Vatican Regesta 359
1433-1440

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Institute of Historical Research

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J. A. Twemlow (editor)

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1909

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212-237

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'Vatican Regesta 359: 1433-1440', Calendar of Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 8: 1427-1447 (1909), pp. 212-237. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=104429 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


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Vatican Regesta, Vol. CCCLIX. (fn. 1)

Part I.

[2 Eugenius IV.]

[1433.
14 Kal. March.] (fn. 2)
Rome.
(f. 68d.)
To the archbishop of Armagh. Mandate as below. The pope, as the archbishop is aware, dissolved the Council of Basel, and decided that it should be celebrated in the city of Bologna. Seeing that many misinterpreted his intention, the pope ordained that the Council should be celebrated in the city of Basel, as the archbishop will see by the enclosed copy of the pope's letters. (fn. 3) The pope therefore orders the archbishop to come to the said Council within the time ordained in the said letters or, if lawfully hindered, to send his envoys, and moreover to enjoin and order, by the pope's authority, all bishops and prelates, exempt and non-exempt, in his province, who are bound to attend General Councils, to attend the said Council in person within the said period. 'Dudum cum ex certis causisdebeant personaliter conuenisse. Datum Rome etc.'

[3 Eugenius IV.]

[1433.
Circ. Sept. 24. (fn. 4) Rome.]
(f. 80d.)
To Henry, king of England. The pope has appointed to the see of Worcester Thomas Broans (sic), I.U.D. [dean of Salisbury], who was sent to the Council of Basel, and recommends him and his said church to the king, although he hardly thinks it necessary to do so, the king himself having recommended him to Martin V (fn. 5) for promotion to the see of Chichester, to which he had been elected by the chapter. 'Commendamus plurimumauxilio et favore. Datum etc.' [Also in Barb., f. 176 and Chigi, f. 66d. = p. 132, both with 'Datum etc.']
[Ibid.]
(f. 81.)
To the bishops and nobles, the council of Henry, king of England. The pope is writing to king Henry [the preceding] letters 'in hec verba etc.,' and requests and exhorts them, seeing that this promotion has been made of a person acceptable to the king, to assist the above elect in obtaining peaceful possession of the above see. 'Scribimus carissimo in Christo filio nostro Henricoauxilio mediante. Datum etc.' [Also in Barb., f. 177, and Chigi, f. 67 = p. 133, both with 'Datum etc.']
[Ibid.]
(f. 81d.)
To Humphrey, duke of Gloucester. The pope has promoted Thomas Brouns, I.U.D., elect of Worcester, to that see, as the duke will see more fully by the letters which the pope is writing to the king. The pope therefore commends the said elect to the duke, and requests and exhorts him to recommend the same to the king, and to assist him in obtaining peaceful possession of the said see. 'Dilectum filium ThomamValeat exercere. Datum etc.' [Also in Barb., f. 177, and Chigi, f. 67 = p. 133, both with 'Datum etc.']
[1433.
Circ. Sept. 24.
Rome.]
(f. 81d.)
To Henry, archbishop of Canterbury. The pope has recently promoted Thomas Brouns, [I.U.D.], elect of Worcester, to that see, knowing that the king recommended him by his letters to Martin V, and moved by regard for the archbishop. Although the pope knows that the archbishop has a special affection for the said elect, he nevertheless exhorts the archbishop to assist him in obtaining possession of the said church, and to intercede on his behalf with the king and where opportune. 'Quoniam paterna caritate …. ubi fuerit oportunum. Datum etc.' [Also in Barb., f. 177d. and Chigi, f. 67 = p. 133, both with 'Datum etc.']
[Ibid.]
(f. 82.)
To Henry, cardinal priest of St. Eusebius's, the cardinal of England. The see of Worcester having recently become void by the death of bishop Thomas [Polton] in the city of Basel, the pope has appointed to be bishop Thomas Brouns, I.U.D., elect of the said see, as he will see by the letters which the pope is writing to the king. The pope therefore requests and exhorts him to interpose with the king and where necessary, in order that the said Thomas may be able to obtain peaceful possession of the said church. 'Vacante nuper ecclesia Wygornienmerito obligatum. Datum etc.' [Also in Barb., f. 178 and Chigi, f. 67d. = p. 134, both with 'Datum etc.']

4 Eugenius IV.

1434.
10 Kal. April.
St. Chrysogonus's,
Rome.
(f. 82.)
To Henry, king of England. The pope lately [above f. 80d.] wrote to the king that he had promoted Thomas Brouns, I.U.D., dean of Salisbury (Caresburien.) to the see of Worcester. The pope did so, not at the petition of any one, but spontaneously. He did so, moreover, not only out of regard for the said Thomas's merits, but also, and especially, out of consideration for the king, seeing that the king had written [to Martin V, see above] in order that he might be promoted to the church of Chichester.
The pope has now received the king's letters petitioning for the said church on behalf of another [i.e. Thomas Bourchier]. The pope wishes to please the king as far as he can, but he does not see how the king's request can be honourably complied with, for the rejection of a person, when provision has once been made to him of a see, would be to the honour of neither the pope nor the person concerned. He therefore requests and exhorts the king to acquiesce in the promotion which he has made, and to permit Thomas [Brouns] to obtain free possession of the said church. As to Thomas Bourghier (sic), the king's kinsman, on whose behalf he writes, the pope will not forget him when other promotions are made. 'Scripsimus dudum tue serenitati …. juxta desiderium cordis tui. Datum Rome apud Sanctum Crisogonum x Kal. Aprilis anno quarto.' [Also in Barb., f. 178d. and Chigi, f. 67d. = p. 134.]
[1434.
18 Kal. May.
Rome.
(f. 84.)
To Henry, cardinal priest of St. Eusebius's, the cardinal of England. The pope has diligently considered the reasons which the cardinal puts together in his letters in order to persuade the pope to appoint to the church of Worcester Thomas Bourghier (sic), who is of the king's house and the cardinal's kinsman. The pope would gladly satisfy, if he could, the wishes of the king and the cardinal, although Thomas's youth seems too contrary to law and to the constitutions of the Council of Constance. But as the pope lately wrote to the king [above, f. 80d.] and to the cardinal [above, f. 82], before the receipt of the king's letters and also of the cardinal's, he, remembering the great insistence with which the king had recommended to Martin V Thomas Brouns, I.U.D., for promotion to the church of Chichester, thought that his promotion would be all the more acceptable for being spontaneously made. The promotion of such a man, thus made without his knowledge, the pope cannot change without reproach to himself, and he is disposed to persevere in what he has done, nor ought the cardinal to wish him to do otherwise, lest the king (ipse) or the pope be liable to be charged with inconstancy, especially by those who are at Basel and know Thomas's probity, but love neither the king nor the pope. If the nobles of the realm and others who have interceded on behalf of the cardinal's kinsman had known of the royal recommendations and the cause which moved the pope, they would perhaps not have postulated this new promotion. As to what the cardinal writes, that the king's devotion has been constant to the pope in these times, the pope has always praised his wisdom, for he has done what became so great a prince and one sprung from such a race, and what, too, all other Christian kings without exception have done, and inferior princes also. And as to what he writes at the end of his letter, namely that the king will insist on the promotion for which he asks, the pope trusts that, thanks to the counsel of the cardinal and other wise men, the king will behave as the faith and devotion of such a prince and the honour of the realm demand. The pope therefore bids the cardinal to persuade the king and the others whom the cardinal names to favour the pope's promotion, and to approve what they see was done by the royal recommendation. The pope will have special regard for the cardinal's kinsman in respect of other churches, when occasion offers. 'Consideranimus diligenter dilecte fili rationes …… specialiter recommissum. Datum Rome etc.' [The complete date is supplied by the Barberini text (ff. 182d.–184r.), which ends 'specialiter recommissum.Datum Romœ etc. xviii. Kal. Maii Anno Quarto.' Chigi, ff. 68d.–69d. = pp. 136–138, has the same date as the Barberini.]

5 Eugenius IV.

1435.
10 Kal. April.
Florence.
(f. 87d)
To John, king of Castile and Leon. The pope has received several letters from the king requesting him to promote to the church of Siguenza (Seguntin.) Alfonsus Garillo, a papal [proto]notary. (fn. 6) . The pope is surprised that the king seeks from him with so much insistence a thing which for many reasons he cannot grant. The pope believes that the king is unable to resist the importunity of those who surround him, but he must reject unjust demands, even as the pope himself does. He has always tried to please the king, but in the present case there are too many obstacles, such as the age of the candidate, the example to others, the decrees of the Council of Constance, and many other, things which make it impossible for the pope to comply without abasing his honour and conscience. A year ago Henry, king of England, insisted both by orators and letters for the promotion to a cathedral church of a certain minor of royal blood, related to him in the third (fn. 7) degree, (fn. 8) but has only obtained it at present, when the candidate is only three years too young, although he is an excellent doctor [of canon and civil law.] (fn. 9) As therefore king John sees with how much deliberation the pope acts, he is to cease from asking any more what the pope cannot in any wise grant. He [Alfonsus] has had from the pope enough benefices both before and after the death of the cardinal. (fn. 10) When he reaches the lawful age and shows himself worthy of more ample promotion, the pope will honour him to the king's satisfactum. 'Recepimus plures litterasoptime satisfaction. Datum Florentie etc. x Kal. Aprilis anno quinto.' (In the margin: Secreta.) [Partly printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1435, § 16, with a reference to 'Lib. brev. p. 142,' which is evidently an error for 'Lib. brev.p. 87 et in ms. Alex. vii. (i.e. the Chigi MS.) p. 142.' The letter in fact occurs in the Chigi MS., f. 71d. = p.142, and also in the Barberini MS., ff. 190d.–191d., in both cases with the above date.]
Ibid.
(f. 88.)
To Henry, king of England. The promotion of Thomas [Bourchier], elect of Worcester, the pope has put off until now, not because he did not desire to please the king in all his rightful requests, but on account of many reasonable causes, as he has written otherwise to the king [see above, f. 82]. For there was the obstacle of age, the pope having hitherto promoted no one of the like age to a cathedral church. There was the obstacle of the pope's honour, and the king's too, for it seemed unworthy of the king's wisdom that he should wish a man [i.e. Thomas Brouns], excellent in life and doctrine and pleasing to him, to be deprived with ignominy of a dignity which had been conferred on him, and it was foreign to the dignity of the apostolic see to abandon one whom it had once honoured. Moreover, if the pope had complied sooner with the king's wish there would not have been wanting in the Council [of Basel] criticisms (oblocutiones culpantium) not only of the pope's inconstancy, but also of the king's insistent postulations, as imposing on the pope a necessity, as it were, of acting against his intention. The subsequent voidance, therefore, of the church of Rochester seeming to offer a means of saving the honour of [Thomas Brouns], elect of Rochester and the pope's, the pope decided to comply with the king's wish [in regard to his kinsman, Thomas Bourchier], notwithstanding the lack of age, on account of which many kept dissuading him from this promotion. But the pope's affection for the king prevailed, and regard for the person of the elect [i.e. Bourchier, elect of Worcester], he being of royal blood and related to the king. Seeing that, as the king perceives, the pope is transgressing the law in order to please him, the king must please the pope, not by transgressing, but by observing the sacred canons. The pope bids him behold all Christian realms and consider their obedience and devotion to the apostolic see. He will find none, except only his own, in which full obedience is not rendered to the Roman pontiff, the vicar of Jesus Christ. What shame this brings to him and the realm, let him and his counsellors reflect ! The king's father perceived this, and had decided to give to Martin V full liberty of conferring benefices, (fn. 11) as many can testify, but death cut short his purpose. The king has inherited his father's realm, let him try to inherit his father's virtue and devotion, and follow in his footsteps. The pope therefore exhorts the king to take up his father's intention, in order that that so-called statute may be removed by which the pope's collations of benefices of the realm are hindered. To speak of nothing else, the pope marvels that men, learned and pastors of others, do not fear the oaths they have taken and the grave censures ordained against those who observe such statutes and hinder ecclesiastical liberty and the rights of the apostolic see. Up to the present day the pope has not raised this question with the king, for many causes, especially because he desired that it should be done in the Council [of Basel]. But now he can delay no longer, his intention being to make trial (experiri) whether the apostolic see is going to recover its authority in the king's realm, at least in the matter of reserved benefices. He therefore requests the king to notify to him his intention in the matter, in order that he may decide what he is to do. 'Promotionem dilecti filii Thome electistatuere quid simus acturi. Datum Florentie x Kal. Aprilis anno quinto.' (In the margin: Secreta.) [Barberini, ff. 191d.–193d., and Chigi, f. 72 r. and d. = pp. 143, 144. The latter part, viz. from 'The pope bids him behold all Christian realms (Circumspice omnia regna Christranorum)' to the end of the date, is printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1435, § 16, from 'Lib. brev. (i.e. Reg. CCCLIX) pag. 88 et ms. Alex. VII. (i.e. the Chigi MS.) pag. 143.']
10 Kal. April.
Florence.
(f. 89.)
To the bishops and nobles, the council of Henry, king of England. The pope is writing to king Henry [the preceding] letters 'in hec verba: Eugenius etc. [Datum etc.'] (fn. 12) and requires them to use their influence with the young king, as indeed some of them are specially bound by oath to do, that the apostolic see may recover its liberty in the matter of the pope's request. He asks for a reply. 'Scribimus carissimo in Christo filio nostro Henrico … et circa hec placeat respondere nobis.Datum.' (In the margin is 'Secreta.') [Barb. f. 193 and Chigi ff. 72d, 73r. = pp. 144, 145, also with 'Datum.']
[Ibid.]
Florence.
(f. 89d.)
To Henry, cardinal priest of St. Eusebius's. The pope is writing to king Henry letters [above, f. 88] of the following tenor, 'Eugenius etc. Datum etc.', and the cardinal is to consider the pope's intention as manifested therein, in regard to which matter the pope has commissioned to carry a message to the cardinal Adam Moleyns, a chamberlain of the pope and the cardinal's faithful servant, who has with great diligence prosecuted the promotion of [Thomas Bourchier], elect of Worcester. One thing the pope wishes the cardinal to know, namely, that if he acts in such a way that the apostolic see may recover its pristine liberty, the pope will favour him in those matters which the said Adam has set forth to him on the cardinal's behalf, and also in other matters which shall concern (fn. 13) his estate and honour. 'Scribimus in Christo filio nostro Henricogratiam reportes bonorum operum tuorum. Datum Florentie etc.' [Barberini, f. 194 and Chigi, f. 73r. = p. 145; both with an incomplete date: 'operum tuorum.Datum Florentie etc.']
[1435.
Post March 9.] (fn. 14)
Florence.
(f. 90.)
To Thomas [Bourchier], elect of Worcester. Out of regard for king Henry, and also on account of Thomas's own virtues, the pope has promoted him to the said church, in which matter Adam Moleyns, a chamberlain of the pope, and a member of the household and servant of the said Thomas, deserves commendation for his diligence. The pope admonishes the said elect, who is still below (infra) the age appointed for bishops, and in whose case the pope has at the royal intercession departed from his custom, to justify by his good works those who have recommended him, to continue in the study of letters, to strive by prudence and virtue to make up for his defect of years, and to defend and protect the honour of the apostolic see, as indeed he will be bound by oath to do. 'Contemplatione carissimi in Christo filii nostri Henrici …… postmodum illos effectos esse priuignos. Datum Florentie.' [Barberini, ff. 194d.–195d., and Chigi, f. 73r. and d. = pp. 145, 146; both with an incomplete date: '… prinignos. Datum Florentic.']
[1435.
Circ. April 23.] (fn. 15)
Florence.
(f. 91d.)
To Henry, king of England. The pope was pleased to hear recently that a congress (conventio) is to be held at Arras on July 1 next to treat of peace. As the king is aware, the pope lately sent as his legate to him and to France Nicholas, cardinal priest of St. Cross in Jerusalem, in order to bring about peace between England and France, the ill-success of whose mission caused the pope great grief. Had it not been for the intestine wars of Christian princes, and especially for this one, the Saracens would not have dared to invade and spoil Cyprus, nor would they be now building a fleet to take the island of Rhodes. If the pope's strength allowed him, he would go in person to the said town. He has decided to send, however, the above cardinal, and prays the king to send peace-loving and Godfearing men of his blood to the said congress, and to give them such instructions as to make it clear that he desires peace. 'Placuit nobis multum ….. hic est Christianissimus appellandus. Datum Florentie.' [1⅓ pp.] [In Barberini, ff. 198d.–200r. and Chigi, ff. 74d.–75r.= pp. 148, 149, also with an incomplete date,' … appellandus. Datum Florentie.' Printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1435, § 3, with indication 'Lib. brev. (i.e. Reg. CCCLIX) p. 91 et in ms. Alex. VII (i.e. the Chigi MS.) p. 148,' and therefore with 'Datum Florentie' only.]
[Ead. dat.]
Florence.
(f. 92.)
To the bishops and nobles the council of Henry, king of England. The pope is writing to king Henry [the preceding] letters 'in hec verba: Eugenius etc. usque in finem,' and exhorts them to induce the king to seek after and confirm peace. 'Venerabilibus fratribus …. consilioHenrici regis Anglie illustris [salutem etc. Scribimus carissimo in Christo filio nostro Henrico regi Anglie illustri] nostras litteras in hec verba …….. neque homines diutius esse possent. Datum Florentie.' [Barberini, f. 200, and Chigi, f. 75r. =p. 149, both with an incomplete date '….. possent. Datum Florentie,' and the same defective address etc. as above. The address etc. is given correctly below, f. 252.] [Partly printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1435, § 3 from 'Ib. (i.e Reg. Vat. CCCLIX) p. 92et in ms. Alex. VII. (i.e. the Chigi MS.) pag. 149,' and therefore with 'Datum Florentiæ only.']
[1435.]
[Ead. dat.]
Florence.
(f. 92d)
To Charles, king of France. The pope commends his desire for peace, as shown by his letters presented by his counsellor the treasurer of St. Hilaire [Poitiers], and requests him to make choice of peace-loving men for the congress arranged to be held at Arras. The pope cannot comply with his request that four cardinals should go thither, on account of the fewness of cardinals in the [Roman] court, but he is sending as legate the best fitted for the purpose, namely Nicholas, cardinal priest of St. Cross in Jerusalem, although the pope can ill spare him. 'Commendamus meritispopulo suo. Datum Florentie.' [Barberini, ff. 200d.–201r. and Chigi, f. 75d. = p. 150, have also an incomplete date '… populo suo. Datum Florentie etc.' Partly printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1435, § 4 from 'Ibid. (i.e. Reg. Vat. CCCLIX) pag. 92 et in ms. Alex. VII. (i.e. the Chigi MS.) pag. 150,' and therefore without date.]
[Ead. dat.]
Florence.
(f. 93.)
To Reginald, archbishop of Reims. The pope has received his letters by the treasurer of St. Hilaire, a papal subdeacon, from which he learns with pleasure that peace is being treated for in the realm of France. The pope has also received letters on the same subject from king [Charles], to which he is replying, as the archbishop will be able to see from the copy enclosed [see the preceding]. He exhorts the archbishop to urge the king to conclude peace. The pope has complied with the archbishop's prayer in regard to his nephew. 'Per dilectum filium thesaurariumecclesie et apostolice sedis. Datum Florentie etc.' [Barberini, ff. 201r.–202r. and Chigi, f. 75d. = p. 150, have also an incomplete date '… sedis. Datum Florentie etc.']
[Ead. dat.]
Florence
(f. 93.)
To Philip, duke of Burgundy. The pope has recently received his letters written by his hand, and at the same time heard what the bishop of Amiens, a papal referendary, and the provost of Lille (Insulen.) have related to the pope on the duke's behalf, wherein the pope has learned with relief the duke's wish for peace in the realm of France. The pope exhorts him to make every effort to bring about peace. If his strength allowed, he would go in person to make peace, according to the duke's desire. But as that is impossible, he is sending as his legate for the purpose the above cardinal Nicholas, although he can ill spare him. The said bishop will write to the duke at greater length, to whose letters the duke may give credence as if they were the pope's. 'Recepimus nuper litterascuius litteris credas tanquam nostris.Datum Florentie.' [Barberini, ff. 202r.–203r., and Chigi, f. 76r.—p. 151, have also an incomplete date'… nostris.Datum Florentic etc.' Partly printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1435, § 4, from 'Id. ib. (i.e. Reg. Vat. CCCLIX, p. 93) et in ms. Alex. VII. (i.e. the Chigi MS.) pag. 151,' and therefore with the imperfect 'Datum Florentie.'
[1435.
Circ. April 21.] (fn. 16)
Florence.
(f. 93d.)
To Henry, king of England. Letters of recommendation for Master Peter de Monte, I.U.D., apostolic notary, whom the pope has appointed collector of the papal camera in England and Ireland. Propter plurimarum virtutum dotes …. reuerentiam prompto animo esse facturum. Datum Florentie.' [In Barberini, f. 203, with 'Datum Florentie etc.'; Chigi, f. 76r. and d. =pp. 151, 152, has 'Datum Florentie.' See below, f. 306.]
[Ead. dat.]
Florence.
(f. 94.)
To the bishops and nobles, the council of Henry, king of England. Letters to the like effect. (fn. 17) 'Cum dilectum filium magistrum ….. auxilio vestro mediante. Datum Florentie etc.' [In Barberini, f. 204, and Chigi, f. 76d. = p. 152, both with 'Datum Florentie etc.']
[Ead. dat.
Florence.]
(f. 94.)
To Henry, cardinal priest of St. Eusebius's the cardinal of England. Letters to the like effect. 'Dilectum filium magistrum ….. nostrum ac sedis apostolice honorem.Datum etc. [In Barberini, ff. 204d.–205r., and Chigi, f. 76d. =p. 152, both with '…. honorem. Datum.' (fn. 18) ]
[1435.
Circ. April 23.] (fn. 19)
Florence.
(f. 95.)
To the same. Commending him for having always fostered peace between the realms of France and England, even in the time of the late king Henry, and exhorting him to go to the above congress, in which his relationship to the king, and his authority and dignity will have weight. 'Intelleximus iamdudum fuisse ….. nos facere compotem voti nostri. Datum Florentic etc.' [Barberini, ff. 207r.–208r., and Chigi, ff. 77d.–78r.=pp. 154, 155, also with '… voti nostri. Datum Florentie etc …' See Raynaldi Annales, an. 1435, § 3, the reference being to 'ibid. (i.e. Lib. brev., i.e. Reg. CCCLIX) p. 95, et in ms.Alex. VII. (i.e. the Chigi MS.) p. 154,' and therefore without date.]
[1438, Jan. 14—
1439, Jan. 19.] (fn. 20)
Ferrara.
(f. 98.)
To Henry, king of England. The pope was greatly rejoiced lately to hear that he purposed to send his kinsman, the duke of Orleans, to treat peace between England and France. Being related by blood to both parties he would be most apt, and the pope is therefore disquieted to see that nothing more is being done in the matter, and exhorts the king to prosecute his laudable intention of sending the said duke to France, there being none better fitted to treat of peace between the two kings and Philip, duke of Burgundy. 'Dici non potestoperam et auctoritatem nostram. Datum Ferrarie etc.' [Barberini, ff. 212d.–214d., and Chigi, ff. 79d.–80r.=pp. 158, 159, also with an incomplete date '… nostram.Datum Ferrarie etc.' In Raynaldi Annales, an. 1438, § 14, from 'Lib. brev. (i.e. Reg. Vat. CCCLIX) p. 98 et in ms. Alex. VII. (i.e. the Chigi MS.) p. 158,' and therefore without date.]
[1439. (fn. 21)
Post May 10.]
Florence.
(f. 111.)
To the same. The pope has always been careful, in making promotions to churches and monasteries, to promote persons acceptable and faithful to the king, nor has he acted otherwise in the case of the church of Seéz (Sagien.) and the monastery of St. Sever, in regard to the promotions whereto the pope has in these days (his diebus) received the king's letters of complaint, to which he will reply briefly. To the church of Seéz, which had been void for several years (fn. 22) (the city belonging, as the pope was told, to the obedience of Charles, king of the French), the pope made provision of the present bishop. (fn. 23) Afterwards, hearing that the contrary was the case, the pope, in order that the king's subjects might not be offended, suspended the processes which the bishop had by papal authority fulminated against the city. Subsequently, upon its being reported to the pope that the bishop wished to persist in king Henry's obedience and fealty, the pope recommended him to the archbishop of Rouen (fn. 24) and the king's governor (fn. 25) in order that, if it could be done with the king's good pleasure, the bishop might obtain possession of his said church. If there had been an opportunity, the pope would have made provision to the said bishop of another church, in order to do away with all ground of dissension. As to St. Sever [in the diocese of Aire], the fact is very different from what the king writes. For this the pope does not blame the king's letters, but the untrue information of others. On its voidance, (fn. 26) the pope collated it to Peter [de Bearnio, as below, Reg. CCCLXIX, f. 52d.], son of Gaston, count of Longueville and captal de Buch, not an adversary of the king, and thereby the pope naturally thought that the king would be pleased. At any rate, the prior and convent, and the prévét, bailli etc. of St. Sever sent a letter to thank the pope for what he had done, who, upon hearing that elections had taken place in the convent, stopped the expedition of the bulls of provision until the arrival of such elections or postulations. These were four in number, not two as the king writes. The claustral prior, who had five votes, renounced his right in favour of the pope's nominee. The others had two or three votes. Thus the pope made a single provision only, not a twofold (multiplex) provision, (fn. 27) as has been untruly related to the king. The pope did it to please the king, and was sure that he was doing the king a pleasure. For he did not suppose that the king's subjects would have thanked the pope for what might be displeasing to the king. The pope's intention is to do in future what he has always done, namely to promote those whom he knows to be faithful and acceptable to the king, and not only in these matters but in all others to do what is to the king's honour and satisfaction. 'Prout hactenus videre potuitad honorem et consolationem tuam. Datum Florentie etc.' [2 pp.] [Barberini, ff. 241r.–242d. and Chigi, ff. 89r.–90r. = pp. 177–179, also with an incomplete date … consolationem tuam. Datum Florentie etc.']
[1440,
Post May 28.] (fn. 28)
Florence.
(f. 114d.)
To the same. The king has sent to the pope letters full of faith and devotion, a testimony of his good will to the pope and the apostolic see. God will prepare for him, the defender of His church, felicity in this life and an eternal reward in the life to come. The letters which the king has written, and which have been presented to the pope by Vincent Clement, a papal chamberlain, the pope has caused to be read publicly. The king writes like a catholic and truly Christian prince when he expresses a fear lest the doings of that nefarious and abominable rabble (sentinam) of wicked men congregated at Basel may imperil the church, and when he says that he has therefore sent his orators to them to repress their mad temerity, and has written to urge other princes to do likewise. Who would not fear a naked sword in the hands of madmen? Who would not think that a bad tree, which has put forth evil fruit, ought to be cut down and cast into the fire? For what is the abominable fruit and the nefarious harvest of so many years of this sacrilegious conventicle? It declared that it was assembled for the reformation of the church, the peace of Christendom, the extirpation of heresy, the union of the Greeks. Instead, it has introduced a new heresy, has sowed the causes of civil wars, has deformed and torn the church, and has endeavoured, although in vain, to hinder the union of the Greeks. When the pope transferred the Council to Ferrara, those factious men stopped their ears, in order not to hear the voice of the pope nor of king Henry nor of other faithful princes, being resolved on bringing forth the execrable creature which they had long ago conceived (eteum quem jamdiu conceperant, execrabilem fetum parere voluerunt, i.e. the anti-pope, Felix V). The pope is, however, consoled by the king's prudence, who, foreseeing long ago that they were erring, abandoned them, reprehended their sacrilegious works, and then held them as publicans, the which will redound to the lasting glory of him and his realm, and will make the Roman church and the apostolic see his perpetual debtor. The king deserves great praise because, when that unhappy monster (monstrum [Felix V]) would have entrapped him by its fallacious letters and envoys, he rejected its false persuasions, and because, as his letter goes on to say, he and his subjects intend to preserve their obedience and filial devotion to the pope and the Roman church. and will endeavour that other princes and others shall do the same. Such being the first fruits of the king's youth, the pope bids him persevere as he has begun, protecting the pope and the apostolic see and defending the unity of the church, and bids him to carry out his resolve to exhort others by letters and envoys to do the same. On these matters and others Master Peter de Monte, I.U.D., apostolic notary and collector, and Vincent Clementis, a papal chamberlain (the latter of whom in delivering the aforesaid letters made an elegant oration publicly before the pope in praise of the king and in favour of the authority of the pope and the apostolic see, and whom the pope strongly recommends), will report more fully on the pope's behalf, to both of whom, or to one alone in the other's absence, he may give full credence. 'Quod gentium doctor …, propter virtutes suas. Datum Florentie etc.' [3½ pp.] [Barberini, ff. 249r–252r and Chigi, ff. 92r–93d = pp. 183–186, also with 'Datum Florentie etc.' Printed (except the part from 'On these matters' to the end) in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1440, § 6, from 'Lib. brev. (i.e. Reg. CCCLIX), p. 114,' and therefore without date.]
[Ead. dat.]
Florence.
(f. 116.)
To Humphrey, duke of Gloucester. Master Vincent Clement, the duke's orator, a papal chamberlain, has made an elegant and copious relation to the pope of the duke's affection and zeal towards the pope, and also of his good works, especially in regard to the letters which the king has very recently written to the pope. Great is the duke's virtue, which exercises itself in those things which concern the welfare of the church and the conservation of unity. For so many enemies thereof have arisen, that were it not for the virtue and faith of princes, the church would suffer the greatest ruin. The pope therefore bids the duke to persevere as he has begun. On these matters the pope has committed to Master Peter de Monte, apostolic notary and collector, and to the above Vincent certain things to be related to the duke, and to them, or to Vincent alone in the collector's absence, he may give credence. The pope strongly recommends to the duke the said Vincent, who made an elegant oration publicly before the pope in favour of the authority of the pope and the apostolic see. 'Licet multis antea in rebus …. precipua complectimur caritate. Datum Florentie etc.'[Barberini, f. 252, and Chigi, f. 93d = p. 186, also with 'Datum Florentie etc.' Partly printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1440, § 6, from 'Ibid. (i.e. Lib. brev., i.e. Reg. CCCLIX) pag. 116, et in ms. Alex. VII (i.e. the Chigi MS.) pag. 186.']
[1440.] (fn. 29)
Circ. Jan.
Florence.
(f. 123d.)
To Alfonso, king of Portugal and Algarve. The pope believes that it is the importunity of Lewis, sometime bishop of Viseu (Visen.), condemned for schism and heresy by the General Council, which impels the king to write on his behalf and to ask what the pope cannot grant with honour and a good conscience. And certain letters, which the king writes [to say] that he has received from the pope, must have sufficiently signified the pope's intention and justified what he has done in regard to the church of Viseu. (fn. 30) The said Lewis left the men of Basel, not from motives of penitence or conscience, but partly from fear, partly with the hope of recovering his church, and partly to sow scandals. The pope marvels that the king gives the title of 'bishop of Viseu' to one excommunicated for heresy and schism, but the fault is not the king's, whose youth does not allow him to know, but of the author of the letters. The pope therefore exhorts the king to abstain from such letters in future and not to ask what cannot be granted. The pope is resolved not to change what he has done in the matter of the said church, by taking it away from a good catholic and committing it to the infidel and heretic who has been deprived thereof. The pope marvels, too, at what the king says in his letter, namely that Lewis Couthino, bishop of Viseu, has introduced himself into the bishopric without the king's consent, as was required by canon and civil law. The pope does not blame the youthful king, who does not know the law, but the ignorance of the author of the letters, who alleges both canon and civil law, but shows himself to be ignorant of both. For the law assigns to the apostolic see and the successors of Peter the free disposal of all churches, to whose rule it [sic] chooses and appoints in accordance with the utility of the churches, nor does it require the consent of kings or princes. The kings of France, England and Spain and others petition the pope for the promotions of prelates, and commend to him those whom they think fit, and the pope grants their prayers as far as he can. And if it seems to him to be necessary to act otherwise, he disposes of the provision of churches in accordance with his own will, and kings and princes acquiesce. And in king Alfonso's realm, too, provisions have been made in many cases without the king's consent, for the disposal of churches belongs to the pope, not to the kings. The bishop of Viseu promoted by the pope has therefore not erred, if he has accepted the provision made motu proprio by the pope, which required no consent of the king. On the other hand, his being despoiled of the said church by command of the king's court, after having held possession of the said church for about two months in virtue of the pope's provision, is unjust. The pope therefore exhorts and requires the king to restore the said Lewis to possession. 'Credimus a certovidemus aspera dei iudicia incurrisse. Datum Florentie etc.' [3pp.] [Barberini, ff. 306r–308r, and Chigi, ff. 125r–126r = pp. 249–251, also with an incomplete date … 'incurrisse. Datum Florentie etc.' Printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1440, § 2. from 'Lib. brev. (i.e. Reg. CCCLIX) pag. 123 et in eod. ms. Alex. VII (i.e. the Chigi MS.) pag. 249.']

10 Eugenius IV.

1440.
Kal. July.
Florence.
(f. 125.)
To the same. The pope is sure that if the king had received his letters in which he lately wrote that he had deprived Lewis [de Amaral], sometime bishop of Viseu, and that if the king had known what the said Lewis has done against the apostolic see etc., the king not only would not petition on his behalf, but would judge him worthy of all punishment. The pope sets forth the said deprived bishop's misdeeds as a ringleader at Basel against the pope and the unity of the church, after having been well received by the pope as one of the orators sent by the king's father. Both in the pretended suspension (fn. 31) and deprivation (fn. 32) of the pope, and also in the profanation of that idol, (fn. 33) he not only took part, but took the lead, whereby the pope is sure that he transgressed the orders of the king's father, who, had he lived, would have punished him. The pope therefore requests the king to order the said Lewis (who is the enemy and rebel of the pope and the apostolic see, has by the pope, with the approbation of the present (hoc) Council [of Florence] been excommunicated and condemned for heresy and schism, and has been deprived of his church), if he come to the king's realm, to be arrested and imprisoned, and to allow Lewis Cotinho, bishop of Viseu to obtain, as the pope has otherwise written, peaceable possession of the said church. For the pope is resolved never to restore the said sometime bishop to the church of which he has been so justly deprived. 'Certi reddimursuis demeritis exigentibus est priuatus.Datum Florentie Kal. Julii anno xo.' (fn. 34) [2½ pp.] [Barberini, ff. 308d–310d, and Chigi ff. 126r–127r=pp. 251–253, both with a different date ' … est priuatus. Datum Florentie etc., 1440, xxi. Kal. Julii Anno Decimo.' Partly printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1440, § 3, from 'Lib.brev. (i.e. Reg. CCCLIX) pag. 125 et in ms. Alex. VII. (i.e. the Chigi MS.) pag. 251,' and with the date 'Datum Florentiœmecccxl, xvi Kal. Julii anno x.']

[6 Eugenius IV.]

[1436.
Oct. 24.] (fn. 35)
Bologna.
(f. 145d.)
To Lewis [de Luxembourg], archbishop elect of Rouen. The pope was glad when he learned that Lewis was, at the request of many lords and clergy, to be postulated to the said church. He has therefore, without waiting for any postulation, translated him thereto. To the church of Térouane (Morinen.), of which the said Lewis was bishop, the pope has translated [John le Jeune], previously bishop of Amiens. 'Cum intelligeremus tuam fraternitatemin futurum gubernetur. Datum Bononie etc.' [In Barberini, f. 276, and Chigi, f. 105d, p. 210, also with 'Datum Bononiæ etc.']
[Ead. dat.]
Bologna.
(f. 146.)
To the duke of York. (fn. 36) The pope has translated Lewis, elect of Rouen, chancellor of France, to the said church [of Rouen], knowing him to have been and to be faithful and acceptable to the king, and believing that it will please the duke, to whom the pope commends the said elect and his church. 'Cum propter virtutesab intimis recommendantes. Datum Bononie etc.' [In Barberini, f. 276d, and Chigi, f. 105d = p. 210, also with 'Datum Bononiæ etc.']
[Ead. dat.]
Bologna.
(f. 146.)
To Philip, duke of Burgundy. The pope knows that John [le Jeune], bishop of Térouane, a papal referendary, is very pleasing to the duke. He has therefore recently appointed him to the said church, then void by the translation of [Lewis], archbishop of Rouen, and recommends to the duke both the said bishop and his said church, and exhorts the duke to assist him in obtaining possession. (fn. 37) 'Scimus venerabilem fratrem Johannemfuit semper in talibus comprobata.Datum Bononie etc.' [Barberini, ff. 276d-277r, and Chigi, ff. 105d-106r = pp. 210, 211, also with 'Datum Bononiæ etc.']
[1436.
Post April 22.] (fn. 38)
Bologna.
(f. 149.)
To Edward, king of Portugal and Algarve. The king behaves like a catholic prince in wishing peace to be made between Christian princes. No one living is more grieved at these wars than the pope himself. Whatever the cause may be, the wars of which the king speaks are so entangled that the wit of man seems to be incapable of ending them. Nevertheless, the pope has not despaired and has continually endeavoured to bring about peace between France and England, and has left nothing undone for the purpose. For, to say nothing of the letters with which he has exhorted both kings, he sent to France to treat of peace, straightway after his accession, Nicholas, cardinal priest of St. Cross in Jerusalem [see below, Reg. CCCLXXI, f. 29d.], who after a long stay in France, and after many meetings for peace, returned without having accomplished his object. Afterwards, on the announcement of a congress of many princes of both sides to be held at Arras, the pope again, with their consent and at their wish, sent the same cardinal [see below, Reg. CCCLXXIII, f. 189], and after divers negotiations some things were concluded concerning peace [between Burgundy and France], but they had no effect [in regard to peace between England and France]. Recently again the pope wrote to a number of notable men, and also sent verbal messages that he was again ready to send his orators to treat of peace, if they thought it would be pleasing to the princes concerned, and would not be in vain as before. There is therefore no need for the king to exhort the pope to do what he has always been eager to do of his own accord. He has always done, and always will do all that is in his power, and if peace has not yet been made between these kings, the fault is not the pope's but theirs. Although unnecessary, the king's exhortation was pleasing to the pope, who greatly commends the king's zeal for peace. 'More catholici et pii principis …… catholici principis opus. Datum Bononic etc.' [Barberini, ff. 280d-282r, and Chigi, f. 108r8d = pp. 215, 216, also with 'Datum Bononiæ etc.' Printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1436, § 22, from 'Lib. brev. [i.e. Reg. CCCLIX] p. 149 et in ms. Alex VII. [i.e. the Chigi MS.] pag. 215,' and therefore also with 'Datum Bononiæ.']
[1436.
Circ. July 10.] (fn. 39)
Bologna.
(f. 154d.)
To James, king of Scotland (Scotie). Lately the king by his orators, John bishop of Glasgow and Walter abbot of St. Thomas's, Abithiothe (fn. 40) in the diocese of St. Andrews, prayed the pope to send a legate for the reformation of the churches and the ecclesiastical state of the realm. The pope was unable to do so quickly, on account of his attention being distracted by divers hindrances and the badness of the times. Now, however, there is an opportunity, and the pope therefore, having regard to the fact that the cure of spirituals of the realm belongs to the pope, especially by metropolitical right, has decided to send Anthony, bishop of Urbino, as his nuncio, and requests and exhorts the king to assist him in his mission, especially as the king has frequently made this request, and has promised to do so by his [said] last orators. 'Dudum sicut decet bonum principem … …. eterna premia consequi mereatur. Datum Bononie etc.' [Barberini, ff. 288d–289d, with '… mer[e]atur.Datum etc.' Chigi, f. 113r and d=pp. 225, 226, with '….mereatur. Datum Bononie etc.' In Raynaldi Annales, an. 1436, § 31, from 'Lib. brev. [i.e. Reg. CCCLIX] pag. 154, et in ms.Alex. VII [i.e. the Chigi MS.] p. 225', and therefore with 'Datum Bononiæ.' See below, Reg. CCCLXXIV, f. 102d, sqq.]
[1436.]
[Ead. dat.
Bologna.]
(f. 155.)
To Joan, queen of Scotland (Scotie). The pope is writing to James, king of Scots (Scotorum), her husband, his letters in these words 'Eugenius etc. Datum etc.', and requests and exhorts her to assist the above nuncio, and to exhort the king to do the same. 'Scribimus carissimo in Christo filio nostro Jacoboex tuo bono opere commendanda. Datum etc.' [In Barberini, f. 289d, with '… ex tuo [bono] opere commendanda.Datum etc.'; Chigi, f. 113d = p. 226, with '… ex tuo bono opere commendanda. Datum etc.']
[Ead. dat.]
Bologna.
(f. 155d.)
To the bishops and nobles, the council of James, king of Scots (Scotorum.). A like request. 'Scribimus carissimo etc.ut in precedentisuis meritis commendanda.Datum Bononie etc.' [In Barberini, f. 290, and Chigi, f. 113d =p. 226, both with 'Datum Bononiæ etc.']

[7 Eugenius IV.]

[1437.
May 5.] (fn. 41)
Bologna.
(f. 156d.)
To Anthony, bishop of Urbino, legate of the apostolic see in the realm of Scotland. The pope has recently received his letters by which he signified that he arrived in the said realm, and that he was honourably received by the king and by the prelates and lords. The pope has since (postea) heard with horror of the unhappy fate (infaustum casum) of the late king, and enjoins the legate to strive with the authority of the apostolic see to promote the peace and concord of the realm and the good estate thereof and of the son of the king, and moreover to further the reformation for which the pope has sent him. 'Recepimus nuper tuas litterasex tuo opere ac (cf. below, f. 325d.) laboribus consequatur. Datum Bononie etc.' [See below, f. 325d.] [In Barberini, ff. 291d—292d, with '… … ex tuo opere et laboribus consequatur. Datum Bononiæ etc.' Chigi, ff. 114d–115r = pp. 228, 229, ends '… ex tuo opere ac laboribus consequatur. Datum Bononie etc.' Printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1436 (sic), § 32, from 'Lib. brev. [i.e. Reg. CCCLIX] p. 156, et in ms. Alex. VII [i.e. Chigi] p. 228,' and therefore with 'Datum Bononiæ etc.']

7 Eugenius IV.

1437.
6 Id. April.
Bologna.
(f. 158.)
To Henry, king of England. The king may be certain that the pope has always desired, and still desires, to please him as far as possible. And therefore he has hitherto gladly granted the king's prayers in making promotions to cathedral churches and other dignities, when the king has petitioned on behalf of worthy persons. In the matter of the provision to the church of Ely, seeing that it had been very long void, (fn. 42) that the king's wish in regard to the provision had not been made known to the pope by his letters, and that (a circumstance which very much moved the pope) the chapter, by the king's will, as appears from the decree of election, proceeding to election, postulated bishop Thomas [Bourchier], then bishop of Worcester, the pope, in order that the said church might be no longer void, and having regard to the virtues and lineage of the said bishop, the king's kinsman, whose excellence the king had previously by several letters testified to the pope [see above, f. 82 seqq.], translated the said Thomas to Ely. And certainly the pope was sure, as he has otherwise written, that in honouring one who was the king's kinsman and postulated by the chapter, he had greatly pleased the king. The pope therefore exhorts the king to acquiesce in this translation, for he cannot in any wise change what he has done. He has very often complied with the king's wish—let the king this time comply with the pope's. The pope has of his own accord translated bishop Thomas [Rodburn], then bishop of St. Davids, to Worcester, and intends to honour him further, with the king's good pleasure (quem etiam intendimus de tuo beneplacito honorare), when opportunity offers. And if a time should come in which the bishop of Ely [i.e. Thomas Bourchier] could, with his own honour, be translated to another church befitting him, the pope would then make provision to Ely, if the king should persevere in his purpose, of the aforesaid Thomas [Rodburn]. But at present the pope has decided, for the honour of himself and the apostolic see, and also of the king's aforesaid kinsman [Bourchier], to abide firmly in what he has well and reasonably done. 'Certa sit tua serenitas. . … firmiter permanere. Datum Bononie etc. Sexto Idus Aprilis anno septimo.' [In Barberini, ff. 294r–295d, and Chigi, f. 116r and d=pp. 231, 232, with the same date. For the letter, dated June 22, 1437, in which the king at length abandons his demand for the see of Ely to be given to Thomas Rodburn, and requests the pope to grant the administration of it to Lewis de Luxembourg, see Bekynton Correspondence, I, pp. 4 sqq. And for the pope's acceptance of the king's solution of the deadlock, see the pope's letters, below, Reg. CCCLXV, f. 171d, by which his above translation of Bourchier from Worcester to Ely is annulled, dated on Sept. 27, 1437 (on which same day he made the desired appointment of Lewis de Luxembourg, see Eubel, Hierarchia, II, ad 'Elien'). See also below, Reg. CCCLXV, f. 208.]
[Ead. dat.]
Bologna.
(f. 158d.)
To Humphrey, duke of Gloucester. The pope is writing to king Henry his [preceding] letters 'in hee verba. Eugenius etc.Datum etc.' and requests and exhorts the duke to persuade the king to acquiesce in the above promotions. 'Scribimus carissimo in Christi filio …. tibi ad referendam gratiam merito inuitemur. Datum Bononie etc.' [In Barberini, ff. 295d-296r, Chigi, ff. 116d 117r=pp. 232, 233, also with 'Datum Bononiæ etc.']
[Circ. 1439.
Jan. 19.
Florence.] (fn. 43)
(f. 162.)
To Philip, duke of Burgundy. The pope has received his letters in which he writes the reasons which justified the capture of Master John de Obizis, a papal chaplain and auditor of causes of the apostolic palace. The pope reminds the duke of the difference between law and equity. The pope does not deny that John would have acted more prudently if, on his return journey to the duke he had asked for a safe-conduct, as he did when he came from the duke to the pope. But as he was an Italian, a noble of Lucca, as he was an old member of the papal court, from the time of John XXII (fn. 44) (rectius XXIII) an auditor of causes of the apostolic palace, as he had been long in England, even under the present pope, as papal collector and nuncio, as he had come to the pope for the affairs of the General Council held for the reduction of the Greeks, and as he had said and done nothing against the duke, he did not think that he required a safe-conduct, especially as he was going out of Italy. For he believed that in his return he had enough security in the letter which he was carrying from the pope to the duke, and if the said letter does not mention him and his being a papal chaplain and auditor, it is the fault of those who wrote it, who, like John himself, did not think it was necessary. If he had foreseen what happened, he would have sent again for the duke's safe conduct, or he would have asked the pope for sufficient letters about his security, and would not have gone to meet certain danger. But as he saw that he was an Italian, a priest and the pope's chaplain and auditor, with no concern in the wars, and as he knew that he had done nothing against the duke, and was seeking the pope's honour, he was on his way to the duke without misgiving, simply as the bearer of the pope's letters. The fact is that Henry, king of England, being desirous of sending his orators to the General Council, the said John came to the pope to procure, by means of the pope, the duke's safe-conduct for them and did not anticipate meeting any hindrance on his return journey from the pope, as he was neither English nor an English subject. Seeing therefore that it is not through fraud, but through simplicity, that John has journeyed through the duke's territory without a safeconduct, believing that it was enough to be the bearer of letters from the pope to the duke, the pope exhorts the duke to obtain John's release without ransom. 'Recepimus tuas litterasnon suscipiat exinde detrimentum. Datum. [2¼ pp.] [Barberini, ff. 302r–304r, and Chigi, ff. 119d–120d=pp. 238–240, with a less incomplete date '….. detrimcutum. Datum Florentie etc.']

Part II. (fn. 45)

5 Eugenius IV.

1435.
Sept. 14.
Florence.
(f. 238.)
To Henry, archbishop of Canterbury. The pope does not know who was the author of the lying statement made to the archbishop to the effect that Adam de Moline (rectius Molins), a chamberlain of the pope, had spoken to the pope against him, and assures him that Adam never said anything that was not to the archbishop's honour, and that as far as the pope can see, he is a good servant to the archbishop. The pope therefore commends to him the said Adam. 'Intellerimus fuisse relatum tue fraternitatitui honoris amatorem. Datum Fl[orentie] die xiiii mensis Septembris anno quinto.'
Sept. 1.
Florence.
(f. 239.)
To John, bishop of Bath. Recommending for promotion to some benefice, on account of his services to the pope in the Council of Basel, Ugolinus Lidofed, B.C.L., who is now about to return to England. 'Dilectum filium Ugolinumduxerit ostendendum. Datum Florentie sub anulo nostro secreto die prima mensis Septembris pontificatus nostri anno quinto.'
July 21.
Florence.
(f. 246.)
To the bishop of Lincoln (Linconien.). On the voidance lately of the canonry and prebend of Langten (sic) in Lincoln, which Thomas [Brouns], bishop of Rochester, held before his promotion to that church, the pope conferred them, being reserved to him and the apostolic see, on Robert Sutton, an abbreviator of apostolic letters, an old member of the pope's court. The pope therefore exhorts the bishop to admit Robert to possession. 'Vacantibus dudumIn hoc facies nobis complacentiam specialem. Datum Florentie etc. die xxi mensis Julii pontificatus nostri anno quinto.'
[Ibid.]
(f. 246d.)
To Peter de Monte, D.C.L. (legis [sic] doctori), apostolic notary, and nuncio and collector in the realms of England and Scotland. William Croyser, archdeacon of Teviotdale, a papal acolyte, has suffered persecutions, as he will relate to Peter, because he has opposed by order of the apostolic see divers impediments to ecclesiastical liberty and the rights of the said see. The pope therefore wishes Peter to endeavour to induce the king of Scotland to grant William a safe return to the realm, and his letters of protection for William's persons (sic, cf. f. 247) and goods, to receive him into the royal favour, and to grant him restitution of the fruits of his benefices, which have been sequestrated on account of the aforesaid. 'Dilectus filius Guillelmushoc erit admodum gratum nobis. Datum ut supra.' [This letter immediately follows the preceding letter to the bishop of Lincoln, and immediately precedes the following letter to the cardinal of St. Cross.] [See below, Reg. CCCLXXIV, f. 60.]
June 21.
Florence.
(f. 246d.)
To Nicholas, cardinal priest of St. Cross in Jerusalem, legate of the apostolic see. Exhorting him to urge by letter or otherwise the king of Scotland to receive into favour and protection William Coryser (sic), archdeacon of Teviotdale, a papal acolyte, and to cause restitution to be made to him of the fruits of his benefices, which have been sequestrated. For he has suffered much in the realm on account of the defence of the liberty of the church. 'Exhortamur tuam circumspectionemne ei flat iniuria. Datum Florentie die xxi mensis Junii pontificatus nostri anno quinto.'
June 12.
Florence.
(f. 247.)
To William de Foulis, keeper of the privy seal of James, king of Scotland. The pope has lately learned that William Croyser, archdeacon of Teviotdale, a papal acolyte, has been despoiled of his archdeaconry, and also lies without the royal favour because the pope took him under his protection and that of the apostolic see, inasmuch as he was defending by order of the said see ecclesiastical liberty. The pope therefore exhorts and requests the above William to endeavour to induce the king to receive William into his favour, to grant him his letters of protection for his person (cf. f. 246d) and goods, and cause the restitution of the fruits of his benefices. He is also to persuade the king not to permit ecclesiastical liberty and the rights of the said see to be trampled under foot. 'Dudum intelleximus quodad honorandam personam tuam. Datum Florentie die xii mensis Junii anno quinto.'
[Ibid.]
(f. 247d.)
To the three estates of the realm of Scotland. William Croyser, archdeacon of Teviotdale, a papal acolyte, whom the pope has taken under his protection and that of the apostolic see, has always been, as far as the pope has been able to see, faithful to the king and the realm, and has never done anything by word or deed which could have deservedly displeased the king. The pope has heard, however, that he suffers persecutions because, against the wish of certain persons, he has defended ecclesiastical liberty. The pope therefore requests and exhorts the three estates to intercede with the king on William's behalf, in order that he may be received again into favour, and that the fruits of his benefices may be restored to him. 'Dilectus filius Guillelmus …. In hoc facietis nobis complacentiam specialem. Datum etc.'
[Ead. dat.]
Florence.
(f. 252.)
To the bishops and nobles, the council of Henry, king of England. The pope etc., as above, f. 92. 'Venerabilibus fratribusconcilio …. Henrici regis Anglie illustris salutem etc. Scribimus carissimo in Christo filio nostro Henrico regi Anglie illustri nostras litteras in hec verba …..neque homines diutius esse possent. Datum Florentie etc.'
[1435.
Circ. April 23. (fn. 46)
Florence.]
(f. 252d.)
To Henry, king of England. The pope etc., as above, f. 91d, 'Placuit nobis multum …… hic est Christianissimus appellandus. Datum [Florentie] etc.'
1435.
April 12.
Florence.
(f. 255.)
To the bishop of Térouane (Morinen.), chancellor of France. The bishop of Amiens has petitioned the pope, on behalf of the above chancellor, as the chancellor has himself also done by letter, to confer the deanery of Rouen on [Giles Deschamps] (fn. 47) , a member of the chancellor's household. Several others petitioned previously for the said deanery, amongst them being Robert Anclon, on whose behalf many interceded by letter, and on whom some hoped that the pope would confer it. Desirous, however, of pleasing the chancellor, the pope has conferred it on his said servant. Whenever he can, the pope intends to grant the chancellor's petitions and to honour him, as the said bishop of Amiens will notify him more fully by letter. The same bishop has narrated to the pope divers things which were contained in the chancellor's letters to the bishop, the which the pope was glad to hear, since many persons spoke otherwise. 'Venerabilis frater noster episcopus Ambianen ….. cum multi varia loquerentur. Datum Florentie etc. die xii mensis Aprilis anno quinto.'
March 19.
Florence.
(f. 257d.)
To John, archbishop of York. Lately the pope conferred, motu proprio, on Thomas Chapeman, clerk, of the diocese of York, an abbreviator of apostolic letters, the canonry and prebend of Laghoton in York; and the pope exhorted the archbishop to favour Thomas in obtaining possession. Seeing that, as Thomas has reported to the pope, certain objections have been raised against the collation, the pope again exhorts the archbishop to intercede in order that Thomas may obtain possession. 'Dudum dilecto filio Thome ….. tua opera intercedente. Datum Florentie sub anulo nostro secreto die xiiii mensis Martii pontificatus nostri anno quinto.'
April 20.
Florence.
(f. 258d.)
To the same. Lately the pope conferred, motu proprio, on Thomas C[h]apeman, [clerk], of the diocese of York, an abbreviator of apostolic letters, the canonry and prebend of Lagheon (sic) in York; and the pope etc., verbatim as in the preceding, as far as the end. 'Dudum dilecto filio Thometua opera intercedente. Datum Florentie sub anulo nostro secreto xx die mensis Aprilis pontificatus nostri anno quinto.'
March 12.
Florence.
(f. 260.)
To the same. The pope has conferred, motu proprio, on Richard Pettelborth (rectius Petteworth), secretary of Henry, cardinal priest of St. Eusebius's, the canonry and prebend in York, which are void by the pope's promotion of Thomas [Bourchier], elect of Worcester, to that see, or which are to become void when he is consecrated, and which are specially reserved. The pope therefore exhorts the archbishop to permit and to help Richard to obtain possession. 'Propter multiplicia virtutum meritatua opera atque auxilio mediante. In quo nobis plurimum complacebis. Datum Florentie die xii mensis Martii pontificatus nostri anno quinto.'
Ibid.
(f. 260.)
To the bishop of Lichfield. The pope has conferred, motu proprio, on Adam Molegnis (sic), licentiate of civil law, a papal chamberlain, the canonry and prebend (fn. 48) in Lichfield which are void etc. as in the precediny. The pope therefore exhorts etc.as ibid. 'Cognoscentes probitatemtua opere (sic) atque auxilio intercedente, quod nobis plurimum erit gratum.Datum Florentie die xii mensis Martii pontificatus nostri anno quinto.'
Ibid. To John, bishop of Bath and Wells. The pope has conferred, motu proprio, on John River, B.C.L., who is present in the Roman court, the canonry and prebend in Wells which are void etc., as in the preceding. The pope therefore exhorts etc., as ibid. 'Dilecto filio Johannitua opera atque auxilio mediante, in quo nobis plurimum complacebis. Datum Florentie die xii mensis Martii pontificatus nostri anno quinto.'

4 Eugenius IV.

1434.
7 Kal. Oct.
Florence.
(f. 272.)
To the archbishop and chapter of Dublin. The pope has conferred on John Ardagh, I.U.B., the canonry and prebend of Newcastle [Lyons] (Novicastri) in Dublin, void or to become void by the promotion of William Silli (rectius Silk) to the church of Meath and his consecration, which is to take place, and specially reserved. The pope therefore exhorts etc., as above, f. 260, mutatis mutandis. 'Propter probitatemdignis laudibus commendari. Datum Florentie etc. vii Kal. Octobris anno quarto.'

6 Eugenius IV.

1436.
Dec. 31.
Bologna.
(f. 289d.)
To Lewis, archbishop of Rouen. From the relation of John, bishop of Térouane (archiepiscopi Morinen.), a papal referendary, and also from the continuation of Lewis's good works, the pope is daily informed of his continued affection towards the estate of the pope and the apostolic see, for which the pope commends him. Seeing that he desires to be informed by the said bishop whether the pope perseveres in the intention regarding his exaltation, (fn. 49) which the pope has otherwise written to him and has caused to be written to him by the said bishop, the pope answers that he has not at all changed. 'Ex relatione venerabilissolitam prudentiam et diligentiam prestare.Datum Bononie etc. die ultima mensis Decembris pontificatus nostri anno sexto.'
Sept. 15.
Bologna.
(f. 306.)
To Henry, king of England. Recommending to him Master Peter de Monte, I.U.D., papal notary, and nuncio and collector in the realm of England. 'Dilectum filium magistrumac sua probitas requirit. Datum Bononie die xx mensis Septembris anno sexto.' [See above, f. 93d.]
Ibid. To Henry, cardinal priest of St. Eusebius's, the cardinal of England. Recommending to him the above Peter de Monte. 'Existimamus jam notam esseita ut tuum favorem sibi sentiat profuisse. Datum ut supra.'

[7 Eugenius IV.]

[1437.
May 5.] (fn. 50)
Bologna.
(f. 325d.)
To Anthony, bishop of Urbino, legate of the apostolic see in the realm of Scotland. The pope has recently received his letters, etc., as above, f. 156d. 'Recepimus nuper tuas litterasex tuo opere et (cf. above, f. 156d.) laboribus consequatur. Datum Bononie etc.'

7 Eugenius IV.

1437.
April 9.
Bologna.
(f. 328.)
To Master Peter de Monte, I.U.D., apostolic notary, collector in the realm of England. Peter Lamanni, treasurer-general of the master [and] convent of Rhodes, of the order of St. John of Jerusalem, has need to go to England for certain affairs of his order, but as he is a Frenchman he dares not do so on account of the wars without a safe-conduct. The pope therefore wishes Master Peter to try to obtain from the king a safe-conduct for the said Peter and eight or ten members of his household for four or six months from the day of his entry into the realm. If he obtains it, he is to have it sent as the said treasurer shall write to him. 'Dilectus filius Petrusprout idem thesaurarius scribet tibi. Datum Bononie etc. die viiii mensis Aprilis pontificatus nostri anno septimo.'

Footnotes

1 For the contents of this Register see Cal. Lett. VII, p. 24 note. There are in the Vatican Archives several later copies of it, which evidently served as Formularia, e.g. Arm. XXXI. tom. 46, of about the middle of the sixteenth century. For a detailed study of the Vatican Registers of Eugenius IV see the article by Ottenthal, referred to in Cal. Lett., loc. cit.
2 In the register, not only the present letter, but also several similar letters have the incomplete date 'Datum Rome etc' or 'Datum Rome ut supra,' which might refer back to the first letter of the series, which occurs on f. 67d. and ends 'Datum Rome etc. xiii (rectius xiiii, as in the Barberini and Chigi MSS., infra) Kal.Martii anno secundo' rather than to the general letters Ad sacram Petri sedem' of 16 Kal. March anno 2 on f. 65d, mentioned in the following note The date adopted above. 14 Kal. March, 1433, is taken from the Vatican Library, Barberini MSS. Lat., No. 2001, f 149d. In that MS., not only the letter to the archbishop of Armagh. but several similar letters, have the date 'Datum Romœ xiiiiKal. Martii anno secundo'. This is also the date in MS. D. vii. 101 of the Chigi Library, Rome, f. 58r. = p. 115.
3 i.e. the general letters [Ad fut. rei mem.] Ad sacram Petri sedemDatum Rome etc. Sextodecimo Kal. Martii anno secundo [on ff. 65d–67d of the present Register, printed thence and from the 'MS. Alex. VII. p. 112' (i.e. the above Chigi MS.) and from other MSS., in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1433, § 5], setting forth the pope's reasons for abandoning his transfer of the Council from Basel to Bologna, and ordering all patriarchs, archbishops, bishops, abbots etc. and all who are bound to attend General Councils to appear in the Council of Basel within three months from the date of his present letters
4 i.e. the date of the pope's promotion to the see of Worcester of Thomas [Brouns,—not Bourchier. as in Eubel, Hierarchia. vol. II, ad. verb. Wigornien.] On the news of the voidance of Worcester by the death on Aug. 23, 1433, of bishop Polton at Basel, the pope, without consulting the king, made provision to Brouns, who was also at Basel. The king refused to accept Brouns, and insisted on his own candidate Thomas Bourchier. The death at Basel on Sept. 30, 1434, of John Langdon, bishop of Rochester, enabled the pope to end the conflict, in the way suggested by the king (undated letter in Brit. Mus., Cott. Cleop. E. iii. f. 67d.) namely, by compensating Brouns with provision on Feb. 21, 1435, of the see of Rochester, and complying, on the following March 9, with the king's demand in regard to Bourchier and provision of the see of Worcester. See Eubel, op. cit., ad verb. Roffen., and Le Neve—Hardy Fasti, II, p. 567 and III, pp. 60, 61. where the dates are misleading, but the confusion between Brouns and Bourchier less than in Eubel. See also below, ff. 81 sqq. and 88 sqq.
5 On Aug. 3, 1429, Le Neve—Hardy, I, p. 246.
6 According to Eubel, Hierarchia, vol. II, ad verb. 'Seguntin.', Peter, bishop of Osma, was on April 12, 1434 translated to Siguenza, on its voidance by the death of Alfonsus Carillo, cardinal deacon of St. Eustace's, who had been made administrator of the see by Martin V on Sept. 17, 1422 (ibid. vol. I.). The translation did not, however, take effect, and Alfonsus Carillo or Garillo, as above), a papal protonotary, was appointed administrator of the see on July 6, 1435. as being still void by the death of cardinal Alfonsus. Five years later, on May 9, 1440, he was appointed bishop, having presumably reached the lawful age
7 tertio. Raynaldi has wrongly printed 'certo.'
8 i.e. Thomas Bourchier. See above. f. 82 sqq., and below, f. 88 sqq.
9 Henricusinstititut promoueretur ad ecclesiam cathedralem, neque id obtinuit, nisi ('usque' wrongly in Raynaldus) ad presens, cum ei non deessent nisi tres anni, quamuis etiam sit doctor excellens. Itaque cum uideas nos
10 i.e. Alfonsus, cardinal of St. Eustace's. See the note above.
11 (Decreuerat ….. Martino pape Vtribuere plenam beneficiorum conferendi libertatem.)
12 The Barberini text has Eugenius etc. Datum etc.'
13 Concernent in Reg. CCCLIX and Chigi. The Barberini text has concernunt.
14 i.e. the date of his provision to Worcester. See above, f. 80d., note.
15 i.e. the date of the appointment of Cardinal Albergati to represent the pope at the congress of Arras, in Raynaldus, an. 1435, § 3, and below, Reg. Vat. CCCLXXIII, f. 189.
16 i.e. the date of Peter de Monte's appointment as collector, below, Reg. CCCLXXIII, ff. 177d. sqq.
17 Immediately after the above letter to king Henry and before the above letter to the king's council, there occurs in the Barberini MS., ff. 203d.–204r., a similar letter to James, king of Scotland (Scotie), recommending the above Master Peter de Monte, I.U.D., apostolic notary. whom the pope has appointed collector of the papal camera in the realm of Scotland—'Propter plurimarum virtutum dotes …. reuerentiam etc., usque in finem ut in precedenti. Datum ut supra' [i.e circ. April 21, 1435, the date of his appointment as collector in Scotland, below. Reg. CCCLXXIII, f 180d] Chigi, f. 76d. = p. 152, contains the same letter to king James as the Barberini, but it there ends slightly differently, viz, '… reuerentiam etc. usque in finem ut in prescripta. Datum Florentie ut supra.' This letter to king James does not occur in Reg. CCCLIX.
18 The letter to cardinal Beaufort is immediately followed in Barb. on f. 205r. by a short 'Similiter dilecto filio nobili viro Hunfrido duci Cloucestric,' and in Chigi, f. 76d, p. 152, by a like 'Similiter dilecto filio nobili viro Hunffrido duci Gloucestrie.' Reg CCCLIX omits this reference to the pope's letter to duke Humphrey.
19 i.e. approximately the same date as the letters to king Henry and the royal council, etc., above f. 91d. sqq.
20 The limits of Eugenius IV's stay at Ferrara. The date of the pope's letter is probably nearer the latter of the above two dates. It was at the pope's intervention that on April 29 (and again on July 11), 1437, the king conditionally agreed to allow the duke of Orleans to go to Normandy in order to help to bring about peace (Fadera, orig. ed., X. p. 663). The duke did not fulfil the conditions, but the king nevertheless, on July 17, 1438 (ibid, p 707). consented. on condition of a prescribed sum being paid by the duke before Oct. 1, to have him led to the English coast before Feb. 15, 1439, thence to make his way to Normandy for the purpose of treating for peace. The money not having been raised by Oct. 1, the arrangement fell through for the time and it was not till May 8, 1439 that the duke's keeper. Sir John Stourton, removed him from his place of confinement, in order to take him to the coast and so to Calais (Stevenson, Wars of the English in France, I, 432.) The pope's letter may thus be placed between Oct. 1, 1438 and Jan. 19, 1439.
21 The king's letter to the pope (to which the above is the pope's reply), complaining of the appointments which the pope is rumoured to have made very recently (nuperrime) to Seéz and St. Sever, occurs in Williams, Bekynton Correspondence, I., pp. 65–67, and is dated May 10. 1439. The king's reply to the pope's explanation occurs ibid., I. pp. 23–26. The king's letter is there undated, but in another copy (ibid., I., p. 65) it is dated Feb. 6, 1439[–40.]. The date of the pope's letter lies therefore between May 10, 1439. and Feb. 6, 1440. And as the pope says that he has received the king's letter of complaint 'his diebus', the missing date is May 10, 1439. plus the time of the transit of the king's letter, plus 'these days'.
22 'Vacanti iam pluribus annis ecclesie Sagien.' See the notes in Eubel Hierarchta, vol. II., under Sagien., Lucionen. and Carnoten.
23 John de Pérusse d' Escars, in 1438. See ibid., under Sagien.
24 Lewis de Luxembourg, translated from Térouane (Morinen.). Oct. 24, 1436.See ibid., ad. loc.
25 Richard de Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, appointed lieutenant-general and governor of the realm of France, July 16, 1437 (Fœdera, orig. ed. X, p. 674), died April 30, 1439.
26 By the death of abbot John de Calnario, Oct. 27 (or Nov. 26), 1438, as in Gallia Christiana, I, col. 1179, which states that 'Petrus de Berau al. Veran' obtained possession of the abbey as perpetual administrator by papal authority ' circa annum 1440,' the monks having been unable in a whole year 'toto anno' to agree on the election of a successor to abbot John. The Gallia implies that Peter retained the commenda until 'circiter 1454,' which conflicts with the condition laid down in the pope's letter of Dec. 14, 1446, below, Reg. CCCLXIX, f. 52d.
27 See Bekynton Correspondence, I. p. 66.
28 The letter belongs to the period of Eugenius IV's second stay at Florence, Jan. 19, 1439—March 7, 1443 (Eubel, Hierarchia, II, p. 7, note). The pope's reference to the election of the anti-pope Felix V places it after Nov. 5, 1439 (Raynaldi, an 1439, § 33). It is also later than the despatch of the anti-pope's encyclicals and envoys, and seems, in fact, to be the pope's reply to the letter of king Henry, of May 28, 1440, denouncing the schismatical action of the Council of Basel (Bekynton Correspondence, II, pp. 91–94).
29 On Sept. 9, 1439, Eugenius IV appointed Lewis Coutinicho (Coutinho) to the see of Viseu, void by the deprivation of Lewis de Amaral, condemned as a partisan of the Council of Basel, 'declaratione Ferrariæ et Florentiæ successive contra eum facta' (Eubel, Hierarchia, Vol. II, ad verb, 'Visen.'). The present letters complains that the pope's nominee has been despoiled by the king's court after having held possession for two months in virtue of the pope's provision. Its date cannot therefore be earlier than about the beginning of 1440, and is of course prior to July 1, 1440, the date of the next following letter, below. f. 125.
30 i.e. the above deprivation and promotion.
31 Jan 24, 1438 (Creighton, Papacy, II, 1899 impression, p. 319).
32 June 25, 1439 (ibid., III, 1900 impression p. 17).
33 Felix V, elected Nov. 5, 1439, ibid., III. p.22), crowned July 24, 1440 ibid., III, p. 24).
34 On ff. 127d–128d of Reg. CCCLIX (Barberini, ff. 314r–315d, Chigi, ff. 128r–129r = pp. 255–257), the pope writes to king Alfonso that he has already sufficiently replied to the king's repeated letters on behalf of the above deprived bishop. But in case the king has not received the pope's letters, the pope will reply briefly to the king's last letters of 7 Kal. April [1441]. The pope protests against the king's continuing to give to Lewis [de Amaral], sometime bishop of Viseu, a deprived schismatic and heretic, the title of 'bishop of Viseu,' in contempt of the authority of the pope and the apostolic see, and again sets forth his misdeeds at Basel, etc. The pope requests the king to desist from writing any more such letters. The pope will never absolve the said Lewis unless he sees him contrite, and unless Lewis Cotinho, bishop of Viseu, first gets possession of his church. The pope has made provision to the church of Silves (Siluien.) of another person acceptable to the king. (The date of this letter 'Satis jam respondimustue serenitati innotescet. Datum Florentie etc.' [which is partially printed in Raynaldi Annales, an. 1441, § 8, from ' cod. MS.Alex. VII (i.e. the Chigi MS.) pag. 255, and therefore with the incomplete Datum Florentiæ etc.] is posterior to May 22. 1441. the date of the provision of Rodericus Didaci to the see of Silves. See Eubel, Hierarchia. under 'Silven.') On f. 129 is a letter evidently of the same date, 'Scripsit nobis sepius regia serenitasprout videre poteris per litteras nostras. Datum Florentie etc.', to the Infante Peter, duke of Coimbra, regent of the realms of Portugal and Algarve, in which the pope complains of the king's repeated letters in favour of the above deprived bishop, and of the regent's name appearing in such letters, and adds that he is replying to the king, as the regent will see.
35 i.e., the date of the translations of Lewis de Luxembourg from Térouane to Rouen, and John le Jeune from Amiens to Térouane (Eubel, Hierarchia. II. ad 'Rothomagen.' and Morinen.') The pope had entered Bologna on the previous April 22 (Eubel, ibid., p. 7).
36 The address 'Duci Eboracen.' is added in the margin both in Reg. CCCLIX and in the Barberini and Chigi MSS. The duke of York was, in fact, regent of France from April, 1436, to April, 1437 (Stubbs, III, p. 123, from the Ordinances of the Privy Council).
37 The pope's nomination proved by no means pleasing to the duke of Burgundy. For the consequent dispute see Plancher, Histoire de Bourgogne, ad. loc. Reg. CCCLIX records other conflicts in which Eugenius IV became involved on account of his provisions, e.g. with Wladislav, king of Poland (f. 140), and Charles, king of France (f. 143).
38 i.e. the date on which Eugenius IV. entered Bologna, having left Florence on April 18. He remained at Bologna till Jan. 14, 1438, when he went to Ferrara. [Eubel, Hierarchia, vol. II. p. 7, note.]
39 6 Non. (rectius Id.) July, anno 6 i.e. 1436, being the date of the appointment of Anthony, bishop of Urbino, as nuncio to Scotland. See below, Reg. CCCLXXIV, f. 102d, sqq.
40 So spelt also in the Barberini and Chigi MSS.
41 For this date, see below, f. 325d.
42 Bishop Philip Morgan died Oct. 25, 1435 (Le Neve—Hardy, Fasti, I, p. 338.)
43 The letter belongs to the period of Eugenius IV's second residence at Florence, Jan. 19, 1439—March 7, 1443 (Eubel, Hierarchia, II p. 7, note), and its date is probably nearer to the earlier limit. For the king's letters in behalf of Obizis, of safe-conduct, dated July 5, 1438, and of credence, addressed to the pope and dated June 5, 1438 (Bekynton Correspondence, I, p. 60), apparently refer to his intention, as mentioned in the pope's letter, to send envoys to the Council of Ferrara—Florence. Before October 1 of the same year he left the Roman court in order to return to England (see below, Reg. CCCLXVII, ff. 42, 119.) Allowing time enough for Obizis to get sufficiently far on his return journey to fall into the hands of the duke, for the news to reach the pope, and for the pope to complain and the duke to reply, it may be concluded that the date of the letter is not long after the pope arrived at Florence, viz. Jan. 19, 1439.
44 Sic both in Reg. CCCLIX and the Barberini MS.
45 For this part II, viz. ff. 221–335, of Reg. CCCLIX, see the note in Cal. Lett. VII, p. 24. There is nothing corresponding to it in the Barberini and Chigi MSS.
46 For this date see above, f. 91d, note.
47 A blank space in the Register: 'dilecto filio familiari tuo. According to Gallia Christiana, vol. XI, col. 119. Aegidius Deschamps, nephew of the bishop of Coutances, was elected dean of Rouen on March 9, obtained possession on March 30, 1435, and died Oct. 31, 1438.
48 Probably of Colwich. See Le Neve-Hardy, Fasti, I, p. 592.
49 Lewis de Luxembourg was made cardinal of SS. Quatuor Coronati, Dec. 18. 1439 (Eubel Hierarchia, II, p. 7).
50 The letter is evidently later than 1437. Feb. 20, the date of the murder of James I, the news of which the pope says he has received (see above, f. 156d) It is also earlier than 1438. Jan. 14. when the pope left Bologna. The two letters which immediately precede that on f. 325d in Reg. CCCLIX are dated, 'Die v mensis Maii anno septimo.' If Datum Bononie. etc.' be interpreted to mean 'Datum Bononie ut supra,' May 5, 1437 would be the missing date.