Cecil Papers
1570

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Institute of Historical Research

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E. Salisbury (editor)

Year published

1915

Pages

98-102

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'Cecil Papers: 1570', Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 13: Addenda (1915), pp. 98-102. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=112030 Date accessed: 29 August 2014.


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1570

The Queen, to the Bailiff and Jurats of Guernsey.
1569–70, Feb, 8.Francis Chamberlain, Captain of Guernsey Castle, being sick, she appoints Thomas Carey, Captain of Hurst Castle, to take charge there during Chamberlain's absence.—Hampton Court, 8 February, 1569.
Signed. 1 p. (4. 105.)
Draft of above, with corrections by Cecil.
pp. (4. 109.)
The Queen to the Lieutenant of Guernsey Castle, and the Bailiffs &c. of Guernsey.
1569–70, Feb. 8.Notifying the appointment of Thomas Carey, Captain of Hurst Castle, to survey Guernsey Castle and estimate for repairs and fortifications.—Hampton Court, 8 February, 1569.
Signed. 1½ pp. (4. 107.)
Draft of above.
pp. (4. 108.)
Sir Thomas Gresham's Account.
1569–70, March 3.Receipts 109,218l. 0s. 10d. Payments to Cardinal Chattillion, Lord Thomas Howard for the Earl of Leicester, and others 105,832l. Rest 3,386l. 0s. 10d. Debts owing to the Queen, paid by her Majesty's servants 44,896l. Debts owing by the Queen both in England and Flanders 45,712l.
Endorsed: 3 March, 1569. State of Sir Thomas Gresham's account. 1 sheet. (4. 113.)
Jersey.
1569–70, March 13."13 March, 1569. Minute from the Queen's Majesty to the captain, bailiff and jurats of Jersey for the punishment of Pierre and La Rocque."
Endorsement only. (213. 38.)
Nicholas Steere to —
1569–70, March 14.To end his troublous suit, offers to pay Jones his adversary 5l. yearly for 21 years, and for his annuity 20l.—Undated.
Holograph. Endorsed: 14 March, 1569. 1 p. (4. 119.)
[Mary, Queen of Scots to the Duke of Norfolk.]
[1570,] May 17.I have reseved, my own good constant lord, your comfortable writings, which ar to me als weilcom as ever thing was, for the hop I see you ar in to have some beter fortun nor you have had yet, thourow al your friends favor. And albeiet my friends kas [case] in Scotland be of hevy displesour to me, yet nothing to the feor I had of my sons deliver, and thos that I thot micht be caus of longer deleys in your aferes, and there for I took greter displesour nor I have done sens, and that disminuschit my helth a leitle. For the Earl of Shrewsbury cam on nicht so mery to me, schowing that the Earl of Northumberland was randiit to the Earl of Sussex, which sens I have found fals, but at the sowdens I tewk sik feir for friends comerin me that I wept so til I was al swon thri deies efter. But sens I have hard from you I have gon abrod and sowcht al meanes to avoyd displesour for fear of yours. But I have mester (need) to keer for my helth sens the Earl of Shrewsbury teks me to Chasuth (Chatsworth) and the pest is in Rodrem [Rotherham], and to uther pleses not further nor Fulgems no[r] Estlandes. The Earl of Shrewsbury looks for Betman to be instructed how to deal with me because he is al his and clin tourned from the Earl of Leicester; this I asur you and preys you to kip it quiet. I have no long leser, for I trust to wreit be on of my genlemen schortly mor surly this, for I t[h]ink to have mor mater efter Betman's coming. But I feir at Cheswith I shall guet leitle moyen to heir from you, or to wreit. But I scal [use] diligence and in the mei[n] tym I wreit to N to have his opinion in the coming of the V's to obten their mesters help and to falow it, for com quat so shall I schal never chang from you, but during lyf be trew and obediant as I have professit, and swo I prey you think & hold me in your good grece as your own quha deily schal prey God to send you hapy and hesty delivrance of al troubles, not doubting but you would not then injoy alon then al your felisites on remembren your own fethful to death hwa schal not have any advancement or rest without you, and so I leave to trouble you but to comend you to God. At [symbol] this xvii dey of Mey. Your own D.
The original cipher, now deciphered. Compare with the decipher printed by Labanoff, Lettres de Marie Stuart, III., p. 47, from Harleian MSS 290, fol. 87. The above contains several lines not appearing in the Harleian decipher; which however contains some words not in the original cipher. 1 p. (140. 68.)
Contemporary decipher of the above. 1 p. (133. 7.)
Francois, Duc d'Alencon to the Earl of Lincoln, Admiral of England.
1570, July 11/21.I cannot thank you enough for the good offices you have done for me over there, as I have always heard both from those who have been in England heretofore in my behalf and recently from Lord Stafford. The latter will be able to tell you how I am resolved within a few days to send Commissioners to the Queen, my good mistress, to make a proposition to her as to our marriage. I pray for a continuance of the good will you have always shown me.— "A Mairemoustier le 21 jour de Juillet, 1570."
Signed. French. 1 p. (133. 6.)
H. Earl of Huntingdon to Mr. Secretary.
1570, Aug. 24.There is great expectation amongst the papists of Lancashire and Cheshire that the Earl of Derby will play as fond a part this year as the two earls did last year. He has hitherto been loyal but has at this time many wicked counsellors. There is one Broune, a conjurer, in his h[ouse] kept secretly. Uphalle, who was a pirate and had lately his pardon, could tell somewhat. He that carried Lord Morley over was also there within this se'nnight kept secretly. "If you send some faithful and wise spy that would dissemble to come from D. Alva and dissemble popery, y[ou] might understand all; for if all be true that is said, there is a very fond company in that house at this present."—Ashby, 24 Aug., 1570.
P.S.—"I pray God I may not hear any more of your coming to Kenilworth. (fn. 1) "
Endorsed: "Therle of Huntingdon to my master:" and by Cecil, "Earl Derby."
Holograph. Slightly injured. 1 p. [Haynes, p. 603. In extenso.] (173. 119.)
Hurst Castle.
1570, Sept. 2.Letters patent of grant for life to Thomas Carew of the custody and captaincy of Hurst Castle, Hants.— Gorhambury, 2 September, 12 Eliz.
Latin. Parchment, damaged. (222. 8.)
Cecil House and Theobalds.
1570, Sept. 24.Account of household expenses and works at Cecil House and Theobalds.
A long roll. (143. 86.)
Edmond St. Michell alias Barron, to Sir William Cecil.
1570, Sept.Prays Cecil's help to procure payment for ten tuns of gascoine wine, taken up from him in 1569 for the Queen's service in Ireland. Undated.
Endorsed: September, 1570. 1 p. (1791.)
[The Council] to John Hawkins and William Hawkins.
1570, Oct. 5.Orders them to transport the Cardinal Shastillion and his family and train from Southampton to Rochelle, or any other part he thinks convenient; in the new bark, which they have in charge.—Windsor, 5 October, 1570.
Draft. Endorsed: M[inute] to John Hawkins and William Hawkins of Plymouth. ½ p. (214. 8.)
Debts of John Wilsforde.
1570, Nov. 20.Letter of attorney from Sir John Parratt and John Best made unto Ambrose Watson, to recover all such debts as are due unto either of them from John Wilsforde the elder, merchant tailor of London.—20 November, 1570.
1 p. (2240.)
The Willyby.
1570, Dec. 13.Acknowledgment of receipt by Edward Baeshe from Lord Clinton, Lord Admiral, of 46l. 11s. 0d. for two months' victuals for the Willyby, on April 22 last.— 13 December, 1570.
¼ p. (214. 9.)
Amreinque Fernandes to Francois Mans, Merchant of Antwerp.
1570, Dec.16/26.I have embarked cork as follows. Particulars given. Discusses the terms of their contract and other business matters. I send you herewith a receipt from the Almonsarif. He wants you to buy him out of his money the articles he desires. He is and has been a good friend to us, so do it and send them off by the first ship.— Lisbon, 26 Decembro, Anno 1570.
Holograph. Seal. 3½ pp. Dutch. (202. 85.)
Mary, Queen of Scots.
[1570 (?).]Dissertation on the right of Queen Mary to the crown of England.
Headed: The second book touching the right, title and interest of the foresaid Lady Mary, Queen of Scotland, to the succession of the crown of England.—Undated.
68 pp. (138. 88.)
Ireland.
[1570 ?]"A remembrance of such acts as be past, altered or suspended in Parliament within the Realm of Ireland."
Notes thereon by Cecil. 3 pp. (141. 99.)
Minute from [the Queen].
[1570 ?]And upon the ending of this letter we cannot but somewhat note unto you that we find it very strange to see by advertisement from our cousin of Sussex, the Lord Hudson, and Sir Ralph Sadler how by the letters of our cousin of Cumberland, yourself, and the Lord Wharton, you did condescend to send for our service out of Westmorland and Cumberland but 200 horsemen, and yet not to send them without money to be first sent unto you, which how hard it was then to be sent unto you, we think you can consider and for lack of so small a sum of money we marvel the importance of such a service should be delayed, of which matter we have somewhat more largely imported our mind to this bearer.
Fragment. In Cecil's hand. ½ p. (185. 157.)
A Memorandum.
1570.This is the list of the things the Almosaryf wants. ¾ p. Dutch and Portuguese. (202. 89.)
R. Topcliffe to —
[After 1570.]Prays that no part of those lands under his charge which were old Richard Norton, the rebel's, in Craven, shall pass by sale or grant to any person; as he won the lands from Procter the father and Procter the son after they had twice got them as concealed.—Undated.
1 p. (174.)

Footnotes

1 This name, with the signature of the writer, has been carefully crossed out.


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