America and West Indies
July 1739

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Institute of Historical Research

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K. G. Davies (editor)

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1994

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130-153

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'America and West Indies: July 1739', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 45: 1739 (1994), pp. 130-153. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=115268 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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Contents

July 1739

245
July 3
Virginia
Lieut-Governor William Gooch to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. Intending this as a state of the colony and its trade without mingling therewith anything else, I shall proceed to inform you. Laws: we have none subsisting injurious to the trade, navigation and manufactures of Great Britain. Manufactors: the poor potter's operation is unworthy of your notice. The common people in all parts of the colony and indeed many of the better sort are lately got into the use of looms, weaving coarse cloth for themselves and Negroes; and our new inhabitants on the other side of the mountains make very good linen which they sell up and down the country, nor is the making of shoes with hides of their own tanning less practised though the leather is very indifferent. We have not any other manufacture unless building of sloops and selling them in the British islands may be accounted such; but as this no ways interferes with the trade of Great Britain I am of opinion it may be allowed, considering the exportation of our Indian corn, beef, and pork for the supply of those islands requires more bottoms to carry them thither than to bring back their commodities of rum, sugar and molasses, much less in bulk though of greater value. Trade: besides this trade carried on to the British islands in the West Indies of Indian corn, beef, pork, lumber, wax candles, flour, biscuit, and sometimes a little tobacco, for which we have in return rum, sugar and molasses, we send wheat, flour, wax and wax candles to Madeira and bring back the produce in wine. But the balance of trade, chiefly with the English settled there, being in their favour, is paid by bills of exchange. Our tobacco, with skins and lumber, is carried to Great Britain; and as that staple is under a careful inspection affording an encouraging price to the planters, we may be justly reckoned, by the quantity of goods we annually purchase with the sales of it and the benefit it is to the Crown in its Customs, among the principal plantations in America. We import salt from Cape Verde and the West Indies, far less useful than the salt of Portugal, which makes our traders very uneasy as I informed you in my letter of 14 September 1734. Iron works: we have four furnaces and the pig iron they make (for they cast a few pots and sell them in the country) is sent to London and Bristol, which being yearly about 1500 tons must increase the wealth of our mother country however inconsiderable the profit is to the adventurers. Forge: one for making bar iron but as the duty upon the importation to Great Britain is like to continue, and they don't find a ready vent for it in the country, the owners are much discouraged. They hammer about 20 tons in a year. One air furnace: where they cast pots, backs for chimneys, andirons, and boxes for cartwheels, sold in the colony or exported to other places on the continent without any great gain to the undertaker. The master of the vineyard, having been advised to cut his vines close to the ground in order to strengthen their roots, has not yet used his press to any purpose of interest; but the vineyard is in a flourishing and thriving condition and next year he intends to taste the goodness of the juice. The same gentleman goes on planting Verina tobacco, but as he says, not meeting with the price he expected and having about 100 hogsheads in hand, he goes this summer to London to be his own factor. These are all the trades or manufactors hitherto set up; and you, to whose prudent oversight the commerce of HM's dominions is so happily entrusted, will best judge how far any of them are prejudicial to the manufactures or trade of Great Britain. Signed. PS. Journals of House of Burgesses sent herewith. 2¾ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 25 September, Read 18 October 1739. [CO 5/1324, ff 167–168d]
246
July 4
Whitehall
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to Duke of Newcastle enclosing the following. Signed, Monson, M Bladen, R Plumer, J Brudenell, Edward Ashe. 1 p. Enclosed:
246 i Extract of letter, dated 23 May 1739, from Governor Alured Popple relating to seizure of two sloops by Spaniards. See no 166.¾ p. [CO 37/26, ff 221–225d; entry of covering letter in CO 38/8, pp 305–306]
247
July 4
Treasury
John Scrope to Thomas Hill enclosing the following for opinion of Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. Signed. ½ p. Addressed. Endorsed, Recd., Read 4 July 1739. Enclosed:
247 i Petition of Richard Shelton, late secretary to Lords Proprietors of the Bahamas, to Commissioners of the Treasury. He was secretary for thirty years and there are very great arrears due to him for salary and disbursements. He was at great labour and trouble to procure an agreement advantageous to the Crown. Copy. 1½ pp. Endorsed, (1) 6 April 1739 (2) 3 July 1739, to the Lords of Trade. [CO 23/4, ff 60–63d]
248
July 4
Palace Court
Minutes of Trustees for Georgia. Sealed letter of attorney to enable the secretary to receive at the Exchequer the 20000l granted by Parliament. Sealed appointments to Thomas Jones to be overseer of the Trust's servants in northern parts of Georgia and to Samuel Davison to be overseer in southern parts. Sealed grant of 500 acres to Kennedy O'Brien. Sealed 1200l in sola bills. Entry. 1½ pp. [CO 5/687, pp 126–127; entry of letter of attorney, appointments and grant, all dated 4 July, in CO 5/670, pp 404–411]
249
July 4
Frederica
James Oglethorpe to Trustees for Georgia. Give me leave to thank you for the great care you took to send immediate assistance to me by ordering the issuing of the 500l in bills and by sending me 710l in bills, and by the vigorous push you made in Parliament, the resolutions of which hath preserved this colony and by it covered all the trade of North America from the Spanish guardacostas. I am very glad to find by the last of yours that you have come to a resolution of keeping no stores here, after what is at present in the magazine is expended, but for the future paying for the servants' subsistence and other expenses in ready money. In this there is but two difficulties which I hope to be able to regulate in the execution. The first is the merchants, seeing there is no public stores, may run up the prices of all provisions to treble the value so that the people may not with their money be able to buy food. The second is that the people themselves when they receive their pay may spend it in drink instead of buying victuals and so suffer in their healths as the independent company did in Gen Nicholson's time, of whom two thirds died in a year. However, I believe both these inconveniences may be prevented by the regulations I shall make for the merchants and settlers.
I do not doubt the sum granted by Parliament will enable us not only to pay the debts of the colony and subsist it for the year but also have a fund beforehand which will prevent any accidents for the future; but to bring this about there must be a steady and regular manner of acting here. There are several expenses absolutely necessary and the factious humour of many people, the difficulties of finding amongst such as are sent hither any persons of proper confidence to execute a trust where a gain attends, is very great. The temptations of large sums to poor people who have given no security are difficult to be withstood and I have met with so much roguery that I have been obliged to change hands frequently. The powers given to the magistrates have generally been made use of either to get by winking at men who disobey the laws or expecting large allowances from the Trustees for doing their duty, and they have banded at Savannah so strongly together that they refused Mr Jones (as he informs me) to take any measures for preventing people who were running away with effects when in the Trustees' debt. The people have frequently been striving to deny any authority in me and would fain bring the trial of the Trustees' property before juries, almost every one of whom is interested by being debtors to the Trustees and many declared that they would bring in their verdicts according to their interest. They very ignorantly and unjustly at Savannah tried the people who broke through the rum law by juries who acquitted the sellers in spite of evidence. Here at Frederica the magistrates acted wisely: they tried and convicted them at petty sessions as justices of the peace, and amongst others levied upon a master of a sloop who had so many friends amongst the freeholders that they publicly declared in town that no jury would convict him though he tapped a cask at noonday. This steady proceeding and the appointing a very brisk man, Patrick Grant (a relation of Sir James Grant) naval officer and searcher, has got the better of rum here.
I am insensibly got off from the most important matter, that of keeping the expense of the province within bound and at the same time pushing on the improvements of silk and wine and other agriculture, making the province capable of subsisting itself, and encouraging industry in such manner as the inhabitants may be able to raise and sell food sufficient for the regiment's consumption and for the Trustees' servants so that they may not be obliged to buy from the neighbouring colonies, which if it can be compassed the planters by that money will be enabled not only to purchase clothing but also to pay for the passage of servants and other labouring hands and thereby increase the people of the colony without any new expense to the public, and these methods have already had their effect in Pennsylvania which is grown wondrous populous by the German servants. I have been labouring to reduce the expenses within bounds and to fix them to some certainty but have met with so many other affairs arising from opposition, many of which were surely set on foot on purpose to prevent my having time to regulate the expenses and look into accounts. I think I have got pretty near through and should have finished in about a month's time but the Indians have been stirred up to insist upon my meeting them and they hold a general assembly for that purpose, upon the result of which depends the welfare not only of this but of the colony of Carolina. The Spaniards and French have both been very active and have spared no pains to gain an interest sufficient amongst the Indians to persuade them to separate from the English. I send you an account of sundry disbursements made by me by the hands of Moore and I submit them to you to consider of them; and if you think they ought to be repaid you will please to pay them to Mr Verelst on my account. If there are any articles that you object to, if you will let me know them, I will explain them in the general account, this being only an account of some disbursements which I send home for your perusal till I can get the general account and the issues of all the stores and provisions bought and applied to the Trust's service.
It is necessary to set down the following articles for explaining the expenses of the province.
1st The whole civil and military expenses were to be defrayed by the Trustees till the arrival of the regiment, and till my arrival none of the Trust's military expenses were reduced.
2nd On the arrival of the first detachment with Col Cochran the Trustees were put to new expenses for boats to carry up the soldiers, the King's stores and provisions, also for warehouses for them; and at the Trustees' expense also cleftboard houses were built for the reception of the five companies quartered for the defence of Georgia. These expenses, had I been here, should not have been paid but have been directly certified home, that the Trustees might have applied to the Crown to obtain payment for the persons who had disbursed them. It is very true that they were absolutely necessary or the troops must have perished. It is also as true that colonies who levy taxes upon the people do, out of them taxes, defray all such contingent charges necessary for the troops sent for their defence; but this is not the case of Georgia where there can be no taxes levied and consequently the Trustees cannot defray the contingencies: therefore they very properly ought to have been represented to the Crown.
3rd Mr Horton, when he found that it was necessary there should be cleftboard houses provided for covering the regiment, employed as many of the inhabitants as were indebted to the Trustees for food as would work, and thereby lessened the expense of those buildings since he thereby secured the payment of debts which it would otherwise have been very difficult to recover.
4th Mr Hugh Mackay employed at St Andrews the Trustees' servants to build the cleftboard houses there and some few other carpenters and hired men.
5th I presume that the Trustees have a very good demand for the building of the abovementioned two camps of cleftboard houses in which 500 men and their officers are conveniently lodged since it was done by servants and creditors fed and clothed by the Trust whose labours might have been other ways of use to them.
6th It is necessary for the Trustees to use their endeavours to people the colony for which they are entrusted with the public money. People cannot live without protection and communication. The regular troops protect the frontier islands but boats are necessary for communication and watchmen for preserving the peace of the country and horsemen for pursuing in the woods felons, runaway servants, outlaws and slaves from Carolina, which have already molested the inland parts of the country; and thieving for want of rangers to pursue them is grown so common that great numbers of hogs and not a few cattle have been killed in the woods so that it is dangerous to let them out and people have neither enclosures nor food to keep them at home. The killing and stealing of hogs has been so frequent at Savannah that there is hardly one person in that town that has one, though when I left that province there were several hundreds there.
7th There are great numbers of servants belonging to the Trustees. Those at Savannah were under the care of Mr Bradley and Mr Causton, of whose work I have been hitherto not able to get a full account. Those at Darien were under the charge of Mr McIntosh and have learned to saw so that all the boards employed in the King's works as also those for building the chapel at Frederica have been sawed by them, the value of which I believe will near answer the keeping of them and next year, as they are now masters of their business, will I hope considerably more than maintain them. The servants on Amelia are under Mr Hugh Mackay's charge: there is a very fertile spot of ground on which I placed them and they have made a plantation. It promises fair for a great crop of corn, much more than they can eat, but their clothing and meatkind will be still some charge; nor can the Trustees expect that their servants should at first defray entirely their charges for they must consider that a great part of their time must be taken up in building huts and clearing and fencing of land which is an improvement of the province and a greater gain to it than the crop raised within the year.
8th Several boats are absolutely necessary for the province, one at least to each settlement which, if the Trust does not maintain, the people cannot, and it is as good withdrawing at once from the colony as forcing the people to leave it. I have done all I could to reduce the charges of boats as I have wrote more at large.
9th This country cannot be supported without cattle. The Trustees have a large herd, the keeping of which hath been a considerable expense to them but I think the profit upon the increase, notwithstanding that vast numbers have been killed and stolen, is above treble the charges they have cost. But if Mr Jones, the storekeeper, had not acted with great courage there was a general combination to eat the Trustees' cattle and I cannot say that the magistrates at Savannah did act with that vigour that they might have done till I myself was obliged to make them examine the people before me; and there was such a good-natured spirit stirring that I was informed no Savannah jury would find a man guilty for killing the Trustees' cattle in the woods, of which I suppose Mr Jones has given you a full account. This has forced me to continue a number of cattle hunters by which means I have already stopped the stealing and above sixty calves have been taken up and marked at the cowpen at Ebenezer.
10th Till the present stores are issued, of which I have laid in a great quantity, there will be occasion not only for a storekeeper and clerks but several other servants and labourers for unloading and preserving. Several may be reduced as soon as we can put the new regulations into practice but some will always be necessary, particularly a smith for the Indian arms, a surveyor, etc.
I am afraid I shall tire you with too long a letter if I should enter into the whole detail of the province and it is impossible to explain all things at this distance. The only method I can think of to hinder any increase beyond the intended expenses is strictly to adhere to the notice you have already advertised and which is now up at all the storehouse doors, that no person shall contract any debt chargeable upon the Trustees, and I fear the allowing any of the people here to endorse your bills will give a new credit to them persons which perhaps may be better let alone. For this reason I scratched out the endorsement which I had ordered to be made to Mr Causton and issued them myself and have charged myself with that 500l received from you. I mentioned in my first letter that if you would acquaint me how much you intended to expend yearly in Georgia I would frame an establishment in the best manner I could and would take care to [see] whilst I was here that it should not be exceeded and to have left the strongest orders for securing the same after my return and to have had security given for the execution of them.
There are two matters of great importance that I cannot omit speaking of before I conclude. First, you mention a new law concerning the altering of entails of estates. There are infinite difficulties in getting the laws now in being for this colony executed; therefore I should not yet wish for any new ones. The titles are at present upon a very good footing and those who made most noise about their lands are those who have taken no care of making any use of them. I suppose the heads which you send me will be very well considered and, before passed, many things amended, for as they stand they first deprive the male heir, who has now a right from the grandfather, in favour of the daughter of the son. Secondly they tend to uniting of lots and destroying the agrarian equality, one of the first principles on which you set out. Thirdly they leave freehold possessions open to the frauds of wills, a grievance complained of in England and a yoke which neither we nor our fathers could bear. They bring freeholders to be judged by the civil law which is the law by which wills are decided instead of being judged by the common law of the land, and this will make a court of Doctors Commons and Chancery necessary, either of which will be enough to crush a fullgrown, much more a young colony. I am persuaded that you will not pass any law till such time as the accounts and affairs of the colony are settled.
The second thing is you sent over 700l in bills to be issued for certain purposes. I immediately signed and issued 40l to Mr McLeod, 70l to Mr Bolzius and Mr Gronau, and 60l to Mr Jones for the servants, and sent them to Mr Jones to be signed. Mr McLeod and Mr Jones, etc inform me that Col Stephens and Mr Parker have both refused signing of them, by which means they will be greatly distressed for want of money. Upon which Mr Jones came up in an express boat to me from Savannah: he will acquaint you with Mr Parker's reasons. This might have occasioned some uneasiness to the Trustees' affairs but I have prevented it for I will take up the bills and pay the orders, and I have sent home the bills and hope that you will pay into Mr Verelst's hands the amount of those bills making 710l to answer my drafts upon him for the same. Though this is an inconveniency I think it hath prevented a worse, that is to say your giving a credit to any persons in America after your orders published to the contrary. Signed. 19½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 2 November 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 332–341d]
250
July 4
Ebenezer
Rev John Martin Bolzius to Harman Verelst acknowledging letters of 3 March and 2 April which arrived with the carpenter, shoemaker, and five single women all in very good health. Generosity of the Trustees towards Mr Gronau and the orphan-house acknowleged, also the leather and tools for the shoemaker who will supply the orphan-house at half price. Greater part of the debt incurred for building the orphan-house can now be repaid: we hope for a good crop for its further support. Children have been taught English as far as time and opportunity permit but Ortman, the school-master, is unable to teach it: his pronunciation is quite wrong, very tedious and obscure. The boy Bishop is more useful in instructing the children and might be allowed something to encourage him. Signed. 2½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 5 October 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 330–331d]
251
July 5
Whitehall
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to Governors of Jamaica, Barbados, Leeward Islands, Bermuda, Bahamas, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts (Circular) sending copies of addresses of Houses of Lords and Commons of 13 June. Prepare and transmit the accounts required that they may be laid before the Houses at the next meeting of Parliament. Entry. Signatories, Monson, E Ashe, R Plumer, M Bladen. 1¼ pp. [CO 324/12, pp 244–245]
252
July 7
Petition of Jonathan Belcher, in behalf of his father Governor Jonathan Belcher, to the King praying for six months leave for Governor Belcher to come to this kingdom on public and private business. Signed. 1 p. [CO 5/752, ff 331–332d]
253
July 9
Frederica
John Calwell to Harman Verelst soliciting aid of the Trustees in transporting his child Henry from Cork to Georgia, Gen Oglethorpe having made him surveyor in the room of Mr Auspurgur. Signed. ¾ p. Addressed. Endorsed, Recd. 2 November 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 342–343d]
254
July 11
Romney
Spithead
Capt Henry Medley to Duke of Newcastle acknowledging letter of 15 June and warrant as governor of Newfoundland. Signed. 1 p. [CO 194/24, ff 145–146d]
255
July 11
Palace Court
Minutes of Common Council of Georgia. Read report from committee of accounts on memorial of Capt William Thomson relating to German servants and goods delivered in Georgia in January 1739: the committee reported that 431l 16s 4d should be paid to Capt Thomson but that 69 of the servants and some goods were not chargeable to the Trustees; agreed to the report. Read report from same committee on claim of executors of Paul Jenys that sundry deductions should be made; agreed thereto, and resolved that 491l 9sd be paid to Smith & Bonovrier on whom the executors drew a bill for 636l 17s 3d. Signed draft on the bank for these sums. Read copy of resolution of SPCK (Scotland); resolved to grant 300 acres within 12 miles of New Inverness to Rev John McLeod and his successors as missionary appointed by SPCK (Scotland) who will grant 40l for four servants for cultivating the said land. Resolved that 1061l 8s be paid to meet Gen Oglethorpe's bill on Peregrine Fury, his agent, though no letter of advice had been received; signed draft on the bank for that sum. Resolved that Gen Oglethorpe be desired to endorse sola bills to enable them to be issued to defray estimated expense in Georgia for 1739–1740. Resolved that 1200l in sola bills be sent to William Stephens by Two Brothers. Resolved that Henry Parker be removed from commission for examining public debts, to be replaced by Thomas Christie. Ordered that Ann Emery be allowed to lease her share of her late husband's lot for seven years. Entry. 9½ pp. [CO 5/690, pp 242–251; entry of appointment dated 11 July, of Thomas Christie to be commissioner, in CO 5/670, pp 412–413]
256
July 11
Palace Court
Minutes of Trustees for Georgia. Received receipt from the bank for 20000l paid in by the accountant, being so much received from the Exchequer, less fees. Received receipt for 1l 1s consideration money for grant of land to Kennedy O'Brien. Entry. 1 p. [CO 5/687, p 128]
257
July 11
Georgia Office
Benjamin Martyn to John West. The Trustees grant leave to dispose of your lot provided Mr Stephens approves of the person you dispose of it to, and that the said person has no lands already in Georgia either in possession or expectancy. They likewise grant leave to return home. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 243]
258
July 11
Georgia Office
Same to Thomas Jones. The Trustees have carefully perused your several letters of 8, 17 and 23 February and they therein observe the many difficulties you meet with in adjusting the accounts of the storehouse; but they hope you will not be discouraged in the attempt but pursue the commission sent over to you 2 April last, it being a matter of great consequence to them as well as a demonstration of your fidelity and resolution in their service. For your encouragement herein they have appointed you third bailiff of Savannah, and as a public storehouse is no longer to subsist after Michaelmas day next but all payments made by the Trustees will be in money they are sensible their allowance to a storekeeper must end at that time; wherefore, taking into consideration your usefulness and concern for the prosperity of the province, they hope you will accept of an employment very essential to its interests which is that of overseer of the Trust servants to which there is a salary appointed of 30l per annum: the business thereof is particularly set forth in the enclosed instructions and your commission for executing them will be delivered to you by Mr Stephens. To explain to you that part, viz the Trustees' servants having land of their own when their task is over, orders are sent to Mr Stephens that such servants who have no land set out in the time of their service to work on at spare days for themselves should have 5 acres each set out as part of their 20 acres, which are to lie as near as may be to the lands they are to be employed in the cultivating of for the Trustees, in order that their spare time may be fully employed in their own lands by being contiguous if possible. Entry. ¾ p. [CO 5/667, pp 243–244]
259
July 11
Georgia Office
Same to Thomas Causton. The Trustees have received your letters of 14 January and 14 February but they can say nothing to them nor give any answer thereto till they see the result of the commission which they have appointed to examine and state your accounts. Entry. ¼ p. [CO 5/667, p 244]
260
July 11
Georgia Office
Same to Thomas Hawkins. The Trustees have ordered the public storehouse to be shut up at Michaelmas next, being determined to defray the expenses of the town of Frederica according to the estimate settled by them, whereof a copy as far as relating to the southern part of the province is enclosed to you, that you may see the disposition the Trustees have made for your support for the ensuing year. You will observe by it that 30l is allowed to you as first bailiff of Frederica for the year then commencing and 10l more as correspondent with Mr Stephens, secretary within the province. In consideration of this the Trustees expect that you will be punctual in acquainting Mr Stephens with the plantations and cultivating made in the southern part of the province, the lots taken up, charged or deserted, the deaths, marriages and births of persons, the progress of fishing or any useful arts, the ships arrived or sailed, and all matters of consequence. For your information in these particulars you must call on the minister, the surveyor, the inferior officers of the town of Frederica and such other persons as are respectively capable of giving you accounts. As the Trustees have nothing to prejudice you in their good opinion they hope you will preserve it by maintaining the peace and promoting the industry and good manners of the people and that you will give all the necessary support and countenance to the minister, Mr Norris, who is appointed to reside at Frederica and for whom the Trustees have a great regard. Entry. ¾ p. [CO 5/667, p 245]
261
July 11
Georgia Office
Same to Rev William Norris. The Trustees hope you will be pleased with your removal to Frederica which they think on many accounts will be more satisfactory as you will be nearer to Gen Oglethorpe and will find the people more sober and orderly than you have found them in general at Savannah and as the place is more healthy than the northern part of the province. Besides, as Mr Whitefield who was at Savannah before has collected a considerable sum of money here for erecting an orphan-house for which a grant of land is made by the Trustees near to Savannah, and as he is to have the superintendency of it by building it without any expense to the Trustees, his residence there will become more necessary. As the Trustees have directed their first bailiff at Frederica (Mr Hawkins) to show you all the regard in his power they desire you will from time to time give him an account of the marriages, births and deaths of persons in the southern part of the province and whether the people are regular in their attendance at church. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 245]
262
July 11
Georgia Office
Same to John Fallowfield. The Trustees, having received a good account of your sobriety and abilities and readiness to undertake the office of a magistrate, have therefore appointed you second bailiff of Savannah and they have no doubt but you will endeavour to gain and preserve their good opinion by an exact performance of your duty and a firm execution of justice and the laws without favour or affection, and that you will at all times promote the peace, morals and industry of the people to the utmost of your power. Entry. ¼ p. [CO 5/667, p 246]
263
[July 11
Georgia Office]
Undated letter from same to Robert Gilbert. The Trustees, understanding that you undertook the office of a bailiff of the town of Savannah with great reluctance and that holding the same is inconvenient to you, have eased you thereof and appointed Mr Thomas Jones to succeed you in it. Entry. ¼ p. [CO 5/667, p 246]
264
July 11
Savannah
Rev Israel Christian Gronau to Harman Verelst acknowledging letter of 3 March and news of allowance of 30l towards cost of building house. May God reward the Trustees a thousand times. Gen Oglethorpe arrived here last night and paid the money by Mr Moore, his secretary. Signed. ¾ p. Endorsed, Recd. 5 October 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 344, 344d]
265
July 12
Jamaica
Governor Edward Trelawny to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. I should sooner have acquainted you with the death of Mr Mill, receiver-general and one of the Council, if I had not missed the opportunity of doing it by being in a remote part of the country giving orders for an expedition against the rebellious Negroes settled in the windward part of the island. They have submitted upon the same terms as those which the others lately agreed upon and which I transmitted to you, only with this difference that they have obliged themselves to deliver up all the runaway slaves who have joined with them for three years past and to receive a garrison. I send the laws passed between 14 April 1739 and 29 May following; journal of Council, 11 September 1738 to 19 May 1739; minutes of Council, 27 September 1738 to 19 May 1739; and minutes of Assembly, 13 March 1739 to 19 May 1739. Signed. 2 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 10 December, Read 12 December 1739. [CO 137/23, ff 52, 52d, 59, 59d]
266
July 14
Georgia Office
Harman Verelst to James Oglethorpe by Two Brothers, Capt Thomson, sending copy of last letter of 11 June. The Trustees, after mature consideration of the representation from the inhabitants of Savannah dated 9 December last for altering the tenure of the lands and introducing Negroes into Georgia, have sent their answer thereto to the magistrates of Savannah under the corporation seal and have had their said answer printed to be dispersed in the colony by the magistrate of Savannah and Frederica, one of which printed copies is herewith sent you. The Trustees' estimates of the expenses of the colony from Michaelmas next are sent by this ship and herewith you have copies of them. They have sent 1200l in their sola bills towards defraying the said expenses, which bills are 450 of 1l each and 75 of 10l each and are part of those ordered in 1737 and remained unsent; and the Trustees desire you will sign the endorsements of them to enable William Stephens, Thomas Christie and Thomas Jones, or any two of them, to issue them pursuant to their instructions for defraying the said estimated expenses, and the Common Council under the corporation seal have indemnified you for so doing, which is herewith sent you.
The Trustees have granted the 500-acre plot of land to Kennedy O'Brien pursuant to your recommendation and have sent it over. They have appointed Mr Thomas Christie first bailiff of Savannah and removed Henry Parker from that office and from every other appointment, his late behaviour giving offence. Mr John Fallowfield is appointed second bailiff and Mr Thomas Jones third bailiff of the said town in the room of Robert Gilbert who is removed as an improper person for executing that office, the Trustees being also assured he accepted the office with reluctance. And Mr William Williamson is appointed recorder at Savannah. And the Trustees have ordered Mr Jones a 50-acre lot, the best of any of those forfeited at Savannah, to qualify him to execute the office of third bailiff. In consideration of Mr Jones's faithfulness and capacity the Trustees have not only made him the third bailiff but also overseer of their servants in the northern part of the province; and Samuel Davison, constable at Frederica, is appointed overseer of their servants in the southern part of the province. For these servants tools and materials are sent and the particulars thereof will be herewith received, which are to be distributed in proportion to the number of servants employed in each part of the province. There is also 40 barrels of flour sent and 60 pairs of men's shoes which are to be retailed at such places in the province where most wanted; and as all payments are in money the said flour and shoes must be retailed for ready money by proper retailers to be appointed for that purpose with an allowance of a reasonable profit to themselves on the prime cost which is herewith sent, such retailers paying the money they receive from time to time, as they fetch small parcels away to the amount of such prime cost, to be reissued by William Stephens, Thomas Christie and Thomas Jones, or any two of them, for defraying the expenses of the estimates and thereby keep down the prices of necessaries to a reasonable standard. The 15 tons of strong beer in barrels nos 1 to 90 are sent you according to the Trustees' letter of 11 June which they hope will prove a satisfactory payment for expenses you were at on their account. The 16 half-barrels of gunpowder FF and 28 casks of Indian gun bullets with 2 casks of dropshot, each cask of bullets containing ½ cwt nett and each cask of dropshot 2 cwt nett, are for part of the presents to the Indians, which presents the Trustees choose to send from England to be distributed to the Indians by your directions while in the province and in your absence (when occasion requires) by the directions of William Stephens, Thomas Christie and Thomas Jones or any two of them.
Besides the 1200l in sola bills the Trustees have sent two tons of halfpence which with the said sola bills and a bill for 200l sterling drawn by the receiver of the King's quitrents in South Carolina and remitted by this ship (which the Trustees advanced here for payment of the auditor's salary and other expenses for the Crown) are sent towards defraying the expenses of the estimates from Michaelmas next and for no other purpose by William Stephens, Thomas Christie and Thomas Jones, or any two of them, according to their instructions. The Georgia scoutboat and the charges of the boat at St Andrews are continued for this year by reason of the present situation of affairs, but as those boats are for the military defence of the colony the Trustees apprehend it does not belong to them to defray the expense thereof, and therefore if you think them necessary they have no doubt but you will represent the necessity of them in the proper place.
Capt Thomson having presented a memorial to the Trustees relating to German servants and goods received and delivered by your order in January last, the Common Council have agreed to pay for the following heads only, viz 12½ heads for cultivating lands for religious uses in the northern part of the province; 7 heads to cultivate Trust lands at Fort Argyle; 1 head to Mr Norris the minister; 4 heads to be employed in the public garden; 5⅓ heads employed as cowherds to the Salzburghers; 1 head to attend the Salzburgh orphans; 2 heads to the Salzburgh schoolmaster; 1 head to William Stephens; and 13½ heads to be employed in the cultivating lands for religious uses in the southern part of the province if not already provided, otherwise to be employed in the cultivation of Trust lands at Frederica. But as to 69 heads besides, stated to be delivered pursuant to your order, the Common Council have not sufficient evidence before them at present whereby to think themselves at all chargeable with the expenses thereof and have referred the captain back to the persons for payment or better reasons than yet given for the Trustees to reconsider thereupon. The amount of goods delivered by the said captain to your order was 213l 9s 11¼d whereof 102l 16sd the Common Council have agreed to pay, but the residue being for presents designed to the Spanish messengers when they come to Georgia, for encouragement of shopkeepers, and other credits, which the Common Council thinking themselves no way concerned in have refused payment of.
The account of the late Paul Jenys received from his executors and recommended for dispatch by your letter to the accountant dated 7 April last has been examined by the committee, with the accounts of the said Paul Jenys sent to the Trustees by Mr Causton, with another letter from the said Causton dated 14 February last, and there appear overcharges therein to the amount of 145l 7s 10½dd sterling which reduces the said executors' demand of 636l 17s 3d to the sum of 491l 9sd which is ordered to be paid; and the said overcharges are to be particularized and the account thereof and how they arise to be sent to the commissioners for examining and stating the public debts for their inspection, and another copy thereof to the executors of the said Paul Jenys to make answer or submit to such overcharges being disallowed. The Trustees have appointed Peter Emery to be the pilot resident at Tybee who is ordered to have a lot of 50 acres of land there and his wife has leave to sell beer; and they desire you will name a proper person to be pilot at St Simons or Jekyll Sound. The Trustees not having received an account from you, nor hearing from other hands, that any progress has been made in the adjusting and settling the differences between South Carolina and Georgia concerning the regulation of trade with the Indians to the mutual satisfaction of both provinces, they earnestly recommend it in the most serious manner to you to lose no time in the perfecting so essential a necessary work when the authority which you have in that province and the influence of Lieut-Governor Bull may facilitate an happy conclusion of the misunderstandings which have subsisted on that account, whereby the clamours of many people here may be quieted and harmony restored between the inhabitants of both provinces, so absolutely requisite in this juncture. The Trustees have ordered that the supplies Mr William Stephens had from you should not be accounted part of the two sums of 20l and 30l they ordered him in their letter of 2 April last. Entry. 3½ pp. Enclosed:
266 i Estimate of expense in northern part of Georgia for one year to commence from Michaelmas 1739. 1st magistrate at Savannah, 30l; 2nd and 3rd magistrates, 20l each; recorder, 20l; secretary and postmaster, 100l; register, 20l; schoolmaster at Savannah, 10l; schoolmaster for Salzburghers, 5l; parish clerk at Savannah, 5l; midwife at Savannah, besides 5s per laying, 5l; overseer of garden, 10l; head gardener, 20l; overseer of Trust's servants, 30l; blacksmith, for mending militia arms, 15l; and for mending Indian arms, 15l; Italian family in silk production, 20l; allowance to recorder for clerk, 20l; 4 constables at Savannah, 10l each; allowance to chief magistrate for public rejoicings, etc, 4l; cowpenkeeper, 35l; pilot at Tybee, 40l; care of widows of Trust's servants, 100l; care of sick, 150l. Servants: to each of the three magistrates for two servants, 24l 6s 8d; to the recorder, the Italian family, Widow, Vanderplank, and the cowpenkeeper, for one servant each, 12l 3s 4d each; for charge of 60 men, Trust servants, to be paid 8d a day provided they perform their tasks, 730l; repair of tools, 5l; repair of houses and machines, etc in production of silk, 50l. Total: 1645l 13s 4d.
Expense in southern part. 1st magistrate at Frederica, 40l; 2nd and 3rd magistrates, 15l each; recorder, 20l; minister, 50l; overseer of Trust's servants, 25l; blacksmith, 15l; schoolmaster, 10l; parish clerk, 5l; midwife, besides 5s per laying, 5l; allowance to chief magistrate for public rejoicings, etc, 4l; 2 constables at Frederica, 10l each; care of widows of Trust's servants, 50l; care of sick, 75l; coasting boat with coxswain and 4 hands, 96l 10s; pilot at Jekyll or St Simons, 40l. Servants: to 1st magistrate and minister at Frederica one servant each at 12l 3s 4d; for charge of 21 men, Trust servants, to be paid 8d a day provided they perform their tasks, 355l 10s; for charge of 17 womenservants to be paid 6d a day provided they perform their tasks, 155l 2s 6d. Total: 1020l 9s 2d.
General charges for Georgia. Surveying land to persons on the charity account and servants, 50l; incidental expenses, 500l; building and repairing church, buying furniture and books for school, 100l; execution of justice, 100l; entertaining Indians, 100l; Georgia scoutboat, 258l 15s 1d; provisions and shoes for coxswain and rowers of boat at St Andrews, 48l; William Stephens for services, 25l.
List of working tools for Trustees' servants, and invoices of flour, shoes and beer sent to Georgia. Entry. 7½ pp. [CO 5/667, pp 247–264]
267
July 14
Georgia Office
Harman Verelst to William Stephens. The Trustees have received your letters dated 6 February and 12 March last and their accountant received your letters dated 29 March and 21 April and delivered your journal to said 21 April which gives the Trustees great satisfaction from the fully stating all occurrences. The Trustees have been often applied to for an account of William Wise's effects who died in Georgia before your arrival. A copy of his will came over but no account whether he left anything or not; please, therefore, to inquire about it. They have also been applied to for the effects of Henry Clarke, deceased, whereof an account was sent 20 March 1734/5 signed by John Dearne and Edward Jenkins, a copy whereof is herewith sent you, but no effects have been received pursuant thereto, which you are desired to inquire after. John Murcott has applied to the Trustees relating to a debt owing to him for 28l 9s 9d from Joseph Hetherington, and another debt for 28l 10s from Theophilus Hetherington due on a writ of inquiry to him 19 January 1733/4, and you are desired to acquaint them of it and know in what ability they are for making any and what satisfaction for the said debts.
Mr Whitefield having acquainted the Trustees the branch which was sent sometime ago for the use of the church at Savannah was not in use, the Trustees direct that the said branch be used at church services until the church shall be built. Mr Whitefield is not yet sailed on account of the present embargo, intending for Georgia by the way of Philadelphia. He has collected a great deal of money for an orphan-house and the Trustees apprehend the great house built by the servants under Mr Bradley's directions might be a proper place, but he has a particular letter to you about the land for endowment and the place for building it which he is to choose with your approbation. If he should approve of this house there must be a valuation made at a reasonable price towards reimbursing the Trustees the great expense thereof out of the money he has collected; but if he does not approve of this house the Trustees desire you would inform them if it will not be right to roof the same with a penthouse roof and shingles and underprop it by bricking from the foundation of the cellar and to let them know what would be the expense thereof. And the Trustees direct that no additional buildings of Mr Bradley's at their expense be carried on. As the Trustees have now no public stores it is recommended to you to consider of proper means to let their storehouses to private persons for some income to be applied towards the support of the colony.
As all payments from the Trustees are in money to commence at Michaelmas next, the Trustees not knowing what supply of flour and shoes might be in the colony [continues as in no 266]. Copy of no 279 to John Brownfield enclosed. If you find that he is unwilling to perform the duty required you are desired to recommend a fit person to be employed as register that the accounts so much wanted from him may be expedited. The Trustees having a great many servants at their expense in the province, they desire a particular account of them from you with their names, ages and sexes and how employed, under the execution of the instructions herewith sent for Mr Thomas Jones who is appointed overseer of those in the northern part of the province and the like instructions sent to Mr Hawkins for Samuel Davison who is appointed overseer of those in the southern part of the province. And Samuel Holmes, brickmaker of Savannah, having applied for two servants, if any should lie upon the Trustees who are not provided for by the estimates herewith sent, or that may ease the Trustees from the expense if more than wanted for the services intended for them, the Trustees consent to let Samuel Holmes have two in case he will instruct them in the brickmaker's business but not otherwise. The Trustees desire you would send them another return of the people in the province in the same manner as you did in January 1737/8 and to continue so to do at least annually, and that you will let them know the progress made towards the production of silk and wine or any other produce which may in time arise towards the reimbursing the charge of the province by exports therefrom and also of the progress towards raising a sufficient maintenance for the inhabitants, with an account of the forts, harbours and inlets to enable the Trustees to satisfy the public for the annual charge the colony stands them in.
The Trustees have directed that the supplies you had from Gen Oglethorpe should not be accounted part of the two sums of 20l and 30l they ordered you in their letter of 2 April and have also provided in the estimate for the general charges of the colony 25l for your services from Michaelmas last to Michaelmas next before the estimate herewith sent you takes place; and in that you will find yourself rated at 100l a year by the office of secretary and postmaster for yourself, clerk, etc from Michaelmas next. Copies of the estimates for the general charges of the colony, the expenses of the northern and the expense of the southern part thereof are herewith sent you, which please to communicate to Mr Thomas Christie and Mr Thomas Jones who are appointed, or any two of you, to defray the expenses thereof with the following funds sent in part thereof and the residue will be defrayed by future funds in proper time. The said funds now sent are as follows, viz 2 tons of copper halfpence bought by weight as by the invoice herewith sent appears, to be paid by tale and the difference accounted for towards defraying the expenses of the estimate and thereby the charge of sending them; 40 barrels of flour and 60 pairs of shoes at the prime cost in the invoice; a bill of exchange on Mr George Saxby, deputy receiver of HM's revenues in Charleston, South Carolina, drawn by John Hammerton for value received of the Trustees here for the use of the Crown with a letter of advice thereof; and 1200l value in their sola bills in a covered box directed to yourself no 1 and particularly mentioned in the invoice which you are directed to carry to Gen Oglethorpe and desire his endorsement of them under the writing on the back for yourself, Thomas Christie and Thomas Jones, or any two of you, to issue them; and when you issue them or defray the expense of the estimates as the same shall become due and payable, you are to be careful to transmit accounts thereof signed by two of you, taking duplicated vouchers in two books, the one to keep and the other to send over from time to time with your accounts by every opportunity and such vouchers are to specify the service each sum is paid for agreeable to the expenses estimated, that you may be discharged and the Trustees enabled to give a faithful account, and where sola bills are issued in payment there to specify in the party's receipt the particulars of them issued for each payment.
The wives and children of the Trustees' servants and of any single womenservants to the Trust, not being known in the northern part, could not be computed in the estimate, but whatever saving as to the number of men provided for more than may happen to be in the Trustees' service there will be a fund for the said women and children. And also all other savings which may be made you are desired to give great attention to; but a proper care must be taken of the beacon or lighthouse at Tybee to preserve it from falling after so great an expense in raising it, the same having proved a very useful landmark for ships. If there is not a proper pilot-boat at Tybee it must be provided, those used at Carolina are judged the most proper sort; the same care, if wanting, must be at St Simons or Jekyll Sound. And an Act is drawn for regulating the pilotage and the duty of pilots, for levying a rate for the landmark at Tybee towards its support and for a powder duty for answering signals; as also another relating to the tenure of the lands in Georgia, preserving the entail in the male line of the body and providing for successors in failure thereof, both which it is expected will soon, with the Trustees' approbation, be laid before HM for the royal assent and will be transmitted: which Acts are the result of the Trustees' own consideration before any representation was received from the inhabitants of Savannah. Which representation having been duly considered, the Trustees have sent their answer thereto under the seal of the corporation which you are to deliver to the magistracy for them to give the Trustees' said answer to the complainants and 50 printed copies thereof are sent you in the box no 1 to disperse among the inhabitants of the northern part of Georgia, the like number having been sent Gen Oglethorpe to disperse among the inhabitants of the southern part.
Mr Thomas Christie having served the office of recorder from the first settling of the colony, he is directed by the Trustees to make up his copy of the proceedings of the town-court to the time Mr William Williamson who succeeds him is sworn in, and then you are to deliver Mr Christie his constitution appointing him first bailiff of Savannah in the room of Henry Parker who is removed from the said office by the said constitution. Mr William Williamson's constitution you are to deliver as soon as Mr Christie has perfected his copy of the proceedings of the court to the time of Mr Williamson's taking upon him the said office. You are to deliver Mr John Fallowfield his constitution appointing him second bailiff of Savannah, and Mr Thomas Jones having been ordered possession of the best forfeited lot at Savannah to qualify him to execute the office of third bailiff, you are to deliver him his constitution appointing him to that office in the room of Robert Gilbert who accepted the said office with reluctance as unfit for it. And you are also to deliver Mr Jones his appointment to the office of overseer of the Trustees' servants and his instructions for performing the said office. All which deeds, together with a grant, counterpart, and memorial registered with the auditor of 500 acres of land to Kennedy O'Brien of Augusta in Georgia, are in the said box directed to you no 1, with several letters particularly mentioned in the invoice. Mr O'Brien is to execute the said counterpart and pay you 1l 11s 6d, the consideration money and charge of registering with the auditor, before you deliver the said grant to him, which counterpart executed in the presence of two witnesses you are to send back to the Trustees and account for the 1l 11s 6d in defraying the expenses of the estimates.
In the invoice herewith sent are contained several tools and materials for the Trustees' servants which are to be distributed in proportion to the number of servants employed in each part of the province; and there are also contained presents for the Indians which are to be distributed by Gen Oglethorpe's directions while in the province, and in his absence (when occasion requires) by the directions of yourself, Mr Thomas Christie and Mr Thomas Jones or any two of you. By the bill of lading and invoice herewith sent you will see to whom every parcel belongs, which are to be applied and delivered accordingly. The executors of Mr Paul Jenys having sent subsequent accounts to the certificate Mr Causton signed which was sent back to them unpaid, and the committee of accounts having compared them with the accounts of the said Paul Jenys lately received from Mr Causton have reported 491l 9sd due thereon which has been paid, and ordered copies of all the said accounts with their observations of the differences between the said executors' and Mr Causton's accounts to be sent to the commissioners for stating the public debts in Georgia to examine into the articles stated by the said report, a copy of which report is herewith sent you as also another to Mr Jones to whom the copies of the said accounts are sent. Mr Henry Parker is also removed from being a commissioner in the said commission for examining and stating the said public debts and Mr Thomas Christie is appointed in his room, which appointment you are to deliver Mr Christie out of the said box no 1. Mr Causton has sent over his cash accounts from February 1735/6 to 16 October 1738 but the Trustees by their letter from their secretary have referred him to the commissioners in Georgia appointed to examine and state his whole accounts. The Trustees have appointed Peter Emmery to be the pilot resident at Tybee who is ordered to have a lot of 50 acres of land there, and his wife has leave to sell beer as also a licence to let her late husband's, Michael Germain's, house and lot as to her share thereof in her widow's right for any term not exceeding seven years if she shall so long live; and the Trustees on her returning to Georgia have advanced her 10l sterling to buy her necessaries which her husband is to repay in Georgia, to be applied towards the expense of the estimates and for which you have herewith her receipt. The Trustees direct that such of their servants who have no land set out in the time of their service [continues as in no 258]. Entry. 5½ pp. Enclosed:
267 i Invoice of halfpence, Indian goods, boxes and tools, on Two Brothers, Capt William Thomson, consigned to William Stephens. Entry. 2½ pp. [CO 5/667, pp 250–255, 265–267]
268
July 14
Georgia Office
Harman Verelst to Rev William Norris. I have paid Capt Thomson for your draft and care is taken for the future punctual payment of your salary, which Mr Stephens will acquaint you of. The Trustees desire you would send them a catalogue of what books are in Georgia. The Trustees have sent you a pall for the use of burials at Frederica which Mr Hawkins will deliver, and when Mr Whitefield is arrived (who goes by way of Philadelphia but is not sailed yet by reason of the present embargo) he will deliver you a christening basin and eight brass candlesticks, whereof two for the desk, to hold candles at evening public worship, which are for the use of Frederica. Entry. ¼ p. [CO 5/667, p 267]
269
July 14
Georgia Office
Same to Thomas Hawkins sending pall for use at Frederica; large Common Prayer Book for use of minister there; bottle of salitrum seeds for the bloody flux and two receipts for cure thereof; parcel, letters and appointment of Samuel Davison to be overseer of Trustees' servants in southern part of Georgia. Please make proper distribution. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 268]
270
July 14
Georgia Office
Same to Elizabeth and Thomas Jenys acknowledging letter of 7 April and accounts. Committee of accounts has stated balance to be 491l 9sd, which has now been paid to Messrs Smith, Bonovrier & Co for your use. Entry. 1 p. [CO 5/667, pp 268–269]
271
July 14
Georgia Office
Same to Kennedy O'Brien. Grant of 500 acres of land at Augusta will be delivered to you by William Stephens on execution of the counterpart and payment of fee of 1l 11s 6d. Entry. ¼ p. [CO 5/667, p 269]
272
July 14
Georgia Office
Same to William Williamson. The Trustees have named you recorder of the town-court of Savannah at 20l a year, with 20l for a clerk and 12l 3s 4d for a servant, which will be paid in money from Michaelmas next. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 270]
273
July 14
Georgia Office
Same to Thomas Christie. The Trustees have promoted you to be first bailiff of Savannah and commissioner for examining and stating the public debts in Georgia in the room of Henry Parker. The salary is 30l a year, besides 24l 6s 8d for two servants, which will be paid in money from Michaelmas next. You are, therefore, desired to send copies of the proceedings of the court, which have not already been sent, to the time Mr Williamson shall be sworn in as recorder to succeed you. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 270]
274
July 14
Georgia Office
Same to Samuel Davison. The Trustees have appointed you overseer of their servants in the southern part of Georgia at a salary of 25l a year from Michaelmas next. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 271]
275
July 14
Georgia Office
Same to Rev John Martin Bolzius acknowledging letter of 14 March last. The Trustees at present cannot think of sending over any more Salzburghers this year owing to lateness of the season and expense; but you may rest satisfied of their pursuing all possible means for obtaining that end. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 271]
276
July 14
Georgia Office
Same to Isaac Young. The Trustees have directed William Stephens to inquire into the state of the vacant land you took possession of, that they may do you what justice is in their power. They are much concerned at the surveyor's not doing his duty. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 272]
277
July 14
Georgia Office
Same to James Abercromby acknowledging letter of 6 June after a very quick passage. Trustees will readily defray expenses of execution of their commissions. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 273]
278
July 14
Georgia Office
Same to Andrew Duche. In response to your proposals of 29 December last the Trustees have sent materials to encourage you in the making of porcelain. Send specimens of work to enable the Trustees to consider the other part of your proposal. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 272]
279
July 14
Georgia Office
Same to John Brownfield. The Trustees, not hearing from you concerning the execution of your office of register of Georgia, desire to know if you have any obstructions in the execution of it. And in order for the ascertaining of quitrents payable by the inhabitants the Trustees desire an account of every lot of 50 acres or under granted under Trust grants in Georgia, showing when and to whom and by whom granted and who and by what means are the present occupiers, and also an account of all other grants that have been registered in Georgia which have passed the Trustees' seal in England to compare with the grants made here, and such account to show by whom and by what means each particular granted lot made under the seal here is occupied. And the Trustees also require an account of all lots which have been possessed under grants made either in Georgia or sent from England which have since become vacant, if any so are, with the particular occasion thereof against each of such lots. The Trustees have annexed a salary of 20l sterling a year to commence from Michaelmas next to be paid to the register upon his transmitting an exact account of all the grants pursuant to his instructions, which is to be paid by William Stephens, Thomas Christie and Thomas Jones or any two of them, and if you will perform the said office as the Trustees expect you will be entitled thereunto. Entry. ¾ p. [CO 5/667, pp 273–274]
280
July 15
Georgia
Patrick Grant to Trustees for Georgia. Being appointed by Gen Oglethorpe naval officer and searcher concerning rum and other spirituous liquors and contraband goods in the southern boundaries of this province, I thought it my duty to acquaint you that there are considerable quantities of foreign sugars and molasses imported here with a fraudulent intention of re-exporting the same and to defraud the Crown of a part of its revenues contrary to Act for the better securing and encouraging the trade of HM's sugar colonies in America by which it is enacted that duties are to be paid for said goods; and therefore I have made my application to you (as no duties have been as yet levied) in order to know your pleasure. Signed. 1 p. Addressed. Endorsed, Recd. 2 November 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 345–346d]
281
July 16
Savannah
Gen James Oglethorpe to Duke of Newcastle. That part of Georgia where the Lower Creek national and the Choctaws live borders on the French settlements. The French have fallen upon some of those Indians and the Indians have defended themselves and were preparing to attack the French. I find I cannot prevent them by any other method than by going up myself amongst them and set out tomorrow. There is a general assembly of all those Indian nations held to hear what I have to propose. I shall insist upon their not making war with the French and hope I shall succeed. I shall acquaint you with the event. Signed. 1 p. Endorsed, R, 5 November. [CO 5/654, ff 215–216d]
282
July 16
Savannah
Same to Trustees for Georgia. I send you by Mr Auspurgur about 20 lbs of silk. We hoped for five times the quantity but for want of room we made use of the house where the silk people used to be and the infection had such an effect (as Camus tells me) that it occasioned a sickness amongst the worms which destroyed a great many. Some of the silk was wound last year but most this. I hope we shall have better next. Several applications will be made to you for lands but I hope you will make no new grants whatever till we can get those already granted in some manner cultivated. There is one Talfeur, an apothecary-surgeon who gives physick, and one Williams of whom I wrote to you formerly, a merchant who quitted planting to sell rum. To these two almost all the town is in debt for physick and rum, and they have raised a strong spirit to desire that lands may be alienable and then they would take the lands for debts, monopolize the country and settle it with Negroes. They have a vast deal of art and, if they think they cannot, they hope to bring confusions and you cannot imagine how much uneasiness I have had here. I hope therefore that you will make no alterations. I desire you will send over an appointment to the magistrates of the town-court of Savannah for the time being to proceed to put the Rum Act into execution. There is lately a considerable trade started up here and Mr Fallowfield, collector of Savannah, and Mr Grant, naval officer and searcher at St Simons, vigilantly acquainted me that they had discovered that there were some Spanish sugars imported here which I think ought to pay a duty to the King. I ordered the two officers to write to you and hope you will order proper lawyers to be consulted and send us advice what to do. The French and Spaniards have used their utmost endeavours to raise disturbances amongst our Indians and the not deciding clearly in the Act relating to them has given such insolence to the Carolina traders that the Indians have declared, if I do not come up to them, they will arm and do themselves justice, and have ordered a general assembly of all the nations to meet me. I set out this night. Signed. 2 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 2 November 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 348–349d]
283
July 18
Palace Court
Minutes of Trustees for Georgia. Sealed memorial to SPG for allowance of 50l per annum to be paid to Rev William Norris, appointed missionary at Frederica, until the Trustees can raise a sufficient maintenance for him out of the lands for religious uses. Entry. ¾ p. [CO 5/687, p 129; entry of memorial in CO 5/670, p 413]
284
July 19
Whitehall
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to Duke of Newcastle enclosing the following. Entry. Signatories, Monson, M Bladen, James Brudenell, R Plumer. 1 p. Enclosed:
284 i Whitehall, 19 July 1739. Same to the King enclosing the following. No alteration from instructions to late Governor Horsey except omission of 13th article and alteration of 100th article relating to paper money. Entry. Signatories, as covering letter. 1½ pp.
284 ii Draft instructions to James Glen, governor of South Carolina. Entry. 82 pp. [CO 5/401, pp 334–419]
285
July 19
Whitehall
Thomas Hill to Francis Fane sending two Acts passed at New York in 1739, viz Act for reviving Act for granting duties for support of government for one year and Act to revive Act to prevent swine from running at large, for opinion in point of law. Entry. 1 p. [CO 5/1126, p 86]
286
July 19
Whitehall
Same to same sending nine Acts passed in New Jersey on 15 March last for opinion in point of law. Titles stated. Entry. 2¼ pp. [CO 5/997, pp 8–10]
287
July 19
Ebenezer
John Martin Bolzius to [?Henry Newman] soliciting help of Trustees for Georgia towards cost of building his house, now completed at an expense of 82l 12s. Gen Oglethorpe was here yesterday and is now gone up to the Indian nations. He has paid 40l to the orphan-house and spent half a day inquiring into the scandalous behaviour of the wife of the schoolmaster Ortman, who himself is a great burden and not at all useful in the school. Gen Oglethorpe ordered that he should not teach English by reason of his wrong pronunciation and mistakes in spelling. Signed. 3 pp. Endorsed, Mr Verelst. [CO 5/640, ff 350–351d]
288
July 20
Antigua
Governor William Mathew to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations sending minutes of Council of Nevis from 12 November 1738 to 12 May 1739, and minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat for quarter ending midsummer last. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd. 27 September, Read 15 October 1739. [CO 152/23, ff 237, 237d, 242, 242d]
289
July 24
Whitehall
Order of Committee of Council for Plantation Affairs referring the enclosed to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations for examination and report. Seal. Signed, J Vernon. 1¼ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 31 July, Read 1 August 1739. Enclosed:
289 i Petition of John and Samuel Mason of New London, in behalf of chief sachem and tribe of Mohegan Indians, to the King complaining of the determination made by the Rhode Island commissioners of review of the dispute between Connecticut and the Mohegans. Copy. 7½ pp.
289 ii Petition of the major part of the Mohegans to the King stating their grievances. Copy. 1½ pp. [CO 5/1269, ff 57–63d]
290
July 25
Lieut-Governor David Dunbar to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. I am confined to the Fleet prison for part of my encumbrances for making the new settlements abroad; and as in a long course of solicitation for relief I find no prospect of any, I have lately petitioned Sir Robert Walpole for leave to dispose of my employments to clear me from the encumbrances which they and my too forward zeal have subjected me unto, and I hope you will not oppose it. Notwithstanding my unhappy situation, though it may seem ridiculous in me, I think it my duty (as I am not yet superseded in my commission as lieut-governor) to acquaint you that the province of New Hampshire is in a very defenceless condition, the fort not in a condition to keep cattle out, and all the gun-carriages quite rotten. In my time I never knew above two barrels of powder in the fort at once and the few smallarms were quite unserviceable. The French and Indians are near the back settlements of that province and I very much fear you will soon have a melancholy account from that country. As I have taken notice in the prints of warlike stores being shipped off to several of the plantations I hope I may be excused putting you in mind of that province. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 26 July 1739. [CO 5/881, ff 91, 91d, 95, 95d]
291
July 25
Palace Court
Minutes of Trustees for Georgia. Read Act for appointing and regulating pilots in Georgia and for laying duties on ships and vessel to be piloted. Ordered that the Act be engrossed and sealed. Entry. 1 p. [CO 5/687, p 130]
292
July 25
Savannah
William Stephens to Trustees for Georgia. Your commands, which I received from Mr Verelst, of 2 April were so expressive and full in many particulars that they demanded my utmost attention in frequent perusal and all possible regard to be shown in observing them. How far it has lain in my power to act conformable to those orders it behoves me now to unfold as far as my knowledge will inform me. I cannot but take notice that the directions at this time received by me appear to be a continuation and (in a great measure) enforcement of those formerly sent to Mr Parker and me relating to the issues of stores with divers enlargements of such rules as we were to act by. I hope on this occasion I may ask leave to refer to my former letters and journals which I wrote in October last, wherein I laid before you the measures which the general saw proper to take in such an exigence, when Mr Jones received from him such rules as I must presume were requisite on that important occasion which I was unacquainted with. Wherefore Mr Parker and I thought it became us not to appear too officious in meddling with what we could not understand and for that reason might probably err from the purposes the general had formed to reduce matters into good order again in time coming. Mr Jones then had full possession of all and thenceforth appeared not to stand in need of any assistance excepting only in cases of some few necessitous craving people whose importuning would sometimes reduce him to advise with us how far their circumstances (which he was stranger to) entitled them to relief. The stores grew scanty apace by reason of so many large demands of divers creditors and in some few months became quite exhausted, from which time we have been put to hard shifts how to feed your own servants who are pretty numerous by killing now and then two or three hens at a time which has been delivered out fresh, and then all such as had any pretence of claim have also been urgent for a little to help them, having no other market to go to and very few any money to buy if there was, which has frequently been attended with such hardships as cannot but be expected. Nevertheless, the people in general, being inured by degrees to bear them, have with patience truly commendable rubbed on in confidence of seeing a better face of affairs hereafter, whilst they of another disposition, always most clamorous though less worth regarding, have sought for better fare in another province where I am mistaken if they find they can support themselves better unless they take more pains to live by their labour than they used here.
From what I have now wrote as well as formerly hinted you will please to observe that very little of what is done at the stores has fallen within my cognizance or Mr Parker's, which I humbly hope will not be imputed to me as a neglect of duty for what is past or a studied endeavour to avoid what you seem to expect from us at present, for (to speak my mind freely) your storekeeper appears so well fortified in his post that I presume he would not readily admit of any diminution of his authority, which nevertheless shall not deter me from putting him in mind of making up his accounts monthly in the manner you direct and in like manner signify your pleasure to the storekeeper at Frederica. In my last of 22 June to Mr Verelst I gave a full narration of what was done in relation to those bills which you were pleased to direct us to take joint charge of upon ourselves and account for what services and to whom they were issued. But as it was thought needless since, I can assure myself no blame will rest upon such as never declined it. I promise myself that due care will be taken in executing the commission given in charge to the persons therein named pursuant to the instructions therewith sent, which could not well be entered upon immediately till the general's leaving us gave a vacancy of more time; but now we shall no longer delay it (as Mr Jones tells me) intending first to begin with the certificates and principally with what relates to Mr Jenys, and our procedures therein you shall from time to time be as fully informed in as I am capable of. I shall make it my care in conjunction with the first and second bailiffs of Savannah to approve a proper overseer of the Trust's servants under such qualifications as directed as soon as we can come at them; but there is no step yet taken by Mr Bradley to deliver up those under his charge nor anything else of the Trust's goods or effects in his hands, notwithstanding his being absolutely discharged from your service as you inform me. It must be acknowledged indeed that he has been lately very likely to die in a dangerous sickness, wherefore we expect on his going abroad again that he will comply in what is required or other measures must undoubtedly be taken. As soon as those servants can possibly be brought under that regulation now designed I shall transmit such a list as you expect of the whole number in such classes as may show what they are employed about together with the times of service to which they are severally and respectively engaged, when I shall likewise endeavour to learn for your information what will be the expense fully to maintain such by the week in victuals and clothes for the purpose thereby intended. What I have wrote I am sensible will appear rather an account of what I have not done, with the reasons why, than what I have which I hope will be the subject of my next, wherefore I must wish that my journal, herewith sent, may supply the room of what I have else to offer. But I must not omit to acknowledge with all due gratitude the bounty you were so good to allot me of 50l to be paid to me in consideration of those misfortunes that had befallen me as specified in Mr Verelst's letter of 2 April and which, by order from the general, Mr Francis Moore paid me soon after the general left us, he staying here yet by the general's appointment to execute such orders as I presume he was charged with; but what they were or how long his abode is to continue with us I know not. Signed. 3 small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 5 October 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 352–353d]
293
July 26
Antigua
Governor William Mathew to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations sending three Acts passed in Antigua, viz for making free two Negro men slaves and rewarding them; for raising a tax for paying public debts; to prevent sailors from deserting and making extravagant demands. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd. 4 October, Read 15 October 1739. [CO 152/23, ff 236, 236d, 243, 243d]
294
July 26
Savannah
William Stephens to Harman Verelst. I had just made an end of my letter to the board yesterday in the evening when by a boat belonging to this place that returned from Charleston I received a packet sent me by the attorney-general which he had on the arrival of the Prince Galley, Capt Bowles, wherein I found letters for the general and many others which I took due care of, delivering such as belonged to his excellency to his secretary, Mr Moore, and those to other people would likewise be given them safely. Among others I can never forget two that you was so kind to write of 27 April and 10 May signifying to me the kind and generous regard the Trustees were so good unanimously to show to me and my future support when it came under their deliberation, which (you will believe) was matter of great comfort to me; and your kind manner of acquainting me with it plainly discovered such a friendly goodwill of the writer that it added very much to the pleasure. I can only desire that they will continue the same kind opinion of me and be persuaded firmly of my utmost endeavours to render my future service as far as possible adequate to their favours. The public have reason sufficient also to be sensible of the benefit intended them by a further addition in the Act now framing of liberty to all such as have no issue living of their own to appoint any other person their successor under those restrictions named, which surely must put an end to all future pretence of uneasiness about their tenure. And as for the Negroes I always thought it an impudent attempt to subvert the original constitution of the colony in all such as nothing less would please; but there are few left now hardy enough to dwell upon that any longer, and I think under those marks of indulgence so evidently shown we shall at last grow wiser and quickly betake ourselves to such industry and labour as most undoubtedly ought to be the view of all such as come to live here.
By the same packet I also received copy of the commission sent in your former together with copy of the instructions sent with it, as also copy of your letter of 2 April whereto you have now added (under date of 27 April) copy of an account betwixt Messrs Montaigut and Causton wherein sundry particulars are referred to which ought to be well examined, and as we are now entering on that work it may be expected due regard will be had to it. From hence I flatter myself a good understanding may be again renewed betwixt Mr Jones and me and that, laying aside all evil surmises, he will no longer estrange himself in the manner he lately did but that this conjunction in matters of such inquiry as is appointed us will produce a coalition in sentiment and an open freedom in conversation which will best lead us into a right discernment of what justice is due to the Trust. For my part I shall make all proper advancements towards it and will not allow myself to think too hardly of him who possibly of late may be better advised; but really (betwixt you and I) he is the roughest blade I ever had to do with in my whole life. I would choose to defer writing anything concerning the 500-acre grant, whether it be of that which Watson had or that other at the mouth of Vernon River, till the general returns with whom I ought to confer, but I am sensible of the kind intention of the Trust therein which I desire thankfully to acknowledge. My son being the bearer of this, I think I may therefore shorten my letter without rambling into affairs not immediately necessary to be spoke to. Whatever you will please to ask him that he is capable of informing you in, I know he will not make better or worse than he thinks, wherein he may possibly be too blunt and unguarded; but it proceeds from an open heart without disguise. I should be sorry to part with him did I not hope a few months will bring us together again and that he will then return easy in his thoughts relating to his future continuance here as well as restored to bodily ease and strength which has been somewhat impaired a while since. It is indeed the season of the year wherein he can best be spared from attending the works of the field, and though it puts me to some inconvenience to want him in another capacity I hope I shall make shift to get that supplied as carefully and warily as possible so that there be no defect in that part of the service. Signed. 1½ pp. Addressed. Endorsed, Recd. 5 October 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 354–355d]
295
July 27
Whitehall
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to Committee of Privy Council reporting on Lord Fairfax's disputed claim to lands in Virginia. Three grants were made by the Crown, in 1 Charles II, in 21 Charles II, and in 4 James II. Dispute between the Crown and Lord Fairfax, who claimed under Lord Culpepper, began in 1705: it was revived in 1733 and an order made by HM in Council for a survey by commissioners to be appointed by the lieut-governor of Virginia and Lord Fairfax. The two parties appointed different sets of commissioners and in different terms. The Crown commissioners reported four distinct constructions of Lord Fairfax's grant, the most ample giving him more than five million acres. Lord Fairfax's commissioners also made a report and we have heard both parties by counsel. Our own observations are: that there was a difference in the two commissions, the governor's seeming to exceed and Lord Fairfax's to fall something short of the words in the Order in Council, though in all probability no decision of this matter in Virginia could have been final till it should have received HM's determination; that notwithstanding this difference both parties proceeded upon their survey and the maps returned by them to this board agree almost in every particular as to the course of the rivers. The first grant of land made by Lord Culpepper was in 1686, the first by the Crown in 1705. The dispute turns chiefly on the construction of the words of the patent on which counsel for each side has made submissions. Whatever boundary HM shall fix we advise that persons already seated in that district by grants from the government of Virginia may not be disturbed or molested. Entry. Signatories, Monson, T Pelham, M Bladen, R Plumer. 21 pp. [CO 5/1366, pp 301–322; draft in CO 5/1335, ff 165–176d]
296
July 31
Whitehall
Order of Committee of Council for Plantation Affairs referring drafts of instructions prepared for James Glen, governor of South Carolina, back to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to reconsider in the light of enclosed material. Seal. Signed, James Vernon. ¾ p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 2 August 1739. Enclosed:
296 i Memorial of Jame Glen to Committee for Plantation Affairs. That it may be of service to have 13th article of instructions further explained, it having raised such disputes between the two Houses that they have twice broken up without passing the tax bill for the current service of the year. That there being no house for the governor, it may be proper to permit him to accept of an allowance as in Barbados, and likewise to recommend to the Assembly that his salary be in proportion to their present flourishing condition. That it be recommended to the governor to take care that the forces under Mr Oglethorpe's command be quartered agreeable to the laws of the province so as to be least burdensome to the people there and in such places as he with the advice of Council shall judge most for the security of the province. That the last clause in the 99th article of the instructions be left out, it not being agreeable to your order nor at all required by the 21st instruction. Copy. ¾ p. Endorsed, as covering letter. [CO 5/367, ff 32–35]
297
July 31
Whitehall
Same referring to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations an Act prepared by the Trustees for Georgia for regulating pilots, laying duty on shipping, and laying another duty on shipping for repair of beacon on Tybee Island, for examination and report. Seal. Signed, James Vernon. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 2 August, Read 3 August 1739. [CO 5/367, ff 41–42d]
298
July 31
Same referring the enclosed to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. Seal. Signed, James Vernon. 1 p. Endorsed, Read 2 August 1739. Enclosed:
298 i Petition of Henry McCulloh, controller of quitrents in North and South Carolina, to the King, praying for instructions to be sent to the governors concerned agreeable to the 16th instruction to petitioner and to aid and protect him in his office, and that he should be made a member extraordinary of the Councils of both provinces. Signed. 1½ pp.
298 ii 15th instruction to the controller: persons petitioning for land to prove their right before Governor and Council. 16th instruction: grants to be made in due form. Copy. 2 pp. [CO 5/367, ff 37–40d]
299
July 31
Whitehall
Same referring the two enclosed petitions to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. Seal. Signed, James Vernon. ¾ p. Endorsed, Recd. 3 August, Read 9 August 1739. Enclosed:
299 i Petition of John North and others, all Protestant subjects, late of Ireland, to the King, complaining of Governor Belcher's conduct in not countenancing settlement on St George's River in New England. Signed, John North and 212 others. 1½ large pp. Endorsed, 18 July 1739, referred to the Committee; 2 August 1739, referred to Board of Trade. Recd. 3 August with Order of Committee of Council.
299 ii Affidavit, sworn at Cork on 26 December 1738, by William Douse of Ireland. He accompanied Mr Waldo to St George's River in 1736. There were then no settlements above the lowest falls. Settlement was confined to the western branch below the falls and to the western side of St George's. There were several upper falls. Signed, W Douse, A Newman, magistrate. 1 p.
299 iii Boston, 18 April 1739. Certificate by Governor Belcher that Josiah Willard is secretary of Massachusetts and Joseph Allen a JP for Essex County. Signed. Countersigned, Simon Frost, deputy secretary. ¾ p.
299 iv Boston, 27 June 1687. Instructions by governor of Massachusetts to Ensign Joshua Pymon, commander at Pemaquid, to visit Penobscot, make friends with Indians there, and appoint a constable. Copy, certified by J Willard. 1½ pp.
299 v Pemaquid, 21 July 1693. Truce between English and Indians. Copy, certified as no 299iv. Signatories, Medocuando and eleven other Indians. 1 p.
299 vi Fort William Henry, Pemaquid, 11 August 1693. Declaration by Governor Sir William Phips that Indians of Penobscot, Kennebec, and other rivers in Massachusetts have voluntarily subjected themselves to Crown of England. Copy, certified as no 299iv. 2½ pp.
299 vii Affidavit, sworn on 14 April 1739, by Andrew Robinson of Cape Ann. He went up St George's River in 1735 as far as the great fall. Settlements of tenants of Samuel Waldo on said river did not extend above lowest fall. Signed, Andrew Robinson, Joseph Allen, JP. ¾ p.
299 viii Affidavit, sworn on 18 December 1738, by John Tufton Mason of Boston. He was at St George's River seven years ago and knows it and branches well. There are several falls above the lower falls, to which Mr Waldo's settlement is confined. Annexed plan is true description. Signed, John Tufton Mason, W Kenaston. 1½ pp.
299 ix Affidavit, sworn on 14 July 1739, by James Woodside the younger, late of Pemaquid. Mr Waldo's tenants were prevented by Indians from settling above lower falls of St George's River in 1736. Governor Belcher refused to countenance settlement which exposed it to Indian insult when it might have been barrier for other eastern settlements. Signed, James Woodside, Francis Eld. 1½ pp.
299 x Affidavit, sworn on 14 July 1739, by Samuel Waldo of Boston. His settlement on St George's River has been frustrated by Governor Belcher and may be broken up in event of French war. Signed, S Waldo, Francis Eld. 1½ pp.
299 xi Petition of James Woodside, clerk, agent for HM's Protestant subjects settled in eastern parts of New England, to Committee of Privy Council praying that complaints against Governor Belcher for withdrawing protection from settlers on St George's River be heard. Signed. Annotated, Recd. 3 August 1739, with Order of Committee of 31 July 1739. 1 p. Endorsed, Map annexed to these papers is pasted in bundle of maps. [CO 5/881, ff 97–112d; nos 299ii-x are not mentioned in covering document and may be filed here for convenience; no 299i is in disrepair]
300
July 31
Whitehall
Same referring the enclosed to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. Seal. Signed, James Vernon. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 3 August, Read 8 August 1739. Enclosed:
300 i 20 June 1739. Memorial of Joseph Gulston, merchant and contractor for supplying masts for the Royal Navy, Benning Wentworth, Richard Chapman and John Thomlinson, merchants, in behalf of themselves and others trading to New Hampshire, to Duke of Newcastle, representing the defenceless state of New Hampshire. Copy. 1 p. [CO 5/881, ff 92–94d]
301
[July]
Undated letter from John Fallowfield to Trustees for Georgia. As a public officer and collector for this port of Savannah I think it a duty to acquaint you of the frequent importation of Spanish sugars and other foreign goods; and as this place is esteemed by most people in America to be free from duty renders HM's revenue to be little worth and consequently occasions large quantities brought in. Not having instructions from you I have taken bond for 8260 wt imported in the sloop Unity, the property of Caleb Davis and Jemitt Cobley. I should therefore beg you would transmit me your orders in this affair that I may for the future know how to govern myself and whether I may with safety put such bonds in execution or no. Signed. ¾ p. Endorsed, Recd. 2 November 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 369–370d]