Cecil Papers
1583

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Institute of Historical Research

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E. Salisbury (editor)

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1915

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216-243

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'Cecil Papers: 1583', Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 13: Addenda (1915), pp. 216-243. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=112043 Date accessed: 30 August 2014.


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1583

Aliens in London.
[1582–3.]Answers to the aldermen of every ward within the city of London to the precepts to them lately directed from the Lord Mayor concerning the number of strangers resident within their wards, their trades of living and of what churches they are.
The answers of the masters and wardens of the several companies within the city of London (which have licensed any strangers to use any trade or occupation within the same by the space of six years last past) to the several precepts from the Lord Mayor.—Undated.
(Temp. Eliz. Thomas Blanck, Lord Mayor.)
84 pp. Damaged. (210. 11.)
[Printed in extenso in Hugenot Soc. of London Publications, Vol. X, Part II, pp. 258–314.]
Admiralty Matters.
[1582.]"A register of the books of Admiralty matters from anno 1582."
2 pp. (243. 1.)
Brecknock College.
[1582 or later ?]Proofs on the part of the new Bishop of St. David's, concerning the state of the College of Brecknock at the said Bishop's coming thither; and of his great charges in repairing and amending the same.—Undated.
pp. (214. 15.)
Edward Cusake.
[1582.]Petition of Edward Cusake, son of Sir Thomas Cusake of Lesmollen, sometime Lord Justice and Chancellor of Ireland, to the Queen. Has petitioned the Queen for restitution of his lands and goods confiscated by means of his late unjust attainder, and has expected the Queen's resolution therein these seven months. Prays that the examination of his innocence may be referred to the Lord Treasurer.— Undated.
Note at foot by Valentine Dale, that the Queen has commanded the request to be referred to the Lord Treasurer.
1 p. (P. 97.)
Lawrence Wagstaffe to the Same.
[1582 ?]For a lease in reversion, for his services to Henry VIII, Edward VI, Queen Mary and the Queen.— Undated.
Note by Valentine Dale that the Queen grants the petition. 1 p. (1557.)
Reignold Alderson and others to [the Queen].
1582.For leases in reversion of the demesnes of the Manor of Barwick, Yorks, of which they are ancient tenants.
Endorsed: 1582.
Note by Lord Burghley, and note by Valentine Dale that the Queen grants the petition.
1 p. (1560.)
John Ussher of Dublin.
[c. 1582 ?]Grant to John Ussher of Dublin of certain proportions of such clear profits as shall be obtained by his means from merchandise transported out of England and Ireland, above that now received.
Draft, corrected by Burghley.
Note thereon that it was signed August 11, but passed not the seal.
pp. (141. 251.)
Recusants' Bonds.
[1582–3.]Note of recusants' bonds taken before the High Commissioners and certified into the Exchequer to be considered of in equity.
Signed: "Clenche." 1 p. (142. 57.)
[Don Antonio] to [? Queen Elizabeth].
[1582–3,] Jan. 9/19.Serenissima maesta, due litere ho ricevuto in un medesimo iorno di vostra Maesta serenissima indicio veramente della cambiata fortuna ancora senza la volunta de la mia Molinara che tante volte mi ha molido l'alma e vita. Ringrazio il caso la fortuna bella amichevole molinara del mio core, che mi ha cossi acomodato, a quella restaro obligatissimo aquella aficionatissimo, lei sola sara mio dolce amor, a lei si sacrificarano li miei pensieri, et vostra Maesta serenissima fachia quel che sara servita. Solo con la mia amata e dulcissima molinara mi faro forte non rolo contra il povero Filipo ma contro il mundo tuto, anzi quando mi sera quella amica et fidele contra la vostra maesta medesima; altro non vollio altro non quero che la mia minhona la mia amorosa molinara.
Del estato delle mie cose resto contentissimo pero le abracian questi principi con piu caldeza che mai. Espero buon suceso con l'adjute et favor di la Maesta vostra serenissima.
Tenho bone novele del Castiglio de la Mina del Brasil et tute l'altre parti del oceano; solo Inglaterra esta ancora piu gelato che la neve verso me. Del nesto priego a vostra Maesta Serenissima presti credenza a Antonio de Veiga et me conservi in la sua bona gracia.
Serenissima Signora conservi nostro Signor e acresca la vita et il potente estato di vostra Maesta quanto lei desidera.— Di Paris, 19 di ianaro.
Il Maririaro de J. R.
Holograph in Don Antonio's hand. Italian and some Portuguese. No address. Seal of the royal arms of Portugal. 2 pp. (185. 130.)
London Bills of Mortality.
1577, Dec. 26, to 1582–3, Jan. 24.Tabular returns of the numbers of deaths and baptisms in London from 26 December, 1577, to 24 January, 1582–3, distinguishing those dying from the plague and other diseases.
17 pp. partly destroyed by damp. (208. 6.)
Sir Walter Mildmay and others to Sir James Croft.
1582–3, Feb. 13.As commissioners in the cause between the Marquis of Winchester and Henry Ughtred, they require him to furnish them with particulars of his money transactions with Ughtred.—London, 13 Feb., 1582.
1 p. (146. 22.)
The King of Scotland to the Queen.
1583, Mar. 29.The bearer hereof, your servant recommended to us by your letters brought by him, has seen the progress of matters here since his coming so specially as we will forbear to repeat them. In all which we affirm he has behaved himself very discreetly to our good liking. For ourself in sum we pray you, dearest sister, to think and esteem of us as of him that you have assuredly power of in all things tending to your honour, surety and contentment, as of any living. And so, leaving the further declaration of our mind to the present bearer and to our next messenger, Colonel Stewart, a man earnestly affected to the "intertinement" of our amity, we commit you to God.—Holyrood House, 29 March, 1583.
Holograph. 1 p. (133. 26.)
Thornton le Moors.
1583, March 31.Warrant to Lord Burghley, to cause sufficient assurance to be taken to her Majesty's behoof of the lordship of Thornton the Moors, Middlesex, parcel of the possessions of William Askew, and thereupon to pay 4,000l. to Askew; at the suit of Askew and Lady Anne his wife, one of the ladies of the Privy [Chamber].—Manor of Richmond, March 31, 1583.
Signed by the Queen. Endorsed: Void. Much damaged. Parchment 1 p. (216. 6.)
Aliens in St. Katherine's near the Tower.
1583, April 1.The names of all the strangers inhabiting within the precincts of St. Katherines, nigh the Tower of London.
Gives the name, how long a denizen, of what land and of what church. Total Dutch 212, French 48, and Scottish 7.
7 pp. (144. 107.)
[Printed in extenso in Huguenot Soc. of London Publications, Vol. X., Part II, pp. 342–347.]
Aliens in St. Martin's le Grand, London.
1583, April 6.View taken by the constable and headboroughs of the Liberty of St. Martins le Grand, London, of all such strangers being denizens as now inhabit and dwell within the said liberty; and view of all such strangers as have come to inhabit and do dwell within the said liberty within the compass of 6 years now past.—6 April, 1583.
14 pp. (208. 8.)
[Printed in extenso in Huguenot Soc. of London Publications, Vol. X., Part II, pp. 347–353.]
The King of Scotland to the Queen.
1583, April 23.Having sent these two gentlemen of his to treat and negociate a complete union and amity between them, he has privately communicated to the bearer of this letter [Colonel Stewart] certain matters for her secret hearing, and begs her to trust him as fully as she would himself.— Holyrood House, 23 April, 1583.
Holograph. French. 1 p. (133. 27.)
Aliens dwelling in the Blackfriars, London.
1583, April 28.A treue certificat of the nombre names and trade of lyvinge of all Straingers as well denizons as others inhabiting wthin the precincte of the late Blackfriers at London, wth. their Children and Servaunts: howe long they have dwelt there what Churche they are of and howe long they have ben denizons, made and delivered by Robert Donckin and Thomas Hall Conestables of the said Libertie by order from the right honorable the Lord Russell and the Lord Cobham by vertue of letters directed unto them from the lordes of her Maties most honorable privey Counsell the eight and twenteth of Aprill 1583.
1. Jaymes Moore alias Morte blacksmythe borne in Henoo under ye dominyon of Kinge Phillip free denyson as by his pattene datte ye xxiiijth daye of Febr. and in ye iiijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Frenche Churche and hathe no servantes but Englishe men he hath v children all borne in Englande.
2. John Henrick showmacker borne under ye obediance of the Beshope of Lucke being fre denysone as by his letters pattente datt ye first day of December in ye xxth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the Franche Churche, he hathe ij sarvantes strangers, John Rightringe borne in Fresland and Michell de Boye borne in Andwarpe. They bothe came to get ther living. They have ben here ij yers and is of no Churche. The sayd Henrick hath iiij Children all borne in Eang[land].
3. Bastian Bonfoy fether dreser borne under ye obezance of ye Frenche kinge: Free denyson as by the Letters pattent datte ye vijth day of Jenuary in the viijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the English Churche. He hathe ij Children borne in England. He hathe no sarvantes strangers.
4. Richard Boffote mellener borne under the obezance of the Frenche kinge: Fre denyson as by ye letters pattent datt the vijth day of Marche in ye xxth yere of her highnes regne. He is of ye Frenche Churche. He hathe v Children ij borne in Franse and iij in Eng. He hathe no sarvant strangers.
5. Xp'ofer Lardenoys goldsmythe borne under ye obezance of the King of Spayne. Fre denyson as by the Letters pattent datt ye xviijth daye of June in the xth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the French Church. He hath iiij Children all borne in England. He hath no sarvantes strangers.
6. Renold Buffe taylor borne under ye Duck of Clive. Fre denysone as by his letters patt' datt the xxth of Occtobre in ye iijd and iiij the yere of Kinge Phillip and Q. Marye. He is of ye Englishe Churche. He hath no Children. He came about xxx yers past to get his living. He hath no sarvantes.
7. Guy Deppdall goldsmythe borne under ye obezance of ye Frenche Kinge. Fre denyson as by ye letters pattentes datt xvth day of Occtober in ye xxjth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Frenche Church. He hath ij children borne in Eng. He cam for Religion. He hath ij sarvantes John de la Janer born in Paris being her a monthe. He cam to gite his livinge. And ye other is Jacobe Lanyere born in Rone he cam for to git his livinge.
8. Jerame Hawtene letter caster for printers, borne under the Frenche Kinge. Fre denyson as by ye letters pattent datt ye last day of November in the xvijth yer of her Mates regne. He hathe iiij Children all borne in England. He hathe no sarvant strangers. He is of ye French Churche.
9. James le Moyne alias Morgane paynter borne under ye obezance of the French Kinge. Fre denyson as by ye Letters pattentes datt ye xijth day of May in the xxiijth yere of her Mates regne. He hathe one Child borne in England and he hath no sarvant stranger. He cam for religion. He is of ye French Churche.
10. Jeram Pypes brushmaker borne under ye French Kings obezance. Fre denyson as by ye lettres pattent datt the xjth day of Jenuary in ye xviijth yere of her Mate regne. He cam for religion. He is of ye French Churche. He hathe ij Children both borne in England. He hathe no sarvant stranger.
11. Martyne Garate goldsmythe borne under ye King of Spayne in Bregis. Fre denyson as by his letters pattentes datt the xiiijth day of Jenuarye in the xxiijth yere of her Mates regne. He cam into England being a child. He hath one child borne in England. He hath one sarvant stranger borne in Andwarpe a boy. He hime self is of ye Duche Churche.
12. Babtist Vanlanden goldsmythe borne in Gelderlande. Fre denyson as by his letters pattentes datt the xiiijth day of October in ye xxijthe yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Duche Church and cam into England to get his living. He hath one Child of vij yeres old, borne at Andwarpe. He hathe ij sarvantes strangers Nicolas Fustenbroughe and John Stricke they ar boys and of ye Duch churche. Also he hath one Guylam vans Swarvell borne in Andwarp sojerner in his hous and is a marchant adventurer.
13. John Gasker fetherdreser borne under ye obezance of the French Kinge. Fre denyson as by ye letters pattentes datt the vjth day of November in the xvth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye French Church and came for religion. He hath vj Children all borne in England. He hath no sarvant stranger.
14. Harman Bockhold goldsmythe working in Jonsons Shop, borne under ye Kinge of Spayns dominion. Fre denyson as by his letters pattent doth apier datt the xxiiijth of Feb' in ye xviijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Duch Church. He cam into England being a child. He is a bacheler and hath no sarvant stranger.
15. Harman Copleman silversmythe lying in Johnsons howse borne in ye King of Spayns dominion. Fre denyson as by ye letters patent datt ye xjth day of Feb'r in the xviijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye French Church. He cam for living. He hath ij Children both borne in England. He hath one sarvant stranger, Garat Porter, a boy borne in Duchlande.
16. John Morto showmaker borne in Luckland. Free denyson as by ye letters pattent datt ye xvth day of June in ye xijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Frenche Churche. He cam to get his living. He hath iij Children all borne in England, also he hath ij sarvant strangers Barnard Bodwyen borne in ye Lowe Cuntry. He is of ye French churche and came to get his living. Ye other is Jacob Garet borne in ye same Cuntry and cam for ye lick cause.
17. Mathewe Garette, cutler, borne in Luck. Fre denyson as by ye letters pattentes datt ye xth day of Feb'r in ye xxth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the French Churche. He cam to get his living. He hath ij Children borne both in England. He hath one sarvant stranger, Guellam Hanwick, borne by Brussells and is of ye French Churche and cam to get his living.
18. Ascanias de Renialme booksellere borne in Venisia. Fre deneson as by ye letters pattente datt the xijth day of December in ye xxjth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye French Church and cam into England x yers past to se ye contry. He hath one sonne borne in England. He hath a sarvant stranger, Nicolas de Brone, born in Jarmany, and is of ye Duch church.
19. Anthony Gerante borne in France, showmaker and no denysone, beinge of the Franch Churche, and came into England when the masacare was in France for his conscience. He hathe iiij Children ij borne in France and ij in England. He hathe no sarvant stranger.
20. Petter de Orange mellenore borne under the Frenche Kings domenions. Fre deneson as by the letters pattents datt ye vth day of Aprell in ye xxvjth yere of Kinge Henry the eight. He is of the Frenche Churche: his cominge into this land was to get his livinge. He hath nother Children nor sarvant stranger.
21. Lewes de Menell cuttler borne in Normandye. Fre deneyson but some doubte of his pattent bering datt ye viijth day of Aprell in ye xxth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Frenche Churche. He cam into England vj yers past for religion. He hath ij Children both strangers born. He hath no sarvantes strangers.
22. Guyllame Servill mellenor decessed his late wife now using ye same trade had lett'rs pattentes datt the xijth day of Febr' in ye xixth yere of her Mates regne. She is of ye Franch churche and cam into England for Religion. She hathe one Child at hom wth. her: being a stranger borne.
23. John Lemere goldsmythe borne in Parrys. Fre denyson as by the lett'rs pattentes datt the vijth day of November in ye xiijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the French churche and came into Englande for Religion. He hath ij Children both borne in England. He hathe no sarvant strangers.
24. Frances Lewcattelly perfewmare of gloves dwelling wthin. ye hows of John Edwardes, borne in Venes. Fre denyson as by his letters pattentes dat the xxijth of Novemb' in ye xth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Italian Churche. He hath no children nore sarvant stranger.
25. Godffray Englishe joyner borne under ye Ducke of Clif. Fre denyson as by the letters pattentes datt the xxviijth day of June in ye xxiiijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the Duche Churche. He cam into England iij yers past to get his living. He hath no children nor sarvantes; also ther is one othere in ye same hows whos name is Frances.
26. John de Hors late a feltmaker borne under ye French Kinges domenion. Fre denyson as by his letters pattent datt ye xxjth of Jenuary in ye thred yere of Kinge Edward ye vjth. He is of the Franche Churche. He came into England to get his living. He hathe no children nor sarvantes strangers.
27. Nicolas White goldsmythe borne in Bredges, fre denyson as by the lett'rs pattentes datt ye xxviijth of Aprell in ye xxth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the Duche Churche. He came into England to gett his livinge. He hath ij children both borne in England. He hath iij sarvantes strangers Stiven Godwyne, Ebright Sprites, Markes Wills. Godwyn is of ye Franch churche, Sprites is of no churche and Wells is a boye.
28. Tomas Vautrolier Prynter, borne in ye Frenche Kings dominion, fre denyson as by the letters pattentes datt ye viijth day of March in ye iiijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the French Church. He cam into England to gett his living. He hath iiij children all borne in England. He hath one sarvant stranger borne in Scotland. His name is Andrewes of thage of xv yers.
29. Michell Blanck alias Whit hatband maker borne in Roane, fre denyson as by the letters pattent datt ye xxviijth day of Jenuary in ye xixth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the French Churche. He cam into England x yers past to gett his living. He hathe ij Children both borne in England. He hath no sarvant stranger.
30. Symon Brewere tromphit maker borne in Brabante. Fre denyson as by his letters pattentes datt the viijth day of June in ye xxiiijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Duche Churche. He came into England iij yers paste to gett his livinge. He hathe viij Children wherof one only was borne in England. He hath no sarvantes.
31. Fraunces Nowaye clokmaker borne in Brabante free denyson as by the letters pattentes datt the xjth day of Julye in ye xxijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the Duche Churche and came into England vij yers past to get his livinge. He hath ij children both borne in England. He hath one sarvant stranger borne in Andwarpe. He is of ye Duche Churche.
32. Jaymes Charmoys cutler desecid was borne in Parrys. He was a fredenyson as by ye lett'is pattente datt ye xxviijth of June in ye viijth yer of her Mates regne. His late wif beinge a Frenchmans doughter and she English borne hath in her howse Stiven Scatillion borne in Lions in France. He is no denyson. He hath one child borne in England: the widow hath v children all borne in Englande. Ye said Scatillion is of the Englyshe Churche and came into England to get his livinge xx yers paste.
33. John Lews comfit makere borne in Valecia in Spayne fredenyson as by his letters pattentes datt the xxijth day of Feb' in ye xxth yere of her Mates R. He is of the Frenche Churche and cam into England xiiij yers past for his Conciens. He hathe one child borne in England. He hath no sarvant stranger but ij Englishmen.
34. Petter Bonyvall fether dresere borne in ye Frenche (sic). Fre denyson as by his letters pattentes datt the xth of June in ye iij and iiijth yere of Kinge Phillip and Q. Mary. He is of ye French churche and came into England xxxij yers past to git his living. He hath vj children all borne in England. He hathe no sarvant strangers.
35. Nicholas de Barre cutler borne in Paris and no fre denysone worketh in ye hows or chamber of Tanvill a stranger. He is of ye Frenche Churche and came into England xvj yers past to get his living. He hath ij children both borne in England. He hathe no sarvant stranger nor English.
36. Gyls Bolenger potticary borne in Parrys. He is no fre denyson. He hath one child wch. was borne in England. He is of the Frenche Churche. He hath ben in England x yers. He hath no sarvant stranger.
37. Robert le Marson alias Fountayne one of the menesters of Godes worde in ye Frenche Churche came into England x yers past for his conciens saeke. He hathe in his hows iiij children iij borne in England and one in France. He hathe no sarvant stranger in his hows.
38. Will'm de Lanne also one of ye menesters of the same Churche is a fredenyson and came into England about x yers past for his conciens saeke. He hathe in his hows vj chieldrene wherof v was borne in England and one in France. He hathe no sarvant stranger.
39. Petter Chamberlane a Sorjane [surgeon] borne in Frannce and no free denyson but a howsholder. He is of the French Churche. He came into England about x yers past. He hath no sarvant, his mother and his sister dothe Sujarne [sojourn] in his hows.
40. Petter Ormane hatband maker borne under King Phillip fre denyson as by his letters patt datt the xvj day of November in ye viijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Frenche Churche. He came into England to see ye contry. He hathe ij children both borne in England. He hath no sarvantes.
41. Abrahame Mighell torner: borne in Antwapte free denyson as by his letters pattentes datt ye xxiiijth of June in ye xiiijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the Duche Churche. He hath ij children both borne in England. He hath ij sarvante stranger, Albert Geardes borne in Fresland and Wm. Jacobe bothe of ye Duche Churche and cam into England about one yere past.
42. Gloyde Bewboys (fn. 1) crosebowe maker under ye Frenche Kynges obezance, fre denyson as by his letters pattentes datt the xiijth of Feb'r in ye xiijth yere of her Mates regne. He hath ij children bothe borne in Eng[land]. He is of ye Frenche Church and came to get his living. He hath no sarvantes.
43. Petter Sage goldsmyth borne in Roane fredenysone as by his letters pattentes datt xxiiijth Feb'r in the iiijth yere of her Mates regne. He hathe one child. He is of the French Churche. He hath no sarvantes but one cossyne lyeinge in his howse; he hath bene in England about ij monthes and is of no Churche.
44. Henricke Almayne goldsmythe borne in Luckland free denyson as by ye lett'rs pattente datted ye xxvjth of November in ye xvjth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Duch Churche and cam to get his living and hath ben her xvj yers. He hath iij children all borne in England. He hath iij sarvantes strangers Jacob Jaymes Renold Riall and Seger Canteloys ij of ye Duche Churche and one of no Church. They have ben in England about iij yers.
45. John Telliyar blacksmythe borne in Depe under the Frenche King. He is no denyssone. He hath bene her about x yers and came for his consiens and is of ye French church.
46. Frances Bover borne in Savoy bookeseller. He is no fre denyson a bacheller and hath ben here about vj yers. He cam for cause of religion and is of Frenche Churche. He hath in his howse an old man called Nicola de Cortoys a Scowllmaster borne in Depe. He cam for religion and is of ye French Church. He hath ben her about iij monthes.
47. Robert de la Howlay showmaker borne in Roane, fredenyson as by his lett' patt' datt xxiijth of Jenuary in ye xvjth yer of her Mates regne. He cam into England for religione. He is of ye French Church. He hath no Children. He hath ij sarvant strangers borne in Pickardye, one called Frances Presure, ye other Hubert Herdson. They have ben her about iij yers, one of French Church, ye other of non.
48. Potter Boys hattband maker borne in France, free denyson as by his letres patt' datt ye xxviijth of November in ye iijde and iiijth yer of K. Phillip and Q. Mary. He is of ye English Churche and hath iiij children, all borne in England. He hath no sarvantes.
49. Andrewe Robynson showmaker borne under the obezance of the Ducke of Clive, fredenyson as by the letters pattentes datt ye xijth of December, in the xiiijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the Englishe Churche and cam to get his livinge. He hathe one sarvant stranger Nicolas Arnson who hath ben her about one yere and is of no Churche.
50. Henrick Follvatter cutler borne in ye Emperors dominion, fre denyson as by his letters pattentes datt ye xxijth of November in ye xiiijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of the Frenche Churche. He hath ij children Englishe borne. He hath one sarvant borne in Scottland he hath ben her about v yers and is of the English Churche.
51. John Fichit a cooke borne under ye Frenche Kings obezance fre denyson as by his letters patt' datt ye xjth day of June in ye xixth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Frenche Churche: and hathe ij children Englishe borne. He came about xj yers paste for causes of religion.
52. Michell Bosseret (fn. 2) cuttler borne in Naynons under the French Kinges obezance. He is no fre denysone and hathe bene in England about x yers past. He is of the Frenche Churche. He hath no childrene nor sarvant stranger.
53. Thomas Teball scallmaker borne in Roane under the Frenche Kinges obezance. He is no denyson. He hathe bene here about xth yers past. He is of the Frenche Churche and came into England for religion. He hathe no children nor sarvantes.
54. John Edwardes taylor borne under ye Ducke of Clive, fre denyson as by his letters patt' datt' the ixth of June in ye vijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Duche Churche. He came to gett his livinge. He hathe iiij childrene English borne. He hath ben her xxiiij yers and hath no sarvantes.
55. Frannces Roian clokmaker borne in the Frenche Kings dominion, fredenysone as by the letters patt' datt ye ixth day of Marche in ye xviijth yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Frenche Churche. He hath one child borne in England. He cam to get his living. He hathe no sarvantes.
56. Jacobe Jaymes goldsymthe borne in Andwarpe. He workethe in ye hows of one Henrick Allmeyne wch. is a denyson but this Jacobe Jaymes is no denysone. He hath bene here about ij yers past and kipethe a sarvant stranger which is also no denyson. His name is Renold Riall borne in Brudges. They say they ar bothe of the Duche Churche and cam to get ther livinge.
57. Will'm Voshere paynter of paynted papers borne in Normandye. He is no fredenyson. He hath bene in England xxxt yers. He is of the Frenche Churche. He hath ij children borne in England. He hath no sarvantes.
58. Jaccobo Cornells van Armaine showmaker borne in Gelderland and is no fre denysone. He worketh wth. one Bolton an Englishe man. He cam into England about iij yers past to gett his livinge. He is of no Churche.
59. Rocco Josone showmaker borne in Floshing and is no denyson. He came into England half a yer past. He is of no Churche. He worketh wth. one John Boode an Englishe mane.
60. John le Roye a French poste, borne under ye Frenche Kings dominion, fre denyson as by ye letters patt' datt the xxixth day of March in ye xix yere of her Mates regne. He is of ye Frenche Churche. He hath no children nor sarvantes.
61. Nicolas Hottote cobler borne in Normandye. He is no fre denyson. He hath no children. He is of the Frenche Churche. He hathe no sarvant. He hath ben in England xxvjth yere to gett his livinge.
62. Richard Tanvill tynker borne under ye French Kings dominion, fre denyson certenly knowen but we can not have his pattent because he is absent and ye sicknes in his hows. He is of ye Frenche Churche and hath ij children borne in England. He hath no sarvant strangers.
63. Martyne Gylbert a deacon of ye Frenche Church and a Sorjant [surgeon] also. He is of no denysone. He hath no children nor sarvantes. He cam into England ten yers past for religion.
64. Frances Wasell crosbowmaker borne in Heno. Fre denyson as by his pattente made iij yers past. He is of the English Church. He hath no children nor sarvantes.
A Brif notis for memory viz.:
Fre denysonsljc xx ij iij xj persons.
Ther wiveslj
Childrencxxv
No denysons and servant strangersxliiij
The holl nomber of strangers ther wives and children inhabitinge in ye Blakfrers wth. ther sarvantes strangers at this present day.—
20 pp. (208. 7.)
[Apparently the draft of the return for the Black friars, London, included in 208. 14, which is printed in extenso in Returns of Aliens in London, Part II, pp. 353 sqq. (Huguenot Society's Publications, Vol. X.).]
The Marquis of Winchester v. Ughtred.
1583, May 15.Cause of the Marquis of Winchester and Henry Ughtred. Ughtred's trust accounts, and his proceedings after the death of John Marquis of Winchester in 1576, showing him to have remaining in his hands 17,611l. 4s. 7d.
3 sheets. (146. 26.)
1583, May 15.Accounts of Ughtred. Sums received by him and not charged in his former accounts, and other particulars.
sheets. (146. 29.)
The Queen to the King of Scotland.
1583, May 17.Could one's thoughts be as clearly seen as one's face, would never send ambassadors to him, esteeming the long journey a far shorter means of assuring him of her sincerity. Thanks him for the evident signs of his confidence in her and wishes that she were wiser that she might give him better counsel in matters of such importance. Hopes that he will take in good part what she sends assuring him on her faith as a princess that he will never have occasion to repent of the affection he appears to bear her and which she will do everything to preserve or rather to increase. Although the whole charge of these gentlemen put her under great obligation to him, must confess that the ring makes her too much his creditor [créancière]. Will not fail to wear it as an earnest of sincere faith which she values more than any Indian gold and trusts that this gentleman will not fail to tell him the conditions on which she takes it. The diamond is more likely to become malleable than her thoughts to be turned from respect for his honour and safety, if she find no slackness on his part. That would always produce the like affect in her, of which however she has no expectation.— "De mon Chasteau de Grenewich ce 17 de May, 1583."
P.S.—Has found great fidelity and wisdom in these gentlemen and begs him to esteem them for such.
Copy. French. 1½ pp. (133. 28.)
Dowager Marchioness of Winchester to the Lord Chancellor.
1583, May 20.As to the cause between the present Marquis of Winchester and Henry Ughtred, her late husband's executor, as it concerns her portion on the estate.—Chelsey, 20 May, 1583.
Signed. 1 p. (146. 40.)
Henry Ughtred to the Same.
1583, May 23.As to the cause of the Marquis of Winchester. The great charge against him is now reduced to nothing more than he always confessed. Protests that he has not gained a penny by the executorship. The suit is rather of malice unquenchable than of good cause.—London, 1583.
Endorsed: May 23.
Holograph. 1 p. (146. 41.)
Dowager Marchioness of Winchester to the Same.
1583, May 26.As to the cause between Lord Winchester and Mr. Ughtred. Prays for favourable regard of her interests in the matter of her jointure and inheritance, and that her counsel may be heard.—Channon Row, May, 1583.
Endorsed: May 26, 1583.
Signed. ½ p. (146. 42.)
The Queen's entertainment at Theobalds.
1583, May 27.Lodgings appointed on the occasion of the Queen's visit to Theobalds.
On the south side of the inner court lodgings for the Lord Admiral and his lady, the Earl of Warwick and his lady; in the Tower at the end of the Queen's gallery, for the Earl of Leicester and Lord and Lady Hunsdon; under the gallery, for Lord Howard, the Lady Marquis, Lady Stafford and others; on the north side, Mr. Secretary, Sir Tho. Heneage and others.
Endorsed with corrections by Burghley. 6 pp. (140. 26.)
[The latter portion printed in Murdin, II. 375–378 in extenso.]
1583, May 27.Persons to attend on her Majesty at Theobalds.
In Burghley's hand. 2 pp. (140. 31.)
1583, May 27.The total of the flesh and fish to be provided for the Queen's Majesty at Theobalds for May 27 to 30, 1583.
Endorsed by Burghley. 1 p. (143. 62.)
[1583,] May 27.Lodgings for the lords and gentlemen attending on her Majesty 27th of May at Theobalds.
Corrections by Burghley. 2 pp. (143. 63.)
Marquis of Winchester to the Lord Chancellor.
1583, May 27.As to the cause between him and Ughtred. It has pleased the Lord Chancellor and the rest to commit Ughtred. Prays that his liberty be not granted without sufficient assurance, either to discharge Winchester of the great debt due to the Queen, or else to deliver him so much money as that he may discharge it himself.—Winchester House, 27 May, 1583.
Signed. 1 p. (146. 43.)
Henry Ughtred to the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Treasurer, and the Earl of Bedford.
1583, June 5.As to the suit of the Marquis of Winchester. Lord Winchester's claim of 94,000l. not being justified, he hoped they would have cleared him and recompensed him. Has gained nothing by being executor. As to his employment of the executorship money. Prays for enlargement.—The Fleet, 5 June, 1583.
Holograph. 1 p. (146. 44.)
Henry Ughtred to the Lord Chancellor.
1583, June 15.Is ready to make proof of the money set down in his book of account, and doubts not of being able to recover it. This agreed upon, he can set down how the Queen shall be answered her 1,000 marks yearly, and the legatees their legacies.—The Fleet, 15 June, 1583.
Copy. ½ p. (146. 47.)
Lord Chancellor Bromley to Henry Ughtred.
1583, June 15.In answer to his previous letter, desires him to set the matter down in writing.—15 June, 1583.
Copy. ½ p. (146. 47.)
Henry Ughtred to the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Treasurer, and the Earl of Bedford.
1583, June 19.As to the suit of the Marquis of Winchester. Complains of reports which have been spread respecting him, that he must ever lie in prison, and that he has been condemned in 18,000l. more than he is worth; also of the wrongs and losses inflicted on him by his imprisonment.—The Fleet, 19 June, 1583.
Holograph. 1 p. (146. 45.)
[Sir Henry Cobham] to [Sir F. Walsingham].
1583, [June 24].Preparations for the Queen-mother to pass into Lorraine to see her young daughter. The King shows that he will pass from Messiers to Lions, which will give great cause of misliking to Montmorency and those of the religion. They hope Monseigneur's coming into France may stay the King's proceeding. Hears the Queen-mother hopes to renew the treaty of marriage between the Duke of Savoy and the Duke of Lorraine's daughter. Earl Morton has at sundry times in the night been with Glasgow. A long conference at his lodging with Jesuits and others. He is to part this day or tomorrow to the French King. There is in this town Sir John Seton, second son to the lord of Seton, ready to take his voyage to Spain. He has order from the Scotch King to inform King Philip that his subjects hold him prisoner and to demand his counsel and aid. The like commission they say Morton is to deliver to the French King. By letters of 22 June (N.S.) it is written how King Philip had stayed his navy prepared for the Tarzeres (Azores). Hopes of the Spaniards that the marriage between the Catholic King and la reine blanche will take place. The bishop of Liège was elected 2 June bishop of Cologne. Rumour circulated in the Court that Casimer should levy 10,000 roysters of those here of the religion.—Paris, the — of —, 1583.
Copy. 4 pp. (138. 167.)
[The original is in State Papers Foreign, France, Vol. IX., No. 130.]
Cause of the Marquis of Winchester and Henry Ughtred.
1583, June 25.The Marquis's answer to Ughtred's late offer of 3,500l. towards the discharge of the Queen's instalments.
pp. (146. 35.)
The Same.
[1583, June 25.]Terms of payment offered by Ughtred, being 3,500l. in money to the Marquis, payment of legacies, instalments to the Queen &c.
1 p. (146. 38.)
Dowager Marchioness of Winchester to the Lord Chancellor.
1583, June 25.Has been a suitor to them, by her daughter Dacres, in behalf of Mr. Ughtred, who married her late husband's daughter. Hears that he has made an offer which stands to their good liking, and prays that he may be set at liberty.—Chelsey, 25 June, 1583.
Signed. ½ p. (146. 46.)
The Same to the Same.
1583, June 30.Prays for the delivery from prison of Ughtred, who says that he has offered terms whereby the Queen is provided with good security to be paid.—Chelsey, 30 June, 1583.
Signed. ½ p. (146. 48.)
Merchants of the Staple to the Lord Treasurer.
[1583, June.]As to the controversy between them and the Merchants Adventurers, they pray that they may have some time appointed them to attend his pleasure thereon.— Undated.
½ p. (2084.)
Henry Ughtred to the Lord Chancellor.
1583, July 1.He offers as sureties for his appearance in November, Gregory Fynes, Lord Dacres of the South, and Henry Billingsley, citizen and haberdasher.—The Fleet, 1 July, 1583.
Holograph. 1 p. (146. 49.)
The Same to the Same.
1583, July 1.As to the recognisances for his appearance in November next, finds by the terms that they mean to make him again a prisoner. Prays that his sureties may be bound only in obligations, as they will not enter into statute or recognisance.—The Fleet, 1 July, 1583.
Holograph. ¾ p. (146. 50.)
The Same to the Same.
1583, July 3.He did not intend to accuse him of being the cause of his imprisonment, but if he is again committed it will be the cause of his undoing. Is sorry for the Lord Chancellor's displeasure, and asks pardon.—The Fleet, 3 July, 1583.
Holograph. 1 p. (146. 51.)
William Smith to the Queen.
1583, July 3.For a lease in reversion of a farm of the manor of Whitchurch, co. Oxford, for his services as sergeant of the scullery.
Note by Thomas Sekford that the Queen grants the petition.— 3 July, 1583.
1 p. (936.)
Henry Ughtred to the Lord Chancellor.
1583, July 5.Craves his pardon. The words at which the Lord Chancellor takes offence were written only to move his compassion.—The Fleet.
Endorsed: July 5, 1583.
Holograph. ½ p. (146. 52.)
James VI of Scotland to the Queen.
1583, July 9.Is in receipt of her letter and perceives through her wise counsels her unfeigned affection for him. Is quite unable to respond thereto in writing, still less by deeds, but must repeat to her the pleasure he feels in it. Cannot doubt that she will prove as useful to him as she has promised. With regard to her wish that thoughts could be as easily seen as faces, wishes that there were a window in his breast that she might see his grateful acceptance of her gracious offers. The Queen has no need to wish herself wiser to be able to give him the better counsels; would that he were more able to carry out the advice she gives. There is no one else in the world, whose advice he would more willingly follow. The condition under which she accepts his ring explains better his intention than he could express it himself. Prays that when any reports reach her of him who sent the ring, she will remember the promise he has made thereby and believe nothing that she does not know the truth of by him, assuring her that he will do the like "à la bonne femme aveques le chapeau rouge."—"De Chasteau de Saint André ce neufième de juillet, 1583."
Holograph. French. 2½ pp. (133. 29.)
The Earl of Lincoln.
1583, July 10.Warrant under the signet granting to the Earl of Lincoln, Lord High Admiral, and Elizabeth his wife, lease for 21 years of the parsonage of Woking; also of lands called Richmond's lands in Surrey.—Greenwich, 10 July, 1583.
Sign manual. 1 p. Much decayed. (203. 53.)
Cardinal de Guise to Mary, Queen of Scots.
[1583 ?] July 11–21.Since my return from Spain I have been unable to find any means of writing to you but that which presents itself to-day, namely your gentleman (escuier). Because I know it is dangerous to write you much of what I would, I have thought it better to leave so much to the sufficiency of the bearer, reserving the letter to keep myself always in your good graces and to assure you that you will always find me ready to do you service as the most affectionate uncle and servant you have in the world, as you will also know by what I have prayed this bearer to tell you.— "D'Orleans ce 21 Juillet."
Signed. French. 1 p. (133. 40.)
Henry Ughtred to the Lord Chancellor.
1583, July 12.He trusted that Lord Dacres would have been bound for his appearance, but now finds him very jealous of his bond. Has entered into his own recognisances of 7,000l., and Mr. Billingsly has acknowledged an obligation of 1,000l. as his surety. Prays for liberty on this bond.—The Fleet, 12 July, 1583.
Holograph. 1 p. (146. 53.)
[Sir Henry Cobham] to [Sir F. Walsingham].
1583, [July 27.]The Duke of Guise has been twenty-one days past at his signory of Hean (?) hunting the wild boar and other pleasures. He was visited by sundry English young gentlemen who are come over pretending to be papists. There are no ships or men ready to be sent at Havre de Grace or Dieppe, but about Honfleur there is a barque with two lesser vessels a-rigging by order from the Duke d'Elbeuf pretending to serve Don Antonio. Understands these ships are to transport men into Scotland. The bishop of Glasgow is advertised that the Scottish King is retired into the castle of St. Andrew's. David and James Fentre, the Scottish bishop's nephews, with forty of their countrymen, are parted eight days since with intention to repair to the King. The bishop has dealt very earnestly with a friend of [Cobham's] to repair to Lord Hamilton and dissuade him from following her Majesty's course. The Unicorn, Dobeni's [D'Aubigny's] ship, is returned to the isle of Retz on the coast of Bretagne. The Duke of Guise is about to build another monastery in Hen and has raised an impost for the purpose on all things which shall be carried upon the river which descends into the haven of Hen. Rejection by the Rouen parliament of the Cardinal of Bourbon's attempt to have the preaching of the gospel prohibited throughout the duchy of Normandy. The Duke d'Elbeuf would have constrained M. de Mesuage in Normandy to leave the exercise of the religion.
The King came to Paris from Madril the 23rd inst. and lodged in the Duke d'Epernon's house. On the 24th he went in the morning to the Augustins and assisted them in their ceremonies. He resolves to-morrow to repair to Dollenville and so to Lions to meet the Duke Joyeux. The Queenmother is retired into a village between the Bonnes Hommes and St. Clou, a place within half a league of Madril and a league and a half from Ruel where Don Antonio is.
The King has caused Bellievre to persuade Monsiegneur to continue his treaty with the Low Countries, although it is understood that Ghent has publicly resolved to treat no further with the French. Complaints of the injurious treatment of the Queen's subjects trading across the seas.— Paris, the — of —, 1583.
Copy. 6 pp. (138. 169.)
[The original is in State Papers, Foreign, France, Vol. X., No. 14.]
Manor of Ashby, co. Lincoln.
1583, Aug."A note of the causes of the damages assessed by the jury on behalf of George Yorke, plaintiff, against John Allen, defendant."
The cause concerns Yorke's manor of Ashby, Lincoln, and certain bonds.
Endorsed: August, 1583. 3 pp. (2260.)
Mary, Queen of Scots to M. de Mauvissière.
1583, Sept. 3.Was on the point of replying to his of August 22, when she received the letter of the 30th together with two from Archibald Douglas. Wishes that de Mauvissière reply to Douglas only by word of mouth that he may not know she has any secret intelligence, as this fact if known would deprive her of all liberty in future or by putting her host under suspicion of negligence give cause to her enemies and his to take her out of his hands. Douglas is not to write to her in cypher except on matters of very great importance and is to advertise de Mauvissière from time to time of what he knows will concern Mary or her son. Unimportant occurrences are to be reported through the ordinary way of Walsingham.
With regard to the proposal that to avoid the suspicion conceived of her by reason of recent changes in Scotland, she should make new overtures to the Queen to put matters right in that country and send one of her people with that object. Douglas is to inform Beale and others of the Council that Mary after her bad usage and the little respect paid to her offers for the Queen's advantage does not feel occasion to put herself forward again in anything between the said Queen, herself and her son, without sufficient assurance beforehand of being dealt with sincerely. Fears that if she acts otherwise, after her old experiences of their false dealings with her and so recently in the case of the last treaty, they will induce her to assist them under vain hopes of her liberty to bring her son again under the yoke of the Queen. It is for this reason that she has avoided to the best of her power entering into particular offers for Nau's journey, ever since the Earl of Shrewsbury first communicated to her the Queen of England's intentions with regard to the re-establishment of matters in Scotland. But if the Queen will treat directly with her from the first, Mary will be pleased to use her endeavours to bring about quickly a good agreement. If this method of procedure is agreeable to the Queen and her Council, de Mauvissière and Douglas may offer Mary's good offices and she will send Nau to Scotland as soon as she learns how he may best intervene in her name. Otherwise things may stay as they are. Mildmay and Beale can attest her sincerity in the negotiations over the last treaty. All these innovations could have been prevented by a good agreement between Queen Elizabeth, Mary and her son.
Douglas is not to speak in any negotiations as having special commission from Mary, as he pretends, but only upon de Mauvissière's report to whom alone Mary refers all action on her account. As for the general pardon that Douglas wishes her to be a means of obtaining from her son, she wrote to him about three months ago when Douglas was thinking of going to Scotland, but if the Queen of England applies to her in his favour, she will write again openly. She is well satisfied with his excuse for the language he used to one of Walsingham's friends.
De Mauvissière has done well to dispatch 'le petit Fouler' and Mary is infinitely obliged to him for the letter he has written to her son. He should watch the doings of the Hamiltons and let her know their reply to her last messages both by de Mauvissière and Seton. By the latter de Mauvissière will do well to let the Earl of Leicester know what she lately asked him to tell him on her behalf.—"De Worsop, ce 3 Septembre, 1583."
Contemporary copy. French. 4 pp. (133. 31.)
[Printed in extenso by Labanoff, Lettres de Marie Stuart, Vol. V., pp. 361–369.]
The Ordnance.
1583, Oct. 8.Orders set down for the Office of the Ordnance by the Commissioners appointed by commission of 15 August, 24 Eliz. (1582). Two papers.—8 October, 1583.
17 pp. (239. 22.)
John Selwyn.
1583, Oct. 20.Warrant, unsigned, granting lease in reversion to John Selwyn, keeper of Otelands Park.
Note by Dr. Valentine Dale, that the Queen grants it. 20 October, 1583.
1 p. (203. 40.)
Marquis of Winchester v. Ughtred.
1583, Nov. 11.List of bonds of the Lord Pawlett and others in connection with the cause of the Marquis of Winchester and Henry Ughtred; with certificate by Christopher Hoddesdon and Henry Billingsley that the bonds have been shown them.
2 pp. (146. 23.)
Mary, Queen of Scots to M. de. Mauvissière.
1583, Nov. 12.The reasons that have prevented him so long from writing to her are the cause likewise of his not having news from her earlier. Neither from this kingdom regarding her liberty, nor from France touching her dower has she received letters or advice. Is rejoiced to hear of the good health of the King and Queen of France and the Queen-Mother. Hopes that she and her son may profit from the good friendship which exists between them and the Queen of England. Wishes that the said Queen would at last have some consideration for them, seeing that for good or ill they are delivered into her hands. De Mauvissière, having of his good will been for nearly seven years her principal minister, is a better witness than any other of the sincerity with which she has always dealt with the Queen and of the patience with which she has endured her unjust and rigorous captivity. For four years in the gentlest way possible has she begged her freedom. With increasing ill-health and almost beyond hope of cure, she was obliged in order to be put into a more peaceful state, to submit this last summer to conditions such as to no statesman could appear reasonable. But for all that, though everything has been done to draw from her by fine words and hopes what could be used against her and her son to the Queen's advantage, she remains without any reply or resolution arrived at to this present.
Nevertheless, in order to put herself in the right, she has found it necessary to entreat a final resolution upon the treaty between the deputies of the Queen and herself. If de Mauvissière has as yet received no reply he may make overtures on her part to the Queen that if Mary can by any means advance the friendship and good understanding so much desired between herself, her son and the Queen, she will work with all sincerity and good will towards that end, provided that she be assured of being treated in like manner. If Elizabeth will think well to let de Mauvissière pass into Scotland with some gentleman of quality on her behalf, Mary will send with him her secretary fully informed of her intentions so as to impart them to such Scottish lord as she shall choose to intervene in her name with de Mauvissière and the Queen's ambassadors in all negotiations tending to the said friendship. This she thinks the promptest way to cut at the root of the dissension which her enemies are trying to make grow between the Queen, Mary and her son, but if Elizabeth does not think well to send at the beginning personages of such quality into Scotland, Mary offers to make the first rude beginnings of the work (esbaucher les affaires) by sending her said secretary with such whom it shall please Elizabeth to appoint and in one way or another will satisfy the Queen of her proceedings with respect to her son. If no reply from Elizabeth and her Council is made to these overtures, Mary puts it to their judgment and to that of all kings and princes of Christendom that she is acquitted of every part of her duty not as queen and sovereign princess such as she is, but as a very affectionate near relative and prisoner of the said Queen.
As to Walsingham's expedition to Scotland, of which de Mauvissière writes, Mary is astonished at the treatment he and his company have met with at the hands of her son and his lords, but as she was not permitted to intervene, the result of the expedition must not be imputed to her. In addition to what she writes in her enclosed letter to Walsingham, de Mauvissière is to assure him that the choice of him for the expedition was very agreeable to her hopes of a good and quick conclusion of the treaty, "me fiant entierement sur l'asseurance que vous m'aviez donnée que la royne ne l'envoioit en Escosse que à bonne fin et pour accommoder et mectre les affaires de ce couste la en bon estat, je desire deslors infiniment de pouvoir assister l'intention de la royne en toutes choses, scaichant que le bien et repos de moy et de mon filz est le sien propre, ce que je vous prie faire entendre à la royne et à messieurs de son Conseil afin que avec toute sincerité il leur plaise de proceder vers moy comme je veux faire de ma part en tout ce qui dependra de ma puissance tant envers mon filz que au dit Escosse. Et faictes, je vous prie, que j'en aye promptement une responce et des lettres que j'en ay dernierement escrites à la dite royne et ausdits seigneurs de son Conseil, et comme en toutes choses du monde il fault veoir quelque fin qu'il luy plaise la prendre pour elle, pour moy et pour mon dit filz telle qu'elle jugera meilleure envers Dieu et le monde, et que je me resolve de ma part au pis ou au mieux."—Sheffield, 12 November, 1583.
Copy in a French hand. 2 pp. (133. 33.)
[Identical with the first portion of the letter printed in extenso from the original in the Bibliothèque Royale, Paris, by Labanoff, Lettres de Marie Stuart, V. 373 seqq. The concluding portion given above differs from the ending of the original.]
Deposition by William Melis, Niels Mathyssen, Claes Lamberts, Isbrant Willems, and Dune Jemmens all of Utrecht, boatswain and petty officers, attested by the Burgomaster and Town Council of Enchuysen.
1583 (?), Nov. 14.They were serving on the ship of Coert Lenaertson of Hamburgh, on a voyage from Lisbon to Sintuives to load with salt, and in July last between Cape St. Vincent and Islemadera fell in with a pinnace called the May of Sion whose captain was Denton of Hampton (Hanton). This captain, or his crew, cried out twice "Strike your topsails to the Queen of England, for I am her pinnace." The petitioner had his sails taken in and remained alongside all night. In the morning he perceived that the pinnace had another Dutch boat alongside, whereby the petitioner saw that it was no Queen's ship and was minded to have sailed off. But the Captain shouted to the petitioner, "take your mizzen in again or I will make you do so," and, with that, had his boat launched and the petitioner brought aboard him in her, took away his charter party, and confined him for six days. He also took the crew out of the petitioner's ships and the following goods—8 culverins of 20–21 cwt, with tackle and 225 shot, 2 mortars (or stone-guns) with four chambers and all their carriages, 12 muskets and fusees, 2 dozen long pikes, 3 half barrels of powder, 4 flags, 2 small flags, and spars rigging and stores, and so, having stripped the ship, sent the petitioner aboard again, without the petitioner being able to come to speech with him, and sailed away with the plundered goods. Deponents continued their voyage to Sintuives, and laded with salt there, setting sail thence on September 15th. On the 18th of the same month they were boarded by a second freebooter, who took the mizzen sail and all the crew's clothes. In witness &c., the 14th November, anno &c., 28 [? of Philip II].
Copy. Dutch. 2 pp. (203. 71.)
Cause of the Marquis of Winchester and Henry Ughtred.
1583, Nov. 22."Particular of your Lordships' resolution, as the Marquis of Winchester conceives it."
2 pp. (146. 39.)
Baptista Servigi to Captain Sassetti.
1583, Dec. 9.Describes the loss of the island of Terceira, in which action he was engaged. Attributes the defeat to the incompetence of the Governor and the cowardice of the Portuguese.—Undated.
Contemporary copy.
Endorsed: 9 December, 1583. 3 pp. (246. 17.)
— to [Sir E. Stafford].
[1583], Dec. 18.The messenger (Villeye his name) sent to the K. is returned, who as it seemeth hath not only brought cold hope of obtaining the requests I wrote to your H. of by Mr. Modye, but also threatenings, for his Highness was stricken into such dumps after the reading of his brother's letters that he commanded all those to be stayed whom he had licensed the day before to depart, and talked of nothing during supper but of hasty and safe departure, wishing he had such a town as Calais to go to. This Saturday morning arrived here a gentleman who desired to speak with his Highness, and being come before him kneeling down began his talk in this manner—"Sir, two or three days since passing by such a church I entered to do my devotion, and kneeling not far from the door, there entered three or four young men, of the which one, beholding your Highness' picture, began to say in this sort to his fellows, 'See here the gallant whose "bougger" Aurilly I have in charge to despatch,' which words I gave ear unto, and some others which I fear touch your Highness' person, and they leaving the church I followed them, whom I have so narrowly watched that I can give account of all things that he hath done since his departure from Paris." Here he ended, and after divers questions his Highness commanded of his guard to go with him, and first to shut the gates of the town, and after to make diligent search; but passing through the hall they found walking there the man they looked for, whom they presently took, and assembling the Council brought him forth, when he confessed that he had already received money to kill a sergeant's son [Aurilly, written over] called your L. knows how, and that he had promised him a brave horse and 1,000 crowns. Farther he confessed that there are four feed to this rude [sic]. He hath also, upon hope of life, confessed that there are 25 or 30 horsemen that attend him in the villages near about to help to save him when he had wrought his feat, which horsemen were seen yesternight about five of the clock galloping to and fro about a mile off. He sweareth he knoweth not for who he should do, but we suspect that it [is] by the procurement of the nobleman [Duke d'Espernon written over] that Mr. Modye told me you gave the horse unto, for that the foresaid sergeant's son was too familiar with one of the Q. Mother's women [Madame de Saune written over] that the other loveth. I could name her, but I am sure you know her better than I. All our nobility are abroad this night to seek the foresaid horsemen. I have writ the farther I can from their language if the worst should fall.—Undated.
Endorsed: 18 December. Copy of a letter from Chasteautirry. 1 p. (170. 25.)
[Probably the enclosure, or a copy of it, in Stafford's letter to the Queen of 19 December, 1383. See Calendar of Cecil MSS., Part III, p. 20, No. 52.]
Musters.
1583, Dec.Certificate of the Deputy Commissioners for the mustering of horsemen within the county of Bedford.
1 p. (142. 82.)
The Same.
1583, Dec.Certificate of the musters of horsemen in Middlesex. Signed by Owyn Hampton, Robert Wrothe, and William Clerke.—Undated.
Endorsed: December, 1583. 4 pp. damaged. (214. 16.)
Queen Elizabeth to the Great Mogul.
[1583.]Draft letter of recommendation for merchants proposing to trade and settle in India.
Unfinished.
Endorsed: "Queen Elizabeth to the Great Mogul." 2½ pp. (134. 1.)
Printed Libel.
[1583 ?]Memorial with respect to a gross slanderous and libellous printed book against God's church and the Queen of the realm, lately brought into the realm and sent into Scotland. It is headed "preface" and states reasons why the book should be answered.
See S.P. Dom. Cal. 1581–90, pp. 116, 143, where answer of Burghley to such a libel occurs.
In Burghley's hand. 3 pp. (144. 143.)
The Court of Admiralty.
[1583 ?]Declaration by the Judge of the Admiralty Court touching the jurisdiction of the court, with special reference to recent infringements of the same by prohibitions and writs of habeas corpus act of the Queen's Bench and a writ of habeas corpus sent yesterday to remove the body of Arnold Bernert, a stranger remaining in ward for a contract made beyond the sea. If he do disobey it as his predecessors have done then will the justices of the said Bench put a fine of 200l. upon his head and return the same to the Exchequer, and then were it better to relinquish the office than to be so molested.—Undated.
In handwriting of Dr. D. Lewes, endorsed by the Earl of Lincoln. 1 p. (138. 164.)
Hatfield.
[1583 ?]Opinion of Mr. Wray on the grant by the Lord Admiral to Henry Savile and his heirs, of the bailiwick and keepership of the lordship of Hatfield. The opinion is against the claims of Savile's assignees to the offices.
1 p. (141. 133.)
Cause of the Marquis of Winchester and Henry Ughtred.
1583.Statement of Ughtred's claims.
2 sheets. (146. 24.)
[1583.]Answer of Ughtred to the articles of the Marquis of Winchester. 3 pp. (146. 36.)
Thomas Perry.
1583.Warrant granting lease in possession or reversion to Thomas Perry, "presently serving us at Berwick."
Unsigned. Note by Dr. Valentine Dale that the Queen makes the grant, under certain conditions.
Endorsed: 1583. (203. 54.)
Aliens in London.
[1583.]Names of all the strangers inhabiting within the precinct of the late Black Fryers as well householders as wives, children and servants, where they were born, of what trade they are of, how long they have been here, whether they be denizens or not, and of what church they be. The same for East Smithfield, Hallywell, Hallywell Strete, Norton Foldgate, Clerkenwell, Turnmill Strete, St. Johns Strete, Shorditch, Highe Holborne, Wappinge, Whitechappell, Dutchie of Lancaster without the Barres of the New Temple.—Undated.
47 pp. (208. 14.)
[Printed in extenso in Huguenot Soc. of London Publications, Vol. X, Part II, pp. 353–376.]
Aliens in London.
[1583 ?]Names of strangers inhabiting the London Wards, giving the nation and trade.—Undated.
50 pp. (210. 14.)
[Printed in extenso in Huguenot Soc. of London Publications, Vol. X. Part II, pp. 314–341.]
Heretics.
[1583.]MS entitled "How heretics ought to be proceeded against by the laws and statutes now in force." Quotes various statutes, modes of procedure, and cases, from 3 Richard 2 to 25 Eliz. Apparently unfinished.
22 pp. (214. 17.)
Horatio Palavicino.
[c. 1583 ?]"The manner of proceeding in Hora(tio) Pala(vicino's) cause."
To acquaint Sir Walter Mildmay as well with former proceedings as with that which may be thought fit to be done hereafter. To know of the L. Treasurer when we may have conference about his cause. To cause a draft to be made of a letter of promise from the Commissioners unto Horatio Pal(avicino) for the renewing of the bond. To procure her Majesty's letters of credit unto the P. to advance the payment of her interest. To have certain of the wealthiest merchants of Antwerp called before the Commissioners, and to be let understand that in case her Majesty shall not receive present satisfaction, there will be some such order taken as they shall have no cause to like of. The Conference: to consider of the requests of Horatio: to take order for the recovery of the interest.—Undated.
1 p. (186. 123.)
Treatise.
1583.Tractatus de Sacramentis: Sumtione Eucharistie: Absolutione: Matrimonio.
Inscribed: "In re Docto Arosmithi:" also, 1583. (Vol. 275.)
Thomas Watton to the Queen.
1583.For lease in reversion of the site of the manor of Northfleet and other lands in Kent.
Endorsed: 1583.
Note by Dr. V. Dale that the Queen grants the petition.
½ p. (1143.)
Giddings and Hoddesdonbury.
[1583.]"Witham's petitions upon his last account, anno 25 Eliz. 35l."
A list of fines levied in the bailiwick of Giddings and Hoddesdonbury, Herts, for taking in people to dwell without consent of the inhabitants, for not avoiding the town, for non-appearance to recognizances, &c. The parties fined are all noted as being "not worth anything."
1 p. (2245.)
Members of Parliament.
[1572–1583.]"Burgesses of the Parliament House dead."
Berks. Villa Nove Windesor, Ric'us Gallys gen. mort'.
Burgus de Abingdon, Anthonius Forster ar. mort'.
Devon.Burgus Dartmouth Clifton Hardynes, Thomas Gurney gen. mort.
Lancaster.Villa de Liverpoole, Rad'us Sekerston gen. mort.
Midd.Civitas Westm., Thomas Wilbraham ar. mort.
Norff.Villa Thetford, Will'mus Humberston ar. mort.
Suff.Burgus Dunwici, Rob'tus Coppyn gen. mort.
Undated. ½ p. (205. 98.)
Italians in England.
[Before 1584.]Note of all those who have come into this Kingdom within the last three months.
There is now come over a man thirty-five years of age, who frequents sermons and says he has fled from Italy and France because of the persecutions. I have sought to learn if he frequents the Spanish ambassador, in public or in private, but so far have found nothing to make me suspicious; nevertheless I have given orders for him to be watched, and very shortly it will be clearly known.
There is arrived here a Florentine, who having nothing to do in this island, amuses himself in the house of an Italian, wasting his time and seeming to be rather simple than cunning, but I have taken means to be acquainted with his way of life.
There have come by sea from Venice (?), Crete and Flanders other Italians who only stayed a short time in this kingdom, and having given no cause for suspicion, I make no further mention of them.
Ten days ago there arrived a Scottishman, who was one of the King's Guard in France. He made profession of the Religion and said he left France from fear of the house of Guise. He has a passport from the King, and I am warned that he is going into Scotland upon none too honest a business. His name is Cobrone [Cockburne ?] and as I know Mr. Secretary is well acquainted with him, I will say no more about him. Warn his honour to make diligent inquiries in secret of those who are about him, because of some letters written to him from France, of which this ambassador here had copies made and sent to the King. He must do it with his usual discretion, in order not to be the ruin of him who told it to me in confidence.
Undated. Italian. 1 p. (205. 132.)
[—] to [? the Queen].
[After 1583 ?]The Queen 8 years ago granted to Sir Edward Stafford authority for 12 years to dispense with the rigour of certain statutes for the true making of kersies, the execution of which grant has been ever since suspended upon opposition made by the cloth workers of London, as though the said dispensation did belong to them by charter. Prays that the Queen cause her counsel to examine whether the said dispensation does not remain in her only, and finding it so, to order that the same be suffered to be executed for the years yet to come, and also to renew the grant for 12 years more at the suit of Mr. Archbald Douglas.—Undated.
½ p. (1859.)
Herbert Croft to Lord [—].
[After 1583.]Gives the estate of Sir William Morgan's lands, and the suits of himself and Sir William Herbert with regard to the wardship.—Undated.
2 pp. (2445.)
Edmond Holte to the Queen.
1583–4, Jan. 6.The Queen's old servant at Hatfield, for a lease in reversion of the parsonage of All Saints Steyning, in Mark Lane, London, and of the tenements the "Black Bull" and the "Black House," Wandsworth, all now in his own tenure.—Endorsed: 6 January, 1583.
Note by Valentine Dale that the Queen grants the petition. 1 p. (1547.)

Footnotes

1 Gloyde du Bois in 208. 14. (See Hug. Soc. Publ. X. ii. 356.)
2 qy. Bofferat (see Hug. Soc. Publ. X. ii. 357).


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