House of Lords Journal Volume 37
July 1785 1-10

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History of Parliament Trust

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1767-1830

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339-350

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 37: July 1785 1-10', Journal of the House of Lords volume 37: 1783-1787 (1767-1830), pp. 339-350. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=116776 Date accessed: 24 November 2014.


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July 1785 1-10

DIE Veneris, 1o Julii 1785.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Bath. & Wells.
Epus. Bangor.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Comes Gower, C. P. S.
Comes Morton.
Comes Eglintoun.
Comes Breadalbane.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Effingham.
Ds. Sydney, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Elphinstone.
Ds. King.
Ds. Chedworth.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Scarsdale.
Ds. Loughborough.
Ds. Rawdon.

PRAYERS.

Atkinson against The King, in Error:

The Order of the Day being read for hearing the Errors argued assigned upon the Writ of Error, wherein Christopher Atkinson Esquire is Plaintiff, and The King is Defendant, brought in order to reverse a Judgement of the Court of King's Bench; and for the Judges to attend:

Counsel were accordingly called in.

And the Counsel on both Sides having been fully heard:

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

Then the Judges present were directed to deliver their Opinions upon the following Questions; (videlicet)

Questions to Judges:

"Whether the Assignments of Error by the Plaintiff are duly and sufficiently made?"

"Whether there be Error in any of the Respects or Instances assigned as Errors by the Plaintiff in Error?"

"Whether there be any Error in the Record of the Judgement?"

Judges' Opinion delivered.

Whereupon, The Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer, having conferred with the rest of the Judges present, delivered their unanimous Opinion upon the Two last Questions in the Negative, which rendered any Opinion upon the first unnecessary.

Whereupon the following Order and Judgement was made:

Judgement affirmed.

After hearing Counsel this Day to argue the Errors assigned upon the Writ of Error brought into this House on the 25th of April 1785, wherein Christopher Atkinson Esquire is Plaintiff, and The King's Majesty is Defendant, in order to reverse a Judgement given in the Court of King's Bench for the said Defendant ; and hearing the unanimous Opinion of the Judges present upon Three Questions of Law to them proposed, and due Consideration had of what was offered on either Side in this Cause:

It is Ordered and Adjudged, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Judgement of the Court of King's Bench be and the same is hereby affirmed; and that the Record be remitted, to the end such Proceeding may be had thereupon as if no such Writ of Error had been brought into this House.

The Tenor of which Judgement to be affixed to the Transcript of the Record is as follows:

"But because the said Court of Parliament now here, will advise themselves of what Judgement to give, of and upon the Premises, a Day is for that Purpose given as well to the said Christopher Atkinson, as to the said Richard Pepper Arden Attorney General of Our said Lord the King who prosecuted, &c. to be before Our said Lord the King and Peers in the said Court of Parliament now here, until Friday the 1st Day of July now next ensuing, at Westminster in the County of Middlesex aforesaid, to hear Judgement of and upon the Premises aforesaid, because the said Court of Parliament now here are not yet advised thereof, &c. On which Day before the said Lord the King, and Peers in the same Court of Parliament now here at Westminster in the said County of Middlesex assembled, comes as well the said Christopher Atkinson, as the said Richard Pepper Arden Attorney General for Our said Lord the King, who prosecutes &c. in their proper Persons: Whereupon all and singular the Premises having been seen, and by the said Court of Parliament now here fully understood, as well the Record and Proceedings aforesaid, and the Judgement thereupon given: as also the said Causes and Matters, by the said Christopher Atkinson above assigned for Error, being diligently examined and inspected, and mature Deliberation being thereupon had ; it appears to the said Court of Parliament now here, that there is no Error either in the Record and Proceedings aforesaid, or in giving the Judgement aforesaid, and that the Record is in nowise vitious or defective: Therefore it is considered by the same Court of Parliament aforesaid, that the Judgement aforesaid, given in the Court of Our said Lord the King before the King Himself, be in all Things affirmed, and in full Force and Effect the said Causes and Matters above assigned for Error by the said Christopher Atkinson in anywise notwithstanding: And thereupon the aforesaid Record, and also the Proceedings aforesaid had in the said Court of Parliament, are here sent back to the Court of Our said Lord the King, before the King Himself wheresoever he shall be in England, to the end that Execution may be done thereupon."

Game Certificates Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for repealing an Act, made in the Twenty-fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Duties on Certificates, issued with respect to the Killing of Game, and for granting other Duties in Lieu thereof."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Eames and Mr. Montagu:

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

Ireland, Petition of Tallow Chandlers against Resolutions respecting, referred to Committee.

Upon reading the Petition of the Tallow Chandlers and Soap Makers in Lancaster, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, "That the Petitioners having duly considered the Propositions for the Establishment of a new System of Commerce between Great Britain and Ireland, are seriously alarmed at their destructive Tendency, so far as they regard that Branch of Trade in which the Petitioners are materially engaged: That great Quantities of Irish Tallow are imported annually into Britain, which pay a Duty in Ireland upon Exportation, and Kelp for the making of Soap is likewise procured from thence, under the Payment of a considerable Importation Duty; these and other Disadvantages under which they labour, (added to a heavy internal Excise immediately to be advanced by the British Manufacturer,) afford such a decided Superiority to their neighbouring Rivals, as may eventually deprive them of any Share in the Exportation of Candles and Soap, and even interfered with the Home Consumption, which would expose great Numbers who depend on those Manufactures to the utmost Inconvenience and Distress;" and therefore praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to grant them such Relief, as the peculiar Hardships and Difficulties with which they are threatened shall appear to require:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

British Assurance Society Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Alderman Hammett and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for incorporating the Members of a Society called the British Assurance Society;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Bank Loan Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Marquis of Graham and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for further postponing the Payment of the Sum of Two Millions, advanced by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, towards the Supply for the Service of the Year One thousand seven Hundred and eighty-five;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Lunæ, quartum diem instantis Julii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Lunæ, 4o Julii 1785.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar.
Epus. Bangor.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Comes Gower, C. P. S.
Comes Morton.
Comes Uxbridge.
Ds. Osborne, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Sydney, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.

PRAYERS.

Bills passed by Commission.

The Lord Chancellor acquainted the House, "That His Majesty had been pleased to issue a Commission to several Lords therein named, for declaring His Royal Assent to several Acts agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament."

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Then Three of the Lords Commissioners, being in their Robes, and seated on a Form placed between the Throne and the Woolsack, the Lord Chancellor in the Middle, with the Lord Archbishop of Canterbury on his Right Hand, and the Lord Osborne on his Left, commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to signify to the Commons, "The Lords Commissioners desire their immediate Attendance in this House, to hear the Commission read."

Who being come, with their Speaker;

The Lord Chancellor said,

My Lords, and Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

"His Majesty, not thinking fit to be personally present here at this Time, has been pleased to cause a Commission to be issued under the Great Seal, and thereby given His Royal Assent to divers Acts, which have been agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament, the Titles whereof are particularly mentioned; and by the said Commission hath commanded Us to declare and notify His Royal Assent to the said several Acts, in the Presence of you the Lords and Commons assembled for that Purpose; which Commission you will now hear read."

Then the said Commission was read by the Clerk, as follows;

GEORGE R.

George the Third by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth: To Our right trusty and right well-beloved the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and to Our trusty and well-beloved the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses, and the Commissioners for Shires and Burghs of the House of Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, Greeting: Whereas We have seen and perfectly understood divers and sundry Acts agreed and accorded on by you Our loving Subjects the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and the Commons, in this Our present Parliament assembled, and endorsed by you, as hath been accustomed, the Titles and Names of which Acts hereafter do particularly ensue; (that is to say) "An Act for settling an Annuity of Nine thousand Pounds on His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester, in Lieu of the like Annuity, payable out of the Duties of Four and one Half per Centum in Barbadoes and the Leeward Islands. "An Act to repeal the Duties on Male Servants, and for granting new Duties on Male and Female Servants." An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Duties on Licences to be taken out by Persons vending Gloves or Mittens, and also certain Duties on Gloves and Mittens sold by Retail. "An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Duties upon Licences to be taken out by Coachmakers, and also certain Duties upon Carriages to be built for Sale. "An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Stamp Duties on Licences, to be taken out by Persons using or exercising the Trade or Business of a Pawnbroker." "An Act for repealing the Duties on Licences taken out by Persons letting Horses for the Purpose of travelling Post, and on Horses let to Hire for travelling Post and by Time, and on Stage Coaches, and for granting other Duties in Lieu thereof, and also additional Duties on Horses let to Hire for travelling Post and by Time. "An Act for transferring the Receipt and Management of certain Duties therein mentioned, from the Commissioners of Excise and the Commissioners of Stamps respectively, to the Commissioners for the Affairs of Taxes, and also for making further Provisions in respect to the said Duties so transferred." "An Act for repealing an Act, made in the Twenty-fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Duties on Certificates issued with respect to the killing of Game," and for granting other Duties in Lieu thereof." "An Act for better securing the Duties on Coals, Culm, and Cinders." "An Act for better examining and auditing the Public Accounts of this Kingdom." "An Act for regulating Insurances on Ships, and on Goods, Merchandizes, or Effects." "An Act for the more effectual Transportation of Felons and other Offenders in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland, and to authorize the Removal of Prisoners in certain Cases." An Act for reducing the Time for the Imprisonment of Debtors committed to Prison upon Prosecutions in Courts of Conscience in London, Middlesex, and the Borough of Southwark, to the same Periods in each Court, and for abolishing Fees paid by those Debtors to Gaolers or others on Account of such Imprisonment." "An Act for more effectually preventing Deceits and Frauds in the Manufacturing of Cordage for Shipping, and to prevent the Illicit Importation of Foreign made Cordage." "An Act to indemnify such Persons as have omitted to qualify themselves for Offices and Employments, and to indemnify Justices of the Peace or others who have omitted to Register or deliver in their Qualifications, within the Time limited by Law, and for giving further Time for those Purposes, and to indemnify Members and Officers in Cities, Corporations, and Borough Towns, whose Admissions have been omitted to be stamped according to Law, or having been stamped, have been lost or mislaid, and for allowing them Time to provide Admissions duly stamped, to give further Time to such Persons as have omitted to make and file Affidavits of the Execution of Indentures of Clerks to Attornies and Solicitors, and for indemnifying Persons who have acted as Trustees of Turnpike Roads in certain Cases, and declaring their Proceedings valid." "An Act to enable His Majesty to grant the Inheritance of certain Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments, situate in or near North Scotland Yard in the County of Middlesex, in Exchange for the Inheritance of certain Buildings or Barracks, and Land adjoining thereto, and also of certain Grounds contiguous to Tinmouth Castle in the County of Northumberland, belonging to the Duke of Northumberland, or for such further or other Compensation as shall be a full Consideration for the same, and also to empower the said Duke to make such Exchange." "An Act for rebuilding the Parish Church of Christ Church, otherwise the Holy Trinity within the City of Bristol, and for widening the Streets adjacent thereto." "An Act for extending the Dudley Canal to the Birmingham Canal, at or near Tipton Green in the County of Stafford." "An Act for the Removal and rebuild ing of the Council Chamber, Guildhall, and Gaol of the City of New Sarum, and for ascertaining the Tolls of the Market, aud regulating the Chairmen within the said City." "An Act for the better paving, cleansing, and lighting, the Streets, Lanes, Ways, and Passages, within the Borough of Arundel, in the County of Sussex, and for removing and preventing Incroachments, Obstructions, and Annoyances therein." "An Act for amending Two Acts of the Eighth and Sixteenth Years of His present Majesty, for opening certain Passages, and for paving the Streets and other Places in the Parish of Saint Leonard, Shoreditch, and such Part of Hog Lane as lies within the Liberty of Norton Falgate, in the County of Middlesex, and for preventing Annoyances therein." "An Act for supplying the Inhabitants of the Parish of Lambeth and Parts adjacent, in the County of Surrey, with Water." An Act for lighting and watching the Village of Clapham, and certain Roads leading thereto, in the County of Surrey." "An Act for amending the Roads from a Place called Piff's Elm in the Tewkesbury Turnpike Road, through Cheltenham, to Elston Church, and from thence to Coomb-end Beeches in the Road from Cirencester to Gloucester, and from the Market House in Cheltenham to the Burford Turnpike Road at a Place called Pewsdon Ash, and from Cheltenham to the Road from Gloucester to London, at or near a House called Kilkenny, and from the Direction Post in Bembridge Field, through Birdlip, to join the Road from Gloucester to Bath at or near Painswick, and at a House called the Harrow, all in the County of Gloucester." "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of an Act, made in the Fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for repairing and widening the Roads from the End of Stanbridge Lane near a Barn in the Parish of Romsey to the Turnpike Road at Middle Wallop, and from the Turnpike Road between Stanbridge Lane aforesaid and Great Bridge to the Turnpike Road at Stockbridge, and from the Garden of Henry Hattat at Awbridge to the Garden Wall of Denys Rolle Esquire, at East Tuderley, and from Lockerley Mill Stream to East Dean Gate, and from the said Garden Wall to the Turnpike Road leading from Stockbridge aforesaid, in the County of Southampton, to Salisbury." "An Act to enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act, passed in the Tenth Year of His present Majesty's Reign, for amending the Road from Aylesbury in the County of Buckingham, through Thame and Little Milton to the Turnpike Road between Bensington and Shillingford, in the County of Oxford, and for amending the Road from the Turnpike Road at Thame to the Oxford Turnpike Road between Postcomb and Tetsworth, in the said County of Oxford." "An Act to enlarge the Term and explain and amend the Powers of an Act passed in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act for repairing and widening the Road from the Turnpike Road in Banbury, in the County of Oxford, through Daventry and Cottesbach, to the South End of Mill Field in the Parish of Lutterworth, in the County of Leicester." "An Act for vesting certain Messuages, Lands, and Hereditaments, in the Parish of Llandegay in the County of Carnarvon, belonging to the Trustees of the Free School of Beaumaris, in the Right Honourable Richard Lord Penrhyn of the Kingdom of Ireland, and his Heirs, upon certain Terms and Conditions therein mentioned." "An Act for vesting a FeeFarm Rent belonging to Thomas Borrett Esquire, and Martha his Wife, in the County of Bedford, comprized in a Settlement made upon their Marriage, in Trustees to be sold, for the Purposes in the Act mentioned, and for vesting other Parts of their settled Estates, situate in the County of Kent, for the separate Use of the said Martha Borrett, and to other Uses, the same as in the former Settlement thereof." An Act to enable Elizabeth Osborne, William Symonds, Thomas Symonds Powell, and John Moore Green, their Heirs and Assigns, to convey certain Lands and Hereditaments in the Parish of Clehonger, in the County of Hereford, and which are now subject to the Trusts of the Will of the late John Smith Esquire, in Exchange for other Lands in the same County of greater Value, to be conveyed to and held by them respectively upon the Trusts of the said Will of the said John Smith." An Act for dividing and allotting the Open and Common Lands and Grounds within the several Parishes of Fosfont, Swallowclist, Ebesborne, Wake, Broadchalk, Bowerchalk, Alvedeston, Bishopston, and Fifield, in the County of Wilts." "An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open Arable Fields, Ings, or Pasture Grounds and Common, within the Township of Kilnwick, in the Parish of Kilnwick, in the East Riding of the County of York." "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of John Inglis Esquire, with Ann Stewart his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again, and for other Purposes therein mentioned." "An Act to enable John Schrieber Esquire, and the Heirs of his Body, to take and use the Surname and Arms of Lateward." "An Act for naturalizing Charles Imhoff." "An Act for naturalizing Hermann Graumann." And albeit the said Acts by you Our said Subjects the Lords and Commons in this Our present Parliament assembled, are fully agreed and consented unto, yet nevertheless the same are not of Force and Effect in the Law without Our Royal Assent given and put to the said Acts; and forasmuch as for divers Causes and Considerations, We cannot conveniently at this Time be present in Our Royal Person, in the Higher House of Our said Parliament, being the Place accustomed to give Our Royal Assent to such Acts as have been agreed upon by you Our said Subjects the Lords and Commons, We have therefore caused these Our Letters Patent to be made, and have signed the same; and by the same do give and put Our Royal Assent to the said Acts, and to all Articles, Clauses, and Provisions therein contained, and have fully agreed and assented to the said Acts; Willing that the said Acts, and every Articles, Clause, Sentence, and Provision therein contained, from henceforth shall be of the same Strength, Force, and Effects, as if We had been personally present in the said Higher House, and had openly and publickly in the Presence of you all assented to the same: And We do by these Presents declare and notify the same Our Royal Assent, as well to you the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons aforesaid, as to all others whom it may concern: Commanding also, by these Presents, Our right trusty and well-beloved Counsellor Edward Lord Thurlow, Our Chancellor of Great Britain, to seal these Our Letters Patent with Our Great Seal of Great Britain; And also, commanding Our most dear Son and Our faithful Counsellor George Prince of Wales; the most Reverend Father in God Our right trusty and well-beloved Counsellor John Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate and Metropolitan of all England; Our said Chancellor of Great Britain; Our right trusty and well-beloved Counsellor Charles Lord Camden, President of Our Council; Our right trusty and right well-beloved Cousin and Counsellor Granville Earl Gower, Keeper of Our Privy Seal; Our right trusty and right entirely beloved Cousins and Counsellors James Duke of Chandos, Steward of Our Household; Charles Duke of Richmond; George Duke of Montagu, Master of Our Horse; Our right trusty and right well-beloved Cousins and Counsellors James Earl of Salisbury, Chamberlain of Our Household; William Earl of Mansfield, Our Chief Justice assigned to hold Pleas before Us; Our right trusty and well-beloved Cousins and Counsellors Thomas Viscount Weymouth, Groom of Our Stole; Richard Viscount Howe, First Commissioner of Our Admiralty; and Our right trusty and well-beloved Counsellors Francis Lord Osborne, One of Our principal Secretaries of State, and Thomas Lord Sydney, One other of Our Principal Secretaries of State, or any Three or more of them, to declare and notify this Our Royal Assent in Our Absence in the said Higher House, in the Presence of you, the said Lords and the Commons of Our Parliament, there to be assembled for that Purpose, and the Clerk of Our Parliaments to endorse the said Acts, with such Terms and Words, in Our Name, as is requisite, and hath been accustomed for the same; and also to enroll these Our Letters Patent, and the said Acts in the Parliament Roll, and these Our Letters Patent shall be to every of them a sufficient Warrant in that Behalf: And finally, We do declare and will, that after this Our Royal Assent given and passed by these Presents, and declared and notified as is aforesaid, then and immediately the said Acts shall be taken, accepted, and admitted good, sufficient, and perfect Acts of Parliament and Laws to all Intents, Constructions, and Purposes, and to be put in due Execution accordingly; the Continuance or Dissolution of this Our Parliament, or any other Use, Custom, Thing, or Things to the contrary thereof notwithstanding: In Witness whereof, We have caused these Our Letters to be made Patent.

Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Fourth Day of July, in the Twenty-fifth Year of Our Reign.

By the King Himself, signed with His own Hand.

"Yorke."

Then the Lord Chancellor said,

In Obedience to His Majesty's Commands, and by Virtue of the Commission which has been now read, We do declare and notify to you, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and Commons, in Parliament assembled, That His Majesty hath given His Royal Assent to the several Acts in the Commission mentioned; and the Clerks are required to pass the same in the usual Form and Words."

Then the Clerk Assistant, having received the Money Bills from the Hands of the Speaker, brought them to the Table, where the Deputy Clerk of the Crown read the Titles of those and the other Bills to be passed, severally, as follow; (videlicet)

1. "An Act for settling an Annuity of Nine Thousand Pounds, on His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester, in Lieu of the like Annuity payable out of the Duties of Four and One Half per Centum, in Barbadoes and the Leeward Islands."

2. "An Act to repeal the Duties on Male Servants, and for granting new Duties on Male and Female Servants."

3. "An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Duties on Licences to be taken out by Persons vending Gloves or Mittens, and also certain Duties on Gloves and Mittens sold by Retail."

4. "An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Duties upon Licences to be taken out by Coachmakers, and also certain Duties upon Carriages to be Built for Sale."

5. "An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Stamp Duties on Licences to be taken out by Persons using or exercising, the Trade or Business of a Pawnbroker."

6. "An Act for repealing the Duties on Licences taken out by Persons letting Horses for the Purpose of travelling Post, and on Horses let to Hire for travelling Post, and by Time, and on Stage Coaches, and for granting other Duties in Lieu thereof, and also additional Duties on Horses let to Hire for travelling Post, and by Time."

7. "An Act for transferring the Receipt and Management of certain Duties therein mentioned, from the Commissioners of Excise, and the Commissioners of Stamps, respectively, to the Commissioners for the Affairs of Taxes, and also for making further Provisions in respect to the said Duties so transferred."

8. "An Act for repealing an Act made in the Twenty-fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Duties on Certificates issued with respect to the Killing of Game," and for granting other Duties in Lieu thereof."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant in these Words; (videlicet)

"Le Roy remercie ses bons Sujets accepte leur Benevolence et ainsi le veult."

9. "An Act for better securing the Duties upon Coals, Culm, and Cinders."

10. "An Act for better examining and auditing the Public Accounts of this Kingdom."

11. "An Act for regulating Insurances on Ships, and on Goods, Merchandizes or Effects."

12. "An Act for the more effectual Transportation of Felons and other Offenders in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland, and to authorize the Removal of Prisoners in certain Cases."

13. "An Act for reducing the Time for the Imprisonment of Debtors committed to Prison upon Prosecutions in Courts of Conscience in London, Middlesex and the Borough of Southwark, to the same Periods, in each Court, and for abolishing Fees paid by those Debtors to Gaolers or others on account of such Imprisonment."

14. "An Act for more effectually preventing Deceits and Frauds in the Manufacturing of Cordage for Shipping, and to prevent the illicit Importation of foreign made Cordage."

15. "An Act to indemnify such Persons as have omitted to qualify themselves for Offices and Employments, and to indemnify Justices of the Peace or others, who have omitted to register or deliver in their Qualifications within the Time limited by Law, and for giving further Time for those Purposes, and to indemnify Members and Officers in Cities, Corporations, and Borough Towns, whose Admissions have been omitted to be stamped according to Law, or having been stamped, have been lost or mislaid; and for allowing them Time to provide Admissions duly stamped, to give further Time to such Persons as have omitted to make and file Affidavits of the Executions of Indentures of Clerks to Attornies and Solicitors, and for indemnifying Persons who have acted as Trustees of Turnpike Roads in certain Cases, and declaring their Proceedings valid."

16. "An Act to enable His Majesty to grant the Inheritance of certain Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments, situate in or near North Scotland Yard, in the County of Middlesex, in Exchange for the Inheritance of certain Buildings or Barracks, and Land adjoining thereto, and also of certain Ground contiguous to Tinmouth Castle, in the County of Northumberland, belonging to the Duke of Northumberland, or for such further or other Compensation as shall be a full Consideration for the same, and also to empower the said Duke to make such Exchange."

17. "An Act for rebuilding the Parish Church of Christ Church, otherwise the Holy Trinity, within the City of Bristol, and for widening the Streets adjacent thereto."

18. "An Act for extending the Dudley Canal to the Birmingham Canal, at or near Tipton Green in the County of Stafford."

19. "An Act for the Removal and rebuilding of the Council Chamber, Guildhall, and Gaol of the City of New Sarum, and for ascertaining the Tolls of the Market, and regulating the Chairmen within the said City."

20. "An Act for the better paving, cleansing, and lighting the Streets, Lanes, Ways, and Passages within the Borough of Arundel in the County of Sussex, and for removing and preventing Incroachments, Obstructions and Annoyances therein."

21. "An Act for amending Two Acts of the Eighth and Sixteenth Years of His Present Majesty for opening certain Passages, and for paving the Streets and other Places in the Parish of Saint Leonard, Shore ditch, and such Part of Hog Lane as lies within the Liberty of Norton Falgate in the County of Middlesex, and for preventing Annoyances therein."

22. "An Act for supplying the Inhabitants of the Parish of Lambeth, and Parts adjacent in the County of Surrey, with Water."

23. "An Act for lighting and watching the Village of Clapham, and certain Roads leading thereto, in the County of Surrey."

24. "An Act for amending the Roads from a Place called Piff's Elm in the Tewkesbury Turnpike Road through Cheltenham to Elston Church, and from thence to Coombend Beeches, in the Road from Cirencester to Gloucester, and from the Market House in Cheltenham to the Burford Turnpike Road at a Place called Pewsdon Ash, and from Cheltenham to the Road from Gloucester to London, at or near a House called Kilkenny, and from the Direction Post in Bembridge Field, through Birdlip, to join the Road from Gloucester to Bath, at or near Painswick, and at a House called the Harrow, all in the County of Gloucester."

25. "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of an Act made in the Fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for repairing and widening the Roads from the End of Stanbridge Lane near a Barn in the Parish of Romsey, to the Turnpike Road at Middle Wallop, and from the Turnpike Road between Stanbridge Lane aforesaid, and Great Bridge, to the Turnpike Road at Stockbridge, and from the Garden of Henry Hattat at Awbridge, to the Garden Wall of Denys Rolle Esquire, at East Tuderley, and from Lockerley Mill Stream at East Dean Gate, and from the said Garden Wall to the Turnpike Road leading from Stockbridge aforesaid, in the County of Southampton to Salisbury."

26. "An Act to enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act passed in the Tenth Year of His present Majesty's Reign, for amending the Road from Aylesbury, in the County of Buckingham, through Thame and Little Milton, to the Turnpike Road between Bensington and Shillingford in the County of Oxford, and for amending the Road from the Turnpike Road at Thame, to the Oxford Turnpike Road between Postcomb and Tetsworth in the said County of Oxford."

27. "An Act to enlarge the Term, and explain and amend the Powers of an Act passed in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act for repairing and widening the Road from the Turnpike Road in Banbury in the County of Oxford, through Daventry and Cottesbach, to the South End of Mill Field in the Parish of Lutterworth in the County of Leicester."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant in these Words; (videlicet)

"Le Roy le veult."

28. "An Act for vesting certain Messuages, Lands, and Hereditaments in the Parish of Llandegay, in the County of Carnarvon, belonging to the Trustees of the Free-School of Beaumaris, in the Right Honourable Richard Lord Penrhyn of the Kingdom of Ireland and his Heirs, upon certain Terms and Conditions therein mentioned."

29. "An Act for vesting a Fee Farm Rent belonging to Thomas Borrett Esquire and Martha his Wife, in the County of Bedford, comprised in a Settlement made upon their Marriage, in Trustees, to be sold, for the Purposes in the Act mentioned, and for vesting other Parts of their settled Estates, situate in the County of Kent, for the separate Use of the said Martha Borrett, and to other Uses the same as in the former Settlements thereof."

30. "An Act to enable Elizabeth Osborne, William Symonds, Thomas Symonds Powell, and John Moore Green, their Heirs or Assigns, to convey certain Lands and Hereditaments in the Parish of Clehonger in the County of Hereford, and which are now subject to the Trusts of the Will of the late John Smith Esquire, in Exchange for other Lands in the same County of greater Value, to be conveyed to and held by them respectively upon the Trusts of the said Will of the said John Smith."

31. "An Act for dividing and allotting the Open and Common Lands and Grounds within the several Parishes of Fosfont, Swallowclift, Ebesborne, Wake, Broadchalk, Bowerchalk, Alvedeston, Bishopston, and Fifield, in the County of Wilts."

32. "An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open Arable Fields, Ings or Pasture Grounds and Common within the Township of Kilnwick in the Parish of Kilnwick, in the East Riding of the County of York."

33. "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of John Inglis Esquire with Ann Stewart his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again, and for other Purposes therein mentioned."

34. "An Act to enable John Schricber Esquire, and the Heirs of his Body, to take and use the Surname and Arms of Lateward."

35. "An Act for naturalizing Charles Imhoff."

36. "An Act for naturalizing Hermann Graumann."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant in these Words; (videlicet)

"Soit fait comme il est desiré."

Then the Commons withdrew.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Bank Loan Bill.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for further postponing the Payment of the Sum of Two Millions advanced by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England towards the Supply for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and eighty-one."

Pilchard Fishery Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir William Lemon and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for the Encouragement of the Pilchard Fishery, by allowing a farther Bounty upon Pilchards taken, cured, and exported;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Morgan against Jones et al:

Upon reading the Petition of William Jones Esquire and others, Respondents in a Cause, to which Charles Morgan Esquire is Appellant, et è contra; setting forth, That on the Thirtieth Day of May last Judgement was given in this Cause by their Lordships, and amongst other Things there is inserted in the said Judgement the following Orders: "And it is further Ordered, and Adjudged, That in consequence thereof, the Decretal Order of the 4th of August 1784, also complained of in the said Cross Appeal, be amended by leaving out after the Words ("Four per Cent. on the Sum of") the Words ("Sixteen thousand eight hundred and twenty-four Pounds eleven Shillings and three-pence halfpenny"), and inserting instead thereof the following Words ("Nineteen thousand six hundred and nine Pounds one Shilling and four-pence"): And it is further Ordered and Adjudged, That the said Decretal Order be further amended, by leaving out after the Words ("in respect of the") the Words ("Sixteen thousand eight hundred and twenty-four Pounds eleven Shillings and three-pence halfpenny") and inserting instead thereof the following Words ("Nineteen thousand six hundred and ninety Pounds one Shilling and four-pence"): And it is further Ordered and Adjudged, That the said Order be further amended by leaving out from the Words ("original Bill") to the Words ("into the Bank"): And it is further Ordered and Adjudged, That with these Amendments the said several Orders complained of in the said Appeals be and the same are hereby affirmed:" That the Petitioners humbly beg Leave to represent that there is a Mistake in the Petitioners' printed Case by misplacing some of the Words in the said Decretal Order of the 4th of August 1784, which, as it is conceived, led their Lordships to word the Judgement in the Manner before mentioned; but that the same, by Reason of the said Words being so misplaced, cannot be carried into Effect: That the Petitioners have carefully compared and examined the said Judgement with the said original Decretal Order of the 4th Day of August 1784, and humbly beg Leave to represent to their Lordships that the said Judgement and the Intention of their Lordships in making the same may be carried into Effect and Execution by striking out such Part of the said Judgement as is above stated, and inserting instead thereof the following Words: "And it is further Ordered and Adjudged, That in consequences thereof the Decretal Order of the 4th of August 1784, also complained of in the said Cross Appeal, be amended by leaving out after the Words ("to compute Interest on the Sum of") the Words ("Sixteen thousand eight hundred and twenty-four Pounds eleven Shillings and three-pence halfpenny") and inserting instead thereof the following Words ("Nineteen thousand six hundred and ninety Pounds one Shilling and fourpence"): And it is further Ordered and Adjudged, That the said Decretal Order be further amended by leaving out from the Words ("in respect of the said") to the Words ("into the Bank"), and inserting instead thereof the following Words ("Nineteen thousand six hundred and ninety Pounds one Shilling and four-pence"): And it is further Ordered and Adjudged, That with these Amendments the said several Orders complained of in the said Appeals be and the same are hereby affirmed;" and therefore praying their Lordships, "That the said Judgement may be altered in the Particulars herein before mentioned, the Agent for the said Appellant having signed the said Petition as consenting thereto:"

Former Judgement amended.

It is Ordered, That upon the Prayer of the Respondents in the Original and Appellants in the Cross Appeal on the one Part, and with the Consent of the Appellants on the other Part, the said Judgement be and the same is hereby altered accordingly.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Mercurii, sextum diem instantis Julii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Mercurii, 6o Julii 1785.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Bristol. Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Comes Gower, C. P. S.
Comes Hopetoun.
Comes Mansfield.
Comes Uxbridge.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Mount Edgcumbe & Valletort.
Ds. Osborne, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Amherst.

PRAYERS.

Lottery Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Gilbert and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty a certain Sum of Money to be raised by a Lottery;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Gilbert and others:

Mail Coaches Exemption from Toll Bill.

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to exempt Carriages carrying the Mail from paying Tolls at any Turnpike Gate in Great Britain;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Sinking Fund Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Gilbert and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty, a certain Sum of Money out of the Sinking Fund, and for applying certain Monies therein mentioned, for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, and for further appropriating the Supplies granted in this Session of Parliament; and for providing a Compensation to the Clerks, in the Offices of the Principal Secretaries of State, for the Advantages such Clerks enjoyed before the Commencement of an Act, made in the Twenty-fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for establishing certain Regulations concerning the Portage, and Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the Post between Great Britain and Ireland;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Three Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Bank Loan Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for further postponing the Payment of the Sum of Two Millions advanced by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, towards the Supply for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and eighty-one."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Friday next.

Pilchard Fishery Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the Encouragement of the Pilchard Fishery, by allowing a farther Bounty upon Pilchards taken, cured, and exported."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Friday next.

Writs of Error delivered:

The Earl of Mansfield Lord Chief Justice of the Court of King's Bench, in the usual Manner delivered in at the Table, two Writs of Error.

Pegge against Doe.

In the first of which,

Peter Pegge is Plaintiff,
and
Timothy Doe is Defendant.

Oxley and Hancock against Learmouth and Lindsay.

And in the last,
John Oxley and Joseph Hancock are Plaintiffs,
and
Alexander Learmouth and James Lindsay are Defendants.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Veneris, octavum diem instantis Julii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Veneris, 8o Julii 1785.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. Bath. & Wells.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Bristol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Ds. Camden, Præses.
Comes Gower, C. P. S.
Dux Chandos, Senescallus.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Devonshire.
Dux Queensberry.
Dux Portland.
Dux Manchester.
Dux Montagu.
March. Lansdown.
Comes Derby.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Peterborough & Monmouth.
Comes Winchelsea & Nottingham.
Comes Sandwich.
Comes Essex.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Doncaster.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Plymouth.
Comes Scarborough.
Comes Coventry.
Comes Poulet.
Comes Cholmondeley.
Comes Morton.
Comes Eglintoun.
Comes Galloway.
Comes Aberdeen.
Comes Hopetoun.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Aylesford.
Comes Waldegrave.
Comes Effingham.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Cornwallis.
Comes De la Warr.
Comes Northington.
Comes Chatham.
Comes Ailesbury.
Comes Clarendon.
Comes Leicester.
Comes Grosvenor.
Comes Beaulieu.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Weymouth.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Wentworth.
Viscount Dudley & Ward.
Viscount Mount Edgcumbe & Valletort.
Viscount Sackville.
Viscount Howe.
Viscount Keppel.
Ds. Osborne, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Sydney, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Percy.
Ds. Howard de Walden.
Ds. Say & Sele.
Ds. Craven.
Ds. Elphinstone.
Ds. Onslow & Cranley.
Ds. King.
Ds. Montfort.
Ds. Chedworth.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Ponsonby.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Stawell.
Ds. Boston.
Ds. Pelham.
Ds. Milton.
Ds. Cardiff.
Ds. Hawke.
Ds. Amherst.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Rivers.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Foley.
Ds. Loughborough.
Ds. Brudenell.
Ds. Walsingham.
Ds. Southampton.
Ds. Grantley.
Ds. Camelford.
Ds. Carteret.

PRAYERS.

Lottery Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty, a certain Sum of Money to be raised by a Lottery."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Monday next.

Mail Coaches Exemption from Toll, Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to exempt Carriages carrying the Mail, from paying Tolls at any Turnpike Gate in Great Britain."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Monday next.

Sinking Fund Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty, a certain Sum of Money out of the Sinking Fund, and for applying certain Monies therein mentioned, for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, and for further appropriating the Supplies granted in this Session of Parliament, and for providing a Compensation to the Clerks of the Offices of the principal Secretaries of State, for the Advantages such Clerks enjoyed, before the Commencement of an Act, made in the Twenty-fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for establishing certain Regulations concerning the Portage and Conveyance of Letters, and Packets by the Post between Great Britain and Ireland."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Monday next.

Ireland, Petition of Bristol Hat Manufacturers against Resolutions respecting, referred to Committee.

Upon reading the Petition of the Manufacturers and Dealers in Hats in the City of Bristol, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, "That the Petitioners are informed certain Propositions are now under the Consideration of this House, purporting to adjust a new Commercial System between this Kingdom and Ireland: That the Petitioners apprehend, if they are passed into a Law or Laws as they now stand, they will be very detrimental to the Interests of the Petitioners;" and therefore praying this House, "That they may be deferred till the Magnitude and Consequences of them are better understood and defined:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House, appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Bank Loan Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for further postponing the Payment of the Sum of Two Millions, advanced by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, towards the Supply for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and eighty-one."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Hawke reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Pilchard Fishery Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the Encouragement of the Pilchard Fishery, by allowing a farther Bounty upon Pilchards taken, cured, and exported."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Hawke reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Ireland, Petition of Manufacturers of Kendal against Resolutions respecting, referred to Committee:

Upon reading the Petition of the Manufacturers, Tradesmen, and Principal Inhabitants of Kendal, in the County of Westmorland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth," That the Petitioners are perfectly sensible of what high Importance it is to the general Interests of the British Empire, that the Intercourse and Commerce between Great Britain and Ire land should be regulated on equitable Principles, for the mutual Benefit of both Countries; but that the Petitioners cannot (as they conceive themselves to be deeply interested therein) refrain from laying before this House their humble Apprehensions, that a Part of the Resolutions now before this House for adjusting that Intercourse, may, if passed into a Law, be attended with the most pernicious Effects to the Trade, Manufactures, and Interests of this Kingdom; and begging Leave to state to this House the Grounds of such their Apprehensions: The Petitioners have no Wish that Ireland should be deprived of a full Participation of Commercial Advantages with this Kingdom; but, burthened as this Kingdom now is with Taxes and Imposts, for the Payment whereof the Petitioners know of no Fund or Resource but in the Trade and Commerce of Great Britain, the Petitioners beg Leave to represent, that granting such Participation of Advantages to Ireland, without her being bound to a Participation of the Burthens and Disadvantages of Great Britain, can only be considered as an unreasonable and lavish Abandonment of the Resources that enable the latter to bear those Burthens in favour of Ireland, which, from that Circumstance and Moment, will be enabled to undersell and draw the Trade from the British Manufacturer: That in such Case the Artists and Workmen must of necessity quit this Kingdom, where they shall no longer be able to find Employment, and emigrate to Ireland, to the utter Ruin and Annihilation of the manufacturing Trade of and the depopulating this Part of the Country, the great Increase of the Public and Parochial Taxes, and consequent Decrease in Value of the Landed and every other Species of Property; and that the Consequences dreaded by the Petitioners will not be consined to them, but must extend to every other Part of Great Britain: That the Petitioners humbly conceive no equitable System of Commercial Intercourse between the Two Kingdoms can be settled which is not founded on the Principles of an equal and fair Participation of all Public Burthens, as well as Advantages: That if the present Resolutions should pass into a Law, the principal if not all the Articles of Woollen Manufacture (which has been immemorially the Staple Manufacture of the Town of Kendal) will remain subject to a Duty of Ten and a Half per Cent. on Importation into Ireland, though their staple Article will be importable from that Kingdom into Great Britain free of Duty; and that though such Articles may not at present be manufactured to any great Extent in Ireland, yet the Petitioners humbly conceive, that when the Legislature of this Kingdom shall have given up the Power of prohibiting or laying any Restraint upon the Exportation of Materials, Tools, Implements, and Machines necessary for carrying on the same, the great Advantage of Duty, of which the Irish Manufacturer will be in Possession, will in a short Time turn the Scales effectually in his Favour, and destroy every Possibility of Competition to the British Manufacturer: That the Petitioners have not yet been able thoroughly to consider all the manifold and mischievous Consequences which must follow the passing of any Law to the Effect of the Fourteenth of those Resolutions; but the Petitioners humbly beg Leave to represent to this House, that the raw Materials of many Manufactures in this Kingdom are supplied Part by Great Britain and Part by Ireland, on the latter of which Export Duties are payable, and on the First none; and that such Manufactures have been gradually, for some Time past, declining in Great Britain, and increasing in Ireland; and the Petitioners humbly conceive that nothing has prevented the same from being altogether engrossed by Ireland, but the Consideration that the Legislature of Great Britain had the Power, whenever it should be thought necessary, of imposing a Check on the Exportation of the raw Materials of its own Produce; and the Petitioners humbly represent that some Provision, that in every such Case such new or additional Duties shall be imposed by either Kingdom on the Exportation of the raw Materials of its own Produce as may countervail the Export Duties on the raw Materials of the other's Produce, and so as that the Manufacturer of each Kingdom may be enabled to procure the raw Materials for his own Manufacture on the same Terms taken altogether, as the Manufacturer of the other, is the least Security which such of the Petitioners and of the Subjects of this Kingdom as are concerned in those Manufactures are in common Justice entitled to hope for; for the Petitioners humbly beg Leave to suggest, that whilst a Manufacture can be carried on in one Kingdom on better Terms than in the other, the First will have an Advantage never to be counterbalanced by any subsequent or Export Duties, which, if imposed high enough to answer that Purpose in Theory, would, the Petitioners humbly conceive, be found, in Fact, to operate as an Inducement to Smuggling, to the Prejudice of the fair Trader in both: That the Petitioners are persuaded that the Existence of many valuable Manufactures depends on the exclusive Use of numerous Materials, the natural Produce of Great Britain, and a great Variety of Tools, Implements, and Machines, invented by the Artists of this Kingdom; that the Exportation thereof to Ireland will be attended with great Loss to the Manufacturing Trade of this Kingdom, not only by enabling the Irish Manufacturer to rival the Manufactures of Great Britain, in the British as well as foreign Markets, but also by the Importation thereof into foreign Countries, through the Medium of Ireland, by which many Thousands of industrious Poor will be deprived of their usual Means of Subsistence; and that such free Exportation to Ireland, or elsewhere, will at once give to the Manufacturers and Inhabitants thereof, without any Consideration whatever, a full Participation of every Advantage, Profit, and Produce of the Ingenuity and Industry of the British Subject; for though the Regulations proposed, in general Terms, to be adopted by the Eighteenth Resolution, with respect to Patents to be hereafter granted, shall secure the Profits of any future Inventions to the Person or Kingdom where or by whom the same shall be discovered; yet all former Inventions already secured by Patent, together with all future Inventions for which no Patents shall be procured, will be left open to Exportation; that the Petitioners humbly beg Leave to represent that the giving up the Power of making future Regulations of the Commerce and Manufactures of this Kingdom, without the Consent or Concurrence of the Parliament of Ireland, would be an Act highly derogatory to the Honour of the British Legislature, and repugnant to their Ideas of a free and independent Government or State: That the Petitioners humbly apprehend, from the vague and undeterminate Language of the Nineteenth Resolution, that no sufficient Time has been allowed or employed to settle and digest a System of such Magnitude and Importance as is involved in the whole of the said Resolutions;" and therefore praying, "That this House will defer adopting the said Resolutions, or coming to any decisive Determination thereon during the present Session of Parliament, or until the Manufacturers, Traders, and other Subjects of this Kingdom shall have had more Time fully to consider the same, and the probable Effects thereof if passed into a Law; and that the Interests of the Petitioners may be protected and guarded by the Wisdom and Justice of this House in the Premises, in such Manner as to this House shall seem consistent with the Principles of Equity and the general Welfare of this Kingdom:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Scotch Admiralty Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Adam Ferguson and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for regulating the Jurisdiction of the Court of Admiralty, which, before the Treaty of Union between the Two Kingdoms, was styled the High Court of Admiralty of Scotland, and for discharging and abolishing the Payment of Fees and Perquisites to the Judge of the said Court, and for granting a Salary to the said Judge in Lieu thereof, and for the Punishment of Persons destroying Ships;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Ireland, Petitions against Resolutions respecting, referred to the Committee.

Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Traders, and other Inhabitants of Liverpool, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, "That the Petitioners have considered the Propositions relative to a Commercial Arrangement between Great Britain and Ireland, and are greatly alarmed by the numerous Mischiefs which may result from this new System if carried into Execution; that amidst the many Concessions already made in Favour of Ireland, we have still retained those inestimable Blessings secured by our Laws of Navigation in rendering Britain the common Mart for colonial and foreign Productions; Benefits for which nothing equivalent has hitherto been offered us, and perhaps nothing equivalent can be given us in Exchange; that the Propositions now held forth do not appear to the Petitioners likely to afford a just Foundation for an equal Arrangement of Commerce mutually beneficial to both Kingdoms; nor do they apprehend that any Statutes, however rigorously enforced by Britain, can prevent the Introduction of foreign Colonial Productions, and foreign European Manufactures into this Kingdom, through the Interference of Ireland, if these Propositions should pass into a Law; that the Admission of such a total Change in our Colonial and Commercial System might, from the many apparent local Advantages, and other inviting Circumstances which Ireland has to offer, prove productive of the Migration of our Men, Manufactures, and Capitals, with so much Knowledge, Industry, and Experience as, in this unequal Competition, would make us poor indeed; that without an Equality in Taxation, an Equality in Privileges appears to the Petitioners unjust and inadmissible; but so far are the present Propositions from affording a Prospect of reciprocal Advantages to both Kingdoms, that though much is demanded from Britain, we have still to learn what solid Advantage she is to receive in Return;" and therefore praying, That in the Wisdom of their Lordships they may find Deliverance from these impending Dangers, and that the said Propositions may not pass into a Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Upon reading the Petition of the Manufacturers of Sail Canvas in the Town of Warrington, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, being Contractors for supplying His Majesty's Navy; setting forth, "That the Petitioners entertain the most alarming Apprehensions, that if the Propositions for regulating the Commercial Intercourse between this Country and Ireland, now under their Lordships' Consideration, receive the Sanction of the British Legislature in their present Form, they will immediately very much injure, and eventually destroy the Sail Canvas Manufacture in Great Britain; that the British Legislature, sensible how much the Strength and Opulence of a Nation depends on its Manufactures, and having experienced the Inconveniencies occasioned by this Country being dependent on other Nations for the Supply of a Naval Store so necessary as that of Sail Canvas, have afforded the greatest Encouragement to the Manufacture of that Article in this Kingdom, by laying heavy Duties on the Importation of foreign, and granting Bounties on the Exportation of British Sail Canvas; that in Consequence of these Encouragements the Manufactures of Sail Canvas in this Island has, till lately, been continually on the Increase, and has hitherto answered every valuable Purpose which the wife Policy of our Ancestors expected from it; that before America became independent the Export to that Country was a principal Support of the Manufacture in Time of Peace; that since that Event the Demand for British Sail Canvas to America has been very inconsiderable, partly in Consequence of the Independence of the United States, and partly owing to an Act which was precipitated through both Houses the latter End of last Session of Parliament, whereby the Duty on Russian Sail Canvas was drawn back on Exportation to the United States and our Colonies in America; that in Consequence of the Discouragements, the Manufacture of Sail Canvas in this Island is now so much reduced that if it suffers any farther Diminution it will be rendered entirely incapable of supplying the Demand for our Navy in Time of War; that owing to the low Price of Provisions and Labour in Ireland, consequent on its Exemption from the heavy Taxes with which they are burthened, the Irish are enabled to supply this Country with very large Quantities of Linen Yarn on considerably lower Terms than it can be made here, though that Article is subject to a Duty of a Halfpenny per Pound on Exportation from Ireland; that the weaving of Sail Canvas is so very easily acquired that not only Linen Weavers, but even Husbandmen will learn it with Facility; that several Sail Canvas Manufactures are already begun in Ireland, and that the Petitioners apprehend the only Reason, why they are not very much extended is, that the Bounty granted by this Country on Sail Canvas exported to Ireland, enables the British Manufacturer to supply the Irish Market, on as low Terms as the Irish Manufacturer: That if this only remaining Security for the Continuance of this Manufacture in Britain is withdrawn, the Manufacture in Ireland being hereby established, the Irish will be enabled to supply not only the British Colonies on lower Terms than the British Manufacturer, but even Great Britain herself, if no Duties are laid to prevent it: That the Consequence must be the immediate Diminution of the Sail Canvas Manufacture in this Country, and in Process of Time its entire Removal to Ireland, and the British Navy as well the British Merchant, must become dependent on that Country for the Supply of so necessary an Article: That this Supply must be very uncertain and precarious in Time of War; the Vessels bringing the Canvas may be detained by contrary Winds, or taken by the Enemy, and the Communication between this Country and Ireland may be entirely cut off by their Enemies having a superior Fleet at Sea: That considering the very great Advantages conferred upon Ireland, the Irish cannot reasonably object to the Continuance in this Island of a Manufacture so necessary to the Naval Power of these Kingdoms, and on which consequently the Security of Ireland, as well as of Britain, the Protection of her Trade as well as of theirs so necessarily depends: That very considerable Quantities of British Sail Canvas are now exported to the East Indies, the whole of which they apprehend will be immediately supplied with Irish Canvas, if that Part of the Ninth Resolution be agreed to which authorizes the East India Company to take in Irish Manufactures at Cork: That the Irish Parliament some Time ago enacted a Law, confining the Bounty granted on Linens and other Articles to such Goods as were shipped in Vessels navigated with Irish Sail Canvas, and that no similar Law exists in this Country to discourage the Use of Irish Canvas in Great Britain: That in order to procure an internal Supply of Sail Canvas, the Commissioners of His Majesty's Navy were required by an Act passed 7th and 8th William III., to give a Preference to English made Sail Cloth, and to give Two Pence per Yard more for it than for foreign Canvas: That the Petitioners are very much alarmed, that, contrary to this good Policy, it has been intimated, in a Speech of His Majesty's Chancellor of the Exchequer in the House of Commons, that the Surplus of the Irish Revenue should be given to this Country in Naval Stores: That these could only be Sail Canvas and Cordage, they being the only Articles of Naval Store which the Irish are capable of supplying: That if the Irish are permitted to supply the British Navy with Sail Canvas, and hereby an external and consequently a precarious supply be preferred to one that is internal and consequently certain, the Public must be materially injured as well as the British Manufacturers, who extended their Works very considerably the last Wars, on a Dependence that they should, as heretofore, supply what was wanted by Government;" and therefore praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased, in adjusting the Commercial Intercourse with Ireland, to continue the Bounty on British Sail Canvas exported to Ireland; not to permit the East India Ships to take in Irish Sail Canvas at Cork; and prevent Irish Sail Canvas being imported into this Country free of Duty; that they will also be pleased not to suffer the Irish to supply the Canvas wanted for the Navy; and that they will be pleased to confine the Bounty granted on Goods exported from Great Britain, to such Vessels whose Sails are made entirely of British Sail Cloth; or that they will be pleased to take such other Measures to prevent the Ruin of the Sail Canvas Manufacture, as to the House may seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Upon reading the Petition of the Manufacturers of wrought Leather, in the City and Environs of London, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, That the Leather Manufacture of Great Britain has always been considered of very great Importance, both on Account of the Revenue it produces to Government, and the Number of Persons to whom it affords Employment; the Petitioners therefore humbly hope they shall not be deemed wanting in Respect, if they solicit, in the most earnest Manner, the Attention of this House, to a Subject of such National Consequence, and which involves also the whole of the individual Interests of the Petitioners: The Petitioners beg Leave to state, that the Advantages which Ireland at present enjoys are so great, that she is enabled to supply every Foreign Market, except that to the East Indies, upon much lower Terms than the British Leather Manufacturer: The Petitioners are firmly persuaded, if the Propositions for a Commercial Treaty with Ireland, now depending before this House, pass into a Law in their present Form, that the Leather Trade of Great Britain will cease to be a considerable Manufacture, and that Ireland will be able not only to take Possession of the British Market but of that to the East Indies, as she has already done to other Foreign Countries: The Petitioners entertain a most grateful Sense of the Goodness of this House, in having admitted the Evidences who have been examined upon Petitions similar to the present, and as the Petitioners conceive, those Evidences have substantiated the Facts which the Petitioners have represented as the Grounds of their Alarm, the Petitioners humbly trust in this House, to avert those Evils which must otherwise end in the Ruin of the Petitioners and their Manufacture, and grant such Relief as in their Lordships' Wisdom shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

Upon reading the Petition of the Tanners and Tawers in the Town of Hamilton, Strathaven, and Killryde, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; setting forth, "That the Petitioners, for a Series of Years, have applied themselves to the laborious Employment and Study of the Business of Tanning and Tawing of Leather in the above Towns of Hamilton, Strathaven, and Killryde, in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland, in the County of Lanark: They have, with the deepest Concern, considered and reflected on the Consequences that must necessarily result from the Propositions now agitated in Parliament, concerning the establishing a System of Commercial Intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland, shall the same be allowed to pass into a Law: And they are fully sensible that, was such to take Place, it would be attended with inevitable Ruin to them, and their Families in particular, as well as that Part of the Nation in general: The Petitioners, justly alarmed with these dreadful, but certain Consequences, are constrained, with the utmost Submission, to lay their Case before this House, as the Protectors and Guardians of the Rights, Liberties and Privileges of the Nation, as they cannot allow themselves longer to remain idle Spectators of these Rights and Privileges being torn from them, and transferred to another Country, without stating to the House these ruinous Effects, which, in their humble Opinion, must be the Result of adopting this proposed Law: The Petitioners have been trained up to the said Businesses, upon the Success of which their Happiness and Support through Life for themselves and Families depend, and as the Business is carried on by a tedious Process, many of them have their whole Fortunes sunk in the Trade, which at the passing of this Law they behoved altogether to quit, and to dispose of their Subject as they best could, and thereby to experience all the Misfortunes and Inconveniences naturally arising from being deprived of their Business and Means of Subsistence: These Apprehensions, so justly grounded on Truth, and attended with such alarming Consequences, oblige the Petitioners, in the most humble Manner, to call up the Attention of their Common Parent (this Honourable House) for Protection in so momentous a Matter: It must be allowed that the Business of Tanners and Tawers in Great Britain, is not only the Support of many Individuals, but the Trades themselves advantageous to Government; they not only pay a Duty of Three Halfpence per Pound, for Tanned Leather, and a Penny Farthing for each Pound Weight of Tawed Leather, and upon Exportation have a Drawback of a Penny per Pound for the Tanned Leather, but they also pay to Government a yearly Sum for a Licence to practise these Trades: The Kingdom of Ireland is allowed to be the principal Mercat, from which Scotland is supplied with Hides and Skins for Tannage, so that the Tanners in Scotland are obliged to apply to the Irish Mercat for the greatest Part of the Hides and Skins manufactured by them; this lays them under the necessary Expence of Commissions for Buying, Curing, Duties, Freight and Carriage, which, at the lowest Estimation, runs between Fifteen and Twenty per Cent.; these are Expences and Burthens on the Trade in Scotland, from which the Irish Tanners are totally exempted: The Tanners in Glasgow, Paisley, Air, Kilmarnock, and all the Towns in the Low Land Counties in Scotland, as well as the Petitioners, are obliged to purchase most of their Barks for Tanning from England, and the West Highlands of Scotland; Ireland has the same Sources of Supply, but owing to their advantageous local Situation, for Carriage by Sea, their Barks are obtained at least from Eight to Ten Shillings Sterling per Ton lower than the Petitioners or these Tanners in the said Towns or Counties; this gives the Irish Tanner an Advantage over the Tanners in Scotland, of about Two and a Half per Cent. on the Value of the Article tanned, add to this the Consideration of the low Wages paid to the Servant in Ireland, and the low Price of Provisions, arising from the Fertility of the Country makes that Advantage still more considerable; the British Tanner again pays the foresaid Duties to Government, the Irish pay none, except perhaps Port Duties, which the British also pay on Exportation; the British Tanners pay also a Licence to Government for Liberty to exercise that Trade, the Irish are free of this Burden; these the Petitioners consider as Burthens on the Trade, equal at least to Four per Cent. on the Value, from which the Irish Tanners are totally exempted: These Facts, which are clear and undeniable, make it evident to a Demonstration that it is in the Power of the Irish Tanner, to exclude the Tanners in Britain from every Foreign Mercat being able to undersell them to the Extent of between Twenty and Thirty per Cent., a Consideration which will enable the Irish even to undersell the British at Home, in their own Mercats: From this State it is easy to see, to what Condition the Petitioners, and the Nation in general must be reduced; they must evidently be not only excluded from every Foreign Mercat, but also invaded at Home in their Trade and Privileges, as Subjects of the Empire: These Propositions under Discussion having an evident Tendency to establish a Preference in that Trade to the Irish to the Total Exclusion of the Subjects of Great Britain from that Business, on which their Subsistence in Life depends, from all which the Petitioners apprehend themselves justly warranted to apply to this House for Protection and Relief;" and therefore praying the House, "To take the Premises under Consideration, and grant such Protection and Relief to the Petitioners as to their Lordships in their Wisdom shall seem proper:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee of the whole House appointed to consider the Irish Commercial Resolutions.

House in Committee on said Resolutions.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to resolve itself again into a Committee upon the Resolutions come to by the Commons relative to an Adjustment of the Commercial Intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland; and for the Lords to be summoned:

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee thereupon.

After some Time, the House was resumed.

Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Irish Commercial Resolutions be adjourned to Monday next, and the Lords summoned.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Lunæ, undecimum diem instantis Julii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.