BHO

Pembridge

Pages 159-169

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 3, North West. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1934.

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61 PEMBRIDGE (C.c.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XI, S.W., (b)XI, S.E., (c)XVIII, N.W., (d)XVIII, N.E., (e)XVIII, S.W.)

Pembridge is a large parish and small town 7 m. W. of Leominster. The church is of considerable interest, and the town (Plate 157) retains a very high proportion of its early timber-framed buildings. Several of these are of mediæval date, and the lower part of the market hall also survives. The two blocks of almshouses are also noteworthy.

Ecclesiastical

d(1). Parish Church of St. Mary (Plates 8, 155) stands on the S. side of the village. The walls are of local sandstone rubble, mostly ashlar-faced and with dressings of the same material; the roofs are covered with stone slates and slates. The 12th-century capital in the N. porch indicates the existence of a church of this period, and the large sub-bases of four piers of the nave may indicate an earlier aisled structure on the site, though there seems nothing to show that the other piers had not the same bases buried or cut away. The earliest work in the present building is the blocked arches in the side walls of the Chancel, dating from c. 1220–30. They formerly opened into side chapels. The rest of the chancel may be of the same date. The Nave, North and South Transepts and Aisles and the chancel-arch were re-built early in the 14th century. The North Porch was added in the second half of the same century. The detached timber Belfry also dates probably from the 14th century. The chancel was restored in 1871, the building generally in 1908–9, and the belfry in 1898. The Vestry is modern.

The church is an important example of 14th-century work, the Belfry being a noteworthy timber-structure. Among the fittings the monuments and pulpit are of interest.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (37¼ ft. by 21¼ft.) has a partly restored early 14th-century E. window of four trefoiled lights with net-tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label. In the N. wall is a blocked 13th-century arch of which only the springers on the E., the respond-base on the W., and the line of the W. respond externally are now visible; set in the filling is a late 14th-century window of three lights, two cinque-foiled and one trefoiled light in a two-centred head; further E. are two doorways, the eastern of the 14th century and with chamfered jambs and two-centred head and the western perhaps earlier and now blocked; it has square splays and a chamfered lintel. In the S. wall is a blocked 13th-century arch of which the E. springers and respond are partly visible on the inside; the respond has a half-round shaft with a moulded capital carved with stiff-leaf foliage; set in the blocking is a window uniform with that in the N. wall; further E. is a mid 13th-century window of two trefoiled lights with a pierced quatrefoil in the spandrel and an internal label. The early 14th-century chancel-arch is two-centred and of two moulded orders, the outer continuous and the inner springing from triple-shafted corbels with common moulded capitals; about 3 ft. below the springing the responds have been cut away for a former beam connected with the rood-loft.

The Nave (83½ ft. by 22¼ ft.) (Plate 156) has early 14th-century N. and S. arcades, each of six bays with two-centred arches of two moulded orders with a moulded label on the inner face; the octagonal piers and halfoctagonal responds have moulded capitals and bases; the second and third piers on the N. and the first and fourth on the S. have square chamfered sub-bases. Across the S.E. angle of the nave is the square-headed upper doorway to the rood-loft; the sill rests on corbelling supported on a cinque-foiled squinch-stone across the angle. The early 14th-century clearstorey has on each side four circular windows with cinque-foiled ogee cusping; there are two similar windows over the chancel-arch. In the W. wall is a window similar to the E. window but with head-stops to the label; the W. doorway, of the same date, has jambs and two-centred arch of two moulded orders with a moulded label with headstops; the splays and segmental-pointed rear-arch are of two moulded orders.

Pembridge, the Parish Church of St Mary

The North Transept (25 ft. by 18¾ ft.) is of early 14th-century date; the S. part of the E. wall retains the weathering of the roof of the destroyed N. chapel. In the E. wall is a window of two trefoiled ogee lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred head with a moulded label. In the N. wall is a tall similar window of three lights with net-tracery and moulded labels, the internal one finished with head-stops. In the W. wall is a window similar to that in the E. wall but with headstops to the label; further S. is a half arch of two moulded orders, the inner springing from a tripleshafted corbel with a moulded capital and tapering base; the splayed angle, between the transept and aisle, is finished at the top with a trefoiled panel.

The South Transept (25 ft. by 18¾ ft.) (Plate 15) is of early 14th-century date and has windows in the E., S. and W. walls similar to the corresponding windows in the N. transept, but the labels are without external stops. Projecting from the E. wall is the rood-loft stair-turret entered by a doorway with chamfered jambs and ogee head. The half arch in the W. wall and the anglesplay are similar to those in the N. transept.

The North Aisle (11 ft. wide) has, in the N. wall, three early 14th-century windows each of two trefoiled ogee lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred head with a moulded label; the contemporary N. doorway has jambs and two-centred arch of two moulded orders with a moulded label; the splays and rear-arch are also moulded. In the W. wall is a window of three trefoiled ogee lights with net-tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label and head-stops.

The South Aisle (11 ft. wide) has windows and a doorway generally similar to the corresponding features in the N. aisle, but the doorway has no label.

The North Porch is a mid to late 14th-century structure and has a moulded plinth and angle pinnacles. The outer archway has jambs and two-centred arch of two sunk-chamfered orders with a moulded label; above it is a niche with a cinque-foiled ogee head and a two-centred moulded label. The side walls have each a window of two trefoiled lights with tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label. The porch has a stone vault with chamfered wall, ridge, diagonal and intermediate ribs springing from corbels in the angles with arched ogee soffits and cusped panels on the face; the central boss has a quatrefoil enclosing five smaller quatre-foiled panels, and at the other intersections are trefoiled panels.

The Belfry (Plate 154) stands detached to the N. of the chancel and is a timber-framed structure of 14th-century date. It is of octagonal plan and of three diminishing stages with hipped and pyramidal roofs covered with stone slates and shingles. The lowest stage has stone outer walls of varying thickness, and in the S.W. wall is the doorway with moulded jambs and a wooden lintel. In the E. wall are two rough openings, in the N. and N.W. sides a loop-light, and in the S.W. wall a square-headed window originally of two lights. The second stage is supported on four main oak posts with cross-framing which does not appear to be original, as the posts have cuttings for raking struts now removed; this stage is square, as is the small top stage, which has diagonal framing in the sides.

The Roof of the nave is of 14th-century date and of plain trussed-rafter type with moulded wall-plates; one tie-beam with cusped struts below it was intended to counteract the thrust of the two half-arches carrying the W. walls of the transepts. The roofs of the transepts are of similar type and date. The pent-roofs of the aisles have moulded wall-plates of the 14th century.

Fittings—Bells: five; 4th by John Martin, 1658. Brackets: In nave—on E. wall above chancel-arch, carved with face, 14th-century; flanking the same, two shaped brackets. In N. transept—on E. wall, two shaped brackets; on E. wall of S. transept, a similar bracket. Brasses: In chancel—(1) to Alice (Sherborne), widow of Dr. Thomas Trafford, 1709, inscription-plate only. In S. transept—on E. wall, (2) to Walter, son of Thomas Smith, 1661–2, inscription only. Communion Rails: with moulded and enriched rail, flat shaped and pierced balusters, early 17th-century. Coffin-lid: re-used in back of niche over entrance to porch—fragment with part of cross-shaft. Doors: In nave—in W. doorway, of two leaves and of nail-studded battens with strap-hinges, 17th-century. In N. doorway—of nail-studded battens (Plate 45) on diagonal framing; two wrought-iron hinges with ornamental branches and ends, open iron scutcheon with drop-handle, 14th-century, lock 17th-century. In S. doorway—of nail-studded battens with panel-mouldings planted on, drop-handle and strap-hinge, 17th-century. In outer archway of porch—double wooden gates with curved top rails surmounted by iron spikes, panelled lower part and strap-hinges; top rail inscribed, "Tho. Bengough and Jo. Badham, Wardenss Ano. Dmi. 1678." Font (Plate 117): square bowl with half-round projection on each face, with moulded upper edge and deeply moulded lower side, shaft, moulded base and upper step of similar form, round lower step, 13th-century, flat cover with moulding planted on and four brackets supporting twisted central shaft with knob at top, 17th-century. Glass: In N. aisle—in second window from E., small pieces of diapered and foliated glass in head; in W. window—upper part of censing angel and border, borders, diapers, etc., in tracery, 14th-century, in situ. In S. aisle—in tracery of W. window, figure of St. Christopher and two other figures, nearly all modern but incorporating old work in the setting, small pieces of diaper and borders in spandrels, 14th-century. Lectern: modern but incorporating carved panel as on pulpit and enriched band as on communionrail, 17th-century. Prayer-desk incorporating similar work. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In chancel—against N. wall, (1) double monument in form of altar-tomb with two pairs of effigies; tomb with moulded top slab, E. end and part of W. end plain, rest with range of trefoil-headed panels, partly mutilated; eastern pair of effigies (Plate 62): man, in robes of a serjeant-at-law, coif with chin-strap, long gown and short cape over shoulders, two tabs at neck resembling Geneva bands, feet on lion; woman in veil and wimple, long cloak tucked up under left arm, tight sleeves to undergarment, feet on dog; western pair of effigies (Plate 62): man in turban-head-dress, belted cotehardy to knees, loose cloak, buttoned at right shoulder, dagger at side, feet on lion; woman with square head-dress, hanging sleeves, buttoned cloak, feet on dog, mid and late 14th-century; on N. wall, (2) to Anne (Cocks), wife of Essex Sherborne, 1668–9, tablet flanked by female figures and surmounted by entablature, broken pediment, cherubs and cartouche-of-arms; (3) to Thomas Trafford, S.T.P., 1685, tablet (Plate 68) with twisted Corinthian side-columns, entablature, broken pediment, putti and cartouche-of-arms; (4) to Jane (Sherborne), wife of Robert Breton, minister of Pembridge, 1656, tablet with moulded alabaster frame; on S. wall, (5) to Alice (Davenant), wife of William Sherborne, rector, 1660, tablet with segmental head, female figures at sides, entablature, curved pediment, putti and two cartouches-of-arms; (6) to William Sherborne, 1671, tablet with twisted Composite side-columns, entablature, broken pediment and cartouche-of-arms. In N. transept—on N. walls, (7) to Thomas Hopwood, 1679, tablet with twisted Ionic side-columns, broken pediment and putti. In S. transept—on E. wall, (8) to Walter Carwardine, 1706, tablet with scrolls and half-round head. Floor-slabs: In chancel—(1) to Dorothy (Case) Banner, mother of Thomas Trafford, 1691; (2) defaced, late 17th-century; (3) to Mary, daughter of Edward Lloyd, 1658; (4) to M.L., 1668; (5) to Richard Shepard, 1630; (6) to Adrian Metcalf, 1693–4 and Davenant (Sherborne) his widow, 1717, with shield-of-arms. In S. transept—(7) to John Badham, 1687. In S. aisle—(8) to [D]orothy, daughter of John Higins, 16..; (9) fragments dated 1658 and 1679. Paintings: In chancel—on arch-stones and respond of blocked arches, remains of decoration in red, mediæval. In N. transept—on E. wall, two panels with round heads defaced black-letter inscription, painted over earlier panels, both 17th-century. In S. transept—on face of turret-staircase, similar rectangular panel with inscription, painted over earlier panel; lower down a similar panel with scroll-ornament and the Apostles' Creed; on S. splay of E. window and on adjoining wall, red colour diapered with white circles, date uncertain; on S. wall, remains of enriched panel with the Creed, smaller panel below with defaced inscription, 17th-century. In S. aisle—between two first windows, ornamental panel with the Lord's Prayer, 17th or 18th-century. Panelling: In chancel—against responds of chancel-arch, three panels with cusped and traceried heads, moulded rails, 15th-century, incorporated in modern work. In N. transept—loose against W. wall, length of five panels with cinque-foiled and traceried heads, moulded on top rail with bosses; all 15th-century; forming partition across W. end of transept, panelling in three heights, early 17th and early 18th-century. Piscinæ: In chancel—recess with cinque-foiled head and projecting trefoiled sill with quatre-foiled drain, 14th-century. In N. transept—in E. wall, recess with trefoiled ogee head, moulded label, cinque-foiled drain and grooves for shelf, mutilated head-stop above label, 14th-century. In S. transept—in S. wall, similar to that in N. transept, but without head-stop and retaining shelf. In N. porch—loose, head of 12th-century pillar-piscina, with square drain. Pulpit (Plate 71): octagonal with two ranges of carved panels, upper range arcaded and enclosing conventional designs, lower range with grotesque monsters, fluted middle rail, enriched posts and moulded cornice, door loose in N. transept, early 17th-century, reconstructed and stem modern. Recess: In chancel—in S. wall, with two-centred head of two moulded orders and moulded label, traces of colour, 14th-century. Scratchings: On 14th-century parts of structure— various masons' marks. Miscellanea: In N. porch— built into E. wall, small scalloped capital, 12th-century. In S. transept—on E. wall, carved wooden cherub-head, 17th-century. In nave—over S. arcade, large plaster achievement-of-arms, of Coningsby, 17th or 18th-century. Built into N. wall of chancel, outside, recess with segmental head, perhaps piscina.

Condition—Good.

Secular

c(2). Tump, 3 m. W. of the church, is of roughly square form and surrounded by a dry ditch. The mound is flat-topped, about 36 yards across at the base and rises at most 14 ft. above the bottom of the ditch. There is a modern cutting into the S. side of the mound.

Condition—Bad.

e(3). Homestead Moat at Upper Wetton, 3 m. S.S.W. of the church, is fragmentary.

a(4). Court of Noke, house and moat, 1½ m. N.W. of the church. The House is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of brick and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built early in the 18th century and is of half H-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the W. A change in the brickwork may indicate that the S.W. wing is a slightly later addition. The eaves-cornice and dormers were renewed in the 19th century. The E. front is symmetrically designed and has pilasters at the angles, a brick band between the storeys and a modern eaves-cornice; the central bay projects slightly and has a pediment; the windows have flat heads and flush frames. The central doorway has a moulded architrave, key-stone and entablature and is covered by a porch with two columns, an entablature and pediment. The chimney-stacks have moulded stone cappings. The band-course is continued round the side walls, and on the S. side are three windows with solid frames, mullion and transom. Inside the building, the N.E. room is lined with original panelling in two heights, with dado-rail and cornice; the fireplace has a stone surround and eared architrave and is flanked by fluted pilasters carried up to the cornice. The kitchen has exposed ceiling-beams. The original staircase has turned balusters, cut strings, square newels and a panelled dado. On the first floor, the N.E. room has an original fireplace with architrave and entablature; another fireplace has an original moulded surround.

To the N. and E. of the house is a length of millstream with a right-angled bend. A small return scarp on the W. may indicate that this was formerly a moat.

Condition—Good.

d(5). Court House Farm (Plate 160), house, outbuildings and moat, 60 yards S. W. of the church. The House is of two storeys with cellars; the walls are timber-framed and the roofs are tiled. It was built on a rectangular plan early in the 17th century but was much altered early in the 18th century. There are three gables on the N. and two on the E. and W. sides. Inside the building, some of the ceiling-beams are exposed. The two W. rooms are lined with early 18th-century panelling, with dado-rail and cornice; the fireplaces have moulded stone surrounds; there is a similar fireplace in the middle S. room. The middle N. room is lined with early 18th-century panelling, and there are several doors of the same date.

The Outbuildings, S. of the house, form two ranges. They are timber-framed and of the 17th century, and the N.E. range has a gabled cross-wing with a central entry; the head-beam of the opening rests on two shaped brackets.

The Moat, E. of the house, is roughly square, and has been partly filled in on the W. side.

Condition—Of house, good.

d(6). Trafford's Almshouses (Plate 161), range of six tenements, on the N. side of East Street, 275 yards N.E. of the church. The range is of one storey with attics; the walls are timber-framed and the roofs are covered with stone slates. The almshouses were founded by Dr. Thomas Trafford, rector of the parish in 1686. The timber-framing is exposed, and the S. front is symmetrically designed with three pairs of doors to the tenements and six dormer-windows with hipped roofs. The doorways have original moulded frames with shaped head-pieces; above the W. pair is a panel inscribed, "This hospital founded by Thomas Trafford, Dr. in Divinity and Rector of ye parish, was finished and endowed according to his design by Alice his Relict Ano. Dni. 1686"; above the panel is a shield-of-arms of Trafford. Above the W. pair of doorways is a second panel inscribed, "This Hospital was bielded by me, Thomas Powle, carpenter, according to the Doner's will in 1686." At the back are three large projecting chimney-stacks. Inside the building are some exposed ceiling-beams, and the fireplaces have oak lintels.

Condition—Good.

d(7). Duppa's Almshouses (Plate 161), range of six tenements on the W. side of Bridge Street, 90 yards N. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are timber-framed and the roofs are covered with stone slates and tiles. The almshouses were founded by Jeffrey Duppa and augmented by Bryan Duppa, Bishop of Winchester, in 1661. The timber-framing is exposed and the upper storey projects at both ends of the range on curved brackets springing from semi-octagonal posts. The back has three large chimney-stacks of stone. Inside the building are some exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Fairly good.

d(8). Market Hall (Plate 160), in the middle of the road, 60 yards W.N.W. of the church, is now a single storeyed building of timber with a hipped roof of stone slates. It was built in the first half of the 16th century and formerly had an upper storey. This was removed at some uncertain date and the building now consists only of an open structure on eight posts, four on each side. The posts are chamfered and have remains of moulded caps; from these spring curved brackets, now supporting the eaves of the roof and the head-beams. The interior has exposed beams and joists. The N.E. angle-post stands on the stone base of a mediæval cross; it is square to octagonal on plan.

Condition—Fairly good.

d(9). New Inn (Plate 158), 65 yards N.W. of the church, is of two storeys with cellars and attics; the walls are timber-framed and the roofs are tiled. The main structure is of early 17th-century date with cross-wings at the E. and W. ends. A four-gabled wing at the back is probably a rather later addition. The nearly detached W. wing is also of the 17th century and was joined to the main building by the rather later addition of the existing stables. A second wing, separated by a narrow area from the back of the house, is of the same period. Both of these wings are of two storeys. The timber-framing is exposed throughout the various buildings. In the main building the upper storey projects at the S. ends of the cross-wings, with moulded pendants to the upper angle-posts and original carved scroll-brackets on the E. wing; the western doorway has an original moulded frame and a door with strap-hinges. Inside the building, the ceiling-beams are mostly exposed, some of those in the main building being moulded; there is also an original wall-post with a moulded head. The staircase has an original newel with a moulded terminal and moulded handrails. One of the rooms on the first floor has a columnarshaped post supporting the ceiling-beam.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (10–99)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys, timber-framed and with stone, tile or slate-covered roofs. Most of the buildings have exposed external timber-framing and internal ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good.

East Street, N. side

d(10). Cottage, 20 yards E. of Bridge Street, appears to occupy one bay of the hall of a 14th or 15th-century house, the rest of which has been destroyed. An original roof-truss is incorporated in the E. wall; it has a collar with long curved braces forming a two-centred arch and raking struts above. The streetfront is faced with modern brick.

Pembridge, Plan Showing the Position of Monuments

d(11). Greyhound Inn (Plate 160), 45 yards E.N.E. of (10), was built early in the 16th-century, and later in the same century the cross-wing was added at the E. end. The upper storey projects on the whole of the S. front, the original block having shafted posts with moulded capitals and curved brackets carved with roses and foliage; the later wing has plain curved brackets. The upper story also projects at the back of the original block on curved brackets springing from simple shafted posts; the lower storey has some close-set timber-framing. Inside the building, the original block has moulded ceiling-beams.

d(12). Cottage and post office, 10 yards E. of (11), dates from the mediæval period and had a central hall with cross-wings at the E. and W. ends. The hall was subsequently divided into two storeys and the cross-wings are now roofed from E. to W. like the main block. The E. end is a 17th-century extension. Inside the main block are remains of the original crutch-truss, dividing the hall into two bays.

d(13). Range of tenements, immediately E. of (12).

d(14). Range of tenements, immediately E. of (13), is of mediæval origin and incorporates one, and probably a second, crutch-truss. The building was largely reconstructed in the 17th century and heightened in the following century.

d(15). House and shop, 30 yards E. of (14), was built in the 14th or 15th century with a hall and a cross-wing at the W. end. The hall was later divided into two storeys; the front wall has been faced with modern brick and has an added gable. The upper storey projects at the S. end of the cross-wing. Inside the building the original central truss of the former hall has a collar-beam with curved braces below and struts above forming foiled openings with the principals.

d(16). Oak House and outbuilding, 30 yards E. of (15). The House (Plate 160), apart from modern additions, consists of an E. cross-wing probably of mediæval origin and a long main block which was added early in the 16th century. The upper storey of this block projects on the three free sides on original moulded bressummers and curved brackets springing from shafted posts. The central chimney-stack has two diagonal shafts, probably of the 17th century. The Outbuilding, formerly a cottage, N.W. of the house, has been heightened.

S. side

d(17). Townsend Farm, house, 280 yards E.N.E. of the church, has modern additions at the S.E. end.

d(18). House, 100 yards W. of (17), has an inserted upper floor, which may imply that the heavy main framing belongs to the hall of a mediæval house.

d(19). House, two tenements, 20 yards W. of (18), has been heightened. Inside the building is a wall-post with a moulded head.

d(20). House (Plate 161) and smithy, 40 yards W. of (19), consists of the hall-block and W. cross-wing of a mediæval house, perhaps of the 14th century. The hall was subsequently divided into two storeys and the cross-wing was twice extended S. in the 17th century. The original building has framing in large squares. The upper storey originally projected at the N. end of the cross-wing, but has been under-built. The original doorway of the hall, now blocked, has curved braces forming a two-centred arch; its position indicates that the screens occupied the E. end of the hall. Inside the building, the former screens have an original crutch-truss. The cross-wing has an original moulded ceiling-beam and the lower parts of the original roof-trusses, dividing it into four bays, are visible.

d(21). Range of two tenements, immediately W. of (20), has a later extension on the E.

d(22). House, now three tenements, immediately W. of (21), was built in the 14th or 15th century, with a central hall and cross-wing at the E. and W. ends. The hall was divided into two storeys, probably in the 17th century, and its roof extended over the E. cross-wing and heightened. The original framing is in large squares. Inside the building, the former hall has an original central truss, of crutch-type, with curved braces under the collar.

Condition—Poor.

d(23). Cottage, 50 yards W.S.W. of (22).

Condition—Poor.

d(24). House (Plate 161) and shop, called the Old Steps, opposite Bridge Street, was built early in the 16th century and formerly stood free on the W. side. Early in the 17th century a wing was added on this side, and later in the same century a second wing was added at the back. The upper storey formerly projected on the N. and W. sides of the original block but the former has been under-built and the latter covered by the added wing; both projections retain their original moulded bressummers and the N.W. angle post has a diagonal bracket. On the first floor of the N. wall is an original projecting window of seven lights with one light on each return; it has a moulded frame, mullions and sill; the gable above projects on a moulded bressummer and the barge-boards are carved with fruit, flowers and dragons. The upper storey of the W. wing formerly projected on the N. side; it has been under-built but retains one shaped bracket.

West Street, N. side

d(25). Bank Cottage, 80 yards N.N.W. of the church, has been heightened.

d(26). Range of tenements, 30 yards W. of (25), was built probably in the 16th century. The upper storey projects on most of the S. front.

d(27). Range of two tenements, 40 yards W. of (26).

d(28). House, two tenements, immediately W. of (27), is probably of mediæval origin, with a central hall and cross-wings at the E. and W. ends. It has been much altered, and the whole is now under one roof. The upper storey formerly projected at the S. end of both cross-wings, but the E. projection has been under-built; the other retains its moulded bressummer and curved brackets.

d(29). House (Plate 161), two tenements, 50 yards W. of (28), consists of the hall-block and W. cross-wing of a mediæval building. The E. tenement formed the hall which has an inserted floor and was heightened in the 17th century. The cross-wing is now roofed from E. to W. Inside the building are remains of the central and W. trusses of the former hall; they are of crutch-construction, the central one having curved braces forming a pointed arch.

d(30). Cottage (Plate 161), immediately W. of (29).

d(31). House (Plate 159), 5 yards W. of (30), was built in the 16th century. The upper storey projects on the S. front on curved brackets and shafted wall-posts.

d(32). House and shop, immediately W. of (31).

d(33). Cottage, immediately W. of (32).

d(34). House and shop, 35 yards W. of (33), was built probably in the 14th century and consists of a main wing of three bays, formerly of one storey and a cross-wing of two storeys at the W. end. The upper storey and the gable project at the S. end of the cross-wing on curved brackets. Inside the building, the main or hall-block has remains of four crutch-trusses, the blades forming acutely pointed arches tied by collar-beams. The cross-wing has a roof of four bays; the trusses are partly original, the upper timbers being cusped.

d(35). House, immediately W. of (34), is probably also of 14th-century date and has a hall-block with a cross-wing at the W. end. The square timber-framing is exposed. The upper storey projects at the S. end of the cross-wing on curved brackets. Inside the building, the hall-block has an original central crutchtruss with curved braces below the collar and struts above cut to form a pointed oval and two pointed openings; there are remains of a second crutch-truss against the E. wall of the building.

d(36). House, two tenements, 40 yards W. of (35), was built early in the 17th century on a rectangular plan; later in the century it was extended towards the E. and a wing added at the back, projecting diagonally towards the N.W. The S. front of the original block is in three bays with a central gable. The upper storey projects at the E. end of the extension on shaped brackets; the angle-posts have shaped pendants; the gable has diagonal framing as has the gable on the S. front.

S. side

d(37). House, 300 yards W. of the church, is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the W. and N.

d(38). House, two tenements, immediately E. of (37), was built early in the 17th century on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the W. and N. Later in the century the W. wing was extended towards the W., and the N. wing has a modern extension towards the S. Inside the building, the middle room has remains of a panelled plaster ceiling, and on the first floor is a little original panelling.

d(39). Range of three tenements, 20 yards E. of (38), has been much altered. On the N. front there is an original moulded beam at the first-floor level.

d(40). House, 35 yards E. of (39), has been partly refronted in brick.

d(41). Cottage, 20 yards W. of the Market Hall, is perhaps of early 16th-century date, but has been refronted and much altered, probably early in the 19th century. Inside the building is an original moulded ceiling-beam.

d(42). House and shop, 10 yards S.W. of the Market Hall, incorporates part of a 14th-century building which forms a small block in the middle of the S. side. The block to the N. may have been added in the 16th century, but the rest of the building on the E. and W. is of the 17th century with a modern addition on the E. front. The original block has large square timber-framing and one quatre-foiled panel survives within the building; there is also an original moulded ceiling-beam. The roof has two original trusses, one with cusped principals and collar and the other with a tie-beam, cusped principals and struts.

d(43). House (Plate 159), formerly school, on the W. side of the churchyard, was built in the 16th century, and is of three bays. The upper storey projects on the W. front on an original moulded bressummer and curved brackets. There was a similar projection and bressummer on the E. side, but they have been under-built.

Bridge Street, W. side

d(44). Cottage, 55 yards N. of West Street, has been refronted in brick.

d(45). Cottage, immediately N. of (44).

d(46). Rectory Cottage (Plate 159), three tenements, 165 yards N. of (45), was built in the 16th century and has modern additions at the back. The upper storey projects on the E. front on curved brackets.

d(47). Bridge Cottage (Plate 161), three tenements, 30 yards N. of (46), consists of a main block, probably a 14th-century hall, and a S. cross-wing probably of early 17th-century date. The upper storey projects at the E. end of the cross-wing on curved brackets, and in the return wall of the same wing is a window of four lights with chamfered frame and mullions. Inside the building, the original hall has been divided into two storeys and heightened; the framing is in large squares; two original crutch-trusses remain, the blades being cut and shaped to form, with the braces, a four-centred arch under the collar; there are foiled openings above the collar.

E. side

d(48). House (Plate 159), 25 yards N. of East Street, was built early in the 16th century. The close-set framing is exposed on the W. front and the upper storey projects on an original moulded bressummer, curved brackets and shafted posts; at the N. end is an original doorway with chamfered jambs and segmental-pointed head. Inside the building there is a doorway of similar form and original moulded ceiling-beams.

d(49). Cottage, 180 yards E.N.E. of the church, has been heightened.

b(50). Holmcroft, house and outbuilding, on the E. side of the road, 500 yards N. of the church. The House is of irregular plan and has been much altered. The two late 17th or early 18th-century chimneystacks have panels with arched heads in each face. Inside the building, the early 18th-century staircase has octagonal newels with ball-terminals and turned balusters.

The Outbuilding, N. of the house, has a lower storey of stone.

b(51). Middle Brook (Plate 30), house, on the W. side of the road, 300 yards N.N.W. of (50), has a central gable and a gabled porch on the E. side.

b(52). Clear Brook (Plate 31), house, 220 yards N.N.E. of (51), is of T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the W. end. The E. part of the E. wing is probably of the 16th century, but the higher western part and the cross-wing are of early 17th-century date. On the W. front the upper storey projects slightly on a moulded beam with two shaped brackets; the three gables have moulded barge-boards and apex-posts; the framing in them has curved braces with ornamental projections resembling cusping. The doorway (Plate 45) has a moulded frame and a shaped board in the head; the battened door has ornamental strap-hinges. The S. gable of the cross-wing is similar to those on the W. front and has a 17th-century two-light window; the bressummer at the first-floor level has two shaped brackets. The chimneystacks have late 17th-century shafts with arched panels in each face. Inside the building are some moulded ceiling-beams and a doorway with a 17th-century moulded frame. The early 17th-century staircase has shafted, pierced and enriched newels, flat, shaped and pierced balusters and moulded grip-handrails.

a(53). Leen Farm, house and outbuildings, about ¾ m. N.W. of the church. The House is of two storeys with attics; it was built in the 16th century or earlier, but was largely re-built c. 1600, to which date belongs the large block at the S. end. The earlier part to the N. has a 17th-century addition beyond it, now a garage, and there are various modern additions. The upper storey of the original block formerly projected on the S.W. front but has been under-built. At the back is an original window of five lights with chamfered mullions. The block of c. 1600 has a two-storeyed porch; the upper storey projects on brackets, and there are similar brackets under the gable; the inner doorway of the porch, now blocked, has a moulded frame.

The Outbuilding, N.E. of the house, and another long range of outbuilding beyond it, are both of the 17th century.

a(54). Cottage, 150 yards W.S.W. of Court of Noke (4), is of two storeys with attics.

a(55). Cottage, 220 yards W.N.W. of Court of Noke.

a(56). Cottage, at Noke Lane Head, nearly 2 m. W.N.W. of the church, has been partly re-built.

a(57). Grove Farm, house, nearly 2¼ m. N.W. of the church, has been largely re-built.

a(58). Strangwood Farm, house, about 3 m. W.N.W. of the church, is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S.E. and S.W. The S.W. wing has a later extension. The upper storey projects at the N.W. end of the S.E. wing on shaped brackets.

c(59). Cottage, on the E. side of the road, N. of the railway at Upper Marston, 2¼ m. W. of the church, has a thatched roof.

c(60). Lowe Farm, house, 1¼ m. W. of the church, is of T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the W. end. The E. wing is of mediæval origin and has remains of original crutch-trusses. The N. end of the cross-wing is an addition of rather later date than the main block, and the rest of the cross-wing is a rebuilding or addition of the 17th century.

c(61). Moseley Gate, cottage, 1 m. W. of the church, was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century.

c(62). Byletts, house and barn, 760 yards W.N.W. of the church. The House was refaced and largely re-built and added to in 1879, but incorporates remains of a 17th-century building. Inside the house, the Dining-room is lined with original panelling with an enriched frieze and moulded cornice. The Hall has portions of an arabesque frieze of the same period and the Kitchen has moulded ceiling-beams; there are similar beams on the first floor. The upper part of the staircase has original flat wavy balusters.

The Barn, N. of the house, is of L-shaped plan and is partly weather-boarded.

c(63). Pitfield Farm, house, 1,150 yards S.W. of the church, was built on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the N. and E. There are modern additions on the N. and S. of the E. wing.

c(64). Cottage, on the N. side of the road at Marston, and 180 yards N. of Marston Court.

c(65). Cottage, 40 yards W. of (64).

c(66). Yew Tree Farm, house and barn, 100 yards E.S.E. of (64). The House (Plate 21) was built in the 16th century and has a 17th-century wing on the W. The upper storey projects at the S. end on shaped brackets and the gable also projects on similar brackets. The upper storey also projects at the N. end. Inside the building, the original staircase has flat, pierced and shaped balusters, square newels with acorn-terminals and moulded grip-handrails.

The Barn, W. of the house, and on the opposite side of the road, is mostly weather-boarded.

c(67). Marston Court, house and barn, nearly 1¾ m. W.S.W. of the church. The House consists of a N. wing probably of the 16th century, to which the main L-shaped block of the house was added in the 17th century. The walls are partly of stone. Inside the building arc some 17th-century moulded ceiling-beams.

The Barn, S.W. of the house, is mostly weather-boarded.

c(68). Cottage, 60 yards E. of (67), has been heightened.

c(69). Cottage, two tenements, 60 yards S.E. of (67), was built late in the 16th century, on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the N. and E.

c(70). Weston Cottage, on the N. side of the road, 2½ m. S.W. of the church, was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century and has a thatched roof.

c(71). Westonbury, house and barn, nearly 1½ m. S.W. of the church. The House is largely modern except for a block at the N.E. angle. The late 17th-century E. chimney-stack has recessed panels with arched heads in each face. Inside the building are some original moulded ceiling-beams.

The Barn, N.E. of the house, is weather-boarded.

c(72). Weston Court Farm, house and outbuildings, 2 m. S.W. of the church. The House was built probably late in the 16th century, heightened and added to on the E. late in the 17th century. The walls have been partly refaced in stone.

The Outbuildings, N. of the house, form three sides of a quadrangle. In the middle of the N.E. side is a mediæval barn of three bays with crutch-trusses; the building and entry to the N.W. of it was built probably c. 1600. The rest of the buildings in the three ranges are of various periods in the 17th century. To the E. of the house is another 17th-century outbuilding.

Condition—Poor.

c(73). Cottage, on the N.W. side of the road, 70 yards N.W. of (72), is of T-shaped plan with the rather later cross-wing at the S.W. end.

c(74). Cottage, on the N.E. side of the road, 40 yards N.E. of (72), consists of a gabled wing of late 16th-century date with a 17th-century addition on the N.E. The upper storey projects at the S.E. end of the original wing on a moulded bressummer with pendant posts at the angles and curved brackets springing from attached shafts on the posts below; the timber-framing is fairly close set, and the framing in the gable has ornamental curved struts in the panels.

c(75). Cottage, on the N. side of the road, 400 yards E. of (74), has a barn at the S.W. end.

c(76). Cottage, on the S.W. side of the road, 150 yards S.E. of (75), has a thatched roof.

c(77). Cottage, two tenements, on the S. side of the road at Nutfield, 1½ m. S.S.W. of the church.

Condition—Poor.

c(78). Cottage, nearly opposite (77), was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century.

c(79). Cottage, on the S. side of the road at Gorsty Common, over 1¾ m. S.W. of the church.

c(80). Yew Tree Inn, on the W. side of the road, 180 yards S.W. of (79), has been heightened.

c(81). Moorcot Farm, on the S.W. side of the road, 2¾ m. S.W. of the church, was built on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the W. and N. There are various modern additions.

c(82). Cottage, on the N.E. side of the road at Moorcot, 140 yards N. of (81).

c(83). Cottage, 25 yards N.W. of (82), has an 18th-century addition on the S.W.

c(84). Cottage, 30 yards N.W. of (83), was altered probably in 1702, the date on the front door. The doorway has a moulded frame and a shaped board in the head.

c(85). The Yeld, house and barns, nearly ½ m. N.W. of Moorcot. The House was enlarged probably late in the 18th century. The Barns, N.W. of the house, form an L-shaped block with the wings towards the N.E. and S.E. The N.E. barn is of five and the other of three bays.

c(86). Cotmore Farm, house and outbuildings, on the edge of the parish, 800 yards N.W. of (85). The House was built probably late in the 16th century and small wings were added on the E. and N. in the 17th century. It was refaced and extended in 1745, the date on the S. front. The gable at the E. end of this front has enriched barge-boards.

The Outbuildings include a stable N.W. of the house, and a barn further W., of four bays, both of the 17th century.

e(87). Bond's Green, cottage, on the E. side of the road, 3 m. S.W. of the church, was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century.

e(88). Crumps Oak, house, 630 yards S.W. of (87). The E. part of the main block was built probably in the 16th century; it was extended to the W. in the following century with a cross-wing at the W. end. The cross-wing was refaced and extended towards the N. late in the 18th century. A dormer-window, on the S. side, has 17th-century moulded barge-boards and apex-post. Inside the building are some 17th-century shaped and moulded brackets under the ceiling-beams.

Condition—Poor.

e(89). Bolton, house, 600 yards S.S.E. of (88), is of mediæval origin, as indicated by the crutch-truss in the S. wing. The N. wing was added probably c. 1600. Inside the building is some panelling of c. 1600.

e(90). Bruton, house, 670 yards S.E. of (89), is of mediæval date and has remains of two crutch-trusses. It was enlarged late in the 17th century.

Condition—Bad.

e(91). Upper Broadwood, house and outbuildings, 3¼ m. S.S.W. of the church. The House is of mediæval date and has remains of a crutch-truss. The N. wing was added late in the 17th century. The Outbuildings include a store, formerly a cottage, E. of the house, a barn of three bays S.E. of the house, and a barn and outbuilding N.E. of the house; all these are probably of 17th-century date.

e(92). Grub Court, house, on the W. side of the road, 720 yards N. of (91), was built probably late in the 16th century. The S. gable retains one original shaped bracket.

e(93). Cider House, near former site of Lower Wetton, and ¼ m. E.S.E. of (92).

Condition—Bad.

e(94). Court Farm, house, on the W. side of the road at lower Broxwood, 2¾ m. S.S.W. of the church, has cross-wings at the N.E. and S.W. ends. The middle part has been heightened.

e(95). House and Post Office, on the E. side of the road, 150 yards N.N.E. of (94).

e(96). Cottage, on the W. side of the road, 150 yards N. of (95), was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century.

e(97). Cottage, 70 yards N. of (96).

e(98). Collier's Farm, house, 680 yards E. of (94), was built c. 1600 and has 18th-century and modern extensions on the N. and S.

e(99). Lower Barewood Farm, house and barn, 1,150 yards S.S.E. of the church. The House was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century and the Barn, E. of the house, is of four bays and of rather earlier date.

Unclassified

a and c(100). Rowe Ditch, crosses the valley of the Arrow on a line nearly N. and S. and about 1,000 yards W. of the church. It can be traced from Pitfield Farm northwards into the angle of the parish of Staunton on Arrow. Traces of a scarp continuing this line into the N. part of Pembridge parish perhaps indicate that it continued rather further in this direction. The total length of the work is nearly 2¼ m., and it consists of a bank with a ditch on its W. side. The bank rises, in places, to a height of 8 or 8½ ft. above the bottom of the ditch and is some 30 ft. wide. (See Arch. Camb., 1930, p. 61, and Plan, p. xxxi, of this Inventory.)

Condition—Fairly good.