House of Lords Journal Volume 35
October 1776

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History of Parliament Trust

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1767-1830

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3-11

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 35: October 1776', Journal of the House of Lords volume 35: 1776-1779 (1767-1830), pp. 3-11. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=116581 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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October 1776

JOURNALS of the HOUSE of LORDS.

Anno 17o Georgii Tertii.

DIE Jovis, 13o Octobris, 1776.

DIE Jovis, 13o Octobris, 1776, Annoque Regni Serenissimi Domini Nostri Georgii Tertii, Dei Gratia, Magnæ Britanniæ, Franciæ, & Hib'niæ Regis, Fidei Defensoris, &c. Decimo Septimo; in quem Diem hæc Tertia Sessio Parliamenti, per separalia Adjournamenta & Prorogationes, continuata fuerat, in Superiori Domo Parliamenti Magnæ Britanniæ apud Westmonaster. convenere, Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales, quorum Nomina subscribuntur, & præsentes fuerunt:

REX.

Archiep. Cantuar.
Epus. Londin.
Epus. Duresm.
Epus. Eliens.
Epus. Cicestrien.
Epus. Norvicen.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Asaphen.
Epus. Landaven.
Epus. Petriburg.
Epus. Cestrien.
Epus. Wigorn.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Roffen.
Epus. Litch. & Cov.
Comes Bathurst, Cancellarius.
Comes Gower, Præses.
Comes Dartmouth, C.P.S.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Grafton.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Bolton.
Dux Devonshire.
Dux Gordon.
Dux Ancaster, Magnus Camerarius.
Dux Portland.
Dux Manchester.
Dux Chandos.
Dux Dorset.
Dux Bridgewater.
Dux Northumberland.
Dux Montagu.
March. Rockingham.
Comes Talbot, Senescallus.
Comes Hertford, Camerarius.
Comes Derby.
Comes Huntingdon.
Comes Exeter.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Peterborough.
Comes Sandwich.
Comes Essex.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Doncaster.
Comes Berkeley.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Gainsborough.
Comes Plymouth.
Comes Scarbrough.
Comes Jersey.
Comes Cholmondeley.
Comes Eglintoun.
Comes Galloway.
Comes March.
Comes Marchmont.
Comes Oxford.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Bristol.
Comes Sussex.
Comes Pomfret.
Comes Waldegrave.
Comes Effingham.
Comes Buckinghamshire.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Powis.
Comes Fauconberg.
Comes Northington.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Spencer.
Comes Hillsborough.
Comes Ailesbury.
Comes Clarendon.
Comes Mansfield.
Viscount Montague.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Weymouth.
Viscount Falmouth.
Viscount Torrington.
Viscount Wentworth.
Viscount Dudley & Ward.
Viscount Hampden.
Ds. Le Despencer.
Ds. Clifford.
Ds. Abergavenny.
Ds. Willoughby Br.
Ds. Willoughby Par.
Ds. Craven.
Ds. Osborne.
Ds. Boyle.
Ds. Onslow.
Ds. Cadogan.
Ds. Montfort.
Ds. Edgcumbe.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Ponsonby.
Ds. Lyttelton.
Ds. Wycombe.
Ds. Grosvenor.
Ds. Scarsdale.
Ds. Boston.
Ds. Pelham.
Ds. Camden.
Ds. Hume.
Ds. Cardiff.
Ds. Amherst.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Rivers.
Ds. Harrowby.

The King present.

His Majesty, being seated on the Throne, adorned with His Crown and Regal Ornaments, and attended by His Officers of State (the Lords being in their Robes), commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, to let the Commons know, "It is His Majesty's Pleasure they attend Him immediately in this House."

Who being come, with their Speaker;

His Majesty was pleased to say:

His Majesty's Speech.

My Lords, and Gentlemen,

Nothing could have afforded Me so much Satisfaction, as to have been able to inform you, at the Opening of this Session, that the Troubles which have so long distracted My Colonies in North America were at an End; and that My unhappy People, recovered from their Delusion, had delivered themselves from the Oppression of their Leaders, and returned to their Duty. But so daring and desperate is the Spirit of those Leaders, whose Object has always been Dominion and Power, that they have now openly renounced all Allegiance to the Crown, and all political Connection with this Country: They have rejected, with Circumstances of Indignity and Insult, the Means of Conciliation held out to them under the Authority of Our Commission; and have presumed to set up their rebellious Confederacies for independent States. If their Treason be suffered to take Root, much Mischief must grow from it, to the Safety of My loyal Colonies, to the Commerce of My Kingdoms, and indeed to the present System of all Europe. One great Advantage, however, will be derived from the Object of the Rebels being openly avowed, and clearly understood; We shall have Unanimity at Home, founded in the general Conviction of the Justice and Necessity of Our Measures.

I am happy to inform you, that, by the Blessing of Divine Providence, on the good Conduct and Valour of My Officers and Forces by Sea and Land, and on the Zeal and Bravery of the auxiliary Troops in my Service, Canada is recovered; and although, from unavoidable Delays, the Operations at New York could not begin before the Month of August, the Success in that Province has been so important as to give the strongest Hopes of the most decisive good Consequences: But, notwithstanding this fair Prospect, We must, at all Events, prepare for another Campaign.

I continue to receive Assurances of Amity from the several Courts of Europe; and am using My utmost Endeavours to conciliate unhappy Differences between Two neighbouring Powers; and I still hope, that all Misunderstandings may be removed, and Europe continue to enjoy the inestimable Blessings of Peace: I think nevertheless that, in the present Situation of Affairs, it is expedient that We should be in a respectable State of Defence at Home.

Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

I will order the Estimates for the ensuing Year to be laid before you. It is Matter of real Concern to Me, that the important Considerations which I have stated to you, must necessarily be followed by great Expence: I doubt not, however, but that My faithful Commons will readily and chearfully grant Me such Supplies as the Maintenance of the Honor of My Crown, the Vindication of the just Rights of Parliament, and the Publick Welfare, should be found to require.

My Lords, and Gentlemen,

In this arduous Contest I can have no other Object but to promote the true Interests of all My Subjects. No People ever enjoyed more Happiness, or lived under a milder Government, than those now revolted Provinces: The Improvements in every Art, of which they boast, declare it: Their Numbers, their Wealth, their Strength by Sea and Land, which they think sufficient to enable them to make Head against the whole Power of the Mother Country, are irrefragable Proofs of it. My Desire is to restore to them the Blessings of Law and Liberty, equally enjoyed by every British Subject, which they have fatally and desperately exchanged for all the Calamities of War, and the arbitrary Tyranny of their Chiefs."

Then His Majesty was pleased to retire;

And the Commons withdrew.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure to unrobe.

The House was resumed.

PRAYERS.

E. Eglintoun returned as a Scots Peer.

This Day the Deputy Clerk of the Crown in Chancery delivered in a Certificate of the Name of the Peer of Scotland, who by virtue of His Majesty's Proclamation is chosen to sit and vote in this House in the Room of John Earl of Strathmore deceased.

Which was read by the Clerk, as follows; (videlicet),

May it please your Lordships,

I do hereby certify, That by virtue of His Majesty's Royal Proclamation, dated the First Day of May 1776, a Certificate under the Hands and Seals of Alexander Tait and John Mackenzie Esquires, Two of the Principal Clerks of Session, attending the Election after mentioned in virtue of the Lord Clerk Register's Commission to them granted, hath been delivered into the Crown Office in Chancery, whereby it appears that Archibald Earl of Eglintoun was elected and chosen to sit and vote in the House of Peers in this present Parliament, in the Room of John Earl of Strathmore deceased. Given under my Hand, this Thirty-first Day of October 1776.

"John Yorke, Clerk of the Crown in Chancery."

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes.

E. Powis and L. Cadogan take their Seats:

This Day George Edward Henry Arthur Earl of Powis, sat first in Parliament after the Death of his Father George Edward Henry Arthur Earl of Powis; his Lordship having first at the Table taken the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also taken and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes.

This Day Charles Sloane Lord Cadogan of Oakley sat first in Parliament after the Death of his Father Charles Sloane Lord Cadogan; his Lordship having first at the Table taken the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also taken and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes.

Pedigrees delivered.

Garter King of Arms delivered in, at the Table, the Pedigrees of George Edward Henry Arthur Earl of Powis, and Charles Sloane Lord Cadogan, pursuant to the Standing Order.

E. Ailesbury introduced.

Thomas Bruce Lord Bruce being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the 10th Day of June, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Earl of Ailesbury, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Earl of Dartmouth, Lord Privy Seal, and the Earl of Doncaster (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King of Arms, the Deputy Earl Marshal, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Right Trusty and Right Well-beloved Cousin and Counsellor Thomas Earl of Ailesbury, Greeting. Whereas, by reason of certain arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, We did lately, with the Advice and Consent of Our Council, ordain Our present Parliament to be holden at Our City of Westminster, on the Twenty-ninth Day of November, in the Fifteenth Year of Our Reign; which Parliament hath been from that Time, by several Adjournments and Prorogations, adjourned, prorogued, and continued, to and until the Thirty-first Day of this instant October, at Our City aforesaid, to be then here held; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present, at the said Day and Place with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twenty-ninth Day of October, in the Seventeenth Year of Our Reign.

"Yorke."

Then His Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Earls Bench.

E. Clarendon introduced.

Thomas Lord Hyde being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the Fourteenth Day of June, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Earl of Clarendon, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Earl of Essex and the Earl of Jersey (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King of Arms, the Deputy Earl Marshal, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Right Trusty and Right Well-beloved Cousin and Counsellor Thomas Earl of Clarendon, Greeting. Whereas, by reason of certain arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, We did lately, with the Advice and Consent of Our Council, ordain Our present Parliament to be holden at Our City of Westminster, on the Twenty-ninth Day of November, in the Fifteenth Year of Our Reign, which Parliament hath been from that Time, by several Adjournments and Prorogations, adjourned, prorogued, and continued, to and until the Thirty-first Day of this instant October, at Our City aforesaid, to be then there held; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present, at the said Day and Place, with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twenty-ninth Day of October, in the Seventeenth Year of Our Reign.

"Yorke."

Then His Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Earls Bench.

E. Mansfield introduced.

William Lord Mansfield being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the Thirty-first Day of October, in the Seventeenth Year of His present Majesty, created Earl of Mansfield, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Earl of Hertford, Lord Chamberlain of His Majesty's Household, and the Earl of Oxford (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King of Arms, the Deputy Earl Marshal, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Right Trusty and Right Well-beloved Cousin and Counsellor William Earl of Mansfield, Greeting. Whereas Our Parliament, for arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, is now met at Our City of Westminster; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present at Our aforesaid Parliament with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Thirty-first Day of October, in the Seventeenth Year of Our Reign.

"Yorke."

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Earls Bench.

V. Hampden introduced.

Robert Lord Trevor being, by Letters Patent, bearing Date the Fourteenth Day of June, in the Sixteenth Year of His present Majesty, created Viscount Hampden, of Great and Little Hampden, in the County of Bucks, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Lord Viscount Weymouth and the Lord Viscount Wentworth (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King of Arms, the Deputy Earl Marshal, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; his Lordship, on his Knee, presented his Patent to the Lord Chancellor at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk, and the same was read at the Table; his Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth: To Our Right Trusty and Well-beloved Cousin Robert Viscount Hampden, Greeting. Whereas, by reason of certain arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, We did lately, with the Advice and Consent of Our Council, ordain Our present Parliament to be holden at Our City of Westminster, on the Twenty-ninth Day of November, in the Fifteenth Year of Our Reign, which Parliament hath been from that Time, by several Adjournments and Prorogations, adjourned, prorogued, and continued, to and until the Thirty-first Day of this instant October at Our City aforesaid, to be then here held; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present, at the said Day and Place, with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twenty-ninth Day of October, in the Seventeenth Year of Our Reign.

"Yorke."

Then his Lordship took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed on the lower End of the Viscounts Bench.

L. Onslow introduced.

The House was informed, "That George Lord Onslow was without ready to be introduced; and that the Clerk or Keeper of the Records in the Chapel of the Rolls attended with the Record of the Enrolment of the Patent, granted by King George the First to the late Lord Onslow, dated 19o Junii 1716, 2o Georgii 1mi."

And the present Lord, claiming by virtue of a special Limitation in Remainder in the said Patent, was (in his Robes) introduced between the Lord Osborne and the Lord Pelham (also in their Robes); the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, Garter King of Arms, the Deputy Earl Marshal, and the Lord Great Chamberlain, preceding; the said Lord presented his Writ of Summons to Parliament to the Lord Chancellor, on his Knee, at the Woolsack, who delivered it to the Clerk; and the Record of the Enrolment of the said Patent was read at the Table by the Clerk of the Rolls; and the said Writ of Summons was also read, as follows; (videlicet),

George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; To Our Right Trusty and Wellbeloved Counsellor George Onslow, Chevalier, Greeting. Whereas, by reason of certain arduous and urgent Affairs concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our Kingdom of Great Britain, and the Church, We did lately, with the Advice and Consent of Our Council, ordain Our present Parliament to be holden at Our City of Westminster, on the Twenty-ninth Day of November, in the Fifteenth Year of Our Reign; which Parliament hath been from that Time, by several Adjournments and Prorogations, adjourned, prorogued, and continued, to and until the Thirty-first Day of this instant October at Our City aforesaid, to be then there held; We strictly enjoining, command you, under the Faith and Allegiance by which you are bound to Us, that, considering the Difficulty of the said Affairs and Dangers impending, all Excuses being laid aside, you be personally present, at the said Day and Place, with Us, and with the Prelates, Nobles, and Peers of Our said Kingdom, to treat of the aforesaid Affairs, and to give your Advice: And this you may in nowise omit, as you tender Us and Our Honour, and the Safety and Defence of the said Kingdom and Church, and the Dispatch of the said Affairs. Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Twenty-ninth Day of October, in the Seventeenth Year of Our Reign.

"Yorke."

Then his Lordship, at the Table, took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes; and was afterwards placed in his due Place, between the Lord Middleton and the Lord Romney.

Pedigrees of Peers introduced delivered.

Garter King of Arms delivered in, at the Table, the Pedigrees of Thomas Bruce Earl of Ailcsbury, Thomas Earl of Clarendon, William Earl of Mansfield, Robert Viscount Hampden, and George Lord Onslow, pursuant to the Standing Order.

Bill pro forma read.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for better regulating Select Vestries."

Plate in Scotland, List of Persons suspected not to have made due Entry thereof, &c. delivered.

The House being informed, "That a Person from the Commissioners of Excise in Scotland, attended:"

He was called in, and delivered at the Bar,

North Britain.

"List of the Persons suspected of having Silver Plate above One hundred Ounces, and that have never made Entry thereof, nor paid Duty on the same: As also those who have formerly entered, but have discontinued to pay the Duty, with their Answers to the Circular Letters sent them by the Commissioners of His Majesty's Excise in Scotland, in obedience to an Order of the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, of the 13th of May 1776."

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk:

Ordered, That the said List do lie on the Table.

His Majesty's Speech reported:

The Lord Chancellor reported His Majesty's Speech.

And the same being read by the Clerk:

Motion for Address thereon:

Moved, That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, to return His Majesty our Thanks for His most gracious Speech from the Throne.

To congratulate His Majesty on the Success of His Arms in the Province of New York, the Recovery of Canada, and the fair Prospect of decisive good Consequences, which, under the Blessing of Divine Providence, is now opened by the Firmness of His Majesty's Councils, the Valour and good Conduct of His Majesty's Officers and Forces by Sea and Land, and by the Zeal and Bravery of the Auxiliary Troops in His Majesty's Service.

To assure His Majesty, that nothing would have given us equal Happiness to the having been informed by His Majesty at the Opening of this Session, that the Troubles which have so long distracted North America had been at an End; that His Majesty's unhappy People in those Provinces had recovered from their Delusion, and, awakened by a due Sense of their Misfortunes and Misdoings, had delivered themselves from the Oppression of their Leaders, and were returned to their Duty. And while we lament that His Majesty's humane and merciful Intentions have been frustrated by the Neglect shewn to the Means of Conciliation, notified under the Authority of His Majesty's Royal Commission, to express our Indignation at the insolent Manner in which they were rejected, and in particular our Abhorrence of the desperate Spirit of those overbearing Men, who, with an insatiable Thirst of Power and Dominion which has uniformly actuated all their Proceedings, have now renounced Allegiance to the Crown, and all political Connection with Great Britain; and with an Arrogance equal to the Enormity of the Attempt, left a Doubt of their real Designs should remain on the Breast of any Person whatever, have set up their rebellious Confederacies for independant States. And to assure His Majesty, that we are fully aware of the Mischief which would accrue from the Success of this Treason to His Majesty's loyal Colonies, to the Commerce of this Nation, and, more remotely indeed, but not less certainly, to the System of Europe, and to every State upon the Continent of Europe possessed of distant Colonies.

To express the Satisfaction we feel at the solid Advantage which will be derived from the Object of the Rebels being openly avowed and clearly understood, the Unanimity which will prevail at Home, founded in a Conviction of the Justice and Necessity of His Majesty's Measures: And to assure His Majesty, that, inspired with the same Zeal for the Cause of Our Country, which animates the Kingdom at large, we will steadily support His Majesty in the Vindication of the Honour of His Crown, and the just Rights of Parliament, and will chearfully concur in making the necessary Provisions for those great Purposes.

To express our Satisfaction at the Assurances of Amity which His Majesty continues to receive from the several Courts of Europe; our grateful Sense of the Endeavours which His Majesty is exerting to conciliate unhappy Differences between Two neighbouring Powers; and the Confidence we indulge, that, by His Majesty's auspicious Endeavours, these Misunderstandings will be removed, and Europe continue to enjoy the inestimable Blessings of Peace: And at the same Time to return His Majesty our dutiful Thanks for His provident Attention in guarding against any Events which may arise out of the present Situation of Affairs, by keeping us in a respectable State of Defence at Home.

To acknowledge our Gratitude for the Happiness which, under His Majesty's mild Government, is extended to every Part of the British Empire; of which the late flourishing State of the revolted Provinces, their Numbers, their Wealth, their Strength by Sea and Land, which they think sufficient to enable them to make Head against the whole Power of the Mother Country, shew that they have abundantly participated: And to express our earnest Hopes that His Majesty's paternal Object, of restoring His distracted Colonies to the happy Condition from which, by their own Misconduct, they are wretchedly fallen, will be speedily attained."

An Amendment proposed, and disagreed to.

Then an Amendment was proposed to be made to the said Motion, by leaving out from the Word ["Throne"] in the First Paragraph, to the End of the Motion, and instead thereof inserting the following Words; (videlicet),

To assure His Majesty that, animated with the most earnest and sincere Zeal for His true Interest and the real Glory of His Reign, we behold with inexpressible Concern the Minds of a very large and lately loyal and affectionate Part of His People entirely alienated from His Government. Nor can we conceive that such an Event as the Disaffection and Revolt of a whole People could have taken place without some considerable Error in the Conduct observed towards them.

These erroneous Measures we conceive are to be imputed to a Want of sufficient Information being laid before Parliament, and to too large a Degree of Confidence being reposed in those Ministers, who from their Duty were obliged, and from their Official Situation were best enabled, to know the Temper and Disposition of His Majesty's American Subjects; and were therefore presumed most capable of pointing out such Measures as might produce the most salutary Effect. Hence the Schemes which were formed for the Reduction and Chastisement of a supposed inconsiderable Party of factious Men has driven Thirteen large Provinces to Despair. Every Act which has been proposed as a Means of procuring Peace and Submission, has become a new Cause of War and Revolt; and we now find ourselves almost inextricably involved in a bloody and expensive Civil War, which, besides exhausting at present the Strength of all His Majesty's Dominions, exposing our Allies to the Designs of their and our Enemies, and leaving this Kingdom in a most perilous Situation, threatens in its Issue the most deplorable Calamities to the whole British Race.

We cannot avoid lamenting, that in consequence of the Credit given to the Representations of Ministers, no Hearing has been given to the reiterated Complaints and Petitions of the Colonies, neither has any Ground been laid for removing the original Cause of these unhappy Differences, which took their Rise from Questions relative to Parliamentary Proceeding, and can be settled only by Parliamentary Authority. By this fatal Omission, the Commissioners nominated for the apparent Purpose of making Peace, were furnished with no legal Power, but that of giving or withdrawing Pardons at their Pleasure, and for relaxing the Severities of a single penal Act of Parliament, leaving the whole Foundation of this unhappy Controversy just as it stood at the beginning.

To represent to His Majesty, that, in addition to this Neglect, when in the beginning of the last Session His Majesty in His Gracious Speech to both Houses of Parliament, declared His Resolution of sending out Commissioners for the Purposes therein expressed as speedily as possible, no such Commissioners were sent until near Seven Months afterwards, and until the Nation was alarmed by the Evacuation of the only Town then held for His Majesty in the Thirteen United Colonies. By this Delay Acts of the most critical Nature, the Effect of which must as much depend on the Power of immediately relaxing them on Submission, as in enforcing them upon Disobedience, had only an Operation to enflame and exasperate. But if any Colony, Town, or Place, had been induced to submit by the Operation of the Terrors of these Acts, there were none on the Place, of Power to restore the People so submitting to the common Rights of Subjection. The Inhabitants of the Colonies apprized that they were put out of the Protection of Government, and seeing no Means provided for their entering into it, were furnished with Reasons but too colourable for breaking off their Dependancy on the Crown of this Kingdom.

To assure His Majesty, that removing our Confidence from those who in so many Instances have grossly abused it, we shall endeavour to restore to Parliament the Confidence of all His People.

To this End, it may be adviseable to make a more minute Inquiry into the Grievances of the Colonies, as well as into the Conduct of Ministers with regard to them. We may think it proper particularly to inquire, how it has happened, that the Commerce of this Kingdom has been left exposed to the Reprisals of the Colonies, at the very Time when their Seamen and Fishermen, being indiscriminately prohibited from the peaceable Exercise of their Occupations, and declared open Enemies, must be expected, with a certain Assurance, to betake themselves to plunder, and to wreak their Revenge on the Commerce of Great Britain.

That we understand, that amidst the many Disasters and Disgraces which have attended on His Majesty's Arms in many Parts of America, an Advantage has been gained by His Majesty's British and Foreign mercenary Forces in the Province of New York; that if a wise, moderate, and provident Use be made of this Advantage, it is not improbable that happy Effects may result from that Use. And we assure His Majesty, that nothing shall be wanting on our Part, to enable His Majesty to take full Advantage of any Dispositions to Reconciliation which may be the Consequence of the Miseries of War, by laying down, on our Part, real permanent Grounds of Connection between Great Britain and the Colonies, on Principles of Liberty and Terms of mutual Advantage.

"That whilst we lament this Effusion of English Blood, (which we hope has not been greater or other than Necessity required, and Honour justified), we should most heartily congratulate His Majesty on any Event leading to the great desirable End of settling a Peace, which might promise to last, by the Restoration of the antient Affection which has happily subsisted in former Times between this Kingdom and its Colonies: Any other would necessarily require, even in case of a total Conquest, an Army to maintain, ruinous to the Finances, and incompatible with the Freedom of His Majesty's People. We should look with the utmost Shame and Horror on any Events of what Nature soever, that should tend to break the Spirit of any large Part of the British Nation, to bow them to an abject unconditional Submission to any Power whatsoever, to annihilate their Liberties, and to subdue them to servile Principles and passive Habits by the mere Force of Foreign mercenary Arms; because amidst the Excesses and Abuses which have happened, we must respect the Spirit and Principles operating in these Commotions. Our Wish is to regulate, not to destroy them. For though differing in some Circumstances, those very Principles evidently bear so exact an Analogy with those which support the most valuable Part of our own Constitution, that it is impossible with any Appearance of Justice, to think of wholly extirpating them by the Sword in any Part of His Majesty's Dominions, without admitting Consequences and establishing Precedents the most dangerous to the Liberties of this Kingdom."]

Which being objected to;

After long Debate,

Protest against rejecting the Amendment.

The Question was put, "Whether the Words proposed to be left out shall stand Part of the Motion?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

DISSENTIENT.

Manchester.

King.

Effingham.

Richmond.

Scarbrough.

Abingdon.

De Ferrars.

Portland.

Craven.

Fitzwilliam.

Ponsonby.

Devonshire.

Rockingham.

Abergavenny.

Then it was moved, "To agree to the said Motion for an Address as at first proposed."

Which being objected to;

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Then the Lords following were appointed a Committee to prepare an Address pursuant thereto; (videlicet),

Ld. Privy Seal.
D. Beaufort.
D. Gordon.
D. Ancaster.
D. Chandos.
D. Bridgewater.
Ld. Steward.
Ld. Chamberlain.
E. Derby.
E. Huntingdon.
E. Exeter.
E. Denbigh.
E. Sandwich.
E. Essex.
E. Carlisle.
E. Doncaster.
E. Jersey.
E. Abercorn.
E. March.
E. Marchmont.
E. Bristol.
E. Buckinghamshire.
E. Fauconberg.
E. Ailesbury.
V. Townshend.
V. Weymouth.
V. Wentworth.
V. Hampden.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Bp. London.
L. Bp. Durham.
L. Bp. Chichester.
L. Bp. Worcester.
L. Bp. Rochester.
L. Bp. Litch. & Cov.
L. Le Despencer.
L. Clifford.
L. Osborne.
L. Onslow.
L. Cadogan.
L. Edgcumbe.
L. Sandys.
L. Lyttelton.
L. Scarsdale.
L. Boston.
L. Pelham.
L. Hume.
L. Cardiff.
L. Amherst.
L. Brownlow.
L. Rivers.
L. Harrowby.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet immediately, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and the Committee withdrew to prepare the Address.

After some Time, the House was resumed:

Address reported.

And the Lord Osborne reported from the Committee, An Address drawn by them, as follows; (videlicet),

Most Gracious Sovereign,

We, Your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, beg Leave to return Your Majesty our humble Thanks for Your most Gracious Speech from the Throne.

It is with the truest Satisfaction we congratulate Your Majesty on the Success of Your Arms in the Province of New York, the Recovery of Canada, and the fair Prospect of decisive good Consequences, which, under the Blessing of Divine Providence, is now opened by the Firmness of Your Majesty's Councils, the Valour and good Conduct of Your Majesty's Officers and Forces by Sea and Land, and by the Zeal and Bravery of the Auxiliary Troops in Your Majesty's Service.

We beg Leave to assure Your Majesty, that nothing would have given us equal Happiness to the having been informed by Your Majesty, at the Opening of this Session, that the Troubles, which have so long distracted North America, had been at an End; that Your Majesty's unhappy People in those Provinces had recovered from their Delusion, and, awakened by a due Sense of their Misfortunes and Misdoings, had delivered themselves from the Oppression of their Leaders, and were returned to their Duty. While we lament that Your Majesty's humane and merciful Intentions have been frustrated by the Neglect shewn to the Means of Conciliation, notified under the Authority of Your Majesty's Royal Commission, we feel the strongest Indignation at the insolent Manner in which they were rejected; and we want Words to express our Abhorrence of the desperate Spirit of those overbearing Men, who, with an insatiable Thirst of Power and Dominion, which has uniformly actuated all their Proceedings, have now renounced Allegiance to the Crown, and all political Connection with Great Britain; and, with an Arrogance equal to the Enormity of the Attempt, left a Doubt of their real Designs should remain on the Breast of any Person whatever, have set up their rebellious Confederacies for independent States. We are fully aware of the Mischief which would accrue from the Success of this Treason, to Your Majesty's loyal Colonies, to the Commerce of this Nation, and, more remotely indeed, but not less certainly, to the System of Europe, and to every State upon the Continent of Europe possessed of distant Colonies.

We reflect with Pleasure on the solid Advantage which will be derived from the Object of the Rebels being openly avowed, and clearly understood; the Unanimity which will prevail at Home, founded in a Conviction of the Justice and Necessity of Your Majesty's Measures. Inspired with the same Zeal for the Cause of our Country which animates the Kingdom at large, we will steadily support Your Majesty in the Vindication of the Honour of Your Crown and the just Rights of Parliament; and will chearfully concur in making the necessary Provisions for those great Purposes.

The Assurances of Amity, which Your Majesty continues to receive from the several Courts of Europe, afford us great Satisfaction; we entertain the most grateful Sense of the Endeavours which Your Majesty is exerting to conciliate unhappy Differences between Two neighbouring Powers; and we trust that, by Your Majesty's auspicious Endeavours, these Misunderstandings will be removed, and Europe continue to enjoy the inestimable Blessings of Peace. Permit us, Sir, at the same Time, to return Your Majesty our dutiful Thanks for your provident Attention in guarding against any Events which may arise out of the present Situation of Affairs, by keeping us in a respectable State of Defence at Home.

"With Hearts full of Duty and Gratitude, we acknowledge the Happiness, which, under Your Majesty's mild Government, is extended to every Part of the British Empire; of which the late flourishing State of the revolted Provinces, their Numbers, their Wealth, their Strength by Sea and Land, which they think sufficient to enable them to make Head against the whole Power of the Mother Country, shew that they have abundantly participated: And we earnestly hope, that Your Majesty's paternal Object of restoring Your distracted Colonies to the happy Condition from which, by their own Misconduct, they are wretchedly fallen, will be speedily attained."

Which Address, being read by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Address be presented to His Majesty by the whole House.

Ordered, That the Lords with White Staves do wait on His Majesty, humbly to know what Time His Majesty will please to appoint to be attended therewith.

Queen's Answer to Congratulatory Message on the Birth of a Princess.

The Lord Osborne acquainted the House, "That he and the Lord Viscount Wentworth had (pursuant to the Order of the 17th of May last) carried their Lordships Message of Congratulation to Her Majesty on the Birth of a Princess; and that Her Majesty was pleased to return the following Answer:

My Lords,

"I very sincerely thank the House of Lords for this additional Mark of Duty to the King, and Attention to Me."

Committee of Privileges.

Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Orders and Customs of this House, and Privileges of Parliament, and of the Peers of Great Britain, and Lords of Parliament:

Ld. Chancellor.
Ld. President.
Ld. Privy Seal.
D. Richmond.
D. Grafton.
D. Beaufort.
D. Bolton.
D. Devonshire.
D. Gordon.
D. Ancaster.
D. Portland.
D. Manchester.
D. Chandos.
D. Dorset.
D. Bridgewater.
D. Northumberland.
D. Montagu.
M. Rockingham.
Ld. Steward.
Ld. Chamberlain.
E. Derby.
E. Huntingdon.
E. Exeter.
E. Denbigh.
E. Peterborough.
E. Sandwich.
E. Essex.
E. Carlisle.
E. Doncaster.
E. Abingdon.
E. Gainsborough.
E. Plymouth.
E. Scarbrough.
E. Jersey.
E. Cholmondeley.
E. Eglintoun.
E. Galloway.
E. March.
E. Marchmont.
E. Oxford.
E. Tankerville.
E. Bristol.
E. Sussex.
E. Pomfret.
E. Waldegrave.
E. Effingham.
E. Buckinghamshire.
E. Fitzwilliam.
E. Powis.
E. Fauconberg.
E. Northington.
E. Radnor.
E. Spencer.
E. Hillsborough.
E. Ailesbury.
E. Clarendon.
E. Mansfield.
V. Montague.
V. Townshend.
V. Weymouth.
V. Falmouth.
V. Torrington.
V. Wentworth.
V. Dudley & Ward.
V. Hampden.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Bp. London.
L. Bp. Durham.
L. Bp. Ely.
L. Bp. Chichester.
L. Bp. Norwich.
L. Bp. Lincoln.
L. Bp. St. Asaph.
L. Bp. Landaff.
L. Bp. Peterborough.
L. Bp. Chester.
L. Bp. Worcester.
L. Bp. St. Davids.
L. Bp. Rochester.
L. Bp. Litch. & Cov.
L. Le Despencer.
L. Clifford.
L. Abergavenny.
L. Willoughby Br.
L. Willoughby Par.
L. Craven.
L. Osborne.
L. Boyle.
L. Onslow.
L. Cadogan.
L. Montfort.
L. Edgcumbe.
L. Sandys.
L. Ponsonby.
L. Lyttelton.
L. Wycombe.
L. Grosvenor.
L. Scarsdale.
L. Boston.
L. Pelham.
L. Camden.
L. Hume.
L. Cardiff.
L. Amherst.
L. Brownlow.
L. Rivers.
L. Harrowby.

Their Lordships, or any Seven of them, to meet on Monday next at Ten o'Clock, in the House of Peers, and every Monday after; and to adjourn as they please.

Committee for the Journals.

Lords Sub-Committees appointed to consider of the Orders and Customs of this House, and of the Privileges of the Peers of Great Britain and Lords of Parliament, and to peruse and perfect the Journals of this and former Sessions of Parliament:

Ld. President.
Ld. Privy Seal.
D. Richmond.
D. Grafton.
D. Beaufort.
D. Bolton.
D. Devonshire.
D. Gordon.
D. Ancaster.
D. Portland.
D. Manchester.
D. Chandos.
D. Dorset.
D. Bridgewater.
D. Northumberland.
D. Montagu.
M. Rockingham.
Ld. Steward.
Ld. Chamberlain.
E. Derby.
E. Huntingdon.
E. Exeter.
E. Denbigh.
E. Peterborough.
E. Sandwich.
E. Essex.
E. Carlisle.
E. Doncaster.
E. Berkeley.
E. Abingdon.
E. Gainsborough.
E. Plymouth.
E. Scarbrough.
E. Jersey.
E. Cholmondeley.
E. Eglintoun.
E. Galloway.
E. March.
E. Marchmont.
E. Oxford.
E. Tankerville.
E. Bristol.
E. Sussex.
E. Pomfret.
E. Waldegrave.
E. Effingham.
E. Buckinghamshire.
E. Fitzwilliam.
E. Powis.
E. Fauconberg.
E. Northington.
E. Radnor.
E. Spencer.
E. Hillsborough.
E. Ailesbury.
E. Clarendon.
E. Mansfield.
V. Montague.
V. Townshend.
V. Weymouth.
V. Falmouth.
V. Torrington.
V. Wentworth.
V. Dudley & Ward.
V. Hampden.
Ld. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Bp. London.
L. Bp. Durham.
L. Bp. Ely.
L. Bp. Chichester.
L. Bp. Norwich.
L. Bp. Lincoln.
L. Bp. St. Asaph.
L. Bp. Landaff.
L. Bp. Peterborough.
L. Bp. Chester.
L. Bp. Worcester.
L. Bp. St. Davids.
L. Bp. Rochester.
L. Bp. Litch. & Cov.
L. Le Despencer.
L. Clifford.
L. Abergavenny.
L. Willoughby Br.
L. Willoughby Par.
L. Craven.
L. Osborne.
L. Boyle.
L. Onslow.
L. Cadogan.
L. Montfort.
L. Edgcumbe.
L. Sandys.
L. Ponsonby.
L. Lyttelton.
L. Wycombe.
L. Grosvenor.
L. Scarsdale.
L. Boston.
L. Pelham.
L. Camden.
L. Hume.
L. Cardiff.
L. Amherst.
L. Brownlow.
L. Rivers.
L. Harrowby.

Their Lordships, or any Three of them, to meet when, where, and as often as they please.

Stoppages in the Streets, Order to prevent.

The House taking Notice, "That there is such an Interruption by Hackney Coaches, Carts, and Drays, in the Streets and Passages leading to this House, that the Lords and others are frequently hindered from coming thereto:"

It is thereupon Ordered, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, in Parliament assembled, That the High Steward of the City of Westminster, or his Deputy, together with the Justices of the Peace of the said City, shall, by their strict Care and Directions to the Constables, and other Officers within their Jurisdiction, take special Order, that no empty Hackney Coaches be suffered to make any Stay between Whitehall and the End of Abingdon Street in Westminster, from Twelve of the Clock at Noon, until Five of the Clock in the Afternoon of the same Day, during the Sitting of this Parliament; and that no Carriages, Drays, or Carts, be permitted to stop in the Streets and Passages between the End of Market Lane in Pall Mall, and the End of Abingdon Street, between the Hours aforesaid, or to pass through the Old Palace Yard from One of the Clock in the Afternoon, until One Hour after the Rising of this House, during the Sitting of this Parliament; and that all Carriages, Drays, or Carts, hereby permitted to pass through the said Streets and Passages, be obliged to go one after another, in the Manner following; (that is to say), All Carriages, Drays, or Carts, going towards Westminster, to keep on the Side of the Street or Passage next to Saint James's Park, and all those going the contrary Way, to keep on the other Side of the Street, and upon no Account whatsoever to presume to go Two or more abreast during the Sitting of this Parliament: And herein special Care is to be taken by the said Deputy Steward, Justices of the Peace, Constables, and all other Officers herein concerned, as the contrary will be answered to this House: And it is further Ordered, That the High Bailiff of the City of Westminster, and the Justices of the Peace for the City and Liberty thereof, or some of them residing in Westminster, be served with the Order of this House made this Day, for the Purposes aforesaid.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Veneris, primum diem Novembris, jam prox. sequen. hora undecima Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.