • 14. Country Life, 18 Oct. 1946, correspondence.
  • 15. Salisbury Journal, 12 Nov. 1792.
  • 16. No. 4 was advertised for sale in Salisbury Journal, 29 July 1822.
  • 17. Town Council Minutes, 29 Aug. 1832.
  • 18. D.C.C., 10 Sept. 1835.
  • 19. Town Council Minutes, 6 Jan. & 8 Dec. 1853.
  • 20. Salisbury Journal, 23 Aug. 1824.
  • 21. The site of the Manor House is marked on old 6 ins. O.S. maps; no remains exist.
  • 22. See also Weymouth, Monument (13).
  • 23. These are shown in Grimm's drawing c. 1790, B.M., Add. MS 15538, f. 63.