Cecil Papers
July 1609

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

G. Dyfnallt Owen (editor)

Year published

1976

Page

174

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Cecil Papers: July 1609', Calendar of the Cecil Papers in Hatfield House, Volume 24: Addenda, 1605-1668. (1976), pp. 174. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=112716 Date accessed: 03 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

July 1609

Bartholomew Haggat to the Earl of Salisbury.
1609, July 1.He has received Salisbury's letters for the stay of the sale of the woods at Gainford, and has notified the buyers of that decision. The Bishop of Durham himself announced the news in Gainford church. He lists the number of trees already felled and those which have been carried away. He asks for directions how to dispose of the timber which is now available to the King, particularly for the repairs needed at Raby or Barnard's Castle. Those who have bought and sold trees are to account for the money they received for them, and deserve little commiseration.
Some of the lands which he has been authorized to survey within the Bishopric of Durham are in the hands of the Bishop, and include Allerton and Allertonshire and Creak in Yorkshire; Esington, Sedburgh, Cotton, Monville, Middleham and Gateshead in co. Durham, and lands at Howden and Howdenshire in Yorkshire. These estates are of considerable value and account for a great proportion of the revenues of the Bishopric. To Haggat's knowledge, they have never been surveyed before on behalf of the Crown, and the Bishops of Durham have long regarded them as part and parcel of the Bishopric. "I thinke it necessary modesty to be well advized and better instructed ere I passe by or make entrance into a matter that concerneth his Matie and the reputation of the Bishop and the Bishoprick soe deeply." He begs that Calvert be requested to write to him privately, to direct him how to proceed in so delicate a matter. The real title to such extensive estates is obviously of immense importance to the King and the Bishop, since it affects the disposal of £880 a year, now paid to the Berwick garrison, arising from these lands.—From Aukland, the first of July, 1609.
Holograph. Endorsed: "1609, first July. Mr Barthol. Haggat to my Lord." 2 pp. (132. 97.)