BHO

Kendal

Pages 119-129

An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Westmorland. Originally published by His Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1936.

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In this section

47 KENDAL (D.f.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XXXVIII, N.E., (b)XXXVIII, S.E., (c)XXXIX, N.W., (d)XXXIX, S.W.)

Kendal (Plate 113) is a municipal borough and parish on the river Kent and in the southern part of the county. The ancient part of the town has two main streets— Highgate with its continuations Strickland and Kirkland and Stramongate leading to the northern of the two ancient bridges. The principal monuments are the church, Castle Howe, the Castle, Collinfield and Castle Dairy.

Ecclesiastical

a(1). Parish Church of the Holy Trinity (Plate 108) stands at the S. end of the town. The walls are of local rubble with sandstone dressings; the roofs are lead-covered. That there was a church here from early times is perhaps evidenced by the 8th-century crossshaft, but no part of the existing building appears to date from before the 13th century. The Chancel is probably of early to mid 13th-century date though the details have all been restored; the cylindrical columns of the Nave are also largely of this period; the church at this time must thus have had both aisles and chapels. At an unknown date a S. porch was added to this church, the foundations of which have been found under the outer S. aisle. By the middle of the 15th century the church was in a ruinous state and there is evidence of the collection of a large sum of money for its repair. At this period the West Tower was added and the nave perhaps lengthened up to it, with the addition of the clearstorey; the existing Inner and Outer Aisles and Chapels are substantially of late 15th and early 16th-century date, the N. or Bellingham Chapel being built by Sir Roger Bellingham before his death in 1553; the S. or Parr Chapel is probably of rather earlier date. Extensive restorations of the church took place in the 19th century, particularly in 1850–2; the piers of the chancel arcades were re-built, the clearstorey shortened by one bay from the E., the West Porch was re-built and the windows, parapets and roofs were renewed. Vestries were added to the N. of the church in 1934.

The church has been too drastically restored to retain much architectural interest, but among the fittings the Anglian cross-shaft, the coffin-lid and the monuments are noteworthy.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (56 ft. by 19 ft.) has a modern E. wall and window. The N. and S. arcades are probably of the 13th century except for the modern piers; the arches are two-centred and of two chamfered orders, the N.W. arch having a head-corbel, inserted below the main corbel, carrying the inner order on the W. side; the piers between the chancel and nave are probably of the 15th century and are octagonal with a moulded plinth. There is no masonry chancel-arch, but a modern timber arch formerly existed one bay to the E. of the present division and the nave clearstorey extended up to it.

The Nave (63¼ ft. by 17½ ft.) has N. and S. arcades (Plate 109) of four bays with two-centred arches of two chamfered orders; the first two piers on each side are cylindrical and of mid 13th-century origin probably reconstructed in the 15th century; the moulded bases are of the 13th century, the first on the N. having spur-ornaments; the moulded capitals are perhaps of the 15th century, or earlier material re-cut; the third pier on each side is of the 15th century and octagonal with moulded base and no capital. The 15th-century clearstorey has, on each side, eight partly restored windows each of three cinque-foiled lights in a square head, with moulded internal reveals; between the windows are wall-shafts terminating in corbels carved with grotesque heads, an Agnus Dei, beasts, a man's bust, etc.

The Inner North Aisle (14 ft. wide) has a partly restored E. window of three cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label. The early 16th-century N. arcade is of nine bays with two-centred arches of two chamfered orders; the first pier is square with three chamfered angles; the other piers are octagonal except the eighth, which is cylindrical; they have moulded capitals and moulded or chamfered bases; the responds are chamfered, with moulded imposts, that on the W. having two blank shields; over the fifth pier is a projecting stone with a blank shield and there are blank shields on the sixth and seventh capitals. In the W. wall is a modern window.

Kendal, the Parish Church of The Holy Trinity

The Outer North Aisle with the Bellingham Chapel (27 ft. wide) has a modern E. wall and windows. In the N. wall are nine windows all partly or completely restored but of early 16th-century origin; the two easternmost are of four cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in segmental-pointed or four-centred heads; the other windows are each of three cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a segmental-pointed head with a moulded label; in the third bay is a modern doorway. In the W. wall are two restored windows, similar to those just described but with four-centred heads; between them is a restored early 16th-century doorway with moulded jambs, three-centred head and label. The two E. bays of the aisle have a clearstorey with three windows on each side, of early 16th-century date and each of three cinque-foiled lights in a square head; the middle window on each side is blocked.

The Inner South Aisle with the Strickland Chapel (14 ft. wide) has a modern E. window; above it are the jambs of a taller window now destroyed. The late 15th or early 16th-century S. arcade is of nine bays with two-centred arches of two chamfered orders; the piers are cylindrical with moulded capitals and modern bases; on the second capital is a maiden's head, the Parr badge; there is no E. respond, the arch springing from a corbel carved with three coats-of-arms of Strickland, Neville and Constable, perhaps for the three sons-in-law of Ralph Neville, died 1522; the W. respond has a moulded impost with three blank shields. In the W. wall is a much restored late 15th or early 16th-century window of three cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label.

The Outer South Aisle with the Parr Chapel (19 ft. wide) is of late 15th or early 16th-century date. The E. wall and window are modern. In the S. wall are nine windows all extensively or completely restored; they are of three cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a four-centred head with a moulded label; above the heads of the first three windows are carved maiden's heads for Parr; below the third window is a modern doorway. In the W. wall is a modern doorway.

The West Tower (13 ft. by 15 ft.) is of the 15th century and of four stages and three internal storeys; the bell-chamber may be a later addition and has an embattled parapet and angle pinnacles. The ground stage has octagonal piers, supporting the E. angles, with moulded plinths; the three arches are two-centred and of two orders, the inner hollow-chamfered and the outer chamfered, all springing from the piers. In the W. wall is a modern doorway and a five-light window all modern except the splays and moulded reveals. The second storey had, in each wall, a small window with a pointed head, all now blocked; in the blocked N. window is a small square window and in the W. window is a segmental-headed recess. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, two windows each of two pointed lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label.

The Roofs are all modern, but that over the Bellingham chapel incorporates the original bosses painted and carved with the sacred initials and the shields of (a) Bellingham, (b) Lancaster (?), (c) gules three lions or, (d) Sandford (?), (e) gules five doubtful charges, (f) a cheveron between three doubtful charges, (g) a lion quartering bendy, etc.

Fittings—Bells: ten and sanctus; 9th and 10th both by Thomas Stafford of Penrith, 1631, with inscriptions and royal arms; sanctus, uninscribed. Book: Jewell's answer to Harding, 1569. Brasses: In chancel—(1) to Raulph Tirer B.D., vicar, 1627, inscription only; (2) to Robert Dawson, Bishop of Clonfert and Kilmacduagh, 1643, inscription only. In Bellingham Chapel, on N. wall; (3) of Alan Bellingham, 1577, figure of man in armour, with head on helm, inscription and two shields-of-arms; (4) to Catherine, wife of Christopher Redman, 1688–9, inscription only; (5) to Sir Thomas Braithwaite, 1683, inscription only; on E. wall (6) to Alice (Garthwait), wife of Roger Bateman, 1637, inscription only; (7) to Roger Bateman, 1684, inscription only; (8) to Henry Bateman, 1682–3, inscription only; (9) to George, 1713 and George 1733, sons of Thomas Woodburn, inscription only; (10) to Isabella (Benson), wife of William Curwen, 1674–5, inscription only; (11) to Brian Mackreth, 1712, inscription only; (12) to Thomas Sandford, 1692–3, inscription only; (13) to Edward Fisher, 1676–7, inscription only; (14) to Allan Pricket, 1675, inscription only. In Strickland chapel —(15) to Thomas Strickland, 1678, inscription with incised border on stone. Coffin-lid: In Bellingham chapel (Plate 32)—with moulded edge carved and foliated cross on stepped calvary, shield and sword, late 13th-century. Communion Table: In outer S. aisle— with turned legs and fluted top rail with shaped brackets, early 17th-century. Cross-shaft: In outer S. aisle—fragment of shaft (Plate 6) 19½ in. high and 9½ in. by 7½ in., three faces with ivy-vine scrolls and grapes, naturally rendered, probably mid 8th-century. Font: of black marble (Plate 43), octagonal bowl with concave faces, splayed under side and blank shield on each face, plain stem and splayed base, 15th-century. Glass: In Bellingham chapel—in N.E. window, shield-of-arms of Bellingham quartering Burneshead and impaling Aske (?) with quarterings, early 16th-century. In Strickland chapel—in E. window, head of king, 16th-century. In N.E. clearstorey window—fragments of tabernacle-work, 15th-century, incorporated in modern glass. Monuments and Floor-slab: Monuments: In Bellingham chapel—in N.E. angle, (1) to Sir Roger Bellingham, 1533, and Margaret (Aske) his wife, altar-tomb with marble slab and modern brass, on S. side, two quartered shields-of-arms of Bellingham, tomb restored in 1863; on E. wall, (2) to Thomasin (Bellingham), wife of Sir William Thornborough, 1582, small stone and alabaster tablet with scrolled top and shield-of-arms. In Strickland chapel—in N.E. angle, (3) probably to Sir Walter Strickland, 1528 and Katherine (Neville) his wife, altar-tomb with bluestone slab, on side and end two shields-of-arms, (a) Deincourt quartering Strickland, and (b) the same, two quarters only shown, impaling Neville; (4) of Walter, son of Sir Thomas Strickland, 1656 (Plate 112), low enriched base of freestone with alabaster effigy of boy in a shroud with head on pillow, above it a flat canopy of grey slate resting on freestone Doric columns. In Parr chapel—on N. side, (5) probably to Sir William Parr, K.G., early 16th-century, altar-tomb (Plate 46) of dark limestone or marble with moulded top and base, on W. end a shield-of-arms of Roos quartering Parr and quartering Fitzhugh and Marmion, the shield encircled by the garter, on S. side three shields-of-arms of the individual quarters detailed above. In outer N. aisle—on N. wall, (6) to Michael Stanford, 1682, white marble tablet with moulded frame, scrolls and pediment. In inner N. aisle—on W. wall, (7) to Frances, wife of Jacob Dawson, 1700, inscription painted on canvas in wooden frame. In outer S. aisle—on S. wall, (8) to Jane, daughter of Thomas Bigland, 1712, oval tablet with border, flaming urn and lozenge-of-arms; on N. wall at W. end, (9) to Sir Augustine Nicolls, Justice of the Common Pleas, 1616, slate and alabaster tablet, much broken, with side-pilasters, cornice, broken pediment and achievement-of-arms. Floor-slab: In chancel—on same slab as Brass (2), inscription in black-letter, late 15th or early 16th-century. Scratchings: On piers of inner N. arcade—various masons' marks. Screen: In inner N. aisle at W. end—largely modern but incorporating traceried heads, late 15th or early 16th-century. The W. screen of the Strickland chapel incorporates traceried heads of the same period. Stalls: Incorporated in modern desk, two bench-ends (Plate 60) with elaborate traceried panelling and carved popey-heads— late 15th or early 16th-century. Miscellanea: In outer N. aisle—late 16th or early 17th-century morion and sword with basket-hilt. In churchyard—E. of church, various architectural fragments including capitals, head-corbel, gargoyle and fragment with inscription.

Condition—Good, much restored.

Secular

a(2). Castle Howe (Plate 1), motte and bailey earthwork on the W. of the town, 550 yards N.W. of the church. The work comprises a tongue or spur of the hillside and encloses an area of about 2¾ acres. The motte is about 50 yards in diameter at the base and about 37 ft. in height but rising 47 ft. above the level of the bailey, which lies to the E. of the motte. The whole earthwork has been much altered and damaged by the construction of foot-paths, levelling and other operations and little can now be said as to its original form.

Condition—Poor.

a(3). Kendal Castle (Plate 110), ruins and earthworks, on a hill E. of the town and 600 yards N.E. of the church. The castle occupies the crest of a ridge and is of roughly circular form, the ground forming a flat platform within the walls. The walls are of rubble with some ashlar dressings. It was constructed probably at the close of the 12th century, but none of the masonry appears to be of earlier date than the 13th century. The ruins of the hall-block with the adjoining square tower are probably of the 14th century. The castle fell into ruin in the 16th century, but considerable repairs have been made to the ruins in modern times and much of the curtain is modern work. The castle was entered by a gatehouse, on the N. side, which has now entirely disappeared. The curtain followed the line of the enclosure and has a hall-block and tower towards the N.E. and towers or remains of towers towards the S., W. and N.W. The Hall-block (Plate 111) was apparently of two storeys, and the N. and E. walls are still standing some 30 ft. high. Under the eastern part are two cellars with barrel-vaults of unequal height; projecting from the S. wall are fragments of a small bay perhaps of polygonal form externally. The upper storey has remains of three windows in the N. wall, one of which retains its segmental head; immediately below the westernmost window are remains of a recess perhaps flanking a lower window; still lower in the wall is part of the segmental arch of a large fireplace; the level of this fireplace is difficult to reconcile with the floor-level over the cellars unless the level of the E. part of the hall was much higher than the rest. The E. wall of the hall has two openings, but the walling has been much re-built and altered in modern times. Adjoining the hall on the E. was another room, of which the start of the S. wall can be seen. At the N.E. angle of the hall is a rhomboidal North Tower projecting from the face of the curtain; the tower has two external offsets and a plinth; the main floor has a loop-light in the N.W. and S.E. walls; on the floor above is a fireplace and remains of a window; the inner side of the tower has been much patched and the block of masonry on the S. is pierced by a drain-shaft. There are some remains of the rubble base of the curtain between this and the S. tower, and in one fragment is a recess probably indicating an adjoining building, now destroyed. The South Tower was probably a square structure, but modern repairs have altered the appearance of what little remains; adjoin ing it on the E. are the slight remains of a building of uncertain form. Fragments of the base of the curtain survive between this and the West Tower; this tower is a solid semi-circular projection on the outward face of the curtain. Between it and the N.W. tower are remains of a window embrasure in the curtain. The North-west Tower is cylindrical and formerly of three storeys; the lower has a rough stone vault and is entered by a square-headed doorway with a loop-light beside it. The upper storey is entered by a doorway on the N. from the rampart walk of the curtain; it has a fireplace, window, and, in the thickness of the S. curtain, a spiral staircase leading to the floor above; a garde-robe communicates with this staircase; the top floor has been destroyed. N. of this tower is part of the end wall of a building formerly standing against the curtain and of later date.

Kendal Castle

The Earthworks consist of the nearly circular ditch round the castle and remains of an outwork to the N. covering the gatehouse. The ditch is some 85 ft. wide and has an outer rampart rising at most some 19 ft. above the bottom of the ditch. The ditch is crossed by a fairly modern causeway opposite the side of the gatehouse. N. of the ditch is a small enclosure or barbican with remains of an outer ditch on the W. and part of the N. side.

Condition—Of earthworks, good; of ruins, structurally sound.

a(4). Stramongate Bridge, over the river Kent, ½ m. N. of the church, is of rubble and of four spans with segmental arches. It has been widened on both sides, once in 1794, but the narrow earlier structure survives in the middle and may date from the 17th century.

a(5). Nether Bridge (Plate 113), over the river Kent, 200 yards S. of the church, is of stone and of three spans with segmental arches. It was widened in 1772 and again in 1908, but the earlier work of narrow width survives in the middle of the structure; it is perhaps of the 17th century and is of squared stone.

Condition—Good.

b(6). Collinfield, house, 1,000 yards S.W. of the church, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. The S. part of the house was built early in the 17th century; it was acquired in 1668 by George Sedgwick (Secretary of Anne Countess of Pembroke), who added the N. half of the building. The W. wing was extended in the 18th century. The house retains a late 17th-century stone window lighting the cellar and a second window of the same date with a solid wooden frame. There are several chimney-stacks with cylindrical shafts. The porch has a round-headed outer archway and above it a stone tablet inscribed "Nunc mea mox huius sed postea nescio cujus" with the date and initials 1663 I. and M.G. The battened door has a wooden lock with the initials A.P. (for Anne Countess of Pembroke). Inside the building, some of the ceiling-beams are exposed. The N. room has a panelled partition with an enriched frieze and there is similar panelling over the fireplace-recess; on the window reveals are two plaster fleurs-de-lis; the small cupboard (Plate 36), by the fireplace, has the initials and date G.S. 1674. In the adjoining office is a cupboard fixture (Plate 36), with turned balusters and carved frieze; it bears the initials and date G.S. 1675. The S. room has a modelled plaster panel over the fireplace with a foliage-border, two arches and various enrichments with the date 1674; a small cupboard has a panelled door. The kitchen has a plaster frieze with scrolls of fruit and foliage. On the first floor, at the top of the stairs is a 17th-century balustrade (Plate 57) of flat pierced balusters with a dog-gate of similar balusters. There are some panelled partitions and doors of the same date. The S. room has a plaster cornice and frieze with scrolled foliage and fruit; over the fireplace is a plaster panel with foliage and a shield bearing a scutcheon over a fesse. The room over the kitchen has a plaster panel over the fireplace with two arches and flowers.

Collinfield Kendal

Condition—Good.

b(7). Wattsfield, house, two tenements, ½ m. S. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built in the 17th century, and probably early in the 18th century the N. wing and staircase were added. The two-storeyed porch has a late 17th-century doorway with moulded jambs and square head and a curved pediment above enclosing two wings in low relief; the early 18th-century door is panelled; the inner battened door has strap-hinges. Three transomed windows with solid frames remain; they are probably of early 18th-century date. Inside the building are some exposed ceiling-beams, moulded panelling and doors all of the 17th century. The late 17th-century staircase has turned balusters and a square newel with a ball-terminal. The N. wing has some early 18th-century panelling and a staircase with twisted balusters and square newels with ball-terminals.

Condition—Good.

d(8). Raysholme, house, two tenements, 1½ m. S.E. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built probably in the 17th century but has been refitted in the 18th century. The chimney-shafts are set diagonally. Inside the building are some exposed ceiling-beams and an 18th-century staircase.

Condition—Good.

c(9). Birk Hag, house, nearly 1 m. E.S.E. of the church, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built in the 17th century and has a later extension on the N. Two chimney-stacks have cylindrical shafts. Inside the building some ceiling-beams are exposed and there is a small cupboard with the initials and date I. and E.C. 1666. In the N. wing is an original roof-truss with heavy principals slightly curved at the base.

Condition—Good.

Castle Dairy - Kendal

a(10). Castle Dairy (Plate 114), house and tenement on the N.W. side of Wildman Street, 1,000 yards N.N.E. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. The main structure, with its one-storey hall and cross-wings, appears to be substantially of the 14th century. Alterations were made in the hall early in the 16th century and the house was reconditioned and the hall fireplace inserted by Anthony Garnett c. 1560. There is a small 17th-century wing on the N.W. side and a later extension of the S.W. wing. The house has cross-wings at the N.E. and S.W. ends of the hall-block; the latter is of one storey only and has, on the S.E. front, the original doorway to the screens with hollow-chamfered jambs and two-centred head; it has a 17th-century door with moulded fillets; farther N.E. is an original window of three trefoiled lights in a square head; above it is a shield with the initials and date A.G. 1564. The two main chimney-stacks have stepped offsets. The S.E. ends of the wings have each, on the lower floor, an altered window and on the upper floor an original window of two lights in a square head; the lights are trefoiled in one window and four-centred in the other, this being probably a 16th-century alteration; above the lower window in the S.W. wing is the weathered inscription "Qui vadit plane vadit sane A.G." The back elevation has an original doorway similar to that in front and fitted with a battened door with moulded fillets; farther N.E. is a small rectangular window and a window of two trefoiled lights; in the end of the N.E. wing is an original window of two ogee-headed lights.

Interior. The hall has a flat ceiling with two early 16th-century intersecting and moulded beams; at the N.E. or dais end is an early 16th-century embattled cornice with a ribbed cove above, finishing against a chamfered beam; across the fireplace-recess is a mid 16th-century moulded and panelled beam, resting at one end on a post with the date 1560; above the beam and the adjoining doorway is a panelled partition; by the fireplace is a small cupboard with a linen-fold panel on the door. The former 'screens' are represented by the existing passage and at one end is an oak doorway apparently original but re-set; it has a moulded ogee head with the added inscription "Pax huic domui 1558"; the moulded beam above is of early 16th-century character. In the N.E. wing, the partition on the upper floor has exposed framing and an original king-post roof-truss above; the S.E. room has an early 16th-century elliptical ceiling with moulded ribs dividing it into panels; there are two foliated bosses each with a shield-of-arms (a) Deincourt quartering Strickland and (b) Parr quartering Fitzhugh, Roos and another coat; on the S.W. cornice are carved scrolls and two grotesque monsters. In the same room are some quarries and panels of 16th-century painted glass—(a) the initials and date A.G. 1565, (b and c) eagle and child in a tree, the badge of Stanley, (d and e) the initials and date A.G. 1567 and the mottos "Omnia vanitas" and "Viendra le jour," (f) crowned fleur-de-lis. The S.W. wing retains the three king-post trusses of its original roof. The N.W. wing has exposed ceiling-beams. The extension of the S.W. wing is of late 17th or early 18th-century date. The house contains some movable furniture belonging to the building, including a large bedstead with the initials A.G. and a sideboard with the same initials and date 1562.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (11–67)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. Some of the buildings have exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

a(11). House, three tenements, No. 5 Wildman Street, 20 yards S. of (10), has a wing at the back. In it is a panel of modelled plasterwork with scrolls, birds and the initials and date I. and M.F. 1660.

Kendal, Plan Showing the Position of Monuments

Stramongate S.E. side

a(12). House with shop, two tenements, Nos. 63 and 67, 100 yards S.W. of the bridge, has a small added wing at the back of No. 63.

a(13). House in Yard 59, 35 yards S. of (12).

Condition—Bad.

a(14). House, No. 49, 50 yards S.W. of (12), contains some original doors and panelling.

Condition—Poor.

a(15). House, No. 29, 45 yards S.W. of (14), is of three storeys.

a(16). House, Nos. 25 and 27, immediately S.W. of (15), is partly timber-framed.

a(17). House, No. 17, 10 yards S.W. of (16), is partly timber-framed.

a(18). House, No. 11, 12 yards S.W. of (17), is of two storeys with attics; it is said to have been the town-house of the Bellingham family. The front has a modern panel with the Bellingham arms and date 1546. Inside the building are two fireplaces made up with late 17th-century carved woodwork, including shields bearing three cheverons; there is also a cupboard with a panelled door bearing the inscription "Jacobus II, Galle rex C.B." and a second cupboard with a panelled and carved front.

Condition—Poor.

a(19). House with shop, No. 54, on the E. side of Branthwaite Brow, 10 yards N. of Stramongate, is of three storeys with attics. It contains some original panelling and doors and at the top of the stairs are some thick turned balusters.

a(20). House with shop, immediately N. of (19), was built perhaps early in the 18th century.

a(21). House, two tenements and shops, on the S. side of Market Place and 75 yards E. of Stricklandgate, is of three storeys, partly timber-framed. Inside the building are two early 18th-century fireplaces with moulded stone surrounds, also a staircase with turned balusters and square newels probably of the same period.

a(22). House, two tenements, immediately S. of (21), was built early in the 18th century and is of three storeys. It retains some original windows with solid frames. Inside the building is some 18th-century panelling and an original staircase (Plate 56) with twisted balusters and square newels with pendants.

a(23). Globe Hotel, on the N. side of Market Square, 32 yards E. of Stricklandgate, is of three storeys, partly timber-framed. The upper storeys project on the S. front. The top part of the staircase is original and has turned balusters and moulded handrail.

Stricklandgate, E. side

a(24). House with shops, Nos. 13–19, 25 yards S. of Market Place, is of three storeys, partly timber-framed. The upper storey projects and the main chimney-stack has four diagonal shafts. Inside the building, Nos. 13 and 19 have original staircases with turned balusters and square newels. In No. 13 is a small cupboard with the initials and date G. and M.W. 1688.

a(25). House with shops, Nos. 37 and 39, 35 yards N. of Market Place, is of three storeys, was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century and has two original windows at the back, with solid frames.

a(26). House, No. 69, 60 yards N. of (25), was built perhaps late in the 16th century and is of three storeys with attics. It was altered and added to c. 1700. Inside the building is a circular newel-staircase perhaps original. There is some 17th-century panelling and three early 18th-century fireplaces with moulded surrounds.

a(27). Savoy Café, house, immediately N. of (26), is of three storeys and has an 18th-century wing at the back. One chimney-stack has two diagonal shafts. Inside the building is an early 18th-century staircase with twisted balusters and square moulded and panelled newels. There are also some original and later panelled doors.

a(28). House, No. 91, 50 yards N. of (27), is of three storeys. On the W. front is a panel with a wreath and the initials and date T. and I.M. 1698. The original staircase has turned balusters, turned newels and moulded grip-handrails.

a(29). House, Nos. 97 and 97a, 10 yards S. of Sandes' Avenue, was built perhaps in the 16th century; it has a later extension at the back and a modern front. Inside the building are some early 16th-century moulded ceiling-beams.

a(30). House, Nos. 115 and 117, 12 yards N. of Sandes' Avenue, is partly timber-framed.

W. side

a(31). House, No. 160, 100 yards N. of Maude Street, is of three storeys.

a(32). House, in Yard 110, 12 yards S. of Maude Street, has a segmental projection formerly containing a stair. It retains some original windows with solid frames.

a(33). House, No. 86, at the N. corner of Library Road, is of three storeys and was built probably early in the 18th century. A fireplace is said to have had the initials and date L. and A.D. 1710. A small cupboard has original moulded framing and doors.

a(34). House or wing W. of No. 74 and 30 yards S. of (33).

a(35). House, on the W. side of Elephant Yard, 20 yards S.W. of (34), retains two cylindrical chimneyshafts. The W. wing has two original windows with solid frames. Inside the building is a panelled partition with the initials and date T. and K.S. 1651 on the enriched frieze. There is some more panelling of the same period and some 18th-century doors and a staircase.

a(36). House with shops, No. 38a, 85 yards S. of Library Road, was formerly the White Lion Inn. Inside the building is part of an original plaster cornice and two modelled fleurs-de-lis on the adjoining ceiling. There is also an early 18th-century balustrade.

a(37). House with shop, No. 34a, immediately S. of (36), was formerly the Rose and Crown Inn.

a(38). House, W. of No. 4 and 60 yards S. of (37), was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century. Inside the building is some early 18th-century panelling and doors and over a fireplace in the W. wall is a wooden entablature.

Highgate, W. side

a(39). Fleece Inn, 70 yards N. of Allhallows Lane, is timber-framed and of three storeys. The upper storeys project on the E. front.

a(40). House, No. 18, immediately S. of (39), contains a plaster panel with the remains of foliage and the initials and date I. and F.C. 1654.

a(41). House, No. 28, 12 yards S. of (40), is timber-framed and of two storeys with attics. It contains two original panelled doors.

a(42). House, No. 48, formerly the Queen Catherine Inn, 20 yards S. of Allhallows Lane, contains a large plaster panel (Plate 52) with vases of flowers, conventional ornament and a shield with the initials and date I. and D.D. 1683. A ceiling on the first floor has an original cornice, pine-cone ornaments in the angles and fleurs-de-lis.

a(43). House, No. 70, 60 yards S. of (42).

a(44). Sandes' Hospital, 15 yards S. of (43), was founded by Thomas Sandes in 1670 for eight poor widows. The existing almshouses were built in 1852, but the gatehouse block on the street-front is original and was, indeed, built 11 years before the formal foundation. The front (Plate 21) has a central archway with a round head and above it is a restored panel with the initials and date T. and K.S. 1659 and a shield bearing the arms of the Shearman Dyers Company and Sandes. The upper windows appear to retain their original solid frames on both the front and back of the building. In the entrance-passage is a niche containing an iron alms-box with the initials T.S. and an inscription above "Remember the poore." Inside the building, on the first floor is a plaster panel (Plate 52), with foliage, fleurs-de-lis and the initials and date T. and K.S. 1661 on a shield; there is also part of a frieze with scrolls and some original panelling.

a(45). New Inn with tenement, 35 yards S. of (44), contains a small cupboard with the initials and date I. and A.F. 1658.

a(46). House, No. 116, 70 yards S. of (45), has been re-built, but on the S. face of the W. wing is a tablet with the Vintners' arms and the initials and date W. and A.P. 1677.

a(47). Highgate House Hotel, 15 yards N. of Captain French Lane, is of the 18th century, but the passage has a 17th-century doorway with a chamfered frame and nail-studded door with ornamental strap-hinges.

a(48). Tax Office, 85 yards S. of (47), is of three storeys and was built early in the 18th century. The front door has an original shell-hood on scrolled brackets and the staircase has turned balusters and panelled newels with ball-terminals.

E. side

a(49). House and shops, Nos. 185 and 187, 30 yards S.E. of (48).

a(50). House with shop, Nos. 133 and 137, 125 yards N. of (49), is of three storeys with attics.

a(51). House with shop, No. 121, 30 yards N. of (50), is timber-framed and of three storeys. The upper storeys project on the W. front and there is a projecting gabled bay at the back; in this is an original window with a solid frame. Inside the building is an early 18th-century staircase with turned balusters and square newels.

Condition—Poor.

a(52). House with shops, No. 95, 60 yards N. of (51), was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century and is of three storeys.

a(53). House with shops, Nos. 79 and 81, 330 yards S. of Market Place, has a chimney-stack with two oval shafts. In the E. wing is a beam with the date 1644.

a(54). House, at the S.E. corner of Post Office Yard, has a gabled semi-circular projection containing a staircase.

Condition—Poor.

a(55). House, No. 41, 20 yards S. of Lowther Street, has a modern front. Inside the building is a ceiling with modelled fleurs-de-lis in the angles; there is also an early 18th-century fireplace with a moulded surround and panelled overmantel.

a(56). Angel Hotel, 150 yards S. of Market Place, is of three storeys and was remodelled in the 18th century. The chimney-stacks are original and have each four diagonal shafts.

a(57). House, Nos. 45 and 47, at the corner of Allhallows Lane and Low Fellside, was built probably early in the 18th century.

a(58). House, two tenements, No. 8 on the W. side of Middle Lane, 100 yards N.N.W. of (57).

a(59). House, No. 17, on the N. side of the Syke, 80 yards N.W. of (58), has a gabled segmental projection containing a staircase.

a(60). House, Nos. 52 and 54 on the W. side of Low Fellside, 900 yards N.N.W. of the church, is of two storeys with attics. The back door has an original moulded frame and the gable above has a tablet with the initials and date T. and K.S. 1659, probably re-set. Inside the building, the S. room has a cupboard bearing the initials and date I.F.M. 1667; a second cupboard has a carved panel. The same room has remains of a strapwork frieze dated 1666 and here and elsewhere in the house is some 18th-century panelling.

a(61). House, No. 56, immediately N. of (60), has a restored stone tablet on the front with the initials and date T. and I.F. 1669. Inside the building is a two-stage cupboard of 1715 and a second cupboard with carved panels and the initials and date I. and A.B. 1684. On the first floor is a balustrade with turned balusters and a carved and turned newel with a ball-terminal.

Kirkland, E. side

a(62). Range of houses and shops, Nos. 9–15, 110 yards W.N.W. of the church, is of three storeys. No. 15 is said to have had the date 1668 over a fireplace, but this has now been removed.

W. side

a(63). House, No. 28, opposite (62), is timber-framed and of three storeys. The top storey projects and has three gabled dormers.

a(64). House, No. 32, 10 yards S. of (63), was built probably early in the 18th century. The front door has a semi-circular moulded hood and the upper windows, with solid frames, are probably original. On the first floor is a moulded ceiling-beam.

a(65). House and shops, Nos. 48 and 50, 70 yards S.E. of (64).

a(66). House, two tenements, No. 156, 320 yards S. of the church, contains a small cupboard with the initials and date T. and E.W. 1687.

a(67). Old Grammar School, house, 30 yards N.W. of the church, was originally built c. 1588. The date of the existing building is uncertain; it ceased to be a school in 1888. Inside the building is a little 17th-century panelling.