Henry VIII
March 1537, 6-10

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James Gairdner (editor)

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1890

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'Henry VIII: March 1537, 6-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 12 Part 1: January-May 1537 (1890), pp. 268-281. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=103363 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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March 1537, 6–10

6 March.
R. O.
581. REBELS CONDEMNED AT LINCOLN. (fn. 1)
"The names of such offenders as were condemned at Lincoln to suffer death the 6th day of March and not put to execution."
William Marshall, Roland Barker, Thos. Dyxson, Wm. Gaynesboroy, Robt (fn. 2) . Michel, Thos. Kyngston, Thos. Webster, John Sperlyng, John Parkynson. John Walker, John Baget, Jas. Dawson, Wm. Colynson, Henry Chylde, Robt. Hall, Edward and Thomas Richerdson, John Warde, John Blacke, Thos. Sereaunt, Thos. Northcotes, John Foster, Wm. Dey, Thos. Harre, John Dawson, John Wilson, Robert Kell, Thos. Brumpton, Robert Hornclyff, Wm. Toynton, John Fletcher, Wm. Langley, Leonard Bawdre, Wm. Hudson, Hugh Sleforde, Thomas Smyth, Hugh Aleyn, John Kyngston, John Herryson, John Holton, Thos. Yarburgh, James Willumson, Wm. Worthy, Edm. Wynter, John Stele, Henry Forman, John Stoker, John Smythson, John Tacy, Wm. Tayllor, John Shene, Thos. Smyth, Robt. Baldyng, John Grene, John Tayllor, Edm. Walkyngton, Robt. Hyrdman, John Tayllor, John Smyth, John Harryson, John Yardeburgh, Wm. Marshall, Anthony Curtesse.
ii. "The names of such offenders as were condemned at Lincoln to suffer death the 6th day of March."
Wm Smyth, Thos. Nobyll, John Leeke, and Robert Hudson, of Louth; Wm. Herryson, Wm. Nycson, and Ric. Phelipson, of Alforde; Robt. Cotnam, of Spillesby, Wm. Parsons of Caster, Guy Keym, John Fysher of Scartho, priest, John Lyon of Byscarthorpe, priest, Thos. Manby of Louth, Wm. Smyth of Donyngton, priest, Thos. Yolle of Louth, priest, Wm. Holton vicar of Cokryngton, Ralph Grey, priest, James Wylson of Alforde; Thos. Bradley, Ric. Waryn, Wm. Holme, and Jas. Hodgeson, monks of Barlyngs; John Tenaunte, Wm. Coy, John Frances, Wm. Cowper, Ric. Phelip, and Hugh Londysdale, monks of Bardeney; Richard Herryson abbot of Kyrkstede; Reynold Wade, Wm. Swale, and Henry Jenkynson, monks of Kirkstede; Thos. Moigne, John Wade of Boston.
Two columns of names. Endd. by Wriothesley.
R. O.582. KIRKSTEAD.
"An inventory of a brewhouse called the Bell at St. Bartholomew's Gate belonging to the abbot of Kyrkested."
P. 1.
6 March.
R. O.
583. HENRY LORD STAFFORD to CROMWELL.
The bearer John ap Holl (Powell) has been with me for an answer to your letter sent me at Michaelmas last. After my last being with your Lordship, two days after coming home, I had word from my lord Steward to be at Nottingham to serve the King against the rebellious. Wherefore I desired John ap Holl to show your letter to the tenants and all who would meddle with receiving the money. On coming home, I heard one Middleton had received much of the money, and wrote him this letter enclosed. Examined before me and Powell, he denies receipt of any money. In November last I sent to my cousins, Bourchiers, by their servant the copy of your Lordship's last letter advising them to take heed of the King's displeasure. At my poor house beside Stafford, 6 March. Signed: He. Stafford.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd. wrongly: Tho. Stafford.
R. O.584. 2. HENRY LORD STAFFORD to WILLIAM MIDDILTON.
Commands Middleton, in the King's name, to keep the money received for the half year's rent of Doxsey, Hawghton and Offeley till the King's further pleasure. Has commission from lord Crumwell, [lord] Privy Seal, for this. Stafford Castle ... Nov. Signed: He. Stafford.
P. 1., mutilated. Add.: William Middilton [at H]awghton. Endd. wrongly: Thomas Stafford.
6 March.
R. O.
585. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Received his letter by Stafford. Expects daily the performance of my lord Privy Seal's promise. It was never his intention to give Wingfield any of your horses, but keep them for his own stable. Geo. Rolles is gone into Devonshire. He will look to the hunting of the park at Humber-leyght and be your attorney in the Common Pleas. Will procure succat, marmalade and torches. It is thought the Scotch King will gladly pass this way homewards. Hopes soon to send news from Popley by Wm. Leke. London, 6 March.
Hol., p. 1. Sealed. Add.
6 March.
R. O.
586. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
I have received your sundry letters with the 20s. and token to my lady of Sussex, which I have delivered, the 20s. to one Powes, yeoman usher of the Queen's chamber, and the ring to my lady Sussex, with whom I have been in hand for the bed of estate. Mr. Coffin thanks my Lord and you for the hawk. My lady Sussex dare not meddle with Mrs. Catherine, as she has kinswomen come out of Devonshire. The marriage of Mrs. Ashley and Peter Mewtas is as yet uncertain, for it depends on the King's goodness for their living. Meanwhile Mr. Coffin would have her here, because she might stand in the election at the next avoidance. He thinks if labour were made to the marchioness of Exeter she might be sped there. I have taken of Christopher Campion 10½ yds. damask black, 3 yds. black velvet, 2¼ yds. white satin, which is in hand for your ladyship's night gown and waistcoat. Your bonnets of ermines are not yet ready. They will cost 26s. 6d. The cradle will be ready at the end of this week. George Rolles has ridden into Devonshire with your ladyship's letters. Mr. Basset lacks money. There is a barrel of puffins come for Mr. Marshal which Geo. Rolle delivered me. I have put it in Thomson's ship. God make you a glad mother. London, 6 March.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.
R. O.2. Receipt by John Husee to Chr. Campyon of London, mercer, for the above parcels of velvet, satin, &c., for the use of lady Lisle, amounting to 6l. 3s. 9d. to be paid on the 6 Oct. next. 3 March 1536.
Hol., p. 1.
6 March.
R. O.
587. JACQUES DE COUCY [Sieur de Vervins] to the DEPUTY OF CALAIS.
I have written to you in behalf of the fellows of the garrison of Cresecques, taken within your pale and carried prisoners to Turnehen, that you might procure their liberation without ransom, as I have always done in like case towards you. I send the bearers who are of the number of the said prisoners, requesting that you will let me know your intention by them, and send back the compaignons whom you keep prisoners. Boulogne, 6 March.
I understand that the captain of Tournehen is prepared to send you the said compaignons. If you move in the matter, you can get it as easily as in the case of the Burgundians, whom you have sent back. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
7 March.
Vesp. F. XIII. 110 b. B. M.
588. HENRY [LORD] FYTZWAUTER to [CROMWELL?].
Sends his lordship two paper books concerning a "busynes" between the bishop of Norwich and Robert Watson. The parties argued the matter in Christchurch. Norwich, on the 6th inst. before lord Fitzwauter, Sir John Heydon, Sir Wm. Paston, Sir John Shelton, Sir Hugh Hastyngs, Master Wyndham, Master John Clere, Mr. Robsart, Mr. Wotton and others. Bound Watson to appear at the next assizes at Thetford. He has declared that his intention is not seditious. Norwich, 7 March. Signed.
P. 1.
Cleop. E. v. 378. B. M.2. Statement in reference to the above.
"I came to Robert Watson the Tuesday in the first week in Lent, which was the next day after he had reasoned with the bishop of Norwich, and I demanded of him what his opinion was, and he showed me it was this.
"A natural man destitute of the spirit of God, cannot receive the grace of God when it is offered by the Gospel."
Signed: Henry Fitzwauter.
7 March.
R. O.
589. WILLIAM LORD SANDYS to CROMWELL.
Is sorry to be always driven to trouble his Lordship about his offices at Guisnes, in which Cromwell promised that nothing should pass to his prejudice. Encloses a letter he has received from his deputy there, directed under the privy seal, by which he is discharged of all manner of huntings in Guisnes Forest and assigned "to have a certain wood by delivery" which was never seen in his time or any man's before. If he may not hunt he keeps a kennel of hounds of custom for the profit of the country "todefend the fox and wolves," and if he may not have sufficient wood it may endanger the castle. His deputy has committed to ward one Pirot an unthrifty person at Guisnes for opprobrious words, and sent him depositions thereof (enclosed). Begs Cromwell's favour for the bearer, a poor man borne in Arde, who has served with the King's officers of Guisnes for 72 years. If this order of the woods is to stand, must give up his brewhouse for lack of fuel. The Vine, 7 March.
Begs the bearer may be quickly despatched as he is one of the head officers of the castle. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
R. O.2. Examinations of witnesses before Master John Sands deputy of Guisnes Castle, Thomas Lawrence constable of the same, John Bradfeld, John Corson, Wm. Alen, and Barnard Crete, soldiers of the retinue of the said Castle, taken 21 Feb., 1536, concerning "tedious and unsitting words," spoken by Perot de Latur, of Guisnes, tailor.
i. Maurice Barell deposes that about three weeks past, as he and others were drinking at the house of Wm. Morgan at Guisnes, the said Perot and Robert Guisnes were fighting and pulling each other by the hairs of the head when Morgan and others parted them and charged Perot to keep the peace in the King's name, when he answered "A turde for the King."
ii. Davy Ballen, William Tewer, Adrian Mewse, Garert Porter, Wm. Dowse alias Cowpar, Chas. Marche, Peter Rasyne, Jehan Trevet, Reignalt Fraunce, and Palme de Haye, confirm this in part or in whole.
Pp. 3.
7 March.
R. O.
590. SIR WILLIAM PARRE to HENRY VIII.
Immediately upon receipt of the King's commission for an oyer and terminer at Lincoln, went thither, and soon after there arrived Sir Walter Luke, Sergeant Hinde, Wm. Horwood, the King's Solicitor, lord Clynton, lord Burgh, Sir John Vyllers, Sir John Markham, Sir Wm. Newnham, John Harrington, and Thos. Nevell, the King's commissioners. Yesterday, March 6, the abbot of Kirkstede, Thos. Moigne, Guy Keym and others to the number of 34 were condemned as traitors, and ordered to execution in such places as the King appointed. Moigne, for three hours, held plea with such subtle allegations, that if sergeant Hinde and the Solicitor had not acquitted themselves like true servants to the King and profound learned men, "he had troubled and in a manner evict all the rest." Was present to-day at the execution of the abbot, Moigne, and Keym. Tomorrow the others will be conveyed to other places for execution. Will himself be present at the executions at Louthe and Horncastle to-morrow and on Friday. Nepho of Horncastle mentioned in the schedule signed by the King and sent hither, is still in the Tower and Wm. Wodmansey is either in prison in Yorkshire or the duke of Norfolk has caused him to suffer death. The commissioners, the other gentlemen of the shire and the sheriff ask for pardon for the other prisoners. Lincoln, Wednesday, 7 March, 7 p.m. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.: Endd.
7 March.
R. O.
591. SIR WM. PARRE to CROMWELL.
On Monday last he and the other commissioners began to sit for the finding of the chief offenders in the late insurrection. Yesterday the abbot of Kirkstede, Thos. Moigne, Guy Keym, and others to the number of 34, were arraigned. Their names are enclosed. They were all condemned of high treason and to-day the Abbot, Moign, and Keym, were executed here at Lincoln. The others will be conveyed to-morrow to other towns to be executed. Yesterday afternoon and this morning [were condemned] all the the rest of the prisoners which were bailed except Robt. Carre, and Leonard Bawtrey, for whose discharge he received letters from Cromwell, and one Wodmansey who is reported either to be hanged by the duke of Norfolk, or else in prison in Yorkshire. Their names are also enclosed. Keeps them in strait ward till he hears from Cromwell. All the commissioners and gentlemen of the shire beg for pardon for them. Thinks the shire is in good quietness and sorry for their lewd demeanor. Commends the sheriff, whose expenses, with 100 persons daily, ought to be somewhat satisfied.
Asks if he is to compensate Wolsey's wife, whose husband was murdered and whose goods were spoiled during the insurrection, out of the goods come to the King's hand by this attainder. To-day saw the abbot and others executed and will go to morrow to Horncastell, Louthe, and other places.
Antony Curtesse is indicted but not arraigned, because it is thought he is within the compass of the pardon, and would plead it. Keeps him till further instructions. Lincoln, 7 March in the afternoon.
Asks him to be good lord to John Hertwell the bearer. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add: Lord Privy Seal. Sealed.
R. O.592. THOMAS MOIGNE.
In Augm. Misc. Book 409 M. are contained various papers relating to the Moigne family; among others, at ff. 32, 33:—
Extract from the will of Alex. Moigne late of Sixhill, Linc., 4 May 1528, containing a disposition of lands in favor of his son Thomas and the heirs male of his body.
Memorandum of a decree given by the surveyors general of the Crown lands, in the Prince's Chamber at Westminster, 8 March, 29 Hen. VIII., on proof of the authenticity of a deed of Thos. Moigne in favor of Anne, wife of his brother Simon Moigne.
7 March.
R. O.
593. JOHN MOUNSON to CROMWELL.
One Thomas Brumpton of Burton next Lincoln, husbandman, is attainted by his own confession, amongst other rebellious, at this last assize. He was the most misordered person in the parts where I dwell and most complained of by his neighbours, whom he threatened to hang at their own doors, and compelled them to aid the rebellious, to come to him when he caused the common bell to be rung, and to wait on him 5 or 6 days to the muster of the said rebellious. Great pity it is that he should have his pardon. 7 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Elmely.
7 March.
R. O.
594. NORFOLK to the COUNCIL.
Has forborne to make [answer to their] letter of the 25 Feb., "bycause that [I looked] to have sent the same by my c[ousin] Sir Anthony [Browne whose] abode here so long hath be [by o]ccasion of the kill[ing most] shamefully of Roger Fenw[yke kee]per of Tyndale ... persones o[f] that country; th[e cir]cumstance whereof an ... be done hereunto unto th ... me, and also what is d[one] for the punishment of t[he] same I shall refer unt[o the] report of [the] said Sir Ant[hony], who being present at all ... can much [bet]ter declare the same the[n I can] write ..." Gives his opinion (much mutilated) that a mean person should not have the wardenship of the West Marches, and that to keep the wild people of all three marches in order will require men of good estimation and nobility. This opinion is shared by every man of wit[here], as no doubt Sir Anthony will report to the King. "As to your letter concerning Sir Robert Constable [I shall accom]plesshe theffecte thereof; notwithstanding that su[pposing he would] steal away, as I cannot think he will, he, bey[ng at] Flaynborowe, his own town, may ship there [and Mr.] Ever not know thereof unto he be departed. I do n[ow send] by Rudstone Doctor Towneley, against whom I can [find nothing] sith the pardon, nor of no great effect before. I hu ... him in no such matter, the said Rudstone sh ... him the vicar of Burgh, (fn. 3) aga[in]st whom my [lord of [Cumber]londe hath advertised me he can find no mat[ter since the time] of the pardon other than praying [fo]r the bishop [of Rome on]ly. Before he was of all other one of the wors[t]. My Lords, having now suppressed all the religio[us houses within] my commission, there do remain about 300 persons [who desire to] have capacities. And I have none to grant unto the[m such] as my lord [of] Duresme [and] Mr. Thirleby say can ... were sent ... Also [as y]et I hear of no new commissi[on] sent ... for the subsidy. Furthermore, surely all ... people [that w]ere busy si[nce th]e pardon be in marvellous [dread] and half in despair, because that of late I have caused my lord of Westmoreland to take divers, who hath so frankly served his [High]ness therein that I think it were well done he had letters of thanks for the same." All the Council here think that I should have proclamations of pardon like those sent to Lincolnshire, with a schedule attached to be filled in by me and the Council with the names of such as shall be excepted, for it is not good to keep so many men long in desperation. We thought we had the inhabitants of Tynedale in very good stay, but on Saturday last at midnight when the foresaid k[eeper] was returned from hence to have received their pledges the three murderers of old propensed malice did most cruelly murder him; which murder I hope they shall have cause to repent.
Tomorrow night I will be at Durham, and Friday and Saturday sit in execution; and on Sunday return hither to finish the order to be taken with Tynedale. That done I trust to return to York and there sit upon execution before Palm Sunday, and in Easter week return hither to see if all be performed and hear many poor men's causes. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 7 March. Signed.
Pp. 2. Much mutilated. Add. Endd.
R. O.595. THE GOVERNMENT OF THE NORTH.
"A remembrance for order and good rule to be had and kept in the North Parts."
1. That a nobleman of the King's Council be lieutenant there with a discreet Council commissioned to hear all causes in Cumberland, Westmoreland, Northumberland, the bpric. of Durham, and Yorkshire, and that he for the most part abide in those parts. 2. That the lords and gentlemen be ordered to be ready at his commandment to levy people at need and execute justice. 3. That the said lieutenant be chief warden of all the marches against Scotland, the others to be deputy wardens. 4. That whereas the country, of Riddesdale of the inheritance of lord Talboys, is wholly inhabited by thieves and has always been used as a lord marcher's liberty and is not guildable, and whereas the castle of Harbottle, in which the keeper of that country should dwell, is in such ruin that the said officer can neither dwell there nor keep his prisoners, the King should take the country into his own hands, giving Talboys compensation, and repair the said castle of Harbottle, supplying it with artillery, or else compel Talboys to keep it up. 5. A mutilated article about the country of T[ynedale], recommending some fortress to be made there, or else that the castle of Symonborne, of the inheritance of Heron of Ford, be sufficiently repaired and put in the keeping of the bailiff of Tynedale. 6. That some true and hardy gentleman should have the keeping of Tynedale, with the rule of Hexhamshire, Corbrigge, and the barony of Langley, and all the gentlemen dwelling on the water of South Tyne be commanded to take part with him against thieves and Scotch invasions. 7. That all the earl of Northumberland's castles and lands be taken into the King's hands, and the tenants be put in comfort; that no more shall be exacted with gyrsoms or like charges, instead of which they shall be ready with horse and harness when required; for the reason the earls of Northumberland have been so powerful to serve their princes was only that their castles were strongholds and a good number of men dwelt upon them. 8. Whoever shall be warden of the West marches, Dacre must be ordered to keep his tenants of Gillesland, &c., in good rule, and that they be ready on days of truce to wait on the King's officers. 9. The lieutenant should be two or three times in the year at Newcastle to order justice in Nthld., and hear complaints of murders, felonies, and debts. The wardens have no authority to meddle in any causes, except attemptates by Scots or Englishmen. 10. The fees now newly given in Nthld. will do no good, and the money would be better devoted to rewards for good service or repair of fortresses. 11. Some reform is necessary of the laws of the marches, which are uncertain, and there are no books of them.
Pp. 4. Mutilated.
7 March.
R. O.
596. SIR ANTHONY BROWNE to CROMWELL.
Whereas I lately wrote that the countries of Riddesdale and Tyndale were brought to good conformity, that same day Roger Fenwyke, keeper of Tyndale, sent to receive the pledges of that country at Bellingham, was murdered, for old grudges, by three naughty persons. Not knowing whether Norfolk would have made invasion against them, has continued here longer than he intended. To-day certain persons of Tyndale of good estimation have taken such order that he trusts pledges shall be delivered forthwith for the whole inhabitants, except those guilty of this slaughter. To-morrow or next day I will come towards you. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 7 March, 4 p.m. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
7 March.
R. O.
597. W. [BARLOW], Bishop of St. David's, to CROMWELL.
Sent his servant to Cromwell with the confessions of certain pirates, but Mr. Ric. Devoroux, deputy justice, has stayed him in Carmarthenshire. Fears the King's advantage may be hindered and occasion be given to some of the parties in England to avoid. Last night also Devoroux "with brags and hault words" in the Bp.'s own house, presumed to interfere with the liberties granted him by the King, contrary to Cromwell's recent direction. Asks to be exempted from this tyranny that he and his officers may execute justice without interruption. St. David's, 7 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
7 March.
R. O.
598. [MADAME DE BOURS] to LORD LISLE.
I thank you for the fine horse you have sent to my son. I wish he were happy enough to do you some service. If he had been here he would have thanked you himself. I am bound to you for the pains you have taken in directing my man to bring the horses. My nephew, de Riencourt, sends back his man to you. Please help him to obtain the horse of which he has made a report to his master, and have him conducted by one of your men to Boulogne. Your daughter (fn. 4) sends her respects. Abbeville, 7 March. Not Signed.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.
7 March.
R. O.
599. ANNE ROUAUD [MADAME DE BOURS] to LADY LISLE.
I thank you for the trouble you have taken in getting horses for me, and likewise for the fine horse my lord has sent to my son. I have not merited all your kindnesses. I have written to my said lord to get the horse of which you wrote to me for my nephew de Riencourt, who is sending his man. Jehan Semy has left this night to go to court. At his return I will write more at length. I was very glad to know from the letters (fn. 5) : I shall not cease to pray God that you may be delivered of your child. Your daughter will do her duty. I am taking her to see Madame de Warlop, who has passed by this town, whom I find a very honest woman. Tell me if the clock you wanted was such as was sent. Madame de Riou and I have received the herring and salmon, and the sprats (?) (espero), for which we thank you. I have sent the sprats as you desired to the bishop [of Winchester], who is now at Amiens. Abbeville, 7 March.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.
7 March.
R. O.
600. G. LOVEDAYE to LORD LISLE.
Desires to be recommended to lady Lisle. Tomorrow the Scotch king and queen take leave of the King, and will go to Roon, and thence to take shipping homeward. The king of Navarre and the Admiral will accompany the King to Roon, and the queen of Navarre with other ladies will accompany the Queen thither by water. The French king will leave here about Sunday, but it is said he will despatch the Turkish ambassador before he goes. This ambassador is a rude personage and all his men. They are lodged in the fairest lodging of the town. It is not known whether the King will go to Amiens or Peron. He sent the Great Master to Noyon to take musters of the band of the Countye Guilliam, which were said to be 9,000, but are only 5,000. Has no other news but what the bearer can tell. Has been promised a despatch every day, but he lives in hope and takes penances, "for I lack meat and lodging many times, that I have killed a suitor in these parts." Compiegne, 7 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
Otho E. IX. 36. B. M.601. SIR JOHN DUDLEY, Vice-Admiral.
[Instructions to Sir John Dudley], knight "wh[om the King's Grace [appointeth his] Vice-Admi[ral and sendeth to the] seas for the ..."
"Forasmuch as in the time of the late ... the Emperor and the French king which do y[et] ... continue in such terms as the end is uncertain ... [his] Highness' subjects using their traffic and ent ... parties have been both by the French and [the Flemings] on every side spoiled and robbed," and sundry [other] acts done against his Grace by either side, in violation of his neutrality, the King has sent the said [Sir John] Dudley with four ships, armed and equipped, trusting that he will so use himself that his Highness may have cause to put him in further authority. He shall address himself to the s[ea] with diligence and keep his course during the time he shall be upon the [sea] between the Downs and Poole, "the limits whereof he shall not exceed unless it shall be in a chace" for defence or recovery of some spoil, or if he find the French or Flemings on other parts of the coast molesting the King's subjects. He must preserve discipline among the young men and not allow attemptates for covetousness, or any breach of treaties. He shall endeavour to prevent unlawful taking of prizes, and do his best to compel restitution or apprehend offenders, taking the ship to one of the King's ports till he know further the King's pleasure, and having an inventory of all things in her signed by the captain and master, and setting the prize at liberty. He must, however, use foresight and avoid danger, not to cast himself into the hands of enemies. And whereas a ship, of which the captain calls himself the Admiral of Flanders "did [lately take a] French ship laden with brasell ou[t of our port] at Hampton," if Dudley shall meet with him he shall do his best to take him before he go through with the enterprise; and if he can he shall bestow the ship in safety and inform his Majesty.
Fair copy, pp. 3. Mutilated.
8 March.
R. O.
602. SIR JOHN DUDLEY and SIR T. SEYMOUR to HENRY VIII.
Your ships are between the Isle of Wight and Porchemouth. In all the time of our being forth we have seen no men of war from the Thames to the said Isle, either Fleming or Frenchman. But we heard at Rye and elsewhere of spoils done by both. Finding the coasts clear we hastened to the Isle, where we heard there was an argosy laden with Englishmen's goods in danger of being carried off by the French, but they had released their hold of her before our coming. It is said they left her on receipt of a letter from the French ambassador, but they took all the ready money in her and 40 butts of malmsey. Probably the French and Flemings had heard of your ships preparing to the seas, for they keep not their accustomed places. We trust if they come abroad again to make your neutrality respected. Portsmouth, 8 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
8 March.
R. O.
603. SIR JOHN DUDLEY to CROMWELL.
Since my being here upon the seas I have seen nothing worth mentioning except what I have informed the King of, but I feel bound to write to you, remembering the great benefits I have received from you. Portsmouth, 8 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
8 March.
R. O.
604. SIR JOHN DUDLEY to WRIOTHESLEY.
Wishes he could recompense Wriothesley's manifold kindness. Desires to be commended to Mr. Richard [Cromwell]. Since being on the seas has seen nothing to write of. Portsmouth, 8 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
8 March.
R. O.
605. RIC. COLE to CROMWELL.
According to Cromwell's command for him to keep the courts of his old master Sir Wm. Courtenay, deceased, he demanded the books and court rolls from Roger Gyffard. Gyffard refused to give them up without further orders from Cromwell, and though "at these assizes at Exeter," Mr. Ric. Pollard advised him to do so he still continues to refuse. Desires Cromwell to send his further command to Gyffard. Exeter, 8 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
8 March.
R. O.
606. DR. JOHN LONDON to CROMWELL.
I never made such a grant of the farm of Ratcliff to Yong, late farmer there, as is related to your Lordship. It is against the widow's mind that such suit should be made in her name. Immediately after Yong died, I granted, to Mr. Knyzt, (fn. 6) my consent in that farm, chiefly because you were pleased to make him your servant, and he was honest and well learned. Now your Lordship writes for the widow, and Sir John Russel likewise, because a servant of his trusteth to marry with her. If your Lordship and Sir John can induce Mr. Knyzt to release me from my promise I will do what I can. I beg your favour for Mr. Knyzt that, leaving this farm, he may have some recompense. Oxon, 8o. Marcij.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Sealed. Endd.
8 March.
R. O.
607. DR. JOHN LONDON to SIR JOHN RUSSELL.
I am sorry you be persuaded I have promised a lease of the farm of Ratcliff to Yong's wife. I thought Young a suitable man to be my college farmer, but that if he died within the years she might marry again, so I would not grant a joint lease. After Young's death Mr. Knyght, household servant of my lord of the Privy Seal, desired the farm and brought me sundry letters for the same; so I granted it on condition he would allow the widow to continue there during her widowhood. It was affirmed before your servant, and Duncombe also, that she never intended marrying Duncombe; but, supposing she did, I doubt not but Duncombe could get Mr. Knyght's favour by a reasonable recompense at my Lord's instance and yours. Oxon, 8 March.
After writing the above, one of the bursars of my college brought me word from the widow that she was sorry to hear I was troubled with suits for her, for she never intended to marry. Within these 10 days four sundry persous have been with me pretending to have the widow's good will. Notwithstanding this, if your man can get Mr. Knyght's good will and the widow's, I am ready to do you pleasure.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Sir John Russell, Controller of the King's Grace's House. Endd.
8 March.
R. O.
608. SIR WM. PARRE to CROMWELL.
Sir Wm. Tirwhit, sheriff, wishes to have the goods come to the King by Guy Keym's attainder, in recompense of part of his expenses. Asks Cromwell to be a mean to the King that he may have them. Lincoln, 8 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd. wrongly: William Jerrard.
8 March.
R. O.
609. NORFOLK to CROMWELL.
Sends to the King, by Rudstone, the bearer, Dr. Townley and the [vic]ar of Burgh, and will send Dr. Pykeryng [as] soon as he can cause him to [be t]aken. On Friday and Saturday he will sit upon [j]ustice of rebels at Durham. 20 or 24 are taken there, but he does not know how many he will have matter a[gainst]; none sha[ll] escape against whom g[ood] evidence may be gotten. Thence he must return to Newcastle fo[r the qu]ytting of these wild parts, and "thence s[hall go to] York," where he will have m[a]tter against ..., besides those let to bail [by] Sir Ralph [Ell]ercar. Wishes to know by post how many the King would have executed, for he intends to begin at York about Tuesday come sevennight, or Wednesday at latest. Folks think the last justice at Carlisle great, and if more than 20 suff[er] at Durham and York it will be talked about. The earl of Northumberland has sent [do]wn to sell as mo[che] wood in Yorkshire "as may." If the King would have them staid, it must be done with [dil]igence. "As good to [pull] down the houses as destroy the woods." Begs favour for Rudstone, one of the wisest of those parts. Has delivered him 20 nobles for his costs to London. Newcastle, 8 March.
Hol., p. 1. Mutilated. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Sealed. Endd.
8 March.
R. O.
610. WILL. BREMELCUM to LADY LISLE.
My master (fn. 7) thanks you for his brooch, a doz. of ribbon points, and a purse of crimson satin, with a crown of 5s. in it. I thank you for the hose cloth you sent me, and am more bound to you than ever, for now I cost you about 18d. a week for my commons, and my master 2s. 4d., and 16d. a quarter for his chamber; but I trust it will be to your honor and his worship, for he applies his learning diligently; also 20d. a quarter to his laundress, who washes well, and mends his shirts when needful. Lincoln's Inn, 8 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
8 March.
R. O.
611. MAYOR and JURATES of WINCHELSEA to LORD LISLE.
On the 7th March we received your letters by Calais pursuivant, dated at Calais on the 2nd, desiring us to stop a ship of Boulogne, taken by a Fleming, which was laden with merchants' goods of Calais. The said ship arrived at Winchelsea on the 2nd, and we stayed it at the request of one Reynold, who calls himself your servant. Winchelsea, 8 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
8 March.
R. O.
612. JOHN HUTTON to LORD LISLE.
On 3rd March one Oliver of Boulogne boarded a ship of Hull named the Mary Fortune, commanded by John Browne, demanding if he had any Flemings on board In the search Oswald Edwyn and John Langley were cruelly handled. On the pretence that the cargo was Flemish, goods and cloth were taken out of the ship. Begs he will send to Monser Dew Beis (Du Bies), to have the matter examined. Complains of the spoliation that goes on. Barough, 8 March.
If no redress can be had at Boulogne, begs he will write to the English ambassador now at the French Court.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.
8 March.
Harl. MS. 6989, f. 73. B. M.
613. SEBASTIAN MUNSTER to HENRY VIII.
Dedicates to him the Gospel according to Matthew in the original Hebrew, which is now being published (jam in lucem producitur). Praises him for having driven out the Roman tyranny. Basle, 8 March 1537. Signs as public professor of Hebrew at Basle.
Hol. Lat., p. 1. Add. Endd.
9 March.
R. O.
614. EARL OF CUMBERLAND to HENRY VIII.
Has received his letters and credence from the King's servant and councillor [Sir Anthony Brow]one, knt. one of the gentle[men of the Priv]ey Chamber.
Will be agreeable to the King's pleasure with his whole heart and mind. Skypt[on] Castle, 9 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: To the [King's highness]. Endd.
9 March.
R. O.
615. DUKE OF NORFOLK and Others to HENRY VIII.
While sitting on the indictment of divers offenders here, perceived that the bishopric of Durham is not contained in the commission. Were driven to the extremity of our simple wits; but considering that the country was assembled to pass this day upon the indictments, and tomorrow on the arraignments, we charged the inquest, keeping secret our lack of authority. Norfolk intended to have proceeded the next day by law martial, taking the indictments but as evidence, but they cannot find authority to do so, as the offenders were committed before his commission. Sends up Mr. Thirleby to show the truth. Asks pardon for not perusing his commission more circumspectly. Pexsall, Croke, and such officers will cause him hereafter to have his commissions examined by counsel. Persons who would have suffered for their offences will have respite until after Low Sunday. Durham, 9 March, 7 p.m. Signed: T. Norfolk—Rauff Westmorland—Cutbert Duresme—Wyllm. Eure—T. Tempest—M. Constable—Robert Bowes—Thomas Thyrleby—Richard Coren—Jo. Uvedale.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.
9 March.
R. O.
616. NORFOLK to CROMWELL.
Has received a letter by his servant Mondy, showing Cromwell's favourable reports of his proceedings, for which he cannot sufficiently thank him. Nothing has troubled him more since he came to these parts than the lack of the words in his commission. Wishes Peks[a]ll and Croke for their negligence had five or six days as ill journeys as he has had within this month. There have been this day indicted, though to no purpose, quia coram non judice, 13 persons who he thinks would have been cast tomorrow, but quod differtur non [au]fertur. Will go tomorrow again to Newcastle to settle the affairs of Northumberland, after which he will go to Hull and Beverley, and so to York, and [there] sit upon oyer determiner upon Thursday before Palm Sunday. Desires to know the King's pleasure at Hull on Sunday come se'nnight, how many of the prisoners bailed by Sir Ralph Ellerker he shall take to York to be arraigned there. Durham, 9 March.
Hol., mutilated and injured by damp; p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Sealed.
9 March.
R. O.
617. NORFOLK to WILLIAM TOMSON and HENRY SMYTHE.
Forbids them, in the King's name, to meddle with certain woods of my lord of Northumberland, which it is said they have come into the country to sell. Durham, 9 March. Signed.
Headed: By the duke of Norfolk, the King's lieutenant in the North parts.
P. 1. Add.: To, &c. William Tomson and Henry Smythe, servants to my lord of Northumberland; with an injunction to the bailiff of Topcliff to forward this. Endd. Sealed.
9 March.
R. O.
618. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
Your nightgown and waistcoat are ready to be put to the skinner's. I trust they and the bonnets will be ready by Tuesday next. I must wait for the most part of my lady Sussex's stuff till the lady Beauchamp be churched, when I hope to speed of the bed of estate and also of some carpets. I am told Goodall has sped at Canterbury of hangings, so we shall not need to trouble Mr. Kingston. I am glad they die no more about Lincoln's Inn. A chest must be bought to put this stuff in. Jesu make you a glad mother. London, 9 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: At Calais.
9 March.
R. O.
619. JENNE DE SAVEUZES (Madame de Riou) to LADY LISLE.
Your daughter (fn. 8) makes good cheer. I send you 12 crowns delivered to me by the bearer to procure a taffeta robe, a mantle and other things necessary for her. I will, as you desire, get things made for her, and send you a note of the cost. He said also you were afraid to leave her longer than the time you intended when you sent her. I beg you not to think so on my account, for nothing can give me greater pleasure, and I shall be very sorry when she returns. Pont de Remy, 9 March. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
10 March.
R. O.
620. CLEMENT ABBOT OF EVESHAM to CROMWELL.
I have received your letter in favour of Mr. Knyghtley, serjeant-at-law, and perceive by Mr. Combes that you impute much slackness to me in the matter of our cell of Allyncestre, wherein I performed my promise made to Mr. Richard Cromwell, when he was last at Evesham. I send, however, certain evidences concerning the cell by our prior, who can declare my whole mind. Evesham, 10 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Cromwell lord Privy Seal. Endd.
R. O.621. THE MONKS OF WHALLEY.
Examinations of the monks of Whalley t[ouching] the plate.
The prior says they had a cross of gold which he thinks the abbot sold two years ago to pay the debts of the house; there was also a gold chalice within this twelvemonth. Ric. Crumback, servant of the house, coming homewards from London about a twelvemonth past, met Sir Randulf Lynney, vicar of Blakeborn, at Dunstable, and returned with him to London, where he tried to sell a chalice of gold to Mr. Mundey, but could not agree for a price. Thinks it was afterwards sold in London. At that time they also sold about 165 (?) lbs. of silver to one Trappes and another goldsmith in London. Wm. Whalley and Thos. Horwodd know little of it. John Henley thinks the late abbot this six or seven years continually diminished the plate of the house, especially since he took upon him to be a mitred abbot; his suit for licence to give "bennet and collet in this house" cost him much money, and was one of the causes of his selling the plate. Lawrence Forest says the baron of Walton had a standing cup with his arms on it out of the house at Michaelmas last. John Moor knows nothing and never came into the "bowsery," before the last coming thither of the King's council. These and all the other brethren depose that they never knew of any book of the plate and jewels of the house.
Pp. 2. Endd.
10 March.
R. O.
622. LORD LEONARD GREY to CROMWELL.
According to Cromwell's letter by Walter Cowley, has partly declared his mind to, and begs credence for, Cromwell's servant, the bearer, Ric. Houghe, whom he thinks a "sage and sober person." Kilmanan, 10 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
10 March.
R. O.
623. SIR RICHARD GRAYNFELD to CROMWELL.
Unless Cromwell is a better lord to this bearer Rob. Whetill, son and heir of Sir Richard deceased, he will sustain great loss, because he will not administer to an unreasonable will made by his father in extremis. John Sayn-John, who married one of Whetell's daughters, is gone to England with Wm. Marche to make suit to Cromwell and others of the Council, that the King's lands held in the lordship of Marke are divisible. Is sure that no precedent can be shown for this assertion. Desires that Whetill, who is to marry the writer's daughter, may not be in a worse case than his ancestors for four or five descents past. Will be security in 1,000 marks for Whetill to stand any legal award. Calais, 10 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: My lord Privy Seal. Endd.
10 March.
R. O.
624. ANTHOINE BRUSSET to LORD LISLE.
I am anxions to hear from the King your master touching the compagnons of Gravelines, prisoners at Boulogne, whether they are ransomable or no, as they have been taken on your pale. Aire, 10 March '36. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
10 March.
MS. Bibl. Nat. Paris. Camusat, 13.
625. FRANCIS I.
Instructions for the Bailly of Troyes, maiître d'hôtel to Francis I. respecting what he is to declare to the king of England.
After presenting the letters of credence, he is to say that Francis, being on the frontier of Picardy, determined to send the Bailly to visit Henry, who is the best brother and friend he has in the world, and inform him of certain advertisements which Francis has received from his ambassador at Rome.
The Pope in Consistory has created cardinal Pole, Englishman, to be legate not only in England but in all places which he shall pass through on his way thither, and has given him for colleague John Matthew bishop of Verona; intending, if Henry will not return amicably to his obedience to the Roman Church and the Apostolic See, to deliver to the Cardinal through the merchants a good sum of money, in order to give succour to the people against him, and so constrain him to return to obedience by force. If Francis can do anything, Henry is to let him know.
Some days ago Francis sent a number of light horse and "gens de ses ordonnances" to victual the town of Terouenne, which his enemies endeavoured to hinder, but were unable. Knowing their bad will against him, he has determined to revenge the wrongs, invasions, and damages which they have done to his realm, and has caused the lance-knights under the command of Count William of Furstemberg, the legions of Normandy, Champagne, and Picardy, 1,000 light-horse, and a great part of the "gens de ses dictes ordonnances," to come to this frontier, intending to send them into his enemies' country and pay them back what they lent him last year (et leur rendre ce qu'ils luy ont preste l'année passée). News has just come that the said enemies, having assembled 1,000 foot and 400 or 500 horse at Luxemburgh, have been defeated by the sieur de Sedan with his company, and that of his uncle, the sieur de Jamaiz.
From Piedmont the latest news is that the French troops there have given the enemy two or three defeats. They have taken a town in which were 200 Spanish horse, and 400 or 500 foot, who have all been taken or killed; 400 or 500 horses were captured. Francis is about to send a reinforcement thither under the sieur d'Humiéres.
The Bailly is to pray Henry to contribute aid by sea, according to the treaty; but, as Francis lately wrote to M. de Tarbe his ambassador, he does not wish to inconvenience Henry if he has any business on hand which would at all hinder him from furnishing the aid. As to the marriage between the duke of Orleans and princess Mary, the Bailly is to say what has been commanded him. Moussi, 10 (fn. 9) March 1536. Signed. Countersigned: Bochetel.
Fr.

Footnotes

1 Compare the lists in Vol. XI., No. 827. The names of the 79 prisoners there mentioned as admitted to bail (§ 2), are as follows:—
John Blak of Haltham, Thos. Sergeant and Thos. Northecote of Hennyng, Robt Herdman of Sikson, John Fisher priest, John Smythe, John Wade, John Fisher, Wm. Daye, and Thos. Harre of Boston, Sir John Lyon priest, John Manby, Hen. Sanderson, and And. Sadler, of Louth, John Dawson of Fulstow, Thos. Brodley, Ric. Caton, Wm. Holme, Wm. Kendall, Jas. Whauton, canons of Barlings, John Wilson of Lynwod, Robt. Beld of Dudding ..., Ant. Curtes. † Guy Kayme,† Thos. Brumpton of Burton, Robt. Horneclif of Grimsby, Thos. Ratforde priest, † Sir _ (blank) parson of Duding[ton], Sir Robt. Yolle priest, Avery Mason of _ (blank), Robt. Toyngton of Hakthor . ., John Fleccher of Belforde, Ric. Nevo of Horncastle, Jas. Mytcalf of _ (blank), Thos. Langley of Louth, Thos. Bawdrie (?), Wm. Hudson of _ (blank), Hugh Sleforde of _ (blank), Thos. Smythe, Hugh Alen of _ (blank), John Kingston of Tetney, Robt. Carre of _ (blank), Sir Wm. Holton, priest, John Holton of _ (blank), Thos. Yarbore of Allvyngham, Jas. Willamson of _ (blank), Sir Ralph Grey (?), priest, Wm. Worthy of Castor, John Henryson, and John Yarborowe of Louth, Edm. Wynter, John Stele of Louth, John Jerom, Wm. Gregory, John Ambrose, Wm. Conysby, and Ric. Layton, monks of Bardney, Hen. Jenkynson, Reynold Kyrkby, and Wm. Ripon, monks of Kirkstede; Hen. Forman of _ (blank), Wm. Marshall, John Stoker, John Herryson, John Smytheson and John Tacy of Louth, John Mosham of Gremelby, Wm. Taillor of Salmonby, Robt. Tharrold, Hugh Lednam, monk of Bardney, John Shene of Hornecastell,‡ Thos. Smythe, Robt. Baldyng and John Grene of Spylysbe, John Tayllour of Salmonbe, Edw. Leche of Boston, John Tayller of Louth, Edm. Walkyngton of Golta.
The three names marked with a "†" seem to have been persons who were apprehended again for further examination.
2 From this to the end in another hand
3 Robert Thompson, vicar of Brough under Stainmoor in Westmoreland. See No. 687 (2).
4 Mary Bassett.
5 So in MS. Sentence incomplete.
6 Doubtless Thomas Knyght, proctor of the University of Oxford in 1537, who is mentioned in a later letter.
7 John Basset.
8 Anne Basset.
9 "dixieme" not "deuxieme" as read by Camusat.