Chapter 1
Origins of the grant of the town of Bristol

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Bristol Record Society

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Henry Bush

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1828

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5-42

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'Chapter 1: Origins of the grant of the town of Bristol', Bristol Town Duties: A collection of original and interesting documents [etc.] (1828), pp. 5-42. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=108163 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Bristol Town Duties. A collection of original and interesting documents.

Origin of the Grant of the Town of Bristol.

On consulting our early Historians we find, that for the most part English Towns were originally Royal demesnes, wherein, although the Barons, Earls, and other great men were allowed to appropriate a certain description of lands and tenements for the use of their vassals, yet that the major part of the inhabitants of towns and villages, held immediately under the King, paid all tolls, quit rents, and heriots to his Officer, and were under the government of a Reeve or Bailiff. Whatever has been written concerning Bristol before the reign of William the Conqueror, it is authentically recorded, that in his time, it was as absolute a Royal demesne as any town in England, and it so continued during the King's life, who dying in 1087, his son William, surnamed Rufus, succeeded him, who confirmed the honor of Gloucester on Robert Fitz Hamon, son of Hamon, Lord of Corboile, in Normandy, as a reward for the many services he had rendered his late father, as will be seen in the following style in the Charters, which were granted him, viz.:— 'Sir Robert Fitz Hamon, by the Grace of God, Prince of Glamorgan, Earl of Corboile, Baron of Thorigny and Granville, Lord of Gloucester, Bristol, Tewksbury, and Cardiff, Conqueror of Wales, near kinsman of the King, and General of his Highness's Army in France.' Some time after this, Robert Fitz Hamon married Sybilla, by whom he had four daughters, which continues his history until the retaking of Falaize, in Normandy, when he received a wound in the head, of which he died in March, 1107. After this event it appears, the King was unwilling that so great an estate, as the Honor of Gloucester, should be divided amongst daughters, and that accordingly, he gave Mabile, the eldest of them, to wife to his natural son Robert, and afterwards created him first Consul and Earl of Gloucester. It was this Prince who rebuilt Bristol Castle, and gave every tenth stone towards the building of a Chapel to the Virgin Mary, in the Priory of St. James's, which he had founded. He died in October, 1147, and was buried in the Choir of St. James's Priory; he left four sons and one daughter; the eldest son, William, succeeded him in the honor of Gloucester, and married Hawise, daughter of the Earl of Leicester, and founded the Abbey of Keynsham, and was buried there in 1183, leaving three daughters; upon which King Richard bestowed Avisa, the youngest of them, and with her the Earldom of Gloucester, and Lordship of Tewksbury, &c. on his brother, John, Earl of Moreton, afterwards King of England. Soon after the accession of John to the Crown, having no issue, he divorced himself from Avisa, and in 1213, he gave her in marriage to Geoffry de Mandeville, Earl of Essex, while he retained the Town of Bristol and the Gloucester Estate in his own hands, which, upon his decease, were taken possession of by his son, Henry 3.

In 1227, the 11th of Henry 3, the Men of Bristol are recorded to have paid a fine of £245. a-year, for the Farm of the Town of Bristol, for the term of eight years; during the existence of which, the following curious circumstance is recorded, viz—that in the year 1230, the Bailiffs were served with the King's mandate, directing them to allow to his relation, Eleanor, out of the rent of the Farm of the Town, one robe of scarlet and a garment of pale silk, &c.

In the next century, the Farm of the Town was demised successively to different persons, viz.—26th Henry 3, for twenty years, to his men of Bristol; 18th Edward 2, to Hugh le Despencer, at a rent of £210. per annum; 4th Edward 3, at a rent of £240. per annum; 7th Edward 3, for ten years, at £150. per annum; 45th and 47th Edward 3, to Walter de Derby; 1st Richard 2, to John Woodrow, for two years; and in the 18th year of the same King it was demised for twelve years, at £100. per annum. After which, Henry 4, on his marriage with Johanna, in June, in the 4th year of his reign, settled upon her, amongst other things, the £100. payable for the Farm, and £20. for the rent of the Flesh Shambles, which the following documents will explain.

Amongst the Records of the Court of Chancery, preserved in the Tower of London, to wit, on the Patent Roll for the 4th year of the reign of King Henry IV, part 2, membrane 1. is contained thus:—

The King, to all to whom, &c. greeting. Know ye, that, whereas, on account of the very great love and sincere affection which we have and bear towards the person of our dear consort, Johanna, Queen of England, of our special grace, lately we have granted to our same consort, ten thousand marks, to be received annually at our Exchequer, for the whole of her life, at the Terms of Easter and Saint Michael, by equal portions, or until the time that we shall have provided for our said consort out of lands, tenements, rents, or other possessions, to the value aforesaid per annum, to hold for the term of her life, in the name of dower, or dowry, or otherwise. Of our especial grace we have granted to our same consort, certain castles, manors, lands, tenements, customs, farms, towns, and other places, and possessions to a certain value, in part satisfaction and abatement of the ten thousand marks aforesaid, to hold in part of her dower, or dowry aforesaid, as in our letters patent thereof made more fully, is contained. We, because that we have been informed, that our letters aforesaid, as to the grant of the castles, manors, lands, tenements, and other places and possessions aforesaid, for that by the common law of our kingdom of England, and by the rolls, memoranda, records, and evidences remaining in our Exchequer, being of little worth and of none effect, they were not able in the same Exchequer to make allowance, and a great part of the same they have not granted to our same consort. Of our special grace, at the request of our said consort, and because that she hath restored unto our Chancery, to be cancelled, our said letters, as to the castles, manors, and other places, matters, and possessions aforesaid, we have granted to our said consort, fifty pounds, seventeen shillings and six-pence per annum of the farm of the town of Ipswich; the hundreds of Bosmere and Claydon, in the county of Suffolk, after the value of £20. per annum; the customs of whatsoever goods (fn. 1) and merchandises brought into our kingdom of England, and taken out from the same kingdom, (wool, leather, and wool fells only excepted) to us due, or in any way to us and our heirs hereafter belonging or appertaining in the port of the town of Great Yarmouth: and in all ports and places from thence unto Blakeney, (fn. 2) and from that place on one part, and unto Tilbury on the other part, to have, collect, and receive, by herself and her deputies, to the value of two hundred pounds per annum, which lately were in the hands of George Felbryg, Knight; the Castle of Bristol, with all those lands and tenements, and the flesh-shambles which belonged to Anne, late Queen of England, in the town of Bristol, after the value of £20. per annum; the Farm of £100. per annum of the town of Bristol, with the houses, shops, cottages, stalls, tofts, gardens, mills, pools, tyne of the Castle, rents, landgable tolls, pleas of courts, fairs, markets, and all other jurisdictions, customs, and appurtenants of the town aforesaid, and suburbs of the same, which the Mayor and Commonalty of the same town were bound to render annually to us and our heirs for the same town, which town Lord Richard, the 2nd after the Conquest, late King of England, on the 18th day of February, in the 18th year of his reign, committed or granted, by his letters patent, to the aforesaid Mayor and Commonalty, to have and to hold, to them and their successors, from the Feast of Saint Michael, then last past, unto the end of twelve years, then next following, and fully to be completed; rendering, therefore, annually to the aforesaid late King, one hundred pounds, at the Terms of Easter and Saint Michael, by equal portions, and the reversion of the same town, when it should happen, and with all the shops, cottages, stalls, tofts, gardens, mills, pools, tyne of the castle, rents, landgable tolls, pleas of courts, fairs, and markets, and all other jurisdictions, customs and appurtenants of the town aforesaid, and suburbs of the same, with the appurtenants after the aforesaid term.

Among the Records in the Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer's Office, in the Exchequer, in the 13th year of the reign of King Henry 6th, Roll 6th, there is as follows:—

Whereas, Lord Henry the 4th, late King of England, by his letters patent, here enrolled in the Exchequer of records, dated the 4th day of June, in the 4th year of his reign, amongst other things, in his letters patent contained, granted to Joan, Queen of England, his consort, during her life, the castle and town of Bristol, with divers tenements, the flesh-shambles, in the same town, which were extended per annum at one hundred and twenty pounds, to have and to hold, to his same consort, in part of her dower, or dowry, at the value aforesaid. And afterwards the same late King, by a certain other his Charter here enrolled in the Exchequer of record, dated the 26th day of June, in the said 4th year, amongst other things, in the same Charter contained, granted for himself, and his heirs, to the aforesaid Johanna, Queen of England, his consort, that she should have for the whole term of her life, in all and singular, the castles, lordships and manors, towns, lands, and tenements; also in all other places, to her, by the same late King, assigned, in dower, or otherwise, for the term of her life. The same Queen afterwards, by licence of the aforesaid late King Henry, by a certain indenture, dated the 20th day of November, in the 10th year of the reign of the aforesaid late King Henry, which the same late King Henry confirmed by his Charter; amongst other things in the same indenture contained, granted to John Fyssher, then Mayor, and to the Commonalty of the said town of Bristol, and to their successors, during the life of her, the Queen, to be delivered to the bailiffs and officers of the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, for the whole life of the aforesaid Queen, by the hands of the Sheriff of the county and town of Bristol, and their successors, Sheriffs of the same, for the time being, which same grants the present Lord, the King, by his letters patent, dated the 12th day of January, in the 1st year of his reign, hath granted and confirmed to the aforesaid Mayor and Commonalty of the said town of Bristol, and their successors, to hold in the form aforesaid.'

On the death of Queen Johanna, in the beginning of July, 1437, at Havering, in Essex, the Farm of the Town of Bristol reverted to the King; and Clement Bagot, Mayor and Escheator, rendered, in consequence, at the Exchequer, an Account of the Receipts of the Town, which plainly shows what the Revenues consisted of.

Among the Records in the Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer's Office, in the Exchequer, there is found as follows:—

Bristol,: Rental of the Stalls of the Lord the King in the town of Bristol, made in the time of Clement Bagot, Mayor, Thomas Hore, and Thomas Balle, Bailiffs of the town of Bristol (to wit) from the Feast of Saint Michael the Archangel, in the 16th year of the reign of King Henry VI, after the Conquest of England to the same feast in the then next following year, for the whole year:—

"The First Range.
s.d.
Of John Toppe, for one stall there100
Of Richard Priour, for one stall there80
Of another stall there60
Of John Newman and John Hoby, for two stalls for selling fish68
The Second Range.
Of the same John Newman and John Hobe, for two other stalls for selling fish68
For another stall there40
Of Dionisius Bowcher, for one stall50
Of John Bertram, for one stall80
The Third Range.
Of Walter Southmede, for one stall240
Of John Badren, for one stall160
Of Richard Lucas, for one stall120
Of William Burye, for one stall100
For another stall, vacant for the whole year00
Fourth Range.
Of Richard Walshe, for one stall70
Of Simone Canyngs, for one stall100
Of Thomas Southmede, for one stall100
Of William Pascowe, for one stall160
Of Nicholas Nete, for one stall160
Fifth Range.
Of John Bedelle, for one stall200
Of Richard Belle, for one cellar under aforesaid, and for one stall160
Of Walter Baker, for one stall50
Of John Coke, for one stall50
Of William Russell, for one stall100
Sixth Range.
Of Robert Hure, for one stall50
Of Thomas Singleday, for one stall120
Of John Goldesmyth, for one stall, which he held for the two terms of the year aforesaid50
Of John Kere, for one stall134
Of Walter Kere, for one stall134
Sum total£1400

Bristol,: Rents of the Lord the King of the town of Bristol, annually levied in the same town, called Landgable, in the time of Clement Bagot, Mayor of the said Town of Bristol (to wit) from the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel, from the 16th year of the reign of King Henry 6th, to the same feast next following:—

s.d.
Of Henry Scryven, for John Dene and Thomas Ailleward, for a certain old tenement in the Market, which John Coton lately held20
Of Christian Haill, for William Drewe, for a certain tenement which John Dyos lately held30
For the tenement of the Vicar of Saint Augustine's, towards Frome06
Of Richard White, iremonger, for the tenement Cokbell, which John Droys lately held90
Of William de Romseye, for William Atte Tolseld, for a certain garden which John Erley lately held012
Of John Hobbys, for the King's garden, upon Michael's Mount, which belonged to Christian Clerke, which Thomas Seysell held160
Of Michael Dame, for a tenement and garden, which formerly belonged to Peter the Goldsmith, which John Gosselyn now holds in the market134
Of Robert Cadbury, for a tenement formerly belonging to Peter Myperty, in Wynche-street, which Lewis Brewer now holds50
Of Richard Suller, for a tenement of a certain Matilda Saleier, near Frome-bridge, which Thomas Lombaid now holds120
Of Joyce Reyny, for the burial ground of the Jews, near Mount Saint Brandon, which William Cromale Coke now holds20
Of Alicia, the daughter of John Toller, for a certain house and chamber near Little Lafford, which John Fynch lately held50
Of Reginald Knap, for a certain garden in Horsstreete, per annum20
Of William Pownham, for a waste place there012
Of John Haill, for a certain tenement in Marsschstreete, which the Master of the Fraternity of St. John the Baptiste now holds100
For the tenement of Robert de Berkeley, in Brodemede, which John Cokkes holds06
Of Joan Brydporte, for the corner near the High Cross, which John Frampton, Knight, now holds50
Of the tenement of John Cleveden, which Henry Aleyn holds134
For the tenement of Gilbert Fraunceys, for Robert Bradeney, which Nicholas Excestre lately held06
Of Richard Dene and his heirs, for one tenement in Fish-streete, which John Joye lately held68
For one garden, opposite the Watering-place, which John Rederys lately held20
For one garden, opposite the Mendicant Brethren, which John Bagpath now holds02
Of one tenement in Wynche-street, which William Herberd holds72
Sum£600

Landgable of the Lord the King, within the walls of the town of Bristol, for Trinity ward, annually levied

For the tenement of Richard Tylly, for William Atte Lane, which John Frampton, Knight, holds0
For a tenement of Isabella de Barry, which the aforesaid John now holds3
For the tenement of Roger Cantok, called Oxenfordesyme, which John Coke holds0
For a tenement of the same Roger, which John Budde holds0
For a tenement of the Abbot of St. Augustine's, which David Segodyn now holds0
For the tenement of John Pollard, for Thomas Mountsorell, which Edmund Beirden lately held015
For the tenement of the late Walter Wynter, which Henry Maye holds011
For the tenement of Peter Bowyer, which Geffrey Draper holds0
Of Walter Harvy, for John Adryan, which the Master of St. John's holds015
For the tenement of Nicholas Excestre, which William Oundy, tailor, holds0
For the tenement of the same Nicholas, which Thomas Markes holds0
For the tenement of the same Nicholas, for Thomas Kenfeke, which Alan Wryngton lately held0
For the tenement of the Abbot of Malmesbury, which Parkhous holds0
Of Bernard Atte Welde, for Walter Frampton, which Mark Williams now holds0
Of the same Bernard, for Geoffrey Compe, which Richard Assch lately held0
Of Richard Page, for Peter Oriall, which Thomas Baker lately held, in St. John's-street0
For the tenement of Walter Hervy, for Philip Tyverton, which William Fauconer now holds013½
Of the tenement of Roger Cantok, for Thomas Castelman, which John Godeman, barbour, now holds0
For the tenement of the same Roger, which John Denys now holds0
For the tenement of John Weston, for the Prioress of Barogh, which Roger Coubet now holds0
For the tenement of Thomas Fyssch, which John Bullok now holds015
For the tenement of John Weston, which John Philipes, brewer, now holds0
For the tenement of the Prior of Saint James, for James Cokkes, which Thomas Ball now holds015
Sum14

Division of the Blessed Mary of the Market-place:—

s.d.
For a tenement of the Abbot of Saint Augustine's, which John Gosselyn now holds04
For a tenement of the same Abbot, which Roger Merston now holds0
For a tenement of the same Abbot, which John Heddon lately held0
For a tenement of the same Abbot, which the aforesaid John, lately held in Wynch-street07
For a tenement of the same Abbot, which Laurence Coteler now holds0
For the tenement of John Stephenys, of Gloucester, which Thomas Ricard, smith, now holds0
For the tenement of Ade Beauston, which Robert Herberd now holds0
For a tenement of Thomas Tenbaud, which John Marschfeld, the bruere, holds011¼
For a tenement of Simone de Ely, which the same John holds0
For a tenement of the Abbot of St. Augustine's, for John Legrave, which Geoffry Held now holds015
For the tenement of the same Abbot, which John — now holds0
For of the sister of Dionisius Lanford0
For the tenement of Richard Horncastell, which John Monke holds, in High-street0
For the tenement of John Kerdyf, for Alicia Monster, now there is one garden, which William Frome lately held0
For a tenement of Thomas London, of Excestre, which William Fryscton lately held of Thomas Brak0
Of Richard Welle, for Henry Adryan, which James Cokke held0
For a tenement of John Tyke, for Thomas Cordaner0
Of the Abbot of St. Augustine's, which Thomas Chandeler held0
For a tenement of Richard Calne, for John Legrave, which John Nabbe holds015
For a tenement of John Trumbell, for John Porteshede01
For a tenement of John Atte Welle, for Simon Adryan, which Bernard Brewer lately held0
For a tenement of Robert Tavenor, for Adam Bucton, which Thomas Castelman, brewer, now holds0
For a tenement of William Coke, which Simon Olyver lately held0
For the tenement of Richard Welle, for Henry Caume, which Elizabeth Vyell lately held0
For the tenement of William Coke, for the tenement of John Monachie, which Reginald Tavener lately held0
For the tenement of Richard Calne, for William Cordvaner, which John Gower now holds0
Sum14

Landgable of the Division of All-Saints:—

s.d.
For a tenement of the Master of St. Laurence, which John Asshton lately held0
For the tenement of John Horncastell, which John Tornor, mason, held0
For the tenement of a certain Margarete Cantak, which Mabillia Bond held0
For a tenement of Simon de Ely, which Henry Tyler, bruer, lately held0
For the tenement of Ely Pye, for Walter Haill, which Thomas Williams lately held0
For the tenement of Robert Dapperly, for Henry Calne, which Nicholas Febyan held0
For the tenement of the Prior of St. James, which Philip Excestre holds0
For a tenement of Richard Tylly, which Edward Goldsmyth holds0
For a tenement of the same Richard, which Walter Gylas lately held0
For a tenement of the same Richard, which Thomas Crosseman lately held0
For a tenement of Edward Frensch and Richard Tylly, for Thomas Kenseke, which William Frome lately held015
For a tenement of William de la More, for John Fable, which Philip Goulde holds011½
For a tenement of Richard Tylly, which Walter Gylas lately held0
For a tenement of William Hasfeld, for Adam Wynton, which the aforesaid Walter held0
Of John Cleve, for Adam de Wynton, which the aforesaid Walter held0
For a tenement of the same John, for Peter Martre, which the aforesaid Walter held0
For a tenement of Walter Wyght, for Agness Haill, lately held0
For a tenement of Cecilie Clerke there0
For a tenement of Robert Smyth, which Simon Canynges lately held015
For a tenement of William Daxe, which John Somervyle lately held0
Of Philip Swayne, for Simon de Beryton, which Thomas Clerke lately held0
For a tenement of Robert Passer, for Geoffrey Stele, which Auketyll Moyne lately held0
For a tenement of the same Robert, for the same Geoffrey0
For the Chantry of Richard Spicer, for four messuages and three shops, upon the back Abbone, which the Chaplains of the same Chantry hold012
For a tenement of Thomas Updiche, which John Castel lately held012
For a tenement of Richard Wodehull, which Henry Roper lately held07
For a tenement of John Romney, which Thomas Roper lately held0
For a tenement of Hugh Payn, for Peter Martre, which John Clowde lately held0
Far a tenement in the Corner, which William Chestre now holds0
Sum154

Landgable of the Division of St. Anthony:—

Of the Prior of Bradley, for two shops near the church of St. Andrew, which Nicholas Taillour now holds0
Of a tenement of John Haule, for Johanna Lydeard, which John Marle holds012½
For a tenement of the said John, for the said Johanna, which Hugh Hunte holds015
For a tenement of John Dount, for Walter Pollard, which William Atte Reven lately held0
For a tenement of Thomas Russell, for Robert Bawdeney, which John Sheipard lately held0
For a tenement of Alexander Boufaunt, for Robert Bawdeney0
Of Gervais Kruy, for John Snowe, which John Barstoke held0
Of Henry Longe, for William Wylde, which William Cary lately held0
For a tenement of the Church of St. Werburge, which Walter Milton lately held0
For a tenement of Richard Edmund, for William Kerdyf, which John Excestre holds0
For a tenement of the same Richard, for the same William02
For a tenement of the same Richard, for the said William02
For a tenement of Stephen Monstephen, for Richard Joevene, which John Fulbrooke lately held, opposite the Church of St. Laurence0
For a tenement of Wyburgh, for Simone Portour, which Hugh Hunte lately held in Smal-streete0
For a tenement of John Godeman, for John Lydeard, which Walter Saymour held0
For a tenement of the same John, for the said Johanna0
For a tenement of Roger Beausflour, for the said Johanna, which John Canynges held011¼
For a tenement of Thomas Grave, which Stephen Beke lately held015
For a tenement of Philip Wodeward, which Henry Spelly held0
For a tenement of Thomas Romeney, which Richard Puryton held0
For a tenement of John Atte Leler, for Gilbert Spicer, which Walter Frampton lately held015
For a tenement of Hugh Turtle, in Brod streete, which Edmund Arthur lately held015
For a tenement of Peter Fraunceys, in Brod streete, which lately Thomas Erle held05
For a tenement of the same Peter, for the same Isabella, which Robert Meade held0
For a tenement of the same Peter, for the said Isabella, which John Langton held0
For a tenement of the same Peter, for the said Isabella, which John Brugwater lately held0
For a tenement of John de Romney, for Joan Lydeard05
For a tenement of Roger Tornor, for Roger Cantok, which John Fowen, held0
Sum14

Landgable of the Lord the King without the walls of the town of Bristol:—

For a tenement of the Abbot of St. Augustine's, which William Selewode holds015
For a tenement of William Portour, formerly of William de Cordarye010
For a tenement of John London, which William Pomfret lately held020
For the tenement of Hugh Langbrugge, which the Chantry of Edward le Frenche now holds010
For the tenement of Michael Whittawer, for Walter Hoker010
For the tenement of John Warre, tannator, in Brod meade010
For the tenement of the said John, for a debt to Walter0
For a tenement of the same John, for Geoffrey Stoke0
For a tenement of Henry Shipman, which John Devenyssh held015
For a tenement of the Abbot of Saint Augustine's, which Thomas Botener held015
For a tenement of Walter Polleville, which John Vyell holds0
For a tenement of William Whyte, which John Cleve lately held018
For a tenement of Thomas Roper, which Hugh Carleton lately held, now it is a great garden015
For a tenement of Edithe Swetyng, which the Prioress of Brogh holds015
For a tenement of Richard Tylly, which Edmund Arthur held015
For a tenement of St. John's in le Redelond0
For a tenement of William Gylmyn, Clerk, which the Abbot of Moreton holds015
For a tenement of Roger Dapperly, which the Prior of the Kalendaries holds07
For a tenement of William de Stapilton, which the Prioress of Brogh holds015
For a tenement of William Haill, which John Vyell holds015
For a tenement of Walter Midcorne, which the Procurators of the Church of the Holy Trinity holds0
For a tenement of the Prior of St. James0
Of Roger Wylde, for a tenement of the Blessed Mary Magdalene, which John Combe held015
For a tenement of William Taillor, which Hugh Carleton holds, in Irichmede0
For a tenement of Geoffrey Fraunceys, for Alan Wryngton, now William More holds015½
For a tenement of Nicholas Roulgh, which Hugh Carleton holds015
For a tenement of Thomas Updiche, which the Mendicant Brethren hold0
For a tenement of the same Thomas, for the same Brethren0
For a tenement of the same Thomas, for the same Brethren0
For a tenement of the same Thomas, for the said Brethren0
For a tenement of the same Thomas, for the same Brethren0
For a tenement of the same Thomas, for the same Brethren0
For a tenement of the same Thomas, for the same Brethren0
For a tenement of the same Thomas, for the same Brethren0
For a tenement of the same Thomas, for the same Brethren0
For a tenement of the Master of St. Laurence, which Nicholas Netherbury lately held0
For a tenement of Richard Calne, which John Caudeny lately held0
For a tenement of Stephen Vye, which the Procurators of the Chapel upon the Bridge Abbone held0
For a tenement of Philip Kerwent, which Thomas Wellyngton now holds0
For a tenement of Thomas Dygell, which John Clyve held0
For a tenement of the same Thomas, for the said John05
For a tenement of the same Thomas, for the said John0
For a tenement of the Abbot of Saint Augustine's, which Thomas Boteler now holds0
For a tenement of Henry Shipman, which William Worcestre, senior held0
For a tenement of the same Henry, for Robert Snake07
For a tenement of the same Henry, for the same Robert0
For a tenement of John Daxbrigge, which Yevan Fluyt holds015
For a tenement of Roger Turtle, which William Warmystre held0
For a tenement of the same Roger, for the same William0
For a tenement of the same Roger, for John Aillward015
Sum416
Sum total£110

Bristol.: Customs arising from divers merchandizes, being in ships and boats at Bristol, in the time of Clement Bagot, Mayor and Escheator there, from the Feast of Saint Michael the Archangel, of the 16th year of King Henry the 6th, unto the same feast next following:

A boat called the James, of Padestow, Ralph Coke, master; John Thomas hath in the same 13 pieces of tin.—Customs, 4s. 4d.

Free A ship called the Trinity, of Waterford, Nicholas Deveros, master; Walter Grant hath 300 lamb skins, 100 goat skins, 100 sheep skins, 3 dozen of cloths.; John Rodeth, of Kilkenny, 22 hundred of linen cloths, 200 lamb skins, 100 goat skins.— Customs, 5s. 10½d,

Free A ship called the Mary, of Bristol, Thomas Hawley, master, for going out; Nicholas Skeret, of Galway, 21 dozen and a half of cloths; also 22 dozen.—Customs 21½d.

A boat called the Mary Boat, of Kinsale, John Gough, master; John Water hath in the same 6 barrels of herrings; James Barrell 200 hake in the same.—Customs, 2s. 4d.

A ship called the Saint Mary Boat, of Kinsale, John Gough, master, for going out; John Water hath in the same 6 dozen of cloth.—Customs, 3d.

A ship called the Mary, of Mulford, John Dattes, master; William Chapman hath 10 barrels of salt.—Customs, 2½d.

A boat called the Mary boat, of Kinsale, Richard Russell, master; Nicholas Mayowe, 12 barrels of herrings, 400 hake, half a hundred of fish called Myldell, 1 hogshead of salmon.— Customs, 2s. 9½d.

A ship called the Mary, of Russh, John Maddoc, Master, and hath one hundred and a half of linen cloths.—Customs, 1½d.

A boat called the James, of Saint Ive, Thomas Rafe, master; John Adam, 3 cloths of frize, 100 sheep skins.—Customs, 5d.

A boat called the Mary, of Carmarthen, John Jones, master; David Walter, 7 cloths of frize.—Customs, 7d.

A ship called the Mary, of Bayon, Myngenon Mounson, master, and hath 2 ton of iron and 5 ton of wine.—Customs, 5s.

A ship called the Mary, of Kinsale, Richard Russell, master, for going out; Nicholas Mayodes, of Kinsale, 20 dozen of cloths, 1 pipe of honey, 1 pipe of meath; Nicholas Talour, 3 dozen of cloth.—Customs, 14½d.

A boat called the Dewsare, of Milford, Walter Cyria, master, and hath 8 barrels of herrings.—Customs, 3s.

Nothing A ship called the James, of Rephulle, John Perys, master.

Free Nothing A ship called the George, of Tynby, John Edeeyn, master; John Brokede, of Bridgenorth, 6 barrels of herrings, 6 barrels of hides.

Nothing A boat called the Mary Boat, of Kensale, David Devynish, master;

Free Nicholas Devenysh, 2 barrels of herrings, 800 hake, 1 hogshead of oil, half a hundred of fish—

Free John Atte Dede, 2 barrels of herrings, 500 hake, half a hundred fish—

Free John Streynsam, 400 hake, 100 fish—

Free: Also Nicholas Devonysh, 500 hake—

Nicholas Mayowe, of Kinsale, 16 barrels of herrings, 1 hogshead of sayme, 200 and half of sheep skins, 200 of lamb skins, 3 dickers of leather of deer, 500 hake, 1 weigh of onions.—Customs, 9s.

A boat called the Mary Boat, of Kinsale, Luke Yard, master; John AtteWoode, 5 barrels of herrings; Nicholas Mayowe, 10 barrels of herrings; John Caron, 15 barrels, 200 sheep skins, one weigh and a half of onions, one quarter of hake.—Customs, 7s. 8d.

Free: A ship called the Catherine, of Tynby, Thomas Taylor, master; John Stowe, of Berkeley, 12 barrels of salt.—Customs, 3d.

A ship called the Edmond, of Blakeney, Thomas Shether, master; and hath in the same 12 last and a half of fish, 4 barrels of sayme; William de Droghedd, 100 of calabars.—Customs, 31s. 2½d.

A ship called the George, of Younghull, John Ketyng, master; James Nash, of Calan, 4 pipe of salmon, 800 sheep skins, 1,100 lamb skins, 900 of goats', 300 of hares,' 2 dickers of deer skins, half a pipe of salmon; Richard Walse, 1,200 sheep skins. 100 lamb skins, 700 goat skins, 100 of Hares'; Philip Nongle, 200 sheep skins, 400 lamb skins, 200 goat skins, three dickers of leather; 100 hake; Thomas Strody, 1,300 sheep skins, 600 lamb skins, 400 goat skins, 100 of hares', half a hundred of fowyns, 400 of linen cloth, 9 stone of floxes; Thomas Knynob, 4½ pipe of salmon, 300 sheep skins, 100½ of lamb skins, 600 of goats, 6 stone of floxes, 1 kyp of hare skins; Walter Hygon, 300 sheep skins, 500 of lambs, 200 goat skins, 100 of hares', half of — and squirrils—

di Cs.: John Gregory, 30 hundred of linen cloths, 800 skins, 800 goat skins, 400 sheep skins, 2 pipe of salmon.—Customs, 17s. 6½d.

A boat called the Katherine, of Mynhedd, John White, master. and hath 6 barrels of herrings.—Customs, 12d.

A ship called the Mary, of Russh, Mychell Byrford, master, and John Festam, 3 last and half of herrings, 3 horses, 500 of fish, 2 dickers of hides, 100 stock fish.—Customs, 5s. 5d.

A boat, called the Mary, of Kinsale, David de Devenysh, master, for going out, and hath 15 cwt. of iron; Nicholas Mayowe, half a pack of cloth, 1 hogshead of Meath.—Customs, 20¾d.

A ship called the Mary, of Kinsale, Luke Yard, master; for going out; John Caron, 18 dozen of cloths, 1 pipe of honey, half a hundred of alom.—Customs, 11d.

A boat called the Katherine, of Kinsale, James Perrot, master; William Croke, 35 barrels of herrings, 100½ hake, one weigh of fish; Nicholas Mayowe, 7 barrels of herrings; Richard Fleming. 1 pipe of honey.—Customs, 7s. 10d.

di Cs.: A ship called the Catherine, of Durbarsilond, John Cotterel, master; John Archer, 522 sheep skins, 700 lamb skins, 700 goat skins, 100 lamb skins, half a hundred of goat skins, 700 rabbit skins, 200 and a half hare skins, 3 dozen of foxes and fowyns skins, 300 and a half of squirrels 20lb. of wax, half a hundred of scrof, 13 hundred of linen cloth, 3 dickers of deer skins, 5 weigh and a half of tallow, 201 quarters of sheep skins, half a hundred of black lamb skins, half of goats, half a hundred of hare skins, 3,000 of linen cloths, 400 of sheep skins, 200 and a half of black lamb skins, and half a hundred of goats, 100 of hare skins, half a hundred of squirrels and foxes.

di Cs.: Thomas Mounstie, of Kilkenny, 3 pipe of salmon, 1,600 sheep skins, 6 dickers of deer skins, 3,000 of linen cloths.—Customs, 9s. 2½d.

A ship called the Leonard, of Limerick, Morrice Adonnell, master; Simon Taylor, 500 of linen cloths; David Brown, of Kilkenny—.—.—Customs, 5d.—

David Brown, of Kilkenny, 300 sheep skins, 4 weigh of tallow, 30lbs. of wax, 1 pipe of salmon.—Customs, 6¾d.

A ship called the Peter, of Holme de Insula Humana, John Perys, master, and hath a last of herrings in a barrel; 1 pipe 1 mease and a half of red herrings; Mac Alwyn, 4 lasts of herrings, in barrels, 7 mease and a half of herrings; Peter Mark, 2 lasts of herrings, 1 bot of salmon, 5 meis of red herrings; Manus Leving, 1 barrel of herrings; Thomas de Leather-lond, half a last of herrings, and 1 meis of red herrings; Patrick Macuser, 2 meis of red herrings; Daniel —, 1 meis of herrings.— Customs, 15s. 11¾d.

A boat called the Mary, of Youghell, William Heynes, master; Nicholas Devynish, 1 pipe of salmon, 100; Richard Hatty, 8 pipe of salmon and a half, 500 sheep skins, 800 lamb skins of goats, 100 goat skins, 100 sheep skins, 300 sheep skins, 300 lamb skins; Thomas Fleming, 2 pipes of salmon, 800 hake, 400 barrels of herrings, half a hundred of fish; Richard Evat, 2 pipe of salmon, 600 sheep skins, 200 lamb skins, 100 goat skins.—Customs, 11s. 2½d.

A ship called the Mary, of Russh, for going out; John Festam hath 2 ton of iron; the master hath 1 pipe of iron, 1 hundred of pitch.—Customs, 4s. 3d.

A boat called the Mary of Younghall, William —, master, for going out; John Dealth, 33 dozen of cloths; Thomas Fleming, 21 dozen of cloths, 1 pipe of iron; Theobald Christopher, 15 dozen of cloths, 4 gross of cutlery; Richard Evans, 1 pipe of iron, 5 cloths, 1 gross of cutlery.—Customs, 5s. 1d.

di Cs.: A ship called the Catherine, of Durbeslond, John Coteral, master; John —, 1 ton of iron; John Archer, 3 ton of iron.—Customs, 4s. 2d.

A boat called the Trinity, of Mount Michael, William Power, master, and hath 200 haddock; Edy Caron, 300 and a half of hake and haddock.

di Cs.: A ship called the George, of Waterford, Thomas Martell, Master; Foco Comerford, 2 pipe of salmon; Thomas Maunt, 2,000 sheep skins, 100 of linen cloths, 5 dickers of leather, 100 hare skins, 500 sheep skins, 200 lamb skins, 500 rabbit skins— John Roche, of Kylkenny, 1,500 of linen cloth, 100 and a half of sheep skins, 200 of squirrels, and 200 of rabbit skins, half a hundred of hare skins, 40 lbs. of wax; Thomas Mount, for going out, 2 ton of iron, 20 dozen of cloths; 1,000 of —; Foco Comerford, 1 pipe of iron, 5 dozen of Cloths.—Customs, 11s. 6¼d.

Free: A ship, called the Mary, of Waterford, Morrice Loran, Master; Thomas Craven, 700 sheep skins, 500 of linen cloths; Thomas Shalwey, 400 hake, 1 weigh of fish.—Customs, 2s. 1d.

A ship called the Cawe, of Pretraron, in Ireland, William Bryan, Master, and hath —, 2 last of herrings, (Corf) 400 haddock, 300 fish, half a hundred of rabbit skins,— 5 cwt. of iron.—Customs, 3s. 2½d.

A ship called the Bride, of Mala Hede, John Brille, Master, and hath 12 and a half meise of red herrings, 5 barrels of herrings, 200 haddok, and a quarter of fish; John Down, 30 barrels of herrings, 3 and a half last of red herrings, 2 pipes of salmon, 1 barrel of haddok.—Customs, 10½d.

A ship called the Mary, of Russh, John Maddok, Master, and hath one mease of herrings, one weigh of fish; 4 dickers and a half of leather; Edward Maddok, 1 barrel of Herrings, half a weigh of fish; John Comyn, 2 mease herrings; Richard Peryn, 5 mease of herrings, 5 barrel of haddok, 1 weigh of fish.—Customs, 3s.

A ship called the James, of Russh, John Guyllok, Master; Thomas Taylor, 1,100 stock fish, 5 barrels of flower, 1 barrel of grapes; John Maddox, 3 mease of herrings.—Customs, 3½d.

Free: A ship called the Mary, of Bristol, Thomas Hawley, Master; Morrice de Hae, 2,200 pollok, and 1 last of red herrings; Hardnoyll, 1 barrel and a half of herrings, 2 barrels of eels, 1 barrel and a half of red herrings, 100 hake, and 100 pollok; Dionicues Carrynler, 2 barrels of eels, 1 barrel of herrings; half hundred of hake, 200 eels; Thomas Glover, 3 barrels of herrings and eels; John Gower, 100 skins, one quarter of lamb skins, 100 and a half of hake.—Customs, 5s. 1d.

Free: A ship called the Catherine, of Bristol, James Dent, Master; John White, of Berkley, 2 casks of wine.—Customs, 8d.

Free: A ship called the Nicholas, of Tours, Henry Haydon, Master; John Hogges, 1 pipe of iron—

Free: Edward Thorneton, 2 ton of iron; Richard Berkeley, 1 ton of iron.—Customs, 2s. 6d.

A ship called the John, of Bayon, Peter de Mondat, Master, and hath 1 pipe of rosin, and 100 of frankincence.—Customs, 11d.

Free: A ship called the Trinity, of Bre, Thomas Adams, Master; Wiliiam, of the town of Gascony, 4 casks wine.—Customs, 16d.

A ship called the Katherine, of Howe, in Ireland, Thomas Gwyn, Master; Thomas Gwyn, 900 hides.—Customs, 9d.

A ship called the Saint John, of Bayon, Janycott of Gawes, Master, and hath 1 cask of Rosin.—Customs, 20d.

A ship called the Saint John, of Bayon, Myngenon de Rates, Master, and hath 1 pipe of rosin.—Customs, 10d.

Free: A ship called the Trinity, of Waterford, Nicholas Deverox, Master, for going out, and hath 5 cloths, 2 dozen cardes—

di Cs.: John Roche, of Kyll, 1 ton of iron, 5 clothes.—Customs, 18½d.

A ship called the Mary, of Corke, William Cogan, Master, for going out, Simon Taylour, 8 dozen of cloth.—Customs, 4d.

A ship called the Patrick, of Howe, Thomas Gwyn, Master. for going out; Philip Wyok, 1 ton of iron.—Customs, 20d.

A ship called the Nicholas, of Mynhede, William Jones, Master; and hath 1,200 of fish.—Customs, 3s.

Free: A ship called the Mary, of Corke, John Lucas, Master; William Tobyn, 3 pipe of salmon, 2 butts of Herrings, 500 sheep skins, 600 lamb skins, 500 hake, 2 weigh of fish, 100 hake, 200 goat skins, 1 dicker of deer leather.—Customs, 3s. 5d.

A ship called the Katherine, of the Naunt, Walter Odewyn, master, and hath 19 barrels of sayme, 1,100 hake, 1 weigh of fish, half a mease of haddok.—Customs, 3s. 4½d.

A boat called the Solur, of Saint Ive, John Harris, master, and hath 18 barrels 2 kilderkins of sayme, 700 and a half of hake, half a hundred of fish, 3 mease and a half of haddok.— Customs, 4½d.

A boat called the Goodyear, of Combe, Richard Ber, master, and hath 1500 of fish.—Customs, 3s. 9d.

Free: A boat called the barge of St. John, Fonso Doming, master; William Lyttlebury, 800 of tin.—Customs, 18d.

A boat called the Rapps of St. Ive, Henry Anger, master, and hath 28 barrels of sayme.—Customs, 4s. 10d.

A boat called the Je de Port Je, Stephen Ray, master, and hath half a hundred of fish, 800 hake, half a mease and 1 apell, 48 barrels of sayme, 2 dozen of linen cloths; William Tobyn, 100 yards of Irish frize cloth.—Customs, 9s. 2d.

A ship called the Mary, of Padstow, Ralf Valenty, master, and hath 1,200 of fish; Will Tobyn, for going out, 5 dozen of cloth.—Customs, 3s. 2½d.

Free: A ship called the Cog John de Hermerdyn, William Fisher, master; Lewis Darry, 700 sheep skins, 1 dozen of goat skins, half a dozen of frize cloth.—Customs, 14½d.

A boat called Myhill, of Saint Ive, Stephen Symon, master, and hath 12 barrels 2 kilderkins of sayme.—Customs, 2d. 1d.

Free: A ship called the Nicholas, of Barstaple, John Gubbe, master; Thomas Passewar, 1 pipe of wine, 200 and a half of wax.—Customs, 4½d.

Free: A ship called the George, of Bristol, William Strode, master, and hath 2 casks of salt; William Langton. 2 casks of salt; Hendy Day, 3 pipes of salt; Patrick Stokes, 1 cask of salt; also another Patrick, 1 cask of salt; John Umfray, 1 pipe of salt; Gerrard Roche, 1 cask of salt; John Smyth, 1 pipe of salt. —Customs, 2s. 8½d.

Free: A ship called the Christopher, of Bre, John Don, master; Walter, 1 cask of fruit; Thomas Hoper, 1 pipe of fruit; Edward Benley, 1 pipe of fruit; William Best, 1 pipe of fruit, also a certain person of Portugal, 3 casks of fruit; Germanus, 12 pieces of fruit,—Customs, 11¾d.

Free: A ship called the Gracedieu, of Bristol, John Woodrof, master; John Flour, 1 pipe of salt; William Carpenter, 1 cask of salt; John Letterborne, 1 cask of salt; John Brag, 1 cask of salt.—Customs, 8¾d.

Free di Cs.: A boat called the Coggan, of Bristol, John White, master; John Shirlock, 2 casks of wine, of Kilkenny; also, for portage of sailors, 5 casks of salt.—Customs, 16½d.

A ship called the James Durbaryslond, William Rochford, master; John Deardi, 6 dickers of leather, 6 pipe of salmon, 200 of fish, 100 Rapell, 200 hake, 300 sheep skins, 400 lamb skins, 100 hare skins, 600 calf skins, 200 rabbit skins; Henry Deadthe, 12 sheep skins, 400 lamb skins, 100 rabbit skins, half a hundred of hare skins; John Rule, of Kylkenny, 400 sheep skins.—Customs, 12s. 4d.

Free: A ship called the Trinity, of Waterford, Morrice Duoden, master, and hath 200 fish.—Customs, 9d.

A ship called the Catherine, of Kukvergus, in Ireland, William Lodeles, master; Elyas Warde, 14 dickers of leather; Thomas Warde, 1 dicker of leather, 2 pipes of salmon, 100 of linen cloths, 6 bacon hogs, a weigh of fish.—Customs, 7s.

A boat called the Trinity, of Milford, John Brude, master, and hath 400 fish, and hath, for going out, 600 weight of iron. —Customs, 18d.

A ship called the Katherine, of Knokvergus, for going out, William Ladelas, master, for going out; Elias Warde, 1 cask of iron, and pipe of iron, 2 casks of salt; Thomas Ward, 1 cask of salt for going out.—Customs, 3s. 4d.

A boat called the Michael, of Fowey, Richard Legal, master, and hath 600 fish.—Customs, 21d.

A boat called the Mary, of Wyford, Boland, master, and hath 600 fish, 20 stone of tallow, 300 rabbit skins, two dickers of leather.—Customs, 2s. 5½d.

A boat called the George, of Combe, Walter Hoper, master, and hath 400 fish.—Customs, 3s. 6d.

A boat called the Idmes, of Combe, Thomas Dunsell, master, and hath 1,400.—Customs, 4s. 6d.

A boat called the Michell, of Fowey, William de Badewyn, master, and hath 600 of fish.—Customs. 18d.

A boat called the Mary Boat, of Fowey, Nicholas Gayne, master, and hath 600 of fish.—Cnstoms, 18d.

A boat called the Mary Boat, of Kensale, Richard Russell, master, and hath 200 of fish; John Boteler, 400 of fish.—Customs, 18d.

A boat called the Mary, of Padstow, John Hyklys, master, and hath 400 and a half of fish.—Customs, 10½d.

A boat called the Mary, of Kensale, David Kerry, master, and hath 100 and a half of fish; Thomas Guy, 4 weigh of fish; John Boteler, 800 of fish, 200 hake, 1 barrel of herrings; Morrice White, 300 fish; John Caron, 200 fish; and the aforesaid Master hath, for going out, 5 cloths, 1 pipe of Methe; William a Conewell, 3 dozen cloths.—Customs, 4s. 11½d.

Free: A ship called the Mary, of Bristol, Stephen Miles, master; William Okeborne, 2 hogsheads of herrings; John Boteler, of Kinsale, 200 of fish.—Customs, 14d.

Free: A ship called the Mihell, of Tynby, Philip Coffin, master; Gonsolvo Martins, 3 cask of fruit; Bartholomew Dukesman, 3 pieces of fruit; Court Duchesman, four pieces of fruit.— Customs, 6¾d.

Free: A boat called the Mary, of Cork, John Lucas, master, for going out; Alan Fox, 9 dozen of cloth; William, Tobyn, 12 dozen of cloth, 1 pipe of iron; 1 dozen of cardys, 2 gross of cutlery.—Customs, 21d.

A boat called the Gabriel, of Padstow, Ralph Coke, master, and hath 16 pieces of tin, by weight 32cwt.; John Thomas Brasier, 3 seyms.—Customs, 3s.

A boat called the Mary, of Younghull, Robert German, master, and hath 300 sheep skins, 300 lamb skins, 100 goat skins; John Walshe, 1,200 sheep skins, 200 calf skins; Alan Fox, 100 sheep skins, 100 hare skins; Philip Nash, 600 lamb skins, 100 sheep skins, 100 goat skins.—Customs, 4s. 1d.

A boat called the Michell, of Younghill, Robert Pembroke, master, and hath 700 of fish; John Walsh, for going out, 1 pack of cloth.—Customs, 2s. 7d.

A boat called the Mary, of Waterford, John Nones, Master; Peter Caron, 600 caran, 600 rogan; Nicholas Busher, 200 and 1 quarter of sheep skins, 300 lamb skins, 100 hare skins; John Yongle, 100 sheep skins, 500 lamb skins, 400 goat skins; also 3 quarters of goat skins; also 1 quarter of fox skins, 4 deer skins.—Customs, 2s. 3d,

A boat called the Mary, of Saint Brede, William Polet, Master, and hath 100 and a half of fish.—Customs, 4½d.

A boat called the Margaret, of Seynt Bride, Thos. Williams, Master, and hath 400 of fish, 1 barrel of herrings.—Customs, 11d.

A boat called the James, of Durbarsilond, William Rochford, Master, for going out; John Warde, hath 1 pack of cloth. —Customs, 10d.

A boat called the Mary, of Kensale, Richard Russel, Master, for going out, and hath 2 pipes of honey; John Boteler, 1 cask of wine: David Coursey, 2 dozen of cloths.—Customs, 10d.

A boat called the Mary, of Waterford, John Norris, Master, for going out; Laurence Arnold, 5 cloths; Thomas Mounster. of Kilkenny, 6 gross of cutlery, 6 gross of points, 400 glasses, 100 tubes of ash wood, 1 dozen cardys.—Cnstoms, 7½d.

A ship called the George, of Tynby, Thomas Harrys, Master; a certain Foreigner hath 1,000 lamb skins.—Customs, 10d.

Free: A boat called the Catherine, of Bristol, John Baker, Master; John Church, 1 pipe of salmon, 600 pollok, 100 hake, 200 sheep skins, 100 lamb skins, half a hundred rabbit skins, half a dicker of deer skins, half a hundred of goat skins.—Customs, 17½d.

A ship called the Sous Sprus, of Bayon, Bercasan de Surwete, Master, and hath 2 casks, 1 pipe, 1 hogshead of wine; Mynge de Troy, 5 casks of wine; Myngenon de les Speron. 1 cask wine; Robert Grymstead, 2 pipe of Gayd Ewelverton de Voy; for going out, 12 cloths; also 30 pieces of kersye, in the name of 10 cloths.—Customs, 5s. 9d.

A ship called the Mary of Bayon, Myngenon de Morser, Master; Robert Grimstead, 2 pipe of honey.—Customs, 4d.

A ship called the Trinity of Weyford, John Roche, Master, for going out; Thomas Mounster, of Kyll, 20 cwt. of allom, 700 of —, 1 pipe of wine.—Customs, 14½d.

A boat called the Katherine, of Minehead, John White, Master, and hath—.—Customs, 18d.

A boat called the Katherine, of Minehead, John Symonds, Master. and hath 600 of fish.—Customs, 18d.

A ship called the Trinity, of Monieles, John Wilookye, Master; Thomas Wyseman, of Langlanan, 1 fardell of cloth. —Customs, 2d.

A boat called the Trinity, of Saint Ive, Henry Perrow, Master, and hath 400 and a half of fish, 1 mease of rapell, 1 barrel of Sayne, 100 hake.—Customs, 19d.

A boat called the George, of Combe, Walter Hope, Master, and hath 400 and a half of fish, 100 hake.—Customs, 14½d.

A boat called the Godeye, of Combe, Richard Ber, Master, and hath 500 of fish, 300 hake.—Customs, 18d.

Free: A boat called the George, of Tynby, John Owyn, Master; Geoffry Newport, 2 fardell of cloth.—Customs, 8d.

A ship called the Cogganne, of Bristol, John —, Master; Thomas Kylley, 2 casks of salt, 1 cask 1 pipe of wine; also the Mariners for portage of a certain ship, 18 casks of salt.— Customs, 4s. 9½d.

A boat called the Carnabie, of Saint Bride, William Haynes, Master, and hath 25 mease of herrings.—Customs, 13½d.

Free: A ship called the George, of Bristol, William Srode, Master; William Patrick, 2 casks of salt; John Greffych, 1 cask a pipe of salt; Richard —, a cask 1 pipe of salt; Nicholas Mary, 1 cask of salt; Patrick While, 1 cask 1 pipe of salt; Hankyn Harris, 1 cask 1 pipe of salt; William Langton, 4 casks of salt; John Smyth, 1 pipe of salt; Thomas Hayne, 1 hogshead of salt. —Customs, 2s. 10¼d.

Free: A ship called the Grace Dieu, of Bristol, John Wooderuffe, Master; John Clerk, 1 cask 1 pipe of salt; Hugh de Harlyon, 1 cask 1 pipe of salt; Hehry Cole 1 cask 1 pipe of salt; Thomas Apprice, 3 pipes of salt; German Verray, 3 pipes of salt; John Leatherborne, 1 cask of salt.—Customs, 21¼d.

A boat called the John, of Combe, John Roberdeas, and hath 30 mease of herrings, the same hath 3 barrels of herrings.— Customs, 19d.

A boat called the Mary boat, of Kensale, Richard Long, master, and hath 100 hake, 200 fish; Thomas Rogers, 900 salt fish, 600 dry fish, 2,000 hake, 100 sheep skins, 100 rabbit skins, half a hundred of hare skins, 200 of black lamb skins.—Customs, 6s. 6½d.

Free: A ship called the Julian, of Bristol, John Stemp, master; John Chepstow, 1 cask of salt; William Gascoigne, 1 cask 1 pipe of salt; Stephen Boby, 1 cask of salt; James Stode, 1 cask of salt.—Customs, 18d.

Free: A ship called the James, of Tynby, John Kyste, master; Galfry Newport, 2 packs of cloth.—Customs, 8d.

A boat called the Trinity, of Dale, John Freeman, master, and hath 1 last and a half and 4 mease of herrings.—Customs, 17d.

A boat called the Welfare, of Minehead, William Wode, master, and hath 30 mease of herrings, 2 barrels of herrings; John Bowle, 4 barrels of herrings.—Customs, 2s. 3d.

A boat called the Peter, of Dale, Peter Curet, master, and hath 1 last and a half of herrings, 3 barrels 1 kilderkin of salt, for going out.—Customs, 16d.

A boat called the Mary Boat, of Kinsale, Richard Long, master, for going out; Thomas Rogers, 12 dozen of cloth, 1 hundred of allom.—Customs, 7d.

Free: A boat called the Mary, of Tenby, Thomas Taylor, master; a certain person of Newport, 1 fardel of skins; also a certain foreigner, 1 hogshead of oil.—Customs, 2d.

Free: A boat called the Mary, of Bristol, William Cleve, master, and hath 1 pipe and a half of salmon, half a hundred of cardys. Customs, 3½d.

Free: A ship called the Mary, of Bristol, Thomas Hawley; Mr. William Davie, 1 pipe of salmon; Philip Austyn, 1 pipe of salmon; Thomas Collins, 2 hundred of linen thread, 200 of linen cloths, 1 dicker of deer leather, half a hundred of lamb skins.—Customs, 13½d.

A boat called the Mary, of Milford, John Wallys, master, and hath 300 bushels of herrings.—Customs, 6d.

Free: A boat called the Mary, of Bristol, William Selby, Master; Nicholas Gyrdok, 1 barrel of herrings; Nieholas Majod, one kilderkin.—Customs, 3d.

A boat called the Trinity, of Saint Ive, George Robaid, Master, and hath 600 of fish; Robert Martin, 200 stockfish.— Customs, 2s.

Free: A boat called the Nicholas, of Tower, Stephen Miles, Master; John Stone, of Berkeley, 1 ton of iron, 6 hundred of pitch and rosin, 1 pipe gayde.—Customs, 2s. 6d.

A ship called the Nicholas, of Barstable, John Gubbe, Master; Thomos Passeward, 2 pipe gayde.—Customs, 8d.

A boat called the James, of Tintern; Thomas Taylor, of Letherpole, 3 last and a half of stockfish.—Customs, 8s. 9d.

Free: A ship called the Mary of Kinsale, Richard Russell, Master, and hath 900 hake, 4 barrels of herrings; John Boteley, 1,200 of dried hake, 500 of salt hake, 1 last in a barrel of herrings; Morrice White, 43 barrels of herrings, 1,400 hake, 200 of fish; also, John Cowler, for going out, 7 dozen of cloths.—Customs, 9s. 9d.

A boat called the Catherine, of Bristol, Peter Gegge, Master; William Terry, 900 and a half of stockfish, and John Somer, 200 of stockfish; German Irish, 200 of stockfish.—Customs, 3s. 4½d.

A ship called the Rose, of Bristol, Thomas Nichol, Master; Thomas Borton Sadyer, 200 stockfish—Customs, 6d.

A ship called the George, of Younghall, John Kyllyng, Master, for going out; Thomas Mounster, of Kilkenny, 50 dozen of cloth, 1 ton of iron; John de Kilkenny, 32 dozen of cloth; David Brown, of the same, 21 dozen of cloth, and half a dozen of cardyes; James Nash, of Calan, 50 dozen of cloths, 1 dozen of cardys; Thomas Suney, 15 dozen of cloths, 2 dozen of cardys, 100 of pitch; Philip Noryle, 8 dozen of cloths, 2 gross of cutlery; Richard Walsh, 20 dozen of cloths, 1 dozen of cardys, 200 of allom.—Customs, 9s. 6½d.

A boat called the Trinity, of Milford, John Chapman, Master, and hath 1 last and a half of Corf herrings.—Customs, 11d.

Amount£211610
Also of all other Merchandizes entering in and going out through the Gates of the Town aforesaid, for the year aforesaid, &c.—Customs81710
Sum Total£30148
Also from fines and amercements happening in a certain Court there, called the Tolsey Court, for the whole yeaar aforesaid£1568
Also for the Mills of the Lord the King, in the same Town (to wit.) from the Feast of Saint Michael the Archangel of the said 16th year, unto the Feast of Easter then next following£9140

Indorsed.—These five Rolls were delivered here by the within named, Thomas Hore and Thomas Ball, by their own hands, on the 1st day of February, in the 17th year of King Henry the 6th, for the benefit of the King, &c.

The Return sets forth a rent roll of the flesh-shambles, stalls and landgable, states the profits of the mill, and the fines, &c. in the Tolzey Court, at so much money, and under a distinct head, intitled "the customs arising from divers merchandizes, being in ships and boats at Bristol, from Michaelmas, in the 16th year of King Henry 6th, to Michaelmas following," it enumerates about 220 ships and boats, with masters' names and particulars of cargoes, carrying out a certain sum, as the custom in respect of each cargo. In about twenty instances, the words ad exitum occur in this enumeration, in various relative positions to the other words of the sentence. The Corporation and their legal advisers contend, that these words are to be interpreted "for exportation," applying them to the goods which composed the enumerated cargoes. Now these conjectures (for after all, they are nothing more) are liable to several objections, of which one alone is almost conclusive, viz. the utter inconsistency which, if the proposed reading be adopted, will prevail between the first part of the document, setting forth in general, but very express terms, the nature of the toll; and the latter part, supplying, the details of collection. Besides this, the great improbability will remain, that out of two hundred and twenty cargoes in a whole year, only twenty-two cargoes and parts of cargoes were exported from Bristol; that in a quarter of another year, (fn. 3) two packages only were exported; and that the same ship should at one and the same time, contain goods for importation and exportation. And last, though not least, the question will occur, how came it, if the cargoes thus distinquished were for exportation, and the due was collected indifferently on exports and imports, that the note of distinction was ever used, since it could give no information at all relative to the subject matter of the return, which was merely the amount of a custom collected at a certain, and (at that time) well understood rate?

Is it not, then, the duty of the inquirer, who finds such numerous difficulties in the way of the proposed interpretations, to ascertain whether the words will not bear some other construction, and to adopt it, even without positive evidence in its favor, if it shall be found to violate fewer probabilities than those for which it is substituted? The sense in which it is conceived that the words ad exitum ought to be understood, is this—"for the purpose or with the intent of being sent out"— applying them, of course, to the goods, and not to the vessels enumerated. And the occasion of their use is to be found in the facts, first, that the Town Duty was a custom upon goods coming to the town for sale; and second, that at the time the return was made, a duty was payable at the gates of the city, on all goods which passed through them, being of the nature of the toll which was then taken in every walled town in England, under the name of Toll thorough. For is it not reasonable to suppose, that when goods were imported, either with the intention of being exported again, or of being carried inland, the customary toll upon goods coming for sale would be remitted? And upon this supposition the motive for distinguishing such goods by the note "ad exilum," which could not upon the other hypothesis be perceived, is obvious enough. The Mayor rendered a full accont of all the imports, and of the custom which in the first instance was charged upon them; but in order that the deduction, from the gross amount, which no doubt made, might be understood and allowed, he particularized all the instances in which, either because the goods were imported, merely to be exported again, and, therefore, were not subject to a duty on goods coming for sale, (an encouragement to navigation,) or because they were destined for inland consumption, and would, therefore, be liable to the toll at the town gates, (which, if the import toll were also exacted, would have been a most onerous imposition), the custom was to be considered as not having been received. The only possible objection to this reasoning is, that if what has been suggested were the fact, the easier and more likely plan would have been, to omit, altogether, the mention of the goods thus exempted. Fortunately, the reply is at hand, without straining conjecture for the sake of establishing a favorite hypothesis. In the same return of customs, there are several instances of cargoes imported by burgesses of towns, which are free of Town dues, even according to the admission of the Corporation themselves. On these, the amount of custom is as regularly carried out, as in other cases; but the note, "lib.' (free) in the margin, makes it unquestionble, that the exemption from custom was not forgotten, although, for some reason or other, the customs were uniformly stated.

The Escheator having delivered the Return, before he paid his Balance, it was the practice of the Exchquer to make out a document, in which the different Profits of the Town were specified; it was called a State and View of the Account, in which not a syllable about a Toll or Custom on Exports is to be found, but a description, which, if words have any meaning, excludes, by its particularity, the very idea of such a toll: the words are—and that the issues and profits of the same town consist in divers parcels (that is to say) a certain custom there, called toll, belonging to the town aforesaid, arising from divers merchandizes, and other goods whatsoever, for sale, coming lo the aforesaid town, as well by land as by water.

Among the Records in the Lord Treasurers Remembrancers Office in the Exchequer (to wit.) among the States and Views of Accounts of Easter Term, in the 17th year of the reign of King Henry 6th, Roll 15, there is found as follows, (that is to say)—

Bristol: In the account audited of Clement Bagot, late Mayor and Escheator of the King, in the town of Bristol, and suburbs and precincts of the same, by Charter of Lord King Edward 3rd, of liberties granted to the Burgesses and Commonalty of the same town, to wit, for the issues of the same King's Escheator there, from the Feast of Saint Michael, in the 16th year of the present King, unto the Feast of Saint Michael then next following; from which Feast of Saint Michael, in the 17th year, Hugh Wythyford, now Mayor and the King's Escheator there, is accountable; he oweth £116. 8s. 5d. and allowance and discharge is made in the Great Roll, for the 16th year of the present King; for Bristol he oweth — of which, he seeks to be discharged of 26s. 8d. with which he is charged by the Auditor in his account aforesaid, for the custody of one tenement, with the appurtenances, in the suburbs of Bristol, which belonged to Henry Buxton, of Bristol; which tenement came to the hands of Ann, late Queen of England, as her Escheat; and of a place in Saint Mary's-street, of the same town, opposite the church of the Blessed Peter, between the street which leads towards Wynchester, called Winchesterstreet, and extends itself to the house of William Poynty, late lessee, of Simon Oliver, of Bristol.—to hold from the Feast of Easter, in the 19th year of the reign of King Richard the 2nd, for the term of 60 years next following, and fully to be completed, rendering to the King, for farm annually, to wit,—for the tenement aforesaid, 20s., and for the aforesaid place, 6s. 8d. by equal portions, at the Exchequer, at the terms of Saint Michael and Easter, for which the aforesaid Simon Oliver hath answered thereof to the Lord the King, as is contained in the Great Roll, for the 15th year of this King, for Bristol. And by view of these premises by the Barons, and deliberation thereon had between them, it is considered that the aforesaid late Mayor and Escheator should be discharged and acquitted, by pretext of these premises, from the aforesaid 26s. 8d. of which, as aforesaid, he is charged, for the issues of the tenement, and place aforesaid, with the appurtenances, as is contained in the roll of particulars of the account aforesaid to the King. And the aforesaid Mayor and Escheator sought, in like manner, to be discharged from 53s. 4d. for which, in like manner, he is charged by the Auditor in his account aforesaid, for the issues of one messuage and of one shop, with the appurtenances, in Worship-street, within the town of Bristol, which John Whytyng lately held in the same town, and which being in the hands of the King, for certain causes, lately, was committed to Agnes Pickworth, to farm,—to have from the Feast of Easter, in the 1st year of King Henry 4th, so long as it should happen that the said messuage and shop should remain in the King's hands, rendering therefore, annually, to the King, 53s. 4d. at the Exchequer, by equal portions, at the terms of Saint Michael and Easter, for which the aforesaid Agnes Pickworth, therefore, hath answered to the Lord the King, as is contained in the Great Roll, of the 15th year of this King, for Bristol. And these premises being viewed by the Barons, and deliberation thereon had between them, it is considered that the aforesaid late Mayor and Escheator should be discharged and acquitted, by pretext of these premises, from the aforesaid 53s. 4d. for which, as aforesaid, he is charged, for the issues of the messuage and shop aforesaid, with the apurtenances, as is contained in the rolls of particulars of the account of the said late Escheator to the King. And the said late Mayor and Escheator sought likewise to be discharged from £29. 18s. 8d. upon him charged, in his account aforesaid, by his Auditor aforesaid, that he should answer for £120. per annum, above £91. 15s. 4d. for which he willingly answers, as well for the value of all those lands and tenements, and the flesh shambles, which belonged to Ann, late Queen of England, in the town of Bristol, as for the late farm of £100. per annum, for the same town, with the houses, shops, cottages, stalls, tofts, gardens, pools, tine of the castle, rents, landgable, tolls, pleas of courts, fairs, markets, and all other jurisdictions, customs, and appurtenances of the town aforesaid, and suburbs of the same, which same town aforesaid were bound to render the said farm of £100. annually, in the form aforesaid, to the aforesaid late King. And that the issues and profits as well of the said town (whereof the said farm of £100. then consisted), as the issues and profits of the said lands and tenements, called the flesh-shambles, which at that time extended at £20. per annum, and which the aforesaid, Joanna, late Queen of England, held for term of her life, in the form aforesaid, for the value of the said £120. per annum, by the death of the same late Queen, came to the hands of the present Lord the King, and as yet remain in his hands in approvement. And that the issnes and profits of the same town consist in divers parcets, (that is to say) in divers lands and tenements in the town and suburbs aforesaid, which is called the flesh shambles, a certain water mill, rents of assize there called landgable, and local rents issuing out of divers houses, shops, stalls, tofts, and gardens, paid annually by the hands of the free tenants there, at the Feast of Saint Peter, which is called ad vincula, a certain custom there, called toll, belonging to the town aforesaid, arising from divers merchandizes, and other goods whatsoever, for sale, coming to the aforesaid town, as well by land as by water, and perquisites of a certain Tolzey Court belonging to the same town, and from the time whereof the memory of man doth not exist, hath been holden in every week throughout the year, as often as it should be necessary, and which severally are extended at £72. per annum, as is contained in a certain Inquisition and extent thereof, taken before Richard Foster, late Mayor and Escheator there, in the year next preceding, by virtue of his office, and remaining here. in the Exchequer, in a bag of the particulars of the same late Mayor and Escheator for the same year; at which same £72. the lands, tenements, rents, customs, and courts aforesaid, were extended per annum, as is premised, and at £18. 16s. which the aforesaid lands and tenements, rents, customs, and courts are worth per annum beyond the extent aforesaid; for which same £72. at which the lands, tenements, mills, rents, customs, and courts aforesaid, as is premised, were extended per annum, the same late Mayor and Escheator answers for £63. 14s. as rated in his account aforesaid, for that the aforesaid lands, tenements, mills, rents, customs, and courts, are worth nothing per annum above the aforesaid — and £18. 16s. of new improvement only; and that the said late Mayor and Escheator ought not to be charged, or compelled to answer, as he saith upon his oath to the said Lord the King, for any other or more sums of money, or farms thereof, except for £81. 15s. 4d. for which willingly he answers for the issues of the town, and lands, tenements, mills, rents, customs, and courts aforesaid, in his said account for the time aforesaid, all and singular, which (statement) the same Clement, now accounting, is ready to verify in any way soever: for which same £29. 18s. 8d. no discharge hath been made to him at present. but by grace of the court, it is granted to him, that he shall have thereof respite unto the day of the Holy Trinity, in fifteen days, to hear and determine what, &c.; at which day, the aforesaid Clement Bagot, late Mayor and Escheator, came, by Henry Champreys, his attorney, and, for the cause aforesaid, hath a further day in the state, as now from the day of Saint Martin, in fifteen days, to hear and determine which, &c.; at which day, the aforesaid late Mayor and Escheator came, by his said attorney, and, for the cause aforesaid, hath a further day in the state, as now until from the day of Easter, in fifteen days, to hear and determine which, and, in the mean time, he hath respite for the sums aforesaid, &c. &c; at which day the said late Mayor and Escheator came here, by his said attorney, and for having a more full discharge from the £29. 18s. 8d. aforesaid in these premises, took out here the Writ of the present Lord the King, under the privy seal, directed to the Treasurer and Barons of this Exchequer, which is enrolled amongst the memoranda of the 23rd year of the present King, amongst the Writs directed to the Barons of Hillary Term, Roll 2, the tenor of which writ follows in these words, Henry, by the Grace of God, King of England and France, and Lord of Ireland. To the Treasurer and Barons of our Exchequer, greeting. For as much as we having consideration that Richard Forster, late Mayor and our Escheator of our town of Bristol, and precinct of the same, from the Feast of Saint Michael the 15th year of our reign, unto the Feast of Saint Michael, the 16th year of our reign; and Clement Bagot, late Mayor and our Escheator in the said town, and suburbs of the same, from the Feast of Saint Michael, in the 16th year of our reign, unto the Feast of Saint Michael then next following; and Hugh Whythyford, late Mayor and our Escheator of our said town, suburbs and precincts of the same, from the Feast of Saint Michael, the 17th year of our reign, unto the Feast of Saint Michael then next following, have late, by several accounts, accounted to us, in our Exchequer, of the issues, profits, and revenues to be due, or perteyning by them, severally, in anywise, of the issues of our Escheatry, by the said years and times of, and in the said town, suburbs, and precincts, and that upon the end of their said accounts, there is asked for us against them, severally, divers sums of money, of the which sums they have made several petitions to be thereof severally discharged, as in divers records remaining in our said Exchequer, of the part of the Remembrancer of our Treasurer, plainly it appeareth, as it is said: we will, therefore, and charge you, that ye discharge and acquit against us, and our heirs, for evermore, the said Richard Clement, and Hugh, their heirs, executors, and terretenants, and every of them, of all sums and charges specified and contained in these several petitions, made upon their several accounts, and utterly to cease, of all processes and demands made, served, or to be made, and served for us, and our heirs, against the said Richard Clement, and Hugh, their heirs, executors, and terretenants, or any of them, for any — dette or charge asked for us, against them, severally, or any of them, as Mayors and our Escheators of our said town, suburbs, and precincts, for the said terms and years, or executors or terretenants of any of them, any matter in the said several accounts of the said Richard Clement, and Hugh, or in the said several petitions contained, specified, or alledged; or that the certainty or quantity of the said divers sums of money, and for us, severally, demanded against the said Clement, and Hugh, upon their several accounts herein is not expressed, or any other thing or matter, whatsoever it be, notwithstanding. Given under our Privy Seal, at our Castle of Windsor, the 7th day of December, in the year of our reign 23rd. And, upon this, the aforesaid Clement Bagot, sought to be discharged from the said sum of £29. 18s. 8d. &c. And these premises being viewed by the Barons, and due deliberation thereon had between them, it is adjudged, that the aforesaid Clement Bagot, late Mayor and Escheator, shall be discharged and acquitted, by pretext of the said King's Writ of Privy Seal, and other the premises, from the said £29. 18s. 8d. for which, as is aforesaid he is charged, as is contained in the Roll of Particulars of his account aforesaid, to the King.

This state of things continued, and the Town of Bristol was held by the King until the 29th May, in the 17th year of his reign, when the Town was granted to the Mayor and Commonalty, and their Successors. But before the copy of this Grant is introduced, it may not be irrelevant to explain, that as early as the year 1340, certain other Tolls had been granted to the Burgesses of Bristol, on Ships and Merchandize coming to the Town for Sale, in aid of repairing the Walls, Keys, and Pavements of the Town. And in examining Inquisitions in different reigns, we find the express object of the Crown to have been the most rigid application of the money, so collected, to the purposes of repairing the Walls of the Town, with its Keys and Pavements.

Preserved among the Records of the Court of Chancery in the Tower of London, to wit, on the fine Roll, for the 17th year of the reign of King Henry 6th, membrane 4 is contained:—

The Town of Bristol committed to Farm.: The King, to all to whom, &c. greeting. Know ye, that we have committed to our wellbeloved Hugh Wythyford, Mayor of our town of Bristol, and to the commonalty of the same town, and their successors, the same town with the suburbs of the same, and with the gates, ditches, and stalls of the same town and suburbs; also all those lands and tenements, rents and services, and the flesh shambles which Johanna, late Queen of England held for the term of her life, in the same town, by grant of Lord Henry, late King of England, our grandfather, formerly husband of the same late Queen, made for the same term, and together with the houses, shops, cottages, sheds, tofts, gardens, mills, pools, water courses running down to these mills, rents, landgables and local tolls, pleas of courts, fairs and markets, and of whatsoever courts in the same town and suburbs, with all fines, issues, redemptions and amercements, in the same, forfeited, and adjudged to be forfeited, and all other jurisdic tions and customs, and appurtenances of the town and suburbs aforesaid, with the appurtenances, together with the reversions of all lands tenements, rents, and services, within the precincts of the same town, of whatsoever tenants, granted or committed by us, or any of our progenitors, former Kings of England, or by any other whomsoever, whereof the reversion at present belongs or appertains to us, together with the farms and rents therein reserved (the Castle of the same town, and the ditch of the same only excepted) nevertheless we grant by these presents to the same Mayor and Commonalty, the water-course running down into the aforesaid ditch towards the mill under the Castle, as of old time it used to do, together with the banks of the same water, for the space of four feet in width, towards the same Castle, by all means reserved to the said Mayor and Commonalty,—to have and to hold, to him and his successors, from the Feast of Saint Michael the Archangel next happening, unto the end of twenty years next following, and fully to be completed,—and moreover, we do grant to the same Mayor and Commonalty that they shall have during the term aforesaid, all fines, redemptions and amercements, as well of all men as of all tenants, sole tenants, resident and not resident, in and out of fees, lands and tenements, with their appurtenances, and of all places within the precincts of the same town of Bristol and suburbs of the same, and county of Bristol (the said castle and ditch excepted.) Also we have granted, all things which could have belonged to us and our heirs, during the term aforesaid, within the said town of Bristol, and precincts of the same, for year, day, and waste forfeitures, and fines for murder, in whatsoever Courts of us, and of our heirs, of all men and tenants, they or any of them, shall pay fines and amercements, or be amerced, as well before us and our heirs, as before us and our heirs in our Chancery, and of our heirs also before the Treasurer and Barons of us and of our heirs of the Exchequer, and before the Justices of us and of our heirs itinerant for Common Pleas, and Pleas of the Forest, and also before the Justices of us and of our heirs of the Bench, and of the Justices of us and of our heirs for taking Assizes and delivering Gaols, and also before the Justices of us and our heirs for hearing and determining, and assigned to inquire into felonies, trespasses, and misdemeanors, and before the Steward and Marshall, and Coroner of the Household of us and of our heirs, and the Clerk of the Market, and also before any other Justices and officers of us and of our heirs whomsoever, or wheresoever it shall happen, such fines and redemptions ought to be amerced, or such issues and fines for murders and forfeitures, of year, day, and waste, shall happen to be adjudged and forfeited as fully and wholly as we should have had them if we had kept the town, county, suburbs, and fees, lands, tenements, and places aforesaid in our hands, so that the same Mayor and Commonalty of the same town of Bristol and their successors, during the term aforesaid, by the hands of the Sheriff of the county aforeaid, or of his Bailiffs or Officers, shall be empowered to levy, gather, and receive the fines, redemptions, and amercements aforesaid, and the issues forfeited in the form aforesaid, and all things which might belong to us, and our heirs for year, day, waste, forfeitures, and murders of, and in the said town, country, suburbs and fees, lands, tenements, and places aforesaid, by estreat of the Exchequer of us and of our heirs, to be delivered to the Officers and Bailiffs of the same Maior and Commonalty, and their successors, by the hands of the Sheriff of the county of Bristol and their successors, being Sheriffs of the same county for the time being in whose Bailiwicks the fees, lands, tenements, and places aforesaid are: these they shall be empowered to levy, have and receive, from the lands, tenements, possessions, goods and chattels of the same men and tenants, without let or hindrance of us, or of our heirs, or the Bailiffs or Officers of us, or of our heirs whatsoever. And that the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, during the term aforesaid, likewise shall have in the town, county, suburbs, lands, tenements, fees and places aforesaid (the castle and ditch of the same excepted) the chattels of felons and fugitives, of outlaws, of persons condemned, and waifs, so that if any of the men and tenants aforesaid, or any other person in the town, county, suburbs, fees, and places aforesaid (except as before excepted) ought to lose life or limb, or shall flee, and be unwilling to stand judgment, or shall commit any crime for which they ought to lose their chattels, wheresoever justice ought to be done on them on that account, whether in the courts of us, or our heirs, before us, and our heirs, or before our Justices and Officers of us, or of our heirs whomsoever, before mentioned, or in any other court, their chattels, which shall be found within the said town, county and suburbs, and precincts, shall belong to the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, during the term aforesaid. And it shall be lawful for the Officers of them, the Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, during the term aforesaid, without the let or hindrance of us, or of our heirs, or of others our Bailiffs or Officers, or of our heirs whatsoever, to put them, the Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, in seisin of those chattels, to keep the same for the use and profit of the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors. And that the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, shall hold the same town of Bristol, with the suburbs of the same, the tenements, fees, and places aforesaid whatsoever, within the precinct of the same town, together with the fairs and markets, waters, banks, ways, fishieries, commons, assarts, wastes, and purprestures. And also, rents and returns of all assarts, wastes, and purprestures, as well in the times of our progenitors, formerly Kings of England, as in our own time, in all places aforesaid, within the precinct of the same town as is now rented, and hereafter to be rented, together with the fees for entering such assarts, wastes and purprestures so rented, or to be rented; and with Court of View of Frank-pledge, Hundred Court, Wreck (to wit) wreck of the sea, and wrecks royal, waifs and strays, and royal fish, happening within the said town and county, and jurisdiction of the same, and with other customs, and all other things, to the said town, county, suburbs and precincts, also lands, tenements, places, and fees aforesaid whatsoever, and wheresoever, as if aforesaid belonging, or happening during the term aforesaid. And moreover, we have granted to the same Mayor and Commonalty, and to their successors, that they shall have, during the term aforesaid, all fines, redemptions, issues, forfeited amercements, forfeitures, and other profits whatsoever, in the Iters of the forest, or by reason of the same Iters, as well for trespasses of vert or venison, or for any other offences and causes whatsoever, in any way arising or happening in the said town of Bristol; also in all and singular places and fees within the precincts of the same town, as is aforesaid, so that the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, during the term aforesaid, shall have, by the hands of their Bailiffs and Officers, the fines, redemptions, issues, forfeited amercements, forfeitures, and other profits aforesaid, from those persons who shall be in and of the town of Bristol, and suburbs of the same, the lands, tenements, places, and fees aforesaid, within the precinct of the town aforesaid (the castle and ditch of the same castle excepted) by estreat of the Justices itinerant of the forest, and other the Justices in Eyre, of us and our heirs, to be delivered to the same Bailiffs and Officers of the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, during the term aforesaid, and shall have, levy, and receive all fines, redemptions, issues forfeited, and amerceaments, forfeitures, and other profits aforesaid, of those persons who shall be of and in the said town of Bristol, and the suburbs of the same as is aforesaid; also the lands, tenements, places, and fees aforesaid, within the precinct of the same town of Bristol, and suburbs of the same, and that they may have, and collect at the Exchequer, of us, and of our heirs, by the hands of the Sheriffs and Bailiffs of the liberties in which they shall be Bailiffs, as if we and our heirs should have received the same, without let or hindrance of us or of our heirs, or of our Bailiffs or Officers whatsoever, as if we had retained the same in our hands. And moreover, we have granted that the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, shall have and hold, during the term aforesaid, the said town of Bristol, with the suburbs of the same; also the lands, tenements, places and fees aforesaid (the said castle and ditch excepted) with all franchises and liberties whatsoever, belonging or appertaining to the same, together with the fines, redemptions, issues, and amerceaments, chattels of outlaws and fugitives, escheats, forfeittures, and deodands, which shall happen within the precincts of the town, county, and suburbs aforesaid, and all places, as well by land as by water, within the liberties and jurisdictions of the same, with all other profits arising there, and also all profits and emoluments, as well from punishment for false judgment given in any court, as in any court within the precinct of the town aforesaid, and suburbs of the same, annulled or to be annulled. Also all other profits, treasure, trove, and emoluments, in whatsoever way they shall happen, as well from forests, parks, woods, chaces, warrens, pools, vivaries, marshes, moors, mines, as from all other things which can in any wise arise within the town aforesaid, and county of the same, lands, tenements, places, and fees aforesaid, as is aforesaid, any prerogative, privilege or franchise notwithstanding, all escheats of lands and tenements, hereafter happening, being wholly excepted. And that the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, during the term aforesaid, shall have the privileges, liberties, and emoluments, or profits, rights, and advantages aforesaid, within the precinct of the said town of Bristol, and all things whatsoever, arising or belonging to the same, from all men, residing, and not residing, sole tenants, and not sole tenants, from all things arising within the said county, town and precincts, as fully, and entirely as we should have had them, if we had retained the same town in our hands,—Yielding, therefore, annually to us and our heirs, at our Exchequer, from the said Feast of Saint Michael, during the term of twenty years aforesaid, one hundred and two pounds fifteen shillings and sixpence, at the Feast of Easter, and of Saint Michael the Archangel, by equal portions; and to the Abbot of Tewksbury, and his successors, for the tithes of the town aforesaid, fourteen pounds and ten shillings; to the Prior of Saint James of Bristol, and his successors, for the annual rent of the mill, sixty shillings; to the Constable of the Castle of Bristol and his Officers, for the time being (to wit) to the porter and watchman of the said castle, and to the Forester of Kingswood, thirty and nine pounds, fourteen shillings, to be paid annually during the term aforesaid, at the aforesaid two annual terms, by equal portions, for all services and charges. And moreover, of our more abundant grace, and in aid of repairing and amending, as well the walls of the key, of the town aforesaid, as of the other walls and pavement of the same town, We have granted to the aforesaid Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, that they, during the term aforesaid, may take of things for sale, coming to the town aforesaid, as well by land as by water, by the hands of those whom, for this purpose, they shall appoint, and for which they shall willingly answer the customs underwritten (to wit:)

For every merchant-vessel coming with merchandize within the port there, every time the same shall arrive there6d.
For every vessel laden with fish or herrings, arriving there4
For every merchant or fishing boat, laden with merchandize, fish, or herrings arriving there2
For every quarter of corn and rye, for sale,¼
For every two quarters of beans, peas, malt, oats, and salt, for sale¼
For every cask of wine, for sale2
For every weigh of tallow, for sale1
For every last of herrings for sale3
For every hundred of fish, for sale½
For every vessel laden with wood, brush-wood, or turf, for sale2
For every chaldron of sea-coals for sale¼
For every horse-load of garlic or onions, for sale¼
For every vessel laden with bark for sale1
For every boat or barge, laden with firewood½
For every ten stone of flax or hemp, for sale½
For every horse load of iron, for sale¼
For every fother of lead, for sale1
For every cask of pitch and tar, for sale½
For every cask of salt, for sale1d.
For every cask of ashes¼
For every cask of coal, for sale1
For every hundred weight of wax, for sale1
For every hundred of wove cloth, for sale1
For every hundred of spun linen and canvas, for sale½
For every hundred weight of pepper, for sale1
For every frael of figs and of raisins, for sale½
For every hundred — for sale1
For goods by weight (to wit) for a hundred weight1
For every hundred of boards, for sale½
For every mast, for sale1
For every hundred of rafts and — for sale1
For every bale of cordwaine and base, for sale1
For every chaldron of earth, for sale1
For every vessel laden with mill stones, for sale1
For every horse or mare, ox or cow, for sale½
For ten sheep, goats, and pigs, for sale1
For every hundred weight of — for sale3
For every hundred weight of tin and copper, for sale1

For whatever merchandize and things, for sale, here not specified, coming to the town aforesaid, for sale, as well by land as by water (except wool, leather, and woolfells, one penny per pound (value in money) and one halfpenny for ten shillings, and one farthing for five shillings.

In witness, &c. to continue during the time aforesaid. Witness, the King at Westminster, the 29th day of May.—By Writ of Privy Seal.

Before seven years of the above Grant had expired, in the 24th year of Henry 6, another Patent was granted by the King for 60 years; and in the first year of Edward the 4th, the King granted his interest in the Town in fee, in these words:

Edward, by the Grace of God, King of England and France, and Lord of Ireland, to all to whom these presents shall come (sendeth) health. Know ye, that whereas Henry the 6th, late King of England, on the 15th day of March, in the 24th year of his reign, by his letters patent, committed and granted unto Nicholas Hill, then the Mayor of the town of Bristol, and to the Commonalty of the same town, with the gates, ditches, and walls of the same town and suburbs, also all other the lands, tenements, rents, and services, and the flesh-shambles, which Johanna, late Queen of England, held for the term of her natural life, in the same, from the grant of the Lord Henry the 4th, likewise King of England, her late husband, made to the same late Queen, for the same term, together with the houses, shops, cottages, sheds, tofts, gardens, mills, pools, watercourse running down to those mills, rents, landgables and local tolls, pleas of courts, fairs, markets whatsoever, and courts, in the same town and suburbs, with all fines, issues, redemptions, and amercements, and all other jurisdictions, customary payments, and appurtenances, together with the reversion of all lands, tenements, rents, and services within the precincts of the said town, of all tenants for term of life or years, granted by the same King Henry the 6th, or any of his progenitors, formerly Kings of England, or by any other grant or grants, from whence the reversion at that time pertained, or any ways belonged, to the same late King, together with the ferms and rents received therefrom, (the Castle of the same town, and the ditch of the same, only excepted.) Nevertheless, he then granted to the same Mayor and Commonalty, the water-course running down in the aforesaid ditch toward the mill, under the Castle, as of old time it used to do, together with the banks of the same water, for the space of four feet in breadth, towards the said Castle, all and singular the premises to be had, holden, and occupied, to them and their successors, until the end, and during the term, of sixty years, next and immediately following after the compleating and finishing of twenty years, specified in the said letters; and (whereas) he further granted to the same, the then Mayor and Commonalty, that they should have to themselves and their successors, immediately after the compleating and finishing of the said twenty years, during the same term of sixty years, certain liberties, franchises, commodities, and other things, under a certain form specified in his aforesaid letters, paying thence annually to the same late King Henry the 6th, and his heirs, at his Exchequer, after the said twenty years past and finished, during the aforesaid term of sixty years, £102. 15s. 6d. at the Feasts of Easter and of Saint Michael the Archangel, by equal portions; and to the Abbot of Tewkesbury, and his successors, for the tithes of the town aforesaid, £14. 10s.; to the Prior of Saint James of Bristol, and his successors, out of the annual rent of the mill of the town, aforesaid, 60s.; to the Constable of the Castle of Bristol, and to his officers, for the time being, namely, to the porter and watchman of the said Castle, and to the forester of Kingswood, £39. 14s. 6d. to be paid during the said term of sixty years, at the two aforesaid terms of the year, by equal portions, instead of all services and burdens, as was more fully contained in those letters; and now (whereas) our beloved, the now Mayor and Commonalty of our said town of Bristol, have restored to us into our Chancery, the said letters of the before-mentioned late King Henry the 6th, to be cancelled: We, accepting that restitution, release, and, by these presents, for ever acquit the same now Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, of the form aforesaid, and of each of the rents and burdens aforesaid, in ferm aforesaid, and we remit, and by these presents release, for ever, the same ferm and burdens, to the same now Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors. And further, of our especial grace, and from our certain knowledge and mere motion, we have granted and committed, and by virtue of these presents for ourselves and our heirs, as far as lies in our power, we commit to the aforesaid now Mayor and Commonalty, and to their successors, and to the aforesaid burgesses, their heirs and successors, our said town of Bristol, with the suburbs of the same, and with the gates, ditches and walls of the same town and suburbs, and moreover, all and all manner of lands, tenements, and services, and the fleshshambles pertaining or belonging to us, within the aforesaid town and suburbs, the liberties, and precincts of the same, together with the houses, shops, cottages, cellars, tofts, gardens, mills, pools, watercourse running down to that mill, rents, landgables, and local tolls, pleas of courts, fairs, markets whatsoever, and courts pertaining or in any ways belonging to us in the same town, suburbs, liberties, and precincts, and with all manner of fines, issues, redemptions, and amercements, forfeited and adjudged, and to be forfeited and adjudged, in the same, and with all other jurisdictions and customary payments and appurtenances of the town and suburbs aforesaid, with the appurtenances, together with the reversion of all lands, and tenements, and services within the town, suburbs, liberties, and precincts aforesaid, of all tenants for term of life or years, granted or committed by us or any of our progenitors and late Kings of England, or by any persons whatsoever, from whence the reversion at present anywise belongs or pertains to us, together with the ferms and rents reserved from thence, the aforesaid Castle and ditch of the same only being excepted. Nevertheless, the watercourse in the said ditch, running down in the said ditch towards the mill, below the Castle, as of old it used to do, with the banks of the same water, for the space of four feet in breadth towards the said Castle, which, by virtue of these presents we grant to the said Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, and to the said burgesses, their heirs and successors, being wholly reserved to the same burgesses, their heirs and successors, all and singular the premises to be had, holden, and occupied by the said now Mayor and Commonalty, and by their successors, and by the said burgesses, their heirs and successors, from the Feast of Saint Michael, last past, for ever. And further we have granted, for ourselves and our heirs aforesaid, to the same now Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, and to the said burgesses, their heirs and successors, that from the same Feast of Saint Michael, for ever, they may have for themselves and their successors, all fines, redemptions, and amercements, and also all issues, forfeited and to be forfeited, as well of all men as of all tenants, sole tenants and not sole tenants, residing and not residing, in and out of fees, lands, and tenements, with their appurtenances, and in and out of all places, being within the precincts of the said town of Bristol, and suburbs of the same, and county of Bristol, (the said Castle and ditch excepted) and also (we have granted) all things which can belong to us and our heirs, within the town, suburbs, liberties, county, and precincts aforesaid, from year, day, and waste forfeiture, and fine for murder, in whatsoever courts, of us and our heirs, it shall happen, that all men and tenants, they or any of them, shall pay fines and amercements, or be amerced, as well before us and our heirs, as before us and our heirs in the Chancery, of us and our heirs, and also before the Treasurer and Barons of us and our heirs of the Exchequer, and before the Barons of us and our heirs of the Exchequer, and before the Justices of us and our heirs itinerant for Common Pleas, and Pleas of the Forest, and also before the Justices of us and our heirs of the Bench, and the Justices of us and our heirs for taking Assizes and delivering Gaols, and also before the Justices of us and our heirs assigned for hearing and determining, and for enquiring into felonies and trespasses and misdemeanors, and before the Steward and Marshall, and Coroner of the household of us and our heirs, and the Clerk of the Market of the household of us and our heirs, and also before any other Justices and Officers of us and our heirs whatsoever, or (in whatever court it shall happen) that such issues, and fines for murder, for forfeiture, year, day and waste, shall be adjudged aad forfeited, as fully and entirely as we should have had them if we had kept the town, county, suburbs, and fees, lands, tenements, and places aforesaid, in our own hands; so that the same now Mayor and Commonalty of the same our town of Bristol, and their successors, and the aforesaid Burgesses, and their successors, from the said Feast of Saint Michael last past, for ever, shall be empowered to levy, gather, and receive, by the hand of the Sheriff of the county of Bristol, and of their Bailiffs, the fines, redemptions, and amercements aforesaid, and the issues forfeited, in form aforesaid, and all things which might belong to us and our said heirs, in form aforesaid, out of year, day, and waste forfeiture, and fine for murder, from and in the said town, county, suburbs, and fees, lands, tenements, and places aforesaid, by Estreat of the Exchequer, of us and our heirs, to be delivered from thence to the Bailiffs and Officers of the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, and of the said Burgesses, their heirs and successors, by the hands of the Sheriff of Bristol and of his successors, Sheriffs of the same county for the time being, in whose Bailiwicks the fees, lands, tenements, and places aforesaid, are (these they shall be empowered to levy) from the lands, tenements, possessions, goods, and chattels of the same men and tenants, without let or hindrance, of us or our heirs, or the Bailiffs or Officers of us or our heirs whatsoever. And that the same now Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, and the said Burgesses, their heirs and successors, from the Feast of Saint Michael last past, for ever, shall have in the town, county, and suburbs, lands, tenements, fees, and places aforesaid, (the castle and ditch of the same excepted) the chattels of felons and fugitives, the chattels of felons de. se. chattels of outlaws, of persons condemned, and waifs; so that if any of the men and tenants aforesaid, or any other in the town, county, and suburbs, fees, and places aforesaid, excepting those places before excepted, ought to lose life or limb, or limb, or shall flee, and not choose to stand trial, or shall commit any offence for which he, or they, ought to lose their chattels, wheresoever justice ought to be done on them, on that account, whether in the court of us and our heirs, before us and our heirs, or before the Justices and Officers of us and our heirs whatsoever, before mentioned, or in any other court, their chattels which shall be found within the said town, county, suburbs, liberties, and precincts, shall belong to the Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, and to the said Burgesses, their heirs and successors, from the said Feast of Saint Michael last past, for ever, (we have granted) that it shall be lawful for the officers of them, the Mayor and Commonalty, and successors, without let or hindrance, of us or our heirs, or of any other Bailiffs or Officers of us or our heirs whatsoever, to put them, the Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, and the said Burgesses, their heirs and successors, in seisin of those chattels, for the purpose of keeping them for the use and profit of the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, and of them, the Burgesses, their heirs and successors. And (we have granted) that the same now Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, and the said Burgesses, their heirs and successors, for ever, shall hold the said town of Bristol, with the suburbs of the same, the lands, tenements, fees, and places aforesaid whatsoever, within the liberties and precincts of the same town, together with the fairs, and markets, waters, rivers, ways, fisheries, commons, assarts, wastes, and purprestures, and also the rents and returns of all assarts, wastes, and purprestures in all places aforesaid, within the precincts of the same town, as is aforesaid rented, and hereafter to be rented, as well in the times of our progenitors, formerly Kings of England, as in our own times, together with the fines for the entrance of such assarts, and wastes, and purprestures, so rented, or to be rented, and with the court of view of frank-pledge, hundred court wreck, (viz.) wreck of the sea, and wrecks, royal, waife and sraife, and royal fish arising, and which shall arise, or happen within the said town, and the county and jurisdiction of the same, and with the other customs, and all other things, which of that sort soever, and whatsoever, as is before mentioned, shall appertain, or shall belong, for ever, to the said town, county, and suburbs and precincts, and also the lands, tenements, places, and fees, aforesaid. And further we have granted, and by these presents grant for us and our heirs, to the same the now Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, that from the said festival of Saint Michael last past, they shall have all fines, redemptions, issues, forfeited amercements, forfeitures, and other profits whatsoever, in the courts itinerant of the forest, or by reason of the same courts itinerant, as well for trespasses of vert and venison, as for any other offences and causes whatever, proceeding or arising in the said town of Bristol, and also in all and singular, places and fees, within the precincts of the same town, as is before mentioned, so that the same now Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, and the said Burgesses, their heirs and successors, for ever, from the same Feast of Saint Michael, shall be empowered to levy, collect, and have by the hand of their Bailiffs and Officers, the fines, redemptions, issues, forfeited amercements, forfeitures, and other profits aforesaid, from those persons who shall be in and of the town of Bristol, and suburbs of the the same, the lands and tenements, places and fees, aforesaid, within the precincts of the said town, (the castle and ditch of the same castle being exempted) by Estreat of the Justices in eyre of the forest, and of the other Justices in eyre of us and our heirs, in their circuits, to be delivered from them to the same Bailiffs and Officers of the said Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, and that they may have, and collect, at the Exchequer, of us and our heirs, by the hand of the Sheriffs and Bailiffs of the liberties in which they shall be bailiffs, all the fines redemptions, issues, forfeited, and amercements, forfeitures, and other profits aforesaid, from those persons who shall be of and in the said town of Bristol, and the suburbs of the same, (as is before mentioned) and of and in the lands and tenements, places and fees, aforesaid, within the precincts of the same town of Bris tol, and the suburbs of the same, as we and our heirs should have collected them, if they should have belonged to us and our heirs, without let or hindrance, of us or our heirs, or of our Bailifls or Officers whatsoever, if we had retained the said town, county, and suburbs, and fees, lands, tenements, and places aforesaid, in our hand. And further we have granted, for us and our heirs, that the same Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, and the aforesaid Burgesses, their heirs and successors, for ever, may have, and hold the said town of Bristol, with the suburbs of the same, and also the lands, tenements, places, and fees, aforesaid, (the said castle and ditch excepted) from the said Feast of Saint Michael, the Archangel, last past, with the franchises and liberties howsoever belonging and pertaining to the same, together with the fines, redemptions, issues amercements, the chattels of outlaws and fugitives, escheats, forfeitures, and deodands, which shall arise, or shall happen, within the precincts of the town, the county and suburbs aforesaid, and all places, as well by land, as by water, within the liberties and jurisdiction of the same, together with all other profits in the same places, arising, or which shall arise or happen, and also all profits and emoluments, as well from punishment for false judgment given, or to be given, in any court, as for judgement annulled, or to be annulled, in any court within the precincts of the said town, and suburbs of the same, and moreover all other profits, treasure, trove, emoluments, (howsoever they may happen) as well from forests, parks, woods, warrens, pools, wastes, places, marshes, moors, mines, as from all other things which can in any way arise within the town aforesaid, as was before mentioned, any prerogative, privilege, or franchises, notwithstanding, (all escheats of land and tenements, hereafter happening, being wholly excepted); and that the same now Mayor and Commonalty, and their successors, for ever, shall have from the said Feast of Saint Michael last past, the privileges, liberties, and emoluments or profits, rights and commodities aforesaid, within the precincts of the said town of Bristol, and all things whatsoever arising, or which shall arise, or belonging to them, from all men residing, and not residing, sole tenants, or not sole tenants, out of all things arising, and which shall arise, within the said county, town, and precincts, as fully and entirely as we should have had them, if we had kept them in our own hand,—Yielding, therefore, to us and our heirs, annually, at our Exchequer, from the aforesaid Feast of Saint Michael last past, £102. 15s. 6d., at the Feast of Easter, and of Saint Michael, the Archangel, by equal portions; and to the Abbot of Tewkesbury, and his successors, for the tithes of the town aforesaid, £14. 10s.; to the Prior of Saint James, of Bristol, and to his successors, out of the annual rent of the mill, Sixty Shillings; to the Constable of the Castle of Bristol, and to his officers for the time being, namely, to the porter and the watchman of the said castle, and to the Forester of Kingswood, £39. 14s. 6d.; to be paid annually at the two aforesaid terms of the year, by equal portions, for all services, exactions, burdens, and demands, (strictly commanding all persons that they do not counteract the premises in any respect,) because express mention be not made in these presents, of the true yearly value, or any other value, or of the accuracy of the premises, or any one of them, or of other gifts and grants heretofore made to the aforesaid Mayor and Commonalty, or to their predecessors, by us, or any of our progenitors or predecessors, or any statute, act, ordinance, usage, custom, or provision, made, ordained, used, or provided to the contrary, or any thing, cause, or matter whatsoever, notwithstanding. In witness, whereof, we have caused these our letters to be made patent. Witness, myself, at Westminster, the twelfth day of February, in the first year of our reign."

Having thus traced the right of Ownership of the Town of Bristol from a very early period, and explained the manner in which it was Let to Farm from time to time, sometimes to individuals and at other times to the Corporation; having also given a full statement of the several Tolls which in those days were collected: it must be evident to every reader, that the Corporation are entitled to receive two distinct Tolls on goods, the one called "Custom on all goods coming for sale, as well by land as by water," and applicable to general purposes, and the other called "Murage, Keyage, and Pavage" on Merchandize for sale, coming to the Town by water only, including a Toll on Ships and Boats, to be solely applied to the repairs of the Keys, Walls, and Pavements of the Town.

Footnotes

1 Whenever there was a duty on exports, it was as here clearly defined.
2 In the hundred of Holt, in Norfolk.
3 From the death of Queen Joan, 9th July, to Michaelmas following.