House of Lords Journal Volume 34
May 1776, 21-31

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History of Parliament Trust

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1767-1830

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738-750

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 34: May 1776, 21-31', Journal of the House of Lords volume 34: 1774-1776 (1767-1830), pp. 738-750. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=113707 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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Die Martis, 21o Maii 1776.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar. Comes Bathurst, Cancellarius. Ds. Le Despencer.
Ds. Clifford.
Epus. Roffen. Ds. Willoughby Br.
Epus. Litch. & Cov. Comes Gower, Præses. Ds. Willoughby Par.
Epus. Bangor. Dux Ancaster, Magnus Camerarius. Ds. Paget.
Ds. Craven.
Dux Northumberland. Ds. Godolphin.
Comes Talbot, Senescallus. Ds. Bruce.
Ds. Vere.
Ds. Hyde.
Comes Suffolk. Ds. Walpole.
Comes Denbigh. Ds. Sondes.
Comes Scarbrough. Ds. Scarsdale.
Comes Abercorn. Ds. Pelham.
Comes Marchmont. Ds. Beaulieu.
Comes Aylesford. Ds. Digby.
Comes Waldegrave. Ds. Hume.
Comes Guilford. Ds. Cardiff.
Viscount Falmouth. Ds. Hawke.
Viscount Dudley & Ward. Ds. Cranley.
Ds. Amherst.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Rivers.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Foley.

PRAYERS.

Class against Glass.

The Answer of Jane Glass to the Appeal of John Glass her Husband, was this Day brought in.

Returns respecting the Poor, Bill:

The Lord Hyde (according to Order) reported the Amendments made by the Committee of the whole House to the Bill, intituled, “An Act for obliging the Overseers of the Poor, within the several Parishes and Places within that Part of Great Britain called England, to make Returns upon Oath, to certain Questions, specified in the Act, relative to the State or their Poor; and to authorize and require the Justices of the Peace, within their respective Divisions and Jurisdictions in the several Counties and Cities in England and Wales, to take such Returns upon Oath, and to cause them to be transmitted to the Clerk of the House of Commons.”

The said Amendments were read by the Clerk, as follow; (videlicet),

“Pr. 2. L. 12. Leave out [“House of Commons”], and insert [“Parliaments”].

“L. 13. Leave out [“to have”], and insert [“that”].
“L. 14. and 15. Leave out [“properly abstracted and communicated to”], and insert [“may be inspected by”].
“L. 28. Leave out [“September”], and insert [“October”].
“Pr. 4. L. 29. After [“Peace”] insert [“or the Adjournment thereof”].
“Pr. 7. L. 10. Leave out [“And be it further enacted, That this Act shall be deemed and taken to be a Publick Act; and be judicially taken Notice of as such, by all Judges, Justices, and other Persons, without specially pleading the same”].
“L. 35. Leave out [“House of Commons”], and insert [“Parliaments”],
“In the Title of the Bill.
“L. 10. Leave out [“House of Commons”], and insert [“Parliaments”].”

And the said Amendments, being read a Second Time, were severally agreed to by the House.

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, “An Act for obliging the Overseers of the Poor, within the several Parishes and Places within that Part of Great Britain called England, to make Returns upon Oath, to certain Questions, specified in the Act, relative to the State of their Poor; and to authorize and require the Justices of the Peace, within their respective Divisions and Jurisdictions in the several Counties and Cities in England and Wales, to take such Returns upon Oath, and to cause them to be transmitted to the Clerk of the House of Commons.”

The Question was put, “Whether this Bill, with the Amendments, shall pass ?”

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H C. with Amendments to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Pechell and Mr. Montagu:

To return the said Bill, and acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the same, with some Amendments, to which their Lordships desire their Concurrence.

L. Hume introduced.

Alexander Hume Campbell Esquire, commonly called Lord Polwarth, being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 20th of this instant May, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Baron Hume of Berwick, in the County of Berwick, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Lord Willoughby de Broke and the Lord Bruce (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King at Arms, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding: his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

“George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Trusty and Well-beloved Alexander Hume Campbell of Hume, of Berwick, Chevalier, Greeting. Whereas Our Parliament, for arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, is now met at Our City of Westminster; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present at Our aforesaid Parliament with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers of our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in no wise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twentieth Day of May, in the Sixteenth Year of Our Reign.
“Yorke.

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Barons Bench.

L. Cardiff introduced.

John Stuart Esquire, commonly called Lord Mount Stuart, being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 20th of this instant May, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Baron Cardiff, of Cardiff Castle in the County of Glamorgan, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Lord Le Despencer and the Lord Beaulieu (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King at Arms, and the Lord Great Chains berlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows: (videlicet),

“George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Trusty and Well beloved John Stuart of Cardiff Castle, Chevalier, Greeting. Whereas Our Parliament, for arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, is now met at Our City of Westminster; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present at Our aforesaid Parliament with, Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twentieth Day of May, in the Sixteenth Year of Our Reign.
“Yorke.

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Barons Bench.

L Hawke introduced.

Sir Edward Hawke, Knight of the Bath, being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 20th of this instant May, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Baron Hawket of Towton in the County of York, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Lord Bruce and the Lord Vere (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher or the Black Rod, Garter King at Arms, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

“George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Right Trusty and Well-beloved Councellor Edward Hawke of Towton, Chevalier, Greeting. Whereas Our Parliament, for arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, is now met at Our City of Westminster; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present at Our aforesaid Parliament with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers, of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twentieth Day of May, in the Sixteenth Year of Our Reign.
“Yorke.

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Barons Bench.

L. Cranley introduced.

George Onslow, of Imber Court in the County of Surry, Esquire, being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 20th of this instant May, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Baron of Cranley, in the said County of Surry, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Lord Sondes and the Lord Pelham (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King at Arms, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

“George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Right Trusty and Well-beloved Councellor George Onslow of Cranley, Chevalier, Greeting. Whereas Our Parliament, for arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, is now met at Our City of Westminster; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present at Our aforesaid Parliament with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twentieth Day of May, in the Sixteenth Year of Our Reign.
“Yorke.

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Barons Bench.

L. Amherst introduced.

Sir Jeffery Amherst, Knight of the Bath, being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 20th of this instant May, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Baron Amherst, of Holmesdale in the County of Kent, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Lord he Despencer and the Lord Hyde (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King at Arms, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

“George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Right Trusty and Well-beloved Councillor Jeffery Amherst of Holmesdale, Chevalier, Greeting. Whereas Our Parliament, for arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, is now met at Our City of Westminster; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present at Our aforesaid Parliament with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers, of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twentieth Day of May, in the Sixteenth Year of Our Reign.
“Yorke.

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Barons Bench.

L Brownlow introduced.

Sir Brownlow Cust, of Belton in the County of Lincoln, being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 20th of this instant May, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Baron of Brownlow, in the said County of Lincoln, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Lord Willoughby de Broke and the Lord Paget (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King at Arms, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Kneet presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

“George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Trusty and Well beloved Brownlow Cust, of Brownlow, Chevalier, Greeting. Whereas Our Parliament, for arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, is now met at Our City of Westminster; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present at Our aforesaid Parliament with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twentieth Day of May, in the Sixteenth Year of Our Reign.
“Yorke.

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Barons Bench.

L. Rivers introduced.

George Pitt, of Stratfield say in the County of Southampton, Esquire, being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 20th of this instant May, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Baron Rivers, of Stratfield say in the said County of Southampton, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Lord Bruce and the Lord Digby (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King at Arms, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

“George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Trusty and Well-beloved George Pitt, of Rivers, Chevalier, Greeting. Whereas Our Parliament, for arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, is now met at Our City of Westminster; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present at Our aforesaid Parliament with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers, of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twentieth Day of May, in the Sixteenth Year of Our Reign.
“Yorke.

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Barons Bench.

L. Harrowby introduced.

Nathaniel Ryder, of Harrowby in the County of Lincoln, Esquire, being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 20th of this instant May, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Baron Harrowby, in the said County of Lincoln, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Lord Hyde and the Lord Walpole (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King at Arms, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read as follows; (videlicet),

“George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Trusty and Well-beloved Nathaniel Ryder, of Harrowby, Chevalier, Greeting. Whereas Our Parliament, for arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, is now met at Our City of Westminster; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present at Our aforesaid Parliament with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers, of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in no-wise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twentieth Day of May, in the Sixteenth Year of Our Reign.
“Yorke.

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Barons Bench.

L. Foley introduced.

Thomas Foley, of Great Witely in the County of Worcester, Esquire, being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 20th of this instant May, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Baron Foley of Kidderminster, in the said County of Worcester, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Lord Godolphin and the Lord Hyde (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King at Arms, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

“George the Third, by the Grace of GOD, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Trusty and Well-beloved Thomas Foley of Kidderminster, Chevalier, Greeting. Whereas Our Parliament, for arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, is now met at Our City of Westminster; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present at Our aforesaid Parliament with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers, of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twentieth Day of May, in the Sixteenth Year of Our Reign.
“Yorke.

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Barons Bench.

Peers Pedigrees delivered.

Garter King at Arms delivered in at the Table, the Pedigrees of Alexander Lord Hume, John Lord Cardiff, Edward Lord Hawke, George Lord Cranley, Jeffery Lord Amherst, Brownlow Lord Brownlow, George Lord Rivers, Nathaniel Lord Harrowby, and Thomas Lord Folé y, pursuant to the Standing Order.

Bills passed by Commission.

The Lord Chancellor acquainted the House, “That His Majesty had been pleased to issue a Commission to several Lords, therein named, for declaring His Royal Assent to several Acts agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament.”

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Then Three of the Lords Commissioners, being in their Robes, and seated on a Form placed between the Throne and the Woolsack, the Lord Chancellor in the Middle, with the Archbishop of Canterbury on his Right Hand, and the Lord President on his Left, commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to signify to the Commons, “The Lords Commissioners desire their immediate Attendance in this “House, to hear the Commission read.”

Who being come, with their Speaker;

The Lord Chancellor said,

“My Lords, and Gentlemen of the House of Commons:

“His Majesty not thinking fit to be personally present here at this Time, has been pleased to cause a Commission to be issued under the Great Seal, and thereby given His Royal Assent to divers Acts, which have been agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament, the Titles whereof are particularly mentioned; and by the said Commission hath commanded us to declare and notify His Royal Assent to the said several Acts, in the Presence of you the Lords and Commons, assembled for that Purpose; which Commission you will now hear read.”

Then the said Commission was read by the Clerk, as follows:

George R.

“George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Right Trusty and Right Well-beloved the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and to Our Trusty and Well-beloved the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses, and the Commissioners for Shires and Burghs, of the House of Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, Greeting: Whereas, We have seen and perfectly understood divers and sundry Acts agreed and accorded on by you Our loving Subjects the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and the Commons, in this Our present Parliament assembled, and endorsed by you as hath been accustomed, the Titles and Names of which Acts hereafter do particularly ensue; (that is to say), “An Act for raising a certain Sum of Money by Loans or Exchequer Bills, for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and seventy-six.” “An Act for granting to His Majesty several Duties on Coaches, and other Carriages therein mentioned; and several Rates and Duties upon Indentures, Leases, Bonds, and other Deeds; and upon Cards, Dice, and Newspapers; and for raising the Sum of Two Millions by Annuities, and a Lottery to be attended with Annuities.” “An Act for enabling His Majesty to raise the Sum of One Million, for the Uses and Purposes therein mentioned.” “An Act for the further Encouragement of the Whale Fishery, carried on from Great Britain and Ireland, and the British Dominions in Europe; and for regulating the Fees to be taken by the Officers of the Customs in the Island of Newfoundland.” “An Act for granting further Time for allowing the Drawback upon the Exportation of Muslins and Callicoes, imported by the East India Company in the Years One thousand seven hundred and seventy-three, and One thousand seven hundred and seventy-four; for allowing further Time to the said Company to expose to Sale such Bohea and Singlo Teas and Coffee as remained unsold on the Fifth Day of April One. thousand seven hundred and seventy-six, and also such Bohea Teas as shall be imported on or before a certain Time; and for allowing the Drawbacks on the Exportation of such Teas and Coffee; and for granting further Time for allowing the Drawback on the Exportation of Coffee, imported in the Ship Shrewsbury, in the Year One thousand seven hundred and seventy-three.” “An Act to continue an Act, made in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Second, (intituled, “An Act to prevent the committing of Frauds by Bankrupts;”) and also an Act, made in the Fourteenth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, (intituled, “An Act to prohibit the Importation of light Silver Coin of this Realm from Foreign Countries into Great Britain or Ireland, and to restrain the Tender thereof beyond a certain Sum.”) “An Act for allowing the Exportation of certain Quantities of Wheat and other Articles to His Majesty’s Sugar Colonies in America, and to the Island of Saint Helena, and to the other Settlements belonging to the United Company of Merchants of England trading to the East Indies, and of Biscuit and Pease to Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Bay Chaleur, and Labrador; and for indemnifying all Persons with respect to advising or carrying into Execution His Majesty’s Orders of Council already made for allowing the Exportation of Wheat and other Articles.” “An Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors; and for the Relief of Bankrupts, in certain Cases.” “An Act for allowing Corn, Grain, and Flour, imported into the Port of Preston, to be landed without Payment of the Duties, under the like Restrictions as Corn, Grain, and Flour, is allowed to be landed at the several Ports mentioned in an Act, made in the Thirteenth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, “An Act to regulate the Importation and Exportation of Corn.” “An Act for erecting a Lighthouse or Lighthouses, and Landmarks, in or near the Port of Chester; and for placing Buoys upon the Banks and Shoals leading into and in the said Port; and for regulating of Pilots and Persons towing or tracking of Vessels to and from the City of Chester; and for sixing the Rates payable for the same respectively.” “An Act to declare His Majesty’s natural-born Subjects inheritable to the Estates of their Ancestors, whether lineal or collateral, in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland, notwithstanding their Father or Mother were Aliens.” “An Act to enable the Commissioners of Sewers for several Limits in the Eastern Parts of the County of Kent, more effectually to drain and improve the Lands and Grounds within The General Valhes.” “An Act for repealing a Clause in an Act, made in the Thirteenth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, “An Act to explain, amend, and reduce into One Act of Parliament, the General Laws now in being for regulating the Turnpike Roads in that Part of Great Britain called England, and for other Purposes;” which relates to the Countersinking of the Tire of the Wheels of all Waggons, Wains, and other Carriages, to be used on Turnpike Roads; and for explaining a Provision in the said Act, with respect to the Fellies and Tire of Carriages having the Fellies of the Wheels of the Gauge of Six Inches or upwards.” “An Act to enable the Trustees of certain Charity Lands belonging to the Poor of Salford, in the County Palatine of Lancaster, to grant Building Leales thereof.” “An Act to explain and amend an Act, made in the Twelfth Year of His present Majesty, “for paving, cleansing, lighting, and watching the Streets and Lanes in the Town and Parish of Chatham, in the County of Kent; and for removing and preventing Nuisances and Annoyances therein;” and to extend the Provisions of the said Act to such Parts of the High Street in Chatham, as are sitdate in the Parishes of Saint Margaret and Gillingham, and to other Places adjoining or contiguous to the said Town.” “An Act to continue and render more effectual several Acts of Parliament, for repairing the Highways leading to Highgate Gatehouse and Hampstead, and other Roads in the said Acts mentioned, in the County of Middlesex; and also to continue and render more effectual an Act to enable the respective Trustees of the Turnpike Roads leading to Highgate Gatehouse and Hampstead, and from Saint Giles’s Pound to Kilbourn, to make a new Road from the Great Northern Road at Islington, to the Edgware Road near Paddington; so far as the same is by the said Act directed to be under the Care and Management of the Trustees of the said first mentioned Act; and for making a Road from the said new Road near Queen’s Row to Bagnigge Wash; and for watching, lighting, and watering the said Roads.” “An Act to enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act, passed in the. Twenty-fourth Year of the Reign of His Majesty King George the Second, “for repairing the Road leading from the Town of Ludlow, in the County of Salop, through Woofferton and Little Hereford, to a Place called Monk’s Bridge, in the said County; and also from the said Town of Ludlow, to a Place or House, called The Maidenhead, at Orleton, in the County of Hereford” “An Act for vesting in Trustees the Settled Estate of the Most Noble Peregrine Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, in the County of York, to discharge Incumbrances affecting the same, and other Part of the said Settled Estates; and for purchasing of Estates, to be settled to the several Uses therein mentioned.” “An Act for vesting the Free School House, Dwelling House for the Mailer and Usher, Close, and other Premises thereto belonging, in Courtenhall, in the County of Northampton, in Sir William Wake Baronet, and his Heirs, upon the Conditions therein mentioned.” “An Act for the Sale of the Estates of Sir Charles Whitworth, in the County of Somerset; and for exonerating the same, and his Estates in the County of Kent, from the Portions of his younger Children, provided by his Marriage Settlement.” “An Act to enable William Masterman and Thomas Francis, Esquires, to make a Title to certain Lease-hold and Copyhold Estates of Thomas Nuthall Esquire, deceased.” “An Act for Sale of Part of the Estates, late of John Leigh Esquire, deceased, for Payment of Mortgages and other Debts to which the said Estates are liable; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.” “An Act for vesting the Settled Estates of Robert Dolman Esquire, and Robert Dolman the Younger, in Pockington, and elsewhere, in the County of York, in Trustees, to be sold; and for laying out the Money anfing by such Sale in the Purchase of other Lands and Hereditaments, to be settled in lieu thereof to the same Uses.” “An Act for vesting an Estate in the County of Middlesex, which was settled by Richard Onslow Esquire, deceased, on his Marriage with Poolley Walton, in Trustees, in order that the same may be conveyed to Matthew Winter, and his Heirs, pursuant to an Agreement made by him for the Purchase thereof; and for inverting the Purchase Money in Three per Centum Consolidated Bank Annuities; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.” “An Act for confirming the Settlements made by Charles Vere Dastwood Esquire, in Satisfaction of certain Articles, entered into by him previous to his Marriage, and during his Infancy; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.” “An Act for vesting the Settled Estates of William Upfold Gentleman, in the County of Middlesex, and City of London, in Trustees, to be sold; and for purchasing other Lands and Hereditaments, to be settled to the same Uses.” “An Act for vesting Two Sixth Parts of the Estates, late of Stanhope Mason Gentleman, deceased, in England and Ireland, in Trustees, to be sold; and for purchasing other Estates, to be settled in lieu thereof.” “An Act for vesting several Estates, late of Samuel Shepheard, of Exning, in the County of Suffolk, Esquire, deceased, in Trustees, to be sold; and for purchasing other Estates, to be conveyed to the like Uses; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.” “An Act for dividing and allotting certain Open and Common Fields, Downs, and Commonable Grounds, in the Tithings or Liberties of Eastbury, otherwise Isbury, and Blagrove, in the Parish of Chipping Lamborne, in the County of Berks.” “An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open and Common Fields, Common Pastures, Common Meadows, and other Commonable Lands, of and within the Parish and Liberties of Crick, in the County of Northampton.” “An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open and Common Fields, Common Pastures, Common Meadows, and other Commonable Lands and Grounds, of and in Over Weedon Beck, and Nether Weedon Beck, within the Parish and Liberties of Weedon Beck, in the County of Northampton.” “An Act for dividing and enclosing certain Open Common Fields, Stinted Pastures, and Common Moors or Waste Grounds, within the Manor and Parish of Corbridge, in the County of Northumberland.” “An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open Arable Fields, Meadows, Pastures, Carrs, and other Open Lands and Grounds, within the Township of Boston, in the East Riding of the County of York” “An Act for dividing and enclosing the several Open Fields, Common Pastures, Common and other Waste Lands and Grounds, within the Township of Bihon, in the County of the City of York.” “An Act to disslove the Marriage of Sir Thomas Charles Bunbury Baronet, with the Right Honourable Lady Sarah Lenox, his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.” “And albeit, the said Acts, by you Our said Subjects the Lords and Commons in this Our present Parliament assembled, are fully agreed and consented unto, yet nevertheless the same are not of Force and Effect in the Law without Our Royal Assent given and put to the said Acts: And forasmuch as for divers Causes and Considerations We cannot conveniently at this Time be present in Our Royal Person in the Higher House of Our said Parliament, being the Place accustomed to give Our Royal Assent to such Acts as have been agreed upon by you Our said Subjects the Lords and Commons; We have therefore caused these Our Letters Patent to be made, and have signed the same, and by the same do give and put Our Royal Assent to the said Acts, and to all Articles, Clauses, and Provisions therein contained, and have fully agreed and assented to the said Acts; Willing that the said Acts, and every Article, Clause, Sentence, and Provision therein contained, from henceforth shall be of the same Strength, Force, and Effect, as if We had been personally present in the said Higher House, and had openly and publickly in the Presence of you all assented to the same: And we do by these Presents declare and notify the same Our Royal Assent, as well to you the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons aforesaid, as to all others whom it may concern; commanding also by these Presents Our Right Trusty and Right Well-beloved Cousin and Counsellor Henry Earl Bathurst, Our Chancellor of Great Britain, to seal these Our Letters Patent with Our Great Seal of Great Britain; and also commanding the Most Reverend Father in God, Our Right Trusty and Well-beloved Counsellor, Frederick Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate and Metropolitan of all England; Our said Chancellor of Great Britain; Our Right Trusty and Right Well-beloved Cousins and Counsellors, Granville Earl Gower, President of Our Council; William Earl of Dartmouth, Keeper of Our Privy Seal; Our Right Trusty and Right Entirely-beloved Cousins and Counsellors, Augustus Henry Duke of Grafton, Thomas Duke of Leeds, John Duke of Rutland, Peregrine Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, Great Chamberlain of England; Our Right Trusty and Right Well-beloved Cousins and Counsellors, William Earl Talbot, Steward of Our Household; Francis Seymour Earl of Hertford, Chamberlain of Our Household; Henry Earl of Suffolk and Berkshire, One of Our Principal Secretaries of State; John Earl of Sandwich, First Commissioner of Our Admiralty; Robert Earl of Holdernesse, William Henry Earl of Rochford, Hugh Earl of Marchmont, Wills Hill Earl of Hillsborough, George Viscount Townshend, Thomas Viscount Weymouth, One other of Our Principal Secretaries of State; and our Right Trusty and Well-beloved Counsellor William Lord Mansfield, Our Chief Justice assigned to hold Pleas before Us; or any Three or more of them, to declare and notify this Our Royal Assent, in Our Absence in the said Higher House, in the Presence of you the said Lords and the Commons of Our Parliament there to be assembled for that Purpose; and the Clerk of Our Parliaments to endorse the said Acts with such Terms and Words in Our Name as is requisite and hath been accustomed for the same, and also to enroll these Our Letters Patent and the said Acts in the Parliament Roll; and these Our Letters Patent shall be to every of them a sufficient Warrant in that Behalf: And finally, We do declare and will that, after this Our Royal Assent given and passed by these Presents, and declared and notified as is aforesaid, then and immediately the said Acts shall be taken, accepted, and admitted good, sufficient, and perfect Acts of Parliament and Laws, to all Intents, Constructions, and Purposes, and to be put in due Execution accordingly; the Continuance or Dissolution of this Our Parliament, or any other Use, Custom, Thing or Things, to the contrary thereof notwithstanding. In Witness whereof, We have caused these Our Letters to be made Patent.

“Witness Ourself, at Westminster, the Twenty-first Day of May, in the Sixteenth Year of Our Reign.

By the King himself, signed with His own Hand.
“Yorke.

Then the Lord Chancellor said,

“In Obedience to His Majesty’s Commands, and by virtue of the Commission which has been now read, we do declare and notify to you the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in Parliament assembled, that His Majesty hath given His Royal Assent to the several Acts in the Commission mentioned; and the Clerks are required to pass the same in the usual Form and Words.”

Then the Clerk Assistant, having received the Money Bills from the Hands of the Speaker, brought them to the Table, where the Deputy Clerk of the Crown read the Titles of those, and the other Bills to be passed, severally, as follow; (videlicet),

“1. An Act for raising a certain Sum of Money by Loans or Exchequer Bills, for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and seventy-six.”

“2. An Act for granting to His Majesty several Duties on Coaches, and other Carriages therein mentioned; and several Rates and Duties upon Indentures, Leases, Bonds, and other Deeds; and upon Cards, Dice, and Newspapers; and for raising the Sum of Two Millions by Annuities, and a Lottery to be attended with Annuities.”

“3. An Act for enabling His Majesty to raise the Sum of One Million, for the Uses and Purposes therein mentioned.”

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant, in these Words; (videlicet),

Le Roy remercie ses bons Sujets, accepte leur Benevolence, et ainsi le veult.”

“4. An Act for the further Encouragement of the Whale Fishery carried on from Great Britain and Ireland, and the British Dominions in Europe; and for regulating the Fees to be taken by the Officers of the Customs in the Island of Newfoundland.”

“5. An Act for granting further Time for allowing the Drawback upon the Exportation of Muslins and Callicoes, imported by the East India Company in the Years One thousand seven hundred and seventy-three, and One thousand seven hundred and seventy-four; for allowing further Time to the said Company to expose to Sale such Bohea and Singlo Teas and Coffee as remained unsold on the Fifth Day of April One thousand seven hundred and seventy-six, and also such Bohea Teas as shall be imported on or before a certain Time; and for allowing the Drawbacks on the Exportation of such Teas and Coffee; and for granting further Time for allowing the Drawback on the Exportation of Coffee imported in the Ship Shrewsbury, in the Year One thousand seven hundred and seventy-three.”

“6. An Act to continue an Act, made in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Second, (intituled, “An Act to prevent the committing of Frauds by Bankrupts;”) and also an Act, made in the Fourteenth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, (intituled, “An Act to prohibit the Importation of light Silver Coin of this Realm from Foreign Countries into Great Britain or Ireland, and to restrain the Tender thereof beyond a certain Sum.”)

“7. An Act for allowing the Exportation of certain Quantities of Wheat and other Articles to His Majesty’s Sugar Colonies in America, and to the Island of Saint Helena, and to the other Settlements belonging to the United Company of Merchants of England trading to the East Indies, and of Biscuit and Pease to Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Bay Chaleur, and Labrador;

and for indemnifying all Persons with respect to advising or carrying into Execution His Majesty’s Orders of Council already made, for allowing the Exportation of Wheat and other Articles.”

“8. An Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors; and for the Relief of Bankrupts, in certain Cases.”

“9. An Act for allowing Corn, Grain, and Flour, imported into the Port of Preston, to be landed without Payment of the Duties, under the like Restrictions as Corn, Grain, and Flour, is allowed to be landed at the several Ports mentioned in an Act, made in the Thirteenth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, “An Act to regulate the importation and Exportation of Corn.”

“10. An Act for erecting a Lighthouse or Lighthouses, and Land Marks, in or near the Port of Chester; and for placing Buoys upon the Banks and Shoals leading into and in the said Port; and for regulating of Pilots and Persons towing or tracking of Vessels to and from the City of Chester; and for fixing the Rates payable for the same respectively.”

“11. An Act to declare His Majesty’s natural-born Subjects inheritable to the Estates of their Ancestors, whether lineal or collateral, in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland, notwithstanding their Father or Mother were Aliens.”

“12. An Act to enable the Commissioners of Sewers for several Limits in the Eastern Parts of the County of Kent, more effectually to drain and improve the Lands and Grounds, within The General Vallies.”

“13. An Act for repealing a Clause in an Act made in the Thirteenth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, “An Act to explain, amend, and reduce into One Act of Parliament, the General Laws now in being for regulating the Turnpike Roads in that Part of Great Britain called England, and for other Purposes;” which relates to the countersinking of the Tire of the Wheels of all Waggons, Wains, and other Carriages to be used on Turnpike Roads; and for explaining a Provision in the said Act, with respect to the Fellies and Tire of Carriages having the Fellies of the Wheels of the Gauge of Six Inches or upwards.”

“14. An Act to enable the Trustees of certain Charity Lands, belonging to the Poor of Salford, in the County Palatine of Lancaster, to grant Building Leases thereof.”

“15. An Act to explain and amend an Act, made in the Twelfth Year of His present Majesty, “for paving, cleansing, lighting, and watching, the Streets and Lanes in the Town and Parish of Chatham, in the County of Kent, and for removing and preventing Nuisances and Annoyances therein;” and to extend the Provisions of the said Act to such Parts of the High Street in Chatham, as are situate in the Parishes of Saint Margaret and Gillingham, and to other Places adjoining or contiguous to the said Town.”

“16. An Act to continue and render more effectual several Acts of Parliament, for repairing the Highways leading to Highgate Gatehouse and Hampstead, and other Roads in the said Acts mentioned, in the County of Middlesex; and also to continue and render more effectual an Act to enable the respective Trustees of the Turnpike Roads leading to Highgate Gatehouse and Hampstead, and from Saint Giles’s Pound to Kilbourn, to make a new Road from the Great Northern Road at Islington to the Edgware Road near Paddington, so far as the same is by the said Act directed to be under the Care and Management of the Trustees of the said first mentioned Acts; and for making a Road from the said new Road, near Queen’s Row, to Bagnigge Wash; and for watching, lighting, and watering, the said Roads.”

“17. An Act to enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act, passed in the Twenty-fourth Year of the Reign of His Majesty King George the Second, “for repairing the Road leading from the Town of Ludlow, in the County of Salop, through Woofferton and Little Hereford, to a Place called Monk’s Bridge in the said County; and also from the said Town of Ludlow, to a Place or House called The Maidenhead, at Orleton, in the County of Hereford,”

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant, in these Words; (videlicet),

Le Roy le veult.”

“18. An Act for vesting in Trustees, the Settled Estate of the Most Noble Peregrine Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, in the County of York, to discharge Incumbrances affecting the same, and other Part of the said Settled Estates; and for purchasing of Estates to be settled to the several Uses therein mentioned.”

“19. An Act for vesting the Free School House, Dwelling House for the Master and Usther, Close, and other Premises thereto belonging, in Courtenhall, in the County of Northampton, in Sir William Wake Baronet, and his Heirs, upon the Conditions therein mentioned.”

“20. An Act for the Sale of the Estates of Sir Charles Whitworth, in the County of Somerset; and for exonerating the same, and his Estates in the County of Kent, from the Portions of his younger Children, provided by his Marriage Settlement.”

“21. An Act to enable William Masterman and Thomas Francis, Esquires, to make a Title to certain Leasehold and Copyhold Estates of Thomas Nuthall Esquire, deceased.”

“22. An Act for Sale of Part of the Estates late of John Leigh Esquire, deceased, for Payment of Mortgages, and other Debts, to which the said Estates are liable; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.”

“23. An Act for vesting the Settled Estates of Robert Dolman Esquire, and Robert Dolman the Younger, in Pocklington, and elsewhere, in the County of York, in Trustees, to be sold; and for laying out the Money arising by such Sale in the Purchase of other Lands and Hereditaments, to be settled in lieu thereof, to the same Uses.”

“24. An Act for vesting an Estate, in the County of Middlesex, which was settled by Richard Onslow Esquire, deceased, on his Marriage with Poolley Walton, in Trustees, in order that the same may be conveyed to Matthew Winter, and his Heirs, pursuant to an Agreement made by him for the Purchase thereof; and for investing the Purchase Money in Three per Centum Consolidated Bank Annuities; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.”

“25. An Act for confirming the Settlements made by Charles Vere Dashwood Esquire, in Satisfaction of certain Articles entered into by him previous to his Marriage, and during his Infancy; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.”

“26. An Act for vesting the Settled Estates of William Upfold Gentleman, in the County of Middlesex, and City of London, in Trustees, to be sold; and for purchasing other Lands and Hereditaments, to be settled to the same Uses.”

“27. An Act for vesting Two Sixth Parts of the Estates late of Stanhope Mason Gentleman, deceased, in England and Ireland, in Trustees, to be sold; and for purchasing other Estates to be settled in lieu thereof.”

“28. An Act for vesting several Estates, late of Samuel Shephcard, of Exning, in the County of Suffolk, Esquire, deceased, in Trustees, to be sold; and for purchasing other Estates to be conveyed to the like Uses; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.”

“29. An Act for dividing and allotting certain Open and Common Fields, Downs, and Commonable Grounds, in the Tythings or Liberties of Eastbury, otherwise Isbury, and Blagrove, in the Parish of Chipping Lamborne, in the County of Berks

“30. An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open and Common Fields, Common Pastures, Common Meadows, and other Commonable Lands, of and within the Parish and Liberties of Crick, in the County of Northampton.”

“31. An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open and Common Fields, Common Pastures, Common Meadows, and other Commonable Lands and Grounds, of and in Over Weedon Beck, and Nether Weedon Beck, within the Parish and Liberties of Weedon Beck, in the County of Northampton.”

“32. An Act for dividing and enclosing certain Open Common Fields, Stinted Pastures, and Common Moors or Waste Grounds, within the Manor and Parish of Corbridge, in the County of Northumberland.”

“33. An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open Arable Fields, Meadows, Pastures, Carrs, and other Open Lands and Grounds, within the Township of Boston, in the East Riding of the County of York.”

“34. An Act for dividing and enclosing the several Open Fields, Common Pastures, Common and other Waste Lands and Grounds, within the Township of Bilton, in the County of the City of York.”

“35. An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Sir Thomas Charles Bunbury Baronet, with the Right Honourable Lady Sarah Lenox his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.”

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant, in these Words; (videlicet),

Soit fait comme il est defiré

Then the Commons withdrew.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Sinking Fund Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, “An Act for granting to His Majesty a certain Sum of Money out of the Sinking Fund, and for applying certain Monies therein mentioned for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and seventy-six; and for further appropriating the Supplies granted in this Session of Parliament; for giving further Relief to the Widows of Commission and Warrant Officers of the Royal Navy; and for making forth Duplicates of Exchequer Bills, Lottery Tickets, Certificates, Receipts, Annuity Orders, and other Orders, lost, burnt, or destroyed.”

The Question was put, “Whether this Bill that pass ?”

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers:

Message to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to it.

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Brereton and others:

Messages from H C to return D St. Albans’ Estate Bill;

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act for re-vesting Part of the Real and Personal Estates of the Most Noble George Duke of Saint Albans in him; and for other Purposes therein mentioned;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same with One Amendment, to which they desire their Lordships Concurrence.

and Estcourt’s Bill;

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Brereton and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act for applying the Money to arise by Sale of certain Messuages, situate in Cheapside, in the City of London, devised by the Will of Edmund Estcourt Esquire, deceased, to Trustees, to be sold, in the Building a Mansion House upon the Settled Estates late of the said Edmund Estcourt, at Shipton Moyne and Dovel, in the County of Gloucester, together with the Materials of the antient Mansion House now standing thereon;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Brereton and others:

and Hey-wood’s Bill;

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act for vesting the Settled Estates of Peter John Heywood Esquire, in the Isle of Man, called The Nunnery, in Trustees, to be sold; and for laying out the Money arising by such Sale in the Purchase of Lands and Hereditaments, in that Part of Great Britain called England, to be settled in lieu of the said Estates in the Isle of Man, intended to be sold;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

and L Montfort’s Estate Bill;

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Jenyns and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act for vesting the Real Estates comprized in the Marriage Settlement of Thomas Lord Montfort, situate in the Counties of Cambridge and Suffolk, and the Woods, Underwoods, Timber, and other Trees growing and being thereon, in Trustees, and their Heirs, in Trust, to be sold and disposed of in Manner therein mentioned; and for applying the Monies to arise by Sale thereof in the Manner therein also mentioned;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without Amendment.

and Bentinck’s Bill;

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Lord Edward Bentinck and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act for vesting certain Manors, Messuages, Lands, and Hereditaments, in the several Counties of Middlesex, Surrey, Southampton, and Norfolk, the Freehold, Copyhold, and Leasehold Estates, late of John Albert Bentinck Esquire, deceased, in Trustees, in Trust, to fell, mortgage, or exchange, any Part or Parts thereof; and for applying the Money to arise thereby in discharging Incumbrances, and making Buildings and Improvements on the said Estates, and in compleating Purchases of Lands agreed for by the said John Albert Bentinck; and for other Purposes; and for laying out the Residue of such Money in the Purchases of other Manors, Lands, or Hereditaments, to be settled to the same Uses as are now subsisting concerning the same;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

and Stapilton’s Bill;

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir George Savile and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act for vesting Part of the Settled Estates of Henry Stapilton Esquire, at Wighill, in the County of the City of York, in the said Henry Stapilton, in Fee-Simple; and for settling, in lieu thereof, other Lands and Hereditaments of the said Henry Stapilton, lying contiguous to, and interspersed with, the Remainder of the said Settled Estates, and also the Tithes thereof, and of such Remainder, to the same Uses,” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

and Sir William Molesworth’s Estate Bill;

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir George Yonge and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act to enable certain Persons, during the successive Minorities of Sir William Molesworth Baronet, and his Brothers, to grant Leases of the Estates devised to them by the Will of Sir William Morice Baronet, deceased;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

and Smith’s Bill;

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Popham and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act for vesting certain Estates in the Counties of Wilts and Somerset, late belonging to John Smith Esquire, deceased, in Trustees, to be sold for Payment of his Debts; and for other Purposes therein mentioned;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

and Sir John Abdy’s Estate Bill:

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Luther and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act for the Sale of a Leasehold Estate, late belonging to Sir John Abdy Baronet, deceased, at Bistop’s Canning, in the County of Wilts, and of Timber Trees growing on his Estates in the County of Essex, and also of his Medals and Coins, for paying off and discharging certain Incumbrances affecting his Real Estates in Essex; and for laying out the Residue of the Monies arising by such Sale in the Purchase of Lands to be settled to the same Uses as his Estates in Essex now stand settled by his Will;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

and Returns respecting the Poor Bill;

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Gilbert and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act for obliging the Overseers of the Poor, within the several Parishes and Places within that Part of Great Britain called England, to make Returns upon Oath, to certain Questions, specified in the Act, relative to the State of their Poor; and to authorize and require the Justices of the Peace, within their respective Divisions and Jurisdictions in the several Counties and Cities in England and Wales, to take such Returns upon Oath, and to cause them to be transmitted to the Clerk of the House of Commons;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to their Lordships Amendments made thereto, with One Amendment, to which they desire their Lordships Concurrence.

and Gordon’s Bill;

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Strahan and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act for settling and securing certain Parts of the Lands and Barony of Corsemichael, called Greenlaw, and others, lying in the Stewartry of Kircudbright, to and in favour of Isabel Gordon, of Culvennan, “Widow of William Gordon, of Greenlaw, Esquire, for her Life, and to and in favour of Alexander Gordon, of Culvennan, Esquire, her eldest Son, and the same Series of Heirs in Fee Tail, and under the same Conditions and Limitations, as are mentioned and contained in a Deed of Entail made in the Year One thousand seven hundred and forty-two, by John Macculloch, of Barholm, and Jean Gordon his Wife; and for vesting in the aforesaid Alexander Gordon, and his Heirs and Assigns, in Fee-Simple, the Estate of Culvennan, and others, lying in the County of Wigton, together with the Sum of One thousand nine hundred and seventy-one Pounds Sterling;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

and Whitfeld’s Bill;

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Charles Whitworth and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act to enable John Whitfeld Esquire, to charge Part of his Settled Estates in the County of Northampton in the Manner therein mentioned;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

and Convict’s Bill;

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Charles Whitworth and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act to authorize, for a limited Time, the Punishment, by hard Labour, of Offenders who, for certain Crimes, are or shall become liable to be transported to any of His Majesty’s Colonies and Plantations;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to their Lordships Amendments made thereto.

and Jenkins’s Divorce Bill:

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Serjeant Adair and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act to dissolve the Marriage of the Reverend John Jenkins Clerk, with Mary Jenkins his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Returns respecting the Poor, Bill.

The House proceeded to take into Consideration, the Amendment made by the Commons to the Amendment made by this House, to the Bill, intituled, “An Act for obliging the Overseers of the Poor within the several Parishes and Places within that Part of Great Britain called England, to make Returns upon Oath, to certain Questions, specified in the Act, relative to the State of their Poor; and to authorize and require the Justices of the Peace, within their respective Divisions and Jurisdictions in the several Counties and Cities in England and Wales, to take such Returns upon Oath, and to cause them to be transmitted to the Clerk of the House of Commons:”

And the same, being read Three Times by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

And, A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers:

To acquaint them therewith.

Barllie against Chaigneau and Keogh:

Upon reading the Petition and Appeal of Arthur Baillie of Kilbride, in the County of Carlow, in the Kingdom of Ireland, Esquire, complaining of an Order of the Court of Exchequer in Ireland of the 11th of December 1775; and also of Two other Orders of the said Court of the 24th of February and 30th of April 1776; and praying, “That the same may be reversed and discharged, so far as the Petitioner’s Interest in the Premises in Question is affected thereby, or that the Appellant may have such other Relief in the Premises as to this House, in their Lordships great Wisdom, shall seem meet; and that William Chaigneau Esquire, and John Keogh Attorney at Law, may be required to answer the said Appeal:”

It is Ordered, That the said William Chaigneau and John Keogh may have a Copy of the said Appeal, and do put in their Answer or respective Answers thereunto, in Writing, on or before Tuesday the 25th Day of June next; and Service of this Order upon the said Respondents, or their Agents and Solicitors in the said Court of Exchequer in Ireland, shall be deemed good Service.

Finey to enter into Recognizance on it.

The House being moved, “That George Finey Esquire, of Great Cumberland Street, Oxford Road, may be permitted to enter into a Recognizance for Arthur Baillie Esquire, on Account of his Appeal depending in this House, he residing in Ireland:”

It is Ordered, That the said George Finey may enter into a Recognizance for the said Appellant, as desired.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Mercurii, vicesimum secundum diem instantis Maii, hora undecima Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Die Mercurii, 22o Maii 1776.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Eliens. Comes Bathurst, Cancellarius. Ds. Sandys.
Epus. Cestrien. Ds. Granley.
Epus. Bangor. Dux St. Albans.
Dux Bolton.
Comes Abercorn.
Comes Breadalbane.
Viscount Falmouth.

PRAYERS.

Rice against Howorth et al.

The joint Answer of Edward Mainwaring Davies Howorth Esquire, and others, to the Appeal of Walter Rice, was this Day brought in.

D. St. Albans’ Estate Bill.

The House proceeded to take into Consideration the Amendment made by the Commons to the Bill, intituled, “An Act for re-vesting Part of the Real and Personal Estates of the Most Noble George Duke of Saint Albans in him; and for other Purposes therein mentioned:”

And the same, being read Three Times by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

And, A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Anguish and Mr. Pepys:

To acquaint them therewith.

Message from H. C. to return Hatherop Rectory or Blackwell’s Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Major Hartley and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, “An Act to enable the Rector of the Parish Church of Hatherop, in the County of Gloucester, to exchange Part of his Glebe Lands there, for other Lands more conveniently situated, the Property of Samuel Blackwell Esquire, in the Hamlet of Williamstrip, adjoining to the said Parish of Hatherop;” and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præesens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Jovis, vicesimum tertium diem instantis Maii, hora undecima Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Die Jovis, 23o Maii 1776.

REX.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar. Comes Bathurst, Cancellarius. Ds. Le Despencer.
Ds. Clifford.
Epus. Eliens. Comes Gower, Præses. Ds. Willoughby Br.
Epus. Cicestrien. Comes Dartmouth, C. P. S. Ds. Willoughby Par.
Epus. Oxon. Ds. Paget.
Epus. Bath. & Wells. Ds. Clifton.
Epus. Roffen. Dux St. Albans. Ds. Osborne.
Epus. Litch. & Cov. Dux Bolton. Ds. Craven.
Epus. Bangor. Dux Ancaster, Magnus Camerarius. Ds. Edgecumbe.
Ds. Sandys.
Dux Manchester. Ds. Bruce.
Comes Talbot, Senescallus. Ds. Ravensworth.
Ds. Walpole.
Comes Sandwich. Ds. Scarsdale.
Comes Scarbrough. Ds. Camden.
Comes Jersey. Ds. Digby.
Comes Abercorn. Ds. Hume.
Comes Galloway. Ds. Cardiff.
Comes Loudoun. Ds. Cranley.
Comes Marchmont. Ds. Amherst.
Comes Rosebery. Ds. Brownlow.
Comes Kerr. Ds. Rivers.
Comes Darlington. Ds. Harrewby.
Comes Spencer. Ds. Foley.
Viscount Say & Sele.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Falmouth.
Viscount Wentworth.
Viscount Dudley & Ward.

PRAYERS.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure to robe.

The House was resumed.

King present.

His Majesty being seated on the Throne, adorned with His Crown and Regal Ornaments, and attended by His Officers of State, (the Lords being in their Robes), commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to let the Commons know, “It is His Majesty’s Pleasure that they attend Him immediately in this House:”

Who being come, with their Speaker,

He, after a Speech in relation to the Money Bill to be passed, delivered it to the Clerk, who brought it to the Table, where the Deputy Clerk of the Crown read the Title of that, and the other Bills to be passed, severally, as follow; (videlicet),

Bills passed.

“1. An Act for granting to His Majesty a certain Sum of Money out of the Sinking Fund, and for applying certain Monies therein mentioned for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and seventy-six; and for further appropriating the Supplies granted in this Session of Parliament; for giving further Relief to the Widows of Commission and Warrant Officers of the Royal Navy; and for making, forth Duplicates of Exchequer Bills, Lottery Tickets, Certificates, Receipts, Annuity Orders, and other Orders, loft, burnt, or destroyed.”

To this Bill the Royal Assent was pronounced, by the Clerk Assistant, in these Words; (videlicet),

Le Roy remeras ses bons Sujets, accepte leur Benevolence, et ainsi le veult.”,

“2. An Act to authorize, for a limited Time, the Punishment, by hard Labour, of Offenders who, for certain Crimes, are or shall become liable to be transported to any of His Majesty’s Colonies and Plantations.”

“3. An Act for obliging the Overseers of the Poor, within the several Parishes and Places within that Part of Great Britain called England, to make Returns upon Oath, to certain Questions, specified in the Act, relative to the State of their Poor; and to authorize and require the Justices of the Peace, within their respective Divisions and Jurisdictions in the several Counties and Cities in England and Wales, to take such Returns upon Oath, and to cause them to be transmitted to the Clerk of the Parliaments.”

“4. An Act for suspending, for a limited Time, so much of an Act, made in the Thirteenth Year of His present Majesty’s Reign, intituled, “An Act to explain, amend, and reduce into One Act of Parliament, the General Laws now in being for regulating the Turnpike Roads in that Part of Great Britain called England, and for other Purposes;” as is to subject Carriages having the Fellies of the Wheels thereof of less Breadth or Gauge than Six Inches, to the Payment of Double Tolls; and for vacating Contracts for leasing Tolls.”

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant in these Words; (videlicet),

Le Roy le veult.”

“5. An Act for re-vesting Part of the Real and Personal Estates of the Most Noble George Duke of Saint Albans in him; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.”

“6. An Act for vesting the Real Estates comprized in the Marriage Settlement of Thomas Lord Montfort, situate in the Counties of Cambridge and Suffolk, and the Woods, Underwoods, Timber, and other Trees glowing and being thereon, in Trustees, and their Heirs, in Trust, to be sold and disposed of in Manner therein mentioned; and for applying the Monies to arise by Sale thereof in the Manner therein also mentioned.”

“7. An Act for the Sale of a Leasehold Estate, late belonging to Sir John Abdy Baronet, deceased, at Bistop’s Canning, in the County of Wilts, and of Timber Trees growing on his Estates in the County of Essex, and also of his Medals and Coins, for paying off and discharging certain Incumbrances affecting his Real Estates in Essex; and for laying out the Residue of the Monies arising by such Sale in the Purchase of Lands, to be settled to the same Uses as his Estates in Essex now stand settled by his Will.”

“8. An Act for applying the Money to arise by Sale of certain Messuages situate in Cheapside, in the City of London, devised by the Will of Edmund Estcourt Esquire, deceased, to Trustees, to be sold, in the building a Mansion House upon the Settled Estates, late of the said Edmund Estcourt, at Shipton Moyne and Dovel, in the County- of Gloucester, together with the Materials of the antient Mansion House now standing thereon.”

“9. An Act for vesting the Settled Estates of Peter John Heywood Esquire, in the Isle of Man, called The

Nunnery, in Trustees, to be sold; and for laying out the Money arising by such Sale in the Purchase of Lands and Hereditaments, in that Part of Great Britain called England, to be settled in lieu of the said Estates in the Isle of Man, intended to be sold.”

“10. An Act for vesting certain Manors, Messuages, Lands, and Hereditaments, in the several Counties of Middlesex, Surrey, Southampton, and Norfolk, the Freehold, Copyhold, and Leasehold Estates, late of John Albert Bentinck Esquire, deceased, in Trustees, in Trust, to sell, mortgage or exchange, any Part or Parts thereof; and for applying the Money to arise thereby in discharging Incumbrances, and making Buildings and Improvements on the said Estates, and in completing Purchases of Lands agreed for by the said John Albert Bentinck, and for other Purposes; and for laying out the Residue of such Money in the Purchase of other Manors, Lands, or Hereditaments, to be settled to the same Uses as are now subsisting concerning the same.”

“11. An Act for vesting Part of the Settled Estates of Henry Stapilton Esquire, at Wighill, in the County of the City of York, in the said Henry Stapilton, in Fee-Simple; and for settling in lieu thereof other Lands and Hereditaments of the said Henry Stapilton, lying contiguous to, and interspersed with, the Remainder of the said Settled Estates, and also the Tithes thereof, and of such Remainder, to the same Uses.”

“12. An Act to enable certain Persons, during the successive Minorities of Sir William Molesworth Baronet, and his Brothers, to grant Leases of the Estates devised to them by the Will of Sir William Morice Baronet, deceased.”

“13. An Act for vesting certain Estates in the Counties of Wilts and Somerset, late belonging to John Smith Esquire, deceased, in Trustees, to be sold for Payment of his Debts; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.”

“14. An Act for settling and securing certain Parts of the Lands and Barony of Corsemichael called Greenlaw, and others lying in the Stewartry of Kircudbright, to and in favour of Isabel Gordon of Culvennan, Widow of William Gordon of Greenlaw, Esquire, for her Life, and to and in favour of Alexander Gordon of Culvennan Esquire, her eldest Son, and the same Series of Heirs, in Fee Tail, and under the same Conditions and Limitations as are mentioned and contained in a Deed of Entail, made in the Year One thousand seven hundred and forty-two, by John Macclloch of Barholm; and Jean Gordon his Wise; and for vesting in the aforesaid Alexander Gordon, and his Heirs and Assigns, in Fee-Simple, the Estate of Culvennan, and others lying in the County of Wigton, together with the Sum Of One thousand nine hundred and seventy-one Pounds Sterling.”

“15. An Act to enable John Whitfeld Esquire to charge Part of his Settled Estates, in the County of Northampton, in the Manner therein mentioned.”

“16. An Act to enable the Rector of the Parish Church of Hatherop, in the County of Gloucester, to exchange Part of his Glebe Lands there, for other Lands more conveniently situated, the Property of Samuel Blackwell Esquire, in the Hamlet of Williamstrip, adjoining to the said Parish of Hatherop.”

“17. An Act to dissolve the Marriage of the Reverend John Jenkins Clerk, with Mary Jenkins his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned.”

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant in these Words; (videlicet),

Soit fait comme il est desiré.”

Then His Majesty was pleased to speak as follows:

“My Lords, and Gentlemen,

King’s Speech.

“The Conclusion of the Publick Business, and the advanced Season of the Year, make it proper for Me to give you some Recess; but I cannot put an End to this Session without assuring you, that the fresh Instances of your affectionate Attachment to Me, and of your steady Attention and Adherence to the true Interests of your Country, which you have shewn through the whole Course of your important Deliberations, afford Me the highest Satisfaction.

“No Alteration has happened in the State of Foreign Affairs since your meeting; and it is with Pleasure I inform you, that the Assurances which I have received of the Dispositions of the several Powers of Europe, promise a Continuance of the general Tranquillity.

“Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

“It was with real Regret and Concern that I found Myself under the Necessity of asking of My faithful Commons any extraordinary Supplies: I thank you for the Readiness and Dispatch with which they have been granted; and they are the more acceptable to Me, as you have shewn, in the Manner of raising. them, an equal Regard to the Exigencies of the Service, and the Ease of My People; and you may be assured, that the Confidence you repose in Me, shall be used with proper Frugality, and applied only to the Purposes for which it was intended.

“My Lords, and Gentlemen,

“We are engaged in a great national Cause, the Prosecution of which mull inevitably be attended with many Difficulties, and much Expence: But when We consider that the essential Rights and Interests of the whole Empire are deeply concerned in the Issue of it, and can have no Safety or Security but in that Constitutional Subordination for which We are contending, I am convinced that you will not think any Price too high for the Preservation of such Objects.

“I will still entertain a Hope that My rebellious Subjects may be awakened to a Sense of their Errors; and that, by a voluntary Return to their Duty, they will justify Me in bringing about the favourite With of My Heart, the Restoration of Harmony, and the Re-establishment of Order and Happiness in every Part of My Dominions. But if a due Submission should not be obtained from such Motives and such Dispositions on their Part, I trust that I shall be able, under the Blessing of Providence, to effectuate it by a full Exertion of the great Force with which you have intrusted Me,”

Then the Lord Chancellor, having received Directions from His Majesty, said,

Parliament prorogued.

“My Lords, and Gentlemen,

“It is His Majesty’s Royal Will and Pleasure, That this Parliament be prorogued to Thursday the First Day of August next, to be then here holden; and this Parliament is accordingly prorogued to Thursday the First Day of August next.”