House of Lords Journal Volume 39
March 1792 21-31

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History of Parliament Trust

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 39: March 1792 21-31', Journal of the House of Lords volume 39: 1790-1793 (1767-1830), pp. 318-342. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=116914 Date accessed: 16 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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March 1792 21-31

DIE Mercurii, 21o Martii 1792.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Asaphen.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Carliol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Dux Leeds.
Comes Lauderdale.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Hardwicke.
Comes Uxbridge.
Ds. Grenville, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Cathcart.
Ds. Onslow & Cranley.
Ds. King.
Ds. Scarsdale.
Ds. Amherst.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Gage.
Ds. Grantley.
Ds. Rawdon.
Ds. Sommers.

PRAYERS.

Scott et al. against Balfour et al.

The Answer of David Hay Balfour, of Leys, Esquire, and his Guardians, to the Cross-Appeal of Henrietta Scott and her Guardians, was this Day brought in.

Sir A. Ramsay and Kinnear against Valentine.

As was also, the Answer of Alexander Valentine late of Wester Pitgarvie, to the Appeal of Sir Alexander Ramsay Irvine, of Balmain, Baronet, and Robert Kinnear Tenant of Easter and Wester Pitgarvie.

Proceedings on East India Judicature Act.

It was moved, "That so much of an Act made in the Twenty-sixth Year of His present Majesty's Reign, for the further Regulation of the Trial of Persons accused of certain Offences committed in the East Indies, and for other Purposes therein mentioned, as relates to the Nomination and Appointment of Members of this House, in order to the constituting in Part a Court of Judicature; be read."

The same was accordingly read by the Clerk.

Ordered, That the Clerk do take the Lists laid upon the Table Yesterday, out of the Covers, and put them together into a Box at the Table.

Which done,

The Lords following were appointed a Committee to examine the said Lists; and to report to the House the Titles of such Lords, as shall appear upon Ten of the said Lists:

D. Leeds.
E. Lauderdale.
E. Stanhope.
E. Hardwicke.
E. Uxbridge.
L. Bp. Bangor.
L. Bp. St. Asaph.
L. Bp. St. David's.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Grenville.
L. Cathcart.
L. Onslow & Cranley.
L. King.
L. Scarsdale.
L. Amherst.
L. Harrowby.
L. Gage.
L. Grantley.
L. Rawdon.
L. Sommers.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Friday next, at Ten o'clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers.

Ordered, That all the Lords who have been, or shall be present this Session, and are not named of the said Committee, be added thereto.

Folkestone Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for repairing and widening the Road leading out of the Turnpike Road from Dover, through Folkestone, to Hythe, at a certain Place called Canterbury Lane, within the Liberty of the Town of Folkestone, to a certain Place in the Parish of Folkestone, called Mudshole; and for making a new Road from thence through a certain Field, called Yaldergates, through Rainden Wood, over Swingfield Minnis, through Denton; and for repairing and widening the Road from thence to the Direction Post on Barham Downs, in the Parish of Barham, at the Four Vents."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative:

Bridgnorth Church Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for taking down the Church, Chancel, and Tower belonging to the Parish of Saint Mary Magdalen, in Bridgnorth, in the County of Salop, and for rebuilding the same; and for enlarging the Burial Ground of the said Parish."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Boroughbridge Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for enlarging and altering the Terms and Powers of two Acts of Parliament made and passed in the Eighteenth and Twenty-second Years of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Second, for repairing the High Road leading from Boroughbridge, in the County of York, through Northallerton, in the same County, to Croft Bridge on the River Tees, and from thence through Darlington, in the County of Durham, to the City of Durham; and for reducing the said Acts into one, and for the more effectually repairing and keeping in Repair the said Road."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to the Three preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Pepys and Mr. Ord:

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Taylor's Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for confirming and carrying into Execution certain Articles of Agreement made and entered into between the Reverend John Taylor, Curate of the Curacy of Clifton, in the Parish of Westbury-upon-Trym, in the County of Gloucester, and Harry Elderton, of the City of Bristol, Gentleman, for granting a building Lease of a certain Piece or Parcel of Ground belonging to the said Curacy."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

D. Leeds.
E. Lauderdale.
E. Stanhope.
E. Hardwicke.
E. Uxbridge.
L. Bp. Bangor.
L. Bp. St. Asaph.
L. Bp. St. David's.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Grenville.
L. Cathcart.
L. Onslow & Cranley.
L. King.
L. Scarsdale.
L. Amherst.
L. Harrowby.
L. Gage.
L. Grantley.
L. Rawdon.
L. Sommers.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Thursday the 5th Day of April next, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Sir J. Sheffield's Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of Sir John Sheffield Baronet, praying Leave to bring in a Bill, for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be and is hereby referred to the Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer and Mr. Baron Hotham, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill; and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon under their Hands; and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

M 'Math against McKellars.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing the Cause wherein Donald McMath is Appellant, and John and Neil McKellars are Respondents:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Cause by Counsel at the Bar, on the First vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed.

Sir A. Irvine and Kinnear against Valentine.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing the Cause wherein Sir Alexander Ramsay Irvine Baronet, and Robert Kinnear are Appellants, and Alexander Valentine is Respondent:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Cause by Counsel at the Bar, on the First vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed.

Scott et al. against Balfour et al.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing the Cross-Appeal wherein Henrietta Scott and her Guardians are Appellants, and David Hay Balfour Esquire, and his Guardians, are Respondents:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Cross-Appeal by Counsel at the Bar, at the same Time with the original Appeal wherein David Hay Balfour Esquire, and his Guardians, are Appellants, and Henrietta Scott and her Guardians are Respondents.

Wilmot's Divorce Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of John Wilmot Esquire, with Fanny Sainthill his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned;" and for hearing Counsel for and against the same; and for the Lords to be summoned.

Counsel were accordingly called in.

And Mr. Mills appearing as Counsel for the Bill, and Mr. Graham as Counsel for Mrs. Wilmot; Mr. Mills was heard to open the Allegations of the Bill.

Then Mr. William Lancaster was called in, and being sworn, produced the original Order of the House of the 6th of this instant March, for the Second Reading thereof, with a Copy of which he acquainted the House, "He had personally served Mrs. Wilmot, and also with a Copy of the Bill."

Being asked, "How he knew that the Person he served with the same was Mrs. Wilmot?" he said, He had seen her Three or Four Times at Mr. Wilmot's House, previous to his serving her with the said Order and Copy of the Bill, upon the Occasion of his attending Mr. Wilmot to attest the Execution of certain Deeds."

The Counsel for Mrs. Wilmot being asked, "If he disputed the above Service being made upon Mrs. Wilmot?" said, "He did not."

The Witness next produced a Copy of an Entry in the Marriage Register of the Parish of St. George, Hanover Square, in the County of Middlesex, which he acquainted the House, "He had examined with the Original, and that the same was a true Copy."

The same was read, and is as follows:

Marriages in April 1776.

138. John Wilmot Esquire, of the Parish of Saint George the Martyr, Bachelor, and Fanny Sainthill, of this Parish, a Minor, were married in this Church by Licence, by and with the Consent of Jemima Sainthill Widow, the natural and lawful Mother of the said Minor, this Twentieth Day of April, in the Year 1776, by me,

W. Nicholl, V. of Brighthelmstone.

This Marriage was solemnized between Us,John Wilmot.
Fanny Sainthill.
"In the Presence ofEardley Wilmot.
Maria Marrow Gidson."

These are to certify that the above written is a true Copy of the above Marriage, as entered in the Register Book of Marriages of the Parish of St. George, Hanover Square, and extracted thence this 21st Day of March, in the Year 1792. In Witness whereof I hereunto set my Hand,

Thomas Ash, Curate."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Mr. Eardley Wilmot was called in, and being sworn, acquainted the House, "That he is Brother of the Petitioner Mr. John Wilmot; and that he was present at the Marriage of his said Brother and Fanny Sainthill at St. George's Church, on the 20th of April 1776."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Mr. Philip Henry Clark was called in, and being sworn, produced the original Record of the Court of King's Bench, of a Judgement given in that Court by Default in Trinity Term, the Thirty-first of His present Majesty, in an Action by John Wilmot against Edward Washborne, for a Trespass, Assault, and Criminal Conversation with Fanny Wilmot, Wife of the said John Wilmot, for £500 Damages, assessed against the said Edward Washborne, upon a Writ of Enquiry, besides Costs of Suit.

The same was read.

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Mr. Henry Stevens was called in, and being sworn, produced the original Definitive Sentence of Divorce of the Arches Court of Canterbury, dated the 15th of February 1792, against Fanny Wilmot, Wife of the said John Wilmot, for Adultery committed by her with Edward Washborne.

The same was read.

Being asked, "If he had not brought the Libel and Pleadings in the said Suit?" he said, "No, only the original definitive Sentence."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then William Garthwaite was called in, and being sworn, was examined as follows:

Q. "When did you go to live with Mr. Wilmot, and in what Capacity?"

A. "I went to live with him in January 1791 as Butler."

Q. "Was Edward Washborne in the Service when you first went there?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "How long after did he continue there?"

A. "About Two Months."

Q. "Do you remember any Thing particular between Edward Washborne and Mrs. Wilmot?"

A. "About Three Weeks after I went to the Service, I observed Edward Washborne go up to Mrs. Wilmot after Breakfast at different Times, and stay there from Half-an-Hour to an Hour."

Q. "Did you observe any Thing particular besides that?"

A. "No."

Q. "Do you remember any Thing before you left the Service that struck you besides that?"

A. "Nothing more than that."

Q. "When did he leave the Service?"

A. "About the Beginning of March."

Q. "After he left the Service, was he frequently at Mr. Wilmot's?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you observe any Thing pass between him and Mrs. Wilmot after he left the Service?"

A. "Nothing further than that he used to go up Stairs, and stay there some time."

Q. "In what Room?"

A. "In the Front and Back Drawing Room."

Q. "Was Mrs. Wilmot at Home when he went up Stairs?"

A. "Always."

Q. "Do you remember any particular Day when you made any particular Observation upon his being up Stairs, and what?"

A. "On the 25th of March, Mrs. Wilmot's Woman going up Stairs, and finding the back Drawing-room Door locked, she came down Stairs, and speaking to me, asked if Mrs. Wilmot was from Home? I told her No.—She said she had been up Stairs, and could not find Mrs. Wilmot, but the back Drawing-room Door was locked."

Q. "About what Time was this?"

A. "About Eight o'Clock in the Evening."

Q. "Was Mr. Wilmot at Home then?"

A. "No; I took no further Notice to her, but went up Stairs into the Dining Room, which was not exactly under the Drawing-room, and waited there a few Minutes. Soon after that Mrs. Wilmot came down Stairs into the Room where I was. Seeing me there, she went and put out her Dog into the Yard, and then went up Stairs into the back Drawing-room. I then went down Stairs into the Kitchen."

Q. "Do you know whether Edward Washborne staid in the House?"

A. "I suspected it. I went into the Kitchen and communicated my Suspicions to Samuel Clough, directing him to go into the Area, and see who came out of the front Door. I then went up the Kitchen Stairs, remained there a few Minutes, and heard Mrs. Wilmot and another Foot come down Stairs: They went along the Passage, and opened the Street Door; after the Door was shut, I perceived Mrs. Wilmot coming from the Door as she was returning; I then went down into the Kitchen, and asked Clough who he had seen come out of the Street Door? he said Washborne."

Q. "Before that, did you know Washborne was in the House that Day?"

A. "No."

Q. "When did you communicate to Mr. Wilmot what you had seen on that Day?"

A. "On the 10th of April 1791, to the best of my Knowledge, Mr. Wilmot asked me, before I communicated any Thing to him, whether I had seen Edward Washborne come there? I told him sometimes. After that I told him what I had seen."

Q. "And what you have now related?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Where was Washborne living at that Time, and from the Time he left Mr. Wilmot's?"

A. "In King Street, No. 12."

Q. "How do you know that?"

A. "He himself told me so. I called upon him once there."

Cross-examined.

Q. "At the Time you were speaking of, when Mrs. Wilmot went down to the Door, do you know there was Nobody in the back Drawing-room above Stairs?"

A. "No."

Q. "Were there not several Children at Home at that Time?"

A. "There were one or two, but they were up Stairs in the Nursery."

Q. "How do you know that?"

A. "By the Time of Night, the Maid used to put them to Bed before that Time."

Q. "You do not know they were not there, of your own Knowledge?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "How?"

A. "From the Time of Night."

Q. "What Time did the Children usually go to the Nursery?"

A. "Seven o'Clock."

Q. "When not in the Nursery, were they usually with Mrs. Wilmot?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "And they usually lived in this very room?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "How old were these Children?"

A. "From Eight to Twelve, the two Youngest."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Samuel Clough was called in, and being sworn, was examined as follows:

Q. "Was you living as Footman to Mr. Wilmot in March 1791?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Do you remember being sent by the last Witness into the Area one Evening in March 1791?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Relate what you saw pass?"

A. "I saw Edward Washborne go out of the Street Door."

Q. "What Time in the Evening?"

A. "Between Seven and Eight o'Clock, I cannot say exactly."

Q. "Had you been in Mr. Wilmot's House that Evening?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you know of Washbourne's being in the House that Evening till you saw him go out?"

A. "No."

Q. "Are you sure the Person who went out was Edward Washborne?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Had you seen him at the House often before that Time?"

A. "Yes, I knew him perfectly."

Q. "After his being discharged?"

A. "Yes, after his Discharge and before the Twentyfifth of March."

Q. "How often?"

A. "Six or Eight Times."

Q. "In what Part of the House?"

A. "In all the Rooms, in the Drawing Room, Dining Parlour, and below Stairs."

Q. "Who let him in?"

A. "Different Servants."

Q. "Did they let him in of course?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "As Visitor to them?"

A. "Yes, sometimes."

Q. "Did they let him in as a Visitor to them?"

A. "Yes, I believe so."

Cross examined.

Q. "When did you go into Mr. Wilmot's Service?"

A. "On the 26th of February 1791."

Q. "Did you speak to the Man the Night he went out?"

A. "No."

Q. "When you say it was between Seven and Eight o'Clock, what have you to guide your Memory by?"

A. "I speak from the Dusk of the Evening."

Q. "Does that enable you to say it was before Eight o'Clock?"

A. "Yes, I think it was before Eight o'Clock."

Q. "How long before Eight o'Clock?"

A. "It was just Dusk; the Lamps were just lighted."

Q. "Was it Moon-light?"

A. "No."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Henry Hudson was called in, and being sworn, was examined as follows:

Q. "Did you live with Mr. Wilmot in the Beginning of the Year 1791?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Do you remember Edward Washborne living there, and his leaving the Family?"

A. "He left the Family about the Beginning of February 1791."

Q. "Do you know where he lodged after he left the Family?"

A. "In King Street, Holborn."

Q. "Did you ever go there?"

A. "Yes, twice with two Letters from Mrs. Wilmot."

Q. "By whom were these two Letters delivered to you?"

A. "By Mrs. Wilmot."

Q. "Were they both delivered at one Time or at different Times?"

A. "At different Times."

Q. "Did you receive them from Mrs. Wilmot's own Hand, or from any body else?"

A. "From Mrs. Wilmot's own Hand."

Q. "Did you carry the Letters as directed?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Where to?"

A. "To King Street, Holborn."

Q. "Did you see him?"

A. "No, I delivered them to the Maid."

Q. "Did you see him either Time?"

A. "One time I saw him at the Top of the Stairs."

Q. "To whom did you deliver the Letter then?"

A. "To the Maid."

Q. "Do you know the Number?"

A. "Number 12."

Cross examined.

Q. "Do you now live with Mr. Wilmot?"

A. "No."

Q. "Did you observe the Address of those Letters, to whom they were directed?"

A. "Yes, to Edward Washborne."

Q. "Can you read?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did Mrs. Wilmot give you any Thing to carry those Letters?"

A. "No."

Q. "Did she enjoin you Secrecy?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "What did she say?"

A. "To take the Letters to him, and not to say any Thing about it."

Q. "To whom?"

A. "To Nobody in the House."

Q. "What were her Words?"

A. "Take care to say nothing about it, in the House."

Q. "When were these Letters carried?"

A. "About the 10th of February."

Q. "How long was that after the Discharge of Washborne?"

A. "About a Week or ten Days, as far as I can recollect."

Q. "How long was it after the first Letter, that you had the second delivered?"

A. "Both within that Time."

Q. "What Time?"

A. "Between the 1st and 10th of February; he was discharged about the 1st of February, as nigh as I can recollect."

Q. "How long was it before you carried the first Letter?"

A. "About a Week."

Q. "How long before the second?"

A. "Three or Four Days afterwards."

Q. "Were these the only Letters you ever carried?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "When did you disclose this to Mr. Wilmot?"

A. "I never did."

Q. "When did you first speak of it?"

A. "At Doctors Commons."

Q. "Did you never speak of it before then?"

A. "No, except to my Fellow-Servants."

Q. "When did you speak of it to them?"

A. "Soon after I carried the Letters."

Q. "How came you to speak of it to them, when you were enjoined Secrecy?"

A. "Because I was intimate with the Coachman."

Q. "How long was it before you told the Coachman of it?"

A. "Directly after."

Q. "Was he the only Person you spoke to of it?"

A. "No, to the Footman Samuel Clough."

Q. "How long was it before you told him?"

A. "About the same Time as I told the Coachman."

Q. "Not to any other Servant?"

A. "No."

Q. "Where did you tell it to the Coachman?"

A. "In the Hall."

Q. "Were they both together?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "How long had you been in the Service when Mrs. Wilmot sent you with these Letters?"

A. "About Fourteen Months."

Q. "Had you ever been employed to carry Letters before?"

A. "No, not before I went to the Lodging."

Q. "How came you to be pitched upon for Secrecy, do you know that?"

A. "No."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Mrs. Mary Page was called in, and being sworn, was examined as follows:

Q. "Did you live in King Street, Holborn, in the beginning of the Year 1791?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did Edward Washborne come to your House?"

A. "In the beginning of February 1791."

Q. "Did he Hire any Lodging of you?"

A. "Yes, a Bed-Chamber."

Q. "Up how many Pair of Stairs?"

A. "A First Floor, a back Room."

Q. "How many Windows in it?"

A. "Three."

Q. "Was either of the Windows overlooked by the opposite Houses?"

A. "Only the further Window from the Door."

Q. "Are there Glass Panes that let the Light into the Room from the Stair-Case?"

A. "There are Two over the Door, and Four on the Side."

Q. "What Fastenings were there to the Door?"

A. "A Lock and an Iron Bar which went across the Door."

Q. "How long did Washborne continue there?"

A. "Eleven Weeks."

Q. "Do you remember any Person in particular visiting him?"

A. "Yes, a Person I thought was his fellow Servant, a Woman."

Q. "Describe the Manner in which she was usually let in?"

A. "By Mr. Washborne."

Q. "Did she Knock at the Door?"

A. "Yes?"

Q. "Any particular Knock?"

A. "Generally a double Knock."

Q. "Who went to her?"

A. "Mr. Washborne."

Q. "How often did you see this Person come?"

A. "She did not come for some Time after he came there."

Q. "Was it three Weeks?"

A. "It might be."

Q. "How often did she come?"

A. "About twice a Week generally."

Q. "Into what Part of the House did she go?"

A. "Into his Bed-Chamber, he had only that one Room."

Q. "Do you recollect the Time she used to stay?"

A. "Only a very little While, I cannot tell exactly."

Q. "Did you take particular Notice of the Time?"

A. "No, she often came when I was out; I hardly knew when she was in and when she was out of the House."

Q. "Did you ever see her come in yourself?"

A. "Very seldom."

Q. "Do you remember any one Time when you saw her come in or go out?"

A. "I never saw her but once when she came into my Dining Room."

Q. "Did you never see her come to the House?"

A. "When she came Washborne let her in and let her out."

Q. "You never saw her come in?"

A. "No."

Q. "Do you remember Mr. Fenton and Mr. Scratcher come to your House?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "How long after did Scratcher take a Lodging?"

A. "A Week before the Time of the Discovery."

Q. "What Room had Scratcher?"

A. "A Dining Room."

Q. "How situated?"

A. "Upon the same Floor with Washborne's BedChamber, across the Passage; he had another Room above Stairs."

Q. "Could any Person upon the Stair-Case, looking through these Lights, see Washborne's BedChamber?"

A. "A Part of it."

Q. "Describe the Part of the Room they could not see?"

A. "About half the Width of the Room."

Q. "Could they see the Bed, and every Thing round the Bed?"

A. "I believe they could, but I never looked to observe."

Q. "The Lady on the 25th of April staid at your House?"

A. "Yes, by Mr. Wilmot's Desire, otherwise she would not."

Cross-examined.

Q. "Where was the Bed?"

A. "At the further End of the Room towards the further Window."

Q. "Was it of the Window Side, or of the other Side of the Room?"

A. "In the Middle of the Room, between the Fire Place and the Window."

Q. "Where was the Fire Place?"

A. "In the other Corner of the Room."

Q. "Did the Bed stand fronting the Window?"

A. "No."

Q. "Were the Bar and the Lock you spoke of there before he took the Lodging?"

A. "Yes."

She was directed to withdraw.

Then Mr. Perrot Fenton was called in, and being sworn, was examined as follows:

Q. "What are you?"

A. "I was Assistant to Mr. Bishop, the Proctor of Mr. Wilmot."

Q. "Was you applied to by Mr. Wilmot?"

A. "Yes, on a Friday in April, about the Middle of the Month."

Q. "Did you take any and what Step in Consequence of his Application?"

A. "About Ten Days before the 25th of April 1791, on a Saturday I went to the House of Mrs. Page, the last Witness, and engaged a Lodging for a Mr. Marshall, at her House Number 12 King Street, Holborn, on Monday I introduced Mr. Scratcher as the Person for whom I had engaged the Lodging; I called on him frequently, and on the Morning of Wednesday the 20th of April he was from Home. I sat down in his Dining Room, and when I had been there a little While I heard a Rap at the Door, and I heard a Man come from the Back Room, who I afterwards found was Washborne. I heard him go down Stairs, the Street Door open, and heard him return, talking to a Person who answered him in a Female Voice. The two Persons went together into the Bed Room, and I heard the Bolt of the Door drop into the Staple. I heard them talking in a low Voice, and upon my going up Stairs, up the second Flight of Stairs, I observed through the Lights that the first and third Window Shutters were closed."

Q. "At what Time of the Day was this?"

A. "Between Ten and Eleven."

Q. "Was the third Floor over the Room where these two Persons were?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Which Windows do you speak of?"

A. "There are three Windows, the Middle was open, the Door was at the lower End of the Room, and upon turning into the Room on the Right was the Fire Place; and the Bed stood between the furthermost Window and the Fire Place."

Q. "Then the End of the Bed fronted the Door?"

A. "Not exactly so, the Door and the Fire Place were on one Side, the Windows on the other Side; and the Head of the Bed stood as the Throne does (pointing to the Throne of the House) the Door was opposite the first Window."

Q. "Looking through the Lights was the whole of the Room visible?"

A. "Upon looking through the Lights Part of the Room (over the Windows) could not be discovered, because they were six or seven Feet high. But there were Looking Glasses in the Room, and by Reflection the whole of the Room could be seen, excepting a Nook by the Fire Place, which was not commanded by the Glass opposite."

Q. "Was that Nook large enough to admit two Persons without your seeing them at all?"

A. "The Stair Case having been taken out of the lower Part of the Room, the Part by the Fire was wider, and that Place could not be seen."

Question repeated.

A. "It was large enough to contain six People without being seen."

Q. "Was it near the Bed?"

A. "It was between the Fire Place and the Bed, and about the Length of the Bed."

Q. "Could any Person have been upon the Bed without being visible from the Stair Case?"

A. "I observed by the Glass that the Curtain next the Fire Place was drawn; and I concluded, from my Observation, that the Lady and the Man were in that Corner, as I could see every other Part of the Room. When they had been together about Forty Minutes Scatchard came Home, and I took my leave; and as I opened the Door of the Dining Room the Lady was coming out of the Door, and Washborne. I followed them down Stairs and out of the House. Washborne let the Lady out, shut the Door, and returned."

Q. "You met Washborne coming back?"

A. "I did not know him before."

Q. "Do you know the Lady?"

A. "The Lady I afterwards found was Mrs. Wilmot."

Q. "Did you follow her?"

A. "I lost Sight of her immediately. I believe she went into some House directly."

Q. "The Lights you speak of were partly by the Side of the Door and over the Top?"

A. "They are three small Windows. I think there are three Panes over the Door, and two other small Windows in the Pannels of the Partitions, each composed of two Square of Glass."

Q. "They were within your Reach as you stood upon the Landing Place?"

A. "No, passing up Stairs and leaning on one Side, I could see through them."

Q. "Do you remember the 23d of April?"

A. "On the 23d of April, on a Saturday, I called in King Street."

He was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Bill, and the Second Reading be put off till Tomorrow: and that the Counsel be called in at one o'Clock.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Jovis, vicesimum secundum diem instantis Martii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Jovis, 22o Martii 1792.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Landaven.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Carliol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Dux Norfolk, Marescallus.
Comes Lauderdale.
Comes Stanhope.
Ds. Cathcart.
Ds. King.
Ds. Scarsdale.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Gage.
Ds. Sommers.
Ds. Fife.

PRAYERS.

Bowater's Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of John Bowater Esquire, praying Leave to bring in a Bill for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be, and is hereby referred to Mr. Justice Gould and Mr. Baron Hotham, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill, and after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon, under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the same; and also that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Balliol College Bill.

The Lord Bishop of Bangor reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for carrying into Execution an Agreement between the Master and Scholars of Balliol College, in the University of Oxford, and the Mayor and Commonalty and Citizens of the City of London, for vesting in the said Mayor and Commonalty and Citizens, and their Successors, certain Ground and Buildings in the Parish of Saint Lawrence Jewry, London; and for securing to the said Master and Scholars and their Successors, certain Yearly Rents in Lieu thereof," was committed: That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true, that the Parties concerned had given their Consents, to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Ordered, That the said Bill be engrossed.

Schroder's Naturalization Bill.

The Lord Bishop of Bangor also reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for naturalizing Herman Schroder," was committed: "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Black and Grant against Auchindachy, et al.

Upon reading the Petition and Appeal of William Black of Netherdon, and Isaac Grant, Writer to the Signet; complaining of Four Interlocutors of the Lords of Session in Scotland, of the 7th of July 1791, and 31st of January, 17th of February, and 6th of March 1792, and praying; "That the same may be reversed, varied, or amended, or that the Appellants may have such other Relief in the Premises, as to this House in Their Lordships' great Wisdom shall seem meet; and that Alexander Auchindachy of Kincraigie, and his Creditors, and the substitute Heirs of Entail in the Lands and Estate of Kincraigie, and others, may be required to answer the said Appeal:"

It is Ordered, That the said Alexander Auchindachy and his Creditors, and others, may have a Copy of the said Appeal, and do put in their Answer or respective Answers thereunto in Writing, on or before Thursday the 19th Day of April next; and Service of this Order upon the said Respondents, or upon any of their known Counsel or Agents in the Court of Session in Scotland, shall be deemed good Service.

Spottiswoode to enter into Recognizance on said Appeal.

The House being moved, "That John Spottiswoode, of Sackville Street, Gentlemen, may be permitted to enter into a Recognizance for William Black and Isaac Grant, on account of their Appeal depending in this House, they residing in Scotland:"

It is Ordered, That the said John Spottiswoode may enter into a Recognizance for the said Appellants, as desired.

Wilmot's Divorce Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the further Consideration of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to Dissolve the Marriage of John Wilmot Esquire with Fanny Sainthill his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned;" and for hearing Counsel for and against the same.

Counsel were accordingly called in.

Then Mr. Mark Holman was called in, and being sworn, produced the original Libel and Pleadings in the Consistory Court of London, in the Suit of John Wilmot against Fanny Wilmot his Wife; the same was read.

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Mr. Henry Stevens was again called in, and produced the original Pleadings in the Arches Court of Canterbury in the same suit; the same were read.

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Mr. Perrot Fenton was again called in, and informed the House, "He had made a Plan of Edward Washborne's Apartment:" the same was delivered in.

Then the Witness was examined as follows:

Q. "According to the Plan upon looking through the Lights, the Eye commands the whole of the Bed?"

A. "The whole of the upper Part of the Bed; the Tester, but not the lower Part of the Bed."

Q. "How low?"

A. "The further Part of the Bed may be seen, I could see Part of the Bed Cloaths."

Q. "You could see pretty near down to the Bottom of the Bed?"

A. "That Part near the Windows."

Q. "The Fire Place you could not see?"

A. "No."

Q. "How many Feet of the Room could you not see?"

A. "I suppose there are six or eight Feet in the Nook in Length that could not be seen either by the Eye or by Reflection. The Lights being high you could not see the Objects near the Wainscot."

Q. "You have been in the Room since?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "What is the Depth of the Break?"

A. "Twelve Feet in Length."

Q. "How deep is it from the Fire-place to that Break?"

A. "I suppose the Fire-place fills up half the Nook."

Q. "How far towards the Head of the Bed could you see through the Lights?"

A. The Tester, the Head Cloth, the End of the Bed; about half the Bed was obscured."

Q. "You saw the whole Length of the Bed towards the Window?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "How much towards the fire Place?"

A. "Not any."

Q. "Did you see across the Bed when you made your Observation?"

A. "Yes, the further Side of the Bed."

Q. "So the Curtains were open?"

A. "Yes, the Curtain next to the Fire-place was partly drawn."

Q. "But not so drawn but what you could see across the Bed?"

A. "No."

Q. "Through the Glasses you could see more of the Room?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did the looking Glass upon the South reflect any Part of the Bed?"

A. "Clearly not."

Q. "Did the other?"

A. "No."

Q. "Upon the Occasion you have been speaking of, you did not get a View of the Persons in the Room?"

A. "No, not on the 20th."

Q. "Was you there on the 23d of April?"

A. "On Saturday the 23d of April I called again, found Scatcherd there. He informed me the Lady was with Washborne; this was between Ten and Eleven o'Clock. I left Scatcherd to make his Observations, and was absent Ten Minutes or a Quarter of an Hour, and returned again. On my return I found Scatcherd standing on the Stairs and looking through the Lights. I took his Place, and I saw that the Glass between the second and third Windows reflected the Heads of the Lady and the Man as they were standing, as they appeared to me to be on the Side of the Bed, with their Faces towards the Fire place, and consequently with their Backs to the Glass. They were standing Side by Side, then their Faces were turned to each other and they repeatedly kissed. I could only see their Heads and a small Part of their Necks. I could not see their Bodies, they were not within the Reflection of the Glass."

Q. "How long was it before you saw them change that Situation?"

A. "About Ten Minutes. I then observed the Man turn towards the Lady, to rise up a little, and it appeared to me that he then knelt down before the Lady, at least he sunk beyond the View. I observed the Lady's Head in Motion, and I observed the Tester and Curtain shake, and I supposed at the Time that they were in the Act of Adultery, but it was impossible for me to see more than the Lady's Head after he sunk or knelt down."

Q. "Did you see any Thing more?"

A. "Mr. Scatcherd looked as well as myself, we repeatedly changed Places. Some Time after he went out of the House to watch the Lady home, to identify her."

Q. "Was that the whole you saw?"

A. "No, afterwards I saw them standing together in the Middle of the Room, they had come out of the Nook; they stood near the Foot of the Bed; their Hands were joined; they seemed in earnest Conversation; they frequently joined Hands and looked towards Heaven; they appeared to be making Promises to each other; and were very much agitated. When I heard them coming towards the Door, I went into the Chamber on the Second Floor. I heard the Door open, the Lady said something in a low Voice, and he came partly up Stairs, as it appeared to me she had suggested that Somebody was watching them. He said No, there is not."

Q. "It was on the first landing Place that you heard the Conversation?"

A. "Yes, during all the Time they were together in the Room the Shutters of the first and third Windows were shut in the same Way they were before."

Q. "The first Window was commanded by the Houses?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Was that to the North commanded?"

A. "There were two Houses that had an oblique View of both, but the middle Front Window looked over some small Houses."

Q. "The middle Window was not commanded?"

A. "No."

Q. "You have examined it very particularly?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "It seems strange that the Houses that could command the one Window should not command the other?"

A. "The Houses were one on the Right, and the other a Range of Houses on the Left, none immediately opposite."

Q. "Which Window did you command from the Northward?"

A. "There were Houses on the North Side, they seemed to me to be the Houses in Orange Street."

Q. "Have you been in those Houses to see how they commanded these Windows?"

A. "No."

Q. "Was it possible in the Middle of the Room to see the Houses on the one Side or on the other?"

A. "If I was close to the middle Window, I could see very obliquely. I saw them go down Stairs, the Lady first, and the Man following her. He let her out, I heard the Street Door open and shut, saw the Man return, go into the Room, and as I came down Stairs, he was opening the Shutters."

Q. "You then knew his Person?"

A. "Yes, I had frequently seen him."

Q. "You knew her Person?"

A. "I know it was the same Lady I conversed with afterwards."

Q. "How long did you understand she had been there before you began to watch at the Window?"

A. "I think about Twenty Minutes or Half an Hour, she staid near an Hour, or Hour and an Half."

Q. "What you have been describing consisted about Ten Minutes Time?"

A. "They continued in that State. I left the Situation in which I was placed and did not see them rise."

Q. "How long did they continue in the Posture you represented, namely, that you had seen them standing together frequently kissing, and at length you saw him turn, and in turning drop, so as to lose Sight of him?"

A. "I continued to look at the Lady after he had sunk Five or Six Minutes; then I left the Window and gave up the Place to Mr. Scatcherd."

Q. "How long was it between that and your seeing them with their Hands joined?"

A. "Near an Hour might have elapsed."

Q. "Relate what passed on the Twenty-fifth?"

A. "Upon the Twenty-fifth, which was of a Monday, she visited him again. I saw them in the Room. I breakfasted with Mr. Scatchard."

Q. "What Time of Day?"

A. "About Ten or Eleven o'Clock, the Man let her in, and they went together into the Room, and the Door was barred as usual."

Q. "Did you see them?"

A. "I heard a particular Rap at the Street-Door, the Man ran down and let her in, and I heard the two Parties come up together, and heard the Door barred."

Q. "Was your Door partly open?"

A. "Yes. After they had been together some Time I went out and left Scatcherd to make his Observations, for I wished there might be compleat Evidence without me."

Q. "You took no Observation yourself?"

A. "Yes, I looked through the Window and saw them together."

Q. "How long after they came up Stairs?"

A. "I went out soon after they came, and returned in about Half an Hour, when I looked in, and saw them together in the Room. I came back with Mr. Wilmot."

Q. "Did you look through the Window before you went up Stairs with Mr. Wilmot?"

A. "I do not recollect I did, I left Mr. Wilmot up Stairs, passed Mr. Scatcherd, and saw him looking through a Hole in the Wainscot, I passed him, went to the second Flight of Stairs, looked in at the Window, and saw by the Reflection of the furthermost Glass the Heads of the Lady and the Man, they appeared to me to be sitting on the Bed."

Q. "The same Persons you had seen before?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "On what Part of the Bed?"

A. "On the Part next the Fire, there was a Fire in the Room."

Q. "You are perfectly clear that from the Window you looked through the Glass between the further Jamb would reflect that Part of the Bed?"

A. "Yes it would reflect the Fire-place and immediately on the Bed; but not so low as the Bed Cloaths. After some Time, when I heard the Parties were moving, I knocked at the Door, and the Man opened and unbarred it. I gave him a Letter and desired him to give it to Mrs. Wilmot."

Q. "How long was this after you saw them sitting on the Bed?"

A. "About Ten Minutes."

Q. "You then observed nothing pass between them but their sitting on the Bed?"

A. "I observed the Lady was weeping, and he was soothing her and caressing her. I could see his Arm round her Neck once, and he seemed to be soothing her and trying to comfort her. When he opened the Door, I gave him the Letter which had been written by Mr. Wilmot; for he expressed an Apprehension to me that the Discovery would destroy her. He was himself very much agitated, and he expressed to me that she might be so frightened that she might do some violent Act; and that it might be too much for her. The Man refused the Letter, at first expressed some Surprize, held back, said "Mrs. Wilmot!" expressing Surprize at my saying she was there. But he took the Letter and barred the Door. I then went down to Mr. Wilmot, he came up with me into the Dining Room, and desired me to look again for fear she should throw herself out of the Window. I looked, saw them together holding the Letter, and afterwards consulting and talking together, and so they remained for perhaps Ten Minutes. Then the Door opened, the Man looked out, saw there was nobody on the Landing Place, and the Lady came out and was going down Stairs. I stepped to her, and told her Mr. Wilmot was in the Dining Room, and desired her to come into that Room, she followed me or I led her into the Room. Mr. Wilmot addressed her in very strong Terms, asked her what she could say for herself; he told her he was convinced she was an Adultress, that she must go to her Friends; that they must part, and never meet again. She appeared to be perfectly collected and in Possession of herself, and asked him what he had to charge her with. He said you have committed Adultery with Edward Washborne, you have been here very frequently, and you have visited him for that Purpose. She said, Mr. Wilmot you are mistaken, and said little more till she had drawn from him all the Circumstances that had occurred to his Recollection. Mr. Wilmot said, "I can prove it by this Gentleman." She turned to me and said, after asking who I was; can you take upon yourself to say you have seen me commit Adultery with Washborne, or Words to that Effect. I said, I have not witnessed an absolute Act of Adultery, but I have been Witness to so many approximate Acts, that I can have no Doubt in my Mind upon it. She then asked Mr. Scatcherd if he had seen an Act of Adultery, he said, no, and then she argued with Mr. Wilmot and me, that as there was no Proof, and as we could not prove the last Fact, Mr. Wilmot could not obtain a Divorce, and affected to be very much surprized that I should be of a different Opinion. After a long Conversation of this Nature, Mr. Wilmot and myself left the House, and about Noon on the same Day I went again to the House with Mr. Wilmot, who had procured a Peace Officer to search Washborne's Boxes, suspecting he had some of his Property there. They were opened in my Presence, that of Mr. Scatcherd, Mrs. Page, Mrs. Wilmot, and Mr. Wilmot. In the Boxes we found many Things that Mr. Wilmot said were his; they were trisling Articles. The Man said his Mistress had given them to him. They found many Drawings which he and she said were part of her's. They found a Gold Shirt Pin with Hair set in it, which appeared to be new, as if come from the Goldsmiths, being wrapt up in Paper. He said Mrs. Wilmot gave it to him, and she said it was her Hair, and it was a Present to him. I asked him about Letters. He said he had received many Letters, but that he was going to a new Place in the Evening of that Day, and that he had burnt them on the Sunday before. We did not find any Letters. There were a great many good Cloaths, very elegant; such as one would not expect to find in the Possession of a Servant. I asked him who gave them to him; he said she gave him Money. Mrs. Wilmot was present the whole Time."

Cross-examined.

Q. "What is your usual Profession?"

A. "Assistant to Mr. Bishop, the Proctor to Mr. Wilmot."

Q. "Had you a share of the Profits?"

A. "I have a share of the Profits and of the Business."

Q. "Is the Situation of the Bed and of the Pier Glass, such as you have described it in the Plan?"

A. "As near as I can form it."

Q. "Does it come before the Fire-place, as in the Plan?"

A. "I suppose I have made the Bed longer."

Q. "How much too long?"

A. "I suppose it may be a Third too long."

Q. "Whether the Length of the Bed does not stretch out beyond the looking Glass?"

A. "I suppose it does."

Q. "You gave your Deposition in the Ecclesiastical Court?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "You have said that on the 25th of April you observed him while they were sitting together, caressing and soothing her?"

A. "I saw him moving about, and his Arm appeared to me to be round her Shoulder."

Q. "Did you depose to that Effect in the Ecclesiastical Court?"

A. "I have not looked at my Depositions so as to be able to see."

Q. "Did you or did you not?"

A. "I do not know whether I did or did not, I drew my Deposition from the Minutes I was desirous of referring to here; but as I am not allowed to refer to them, I am not certain."

Q. "When Mrs. Wilmot was introduced to the Room where Mr. Wilmot was, did she or not deny the Charge of Adultery?"

A. She did."

Q. "State in what Terms she denied the Charge?"

A. "She said he was mistaken, indeed he was mistaken; that no Fact of Adultery had passed; that she was ready to make her Oath of it; that she thought it was hard he would not believe her upon her Word; therefore she would go further and make Oath. The Man obtruded himself, and said he was ready to make Oath; and I suppose they would have done so."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Scatcherd was called in, and being sworn, was examined as follows:

Q. "Do you remember going to King Street, No. 12?"

A. "On Monday the 19th of April, I went to lodge there, and staid there till the Monday following."

Q. "Do you remember any body coming to Edward Washborne?"

A. "I was informed there was a Lady in Washborne's Room on the 20th."

Q. "At what Time of Day?"

A. "Between 11 and 12 o'Clock."

Q. "What did you do?"

A. "In consequence of that I looked through the two Squares of Glass in the Partition that separated the Room from the Stair-case. I could not observe any Persons in the Room, but I observed the Bed Curtain to shake, and soon afterwards I returned into the dining Room, and almost instantly a Lady came out, and Mr. Fenton followed her."

Q. "Did you see the Lady distinctly, so as to observe who she was?"

A. "No, on Saturday about 20 Minutes after Ten, I heard a particular loud Rap at the Door, and Washborne immediately went down Stairs, let in a Lady whom for the first Time I then saw, and he and she went into his Room together, and he fastened the Door on the inside."

Q. "Did she see you?"

A. "No."

Q. "Where was you placed?"

A. "In the dining Room that was taken for my sitting Room, the Door was open and I saw her through the Window which was on a Jarr; I peeped for the Purpose; I suppose they did not know I was there; I looked through the Lights before-mentioned, and I saw them both sitting in the Middle of the Room: she brought a Bundle with her. In a few Minutes there was a knock at the Street-Door, which was Mr. Fenton. In order to avoid Suspicion, I went up Stairs or into the dining Room, I do not recollect which, I informed Mr. Fenton the Lady was there. I resumed my Situation on the second Flight of Stairs, and I observed they had retired into the Nook between the Bed and the Fire-place. In a short space of Time after I observed they had come forwarder near the Door, and there I saw both him and her by means of a looking Glass that hung in the Pier, between the second and third Window, stand Face to Face and kiss each other several Times; they had then advanced from the Head of the Bed to the Feet."

Q. "Did that command the whole of the Bed?"

A. "Not wholly so."

Q. "Did the looking Glass command a Space in the Room equal to the whole Length of the Bed?"

A. "Certainly."

Q. "They were standing by the Foot of the Bed?"

A. "They had advanced towards the Foot. After he had stood in this Situation some Time, he sunk down before the Lady, and I could not see him. She appeared to me as if she had been crying, for she wiped her Face. Suspecting she was about to come away, I left the Place and went out of the House to watch her home."

Q. "When he sunk down, did the Lady alter her Situation?"

A. "No, not at all."

Q. "Then she was standing?"

A. "Yes, I went out of the House before they left the Room."

Q. "How much of her Person did the LookingGlass command?"

A. "Nearly half her Person down to her Waist."

Q. "Describe the Act by which you suppose he was kneeling down when you lost Sight of him. Did he sink down in the very Place in which he had been standing?"

A. "Yes exactly so, I had been out of the House Twenty Minutes, when I saw him come out of the Street-Door, look up and down the Street, and almost instantly she came out, went up King Street, and I followed her into a Milliner's Shop. I never lost Sight of her there. I followed her across Red Lion Square, through Prince's Street, to Mr. Wilmot's House in Bedford Row."

Q. "When did she come again?"

A. "On Monday the 25th of April between Ten and Eleven o'Clock; finding it impossible, as I was sent for that Purpose, to command the whole View of the Room from the Glasses, on the Sunday I made some Holes in the Wainscot, three different ones, which enabled me to command the whole of the Nook entirely."

Q. "In what Part?"

A. "The Wainscot is in a Bevil Form, does not run in a direct Line from the Fire-place, in order to make Room for the Stairs."

Q. "One Way would give you the Command of the Recess?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "The other the Command of the Room at large?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you make Holes in both these Places?"

A. "With the help of the Holes and the Windows, I could command the whole View of the Room. About Twenty Minutes after Ten, she came in, and went up Stairs. I heard the Door fastened, presently after I saw her by looking through the Glass upon the Stairs. They seemed in Conversation together, and there being a Rap at the Street-Door, I retired from there. Mr. Fenton came in, and finding it was him, I instantly resumed my Situation, and found they had gone into the Nook. I could not see them by means of the Glass, on account of the Curtain be ing drawn, but I observed the Curtain of the Bed to shake, and informed Fenton the Lady was there. He looked also. Presently afterwards, finding from the Family passing and re-passing, that it would be impossible to apply myself to the Holes on the Stairs, Fenton went out to bring Mr. Wilmot, and I acquainted the Family with it. I then opened the Holes which I had filled up with Putty, to prevent the Light being seen through, and I observed Washborne and the Lady sitting on the Side of the Bed. He took her by the Right Hand, kissed it rather eagerly, had his Left Hand round her Waist, then stooped down, pulled her Petticoats up over her Knees, kissed her Thighs very eagerly twice or three Times, and then put his Hand up her Petticoats; they presently afterwards rose from the Bed and stood Face to Face. He put his Arm round her Waist again, and put his Hand up her Petticoats a second Time. She made some little Resistance at the Time, and what passed at the Time I do not know, from her Cloak being in the Way, but he turned round towards me afterwards, and I saw that the Right Flap of his Breeches was unbuttoned. They seemed to me inclined to go away. I thought she was preparing to go away, went down Stairs, informed Mr. Fenton and Mr. Wilmot who were below, and who went up Stairs immediately; and almost instantly he came out. Mr. Fenton delivered a Letter to her."

Q. "What length of Time were they together from the Time she came to Washborne?"

A. "Very near an Hour and an half or two Hours. I could tell by referring to a Minute I made at the Time."

Q. "Was it made at the very Moment?"

A. "Almost instantly (speaking from a Minute), she came about a Quarter after Ten, and the Letter was delivered at very near Twelve. Mr. Wilmot discovered all the Feelings a Man could on such an Occasion, Mrs. Wilmot received him with rather a Coolness, did not appear so much agitated as might be imagined, and said Things were not as they might appear to be; that she had no criminal Intercourse with Washborne, and hoped he would overlook it. He asked her every Question, such as what could induce her to come there. She said she came to advise him about a a Place he was going to. Soon after it was thought proper to search Washborne's Boxes, and I went with Mr. Wilmot to the Office in Bow Street; searched the Boxes and found a Variety of Articles; a Ring Locket, a kind of Patch Box Paintings; Washborne and Mrs. Wilmot were by at the same Time."

Q. "Was you in the Room where Washborne and the Lady had been?"

A. "Yes, that Day."

Q. "Did you observe the State of the Bed?"

A. "I did."

Q. "How long was it after you went into the Room, before you observed the State of the Bed? Did it not occur to either of you, to see the State of the Bed, when the Letter was delivered?"

A. "I saw the State before."

Q. "When did you next see the Bed?"

A. "About One o'Clock. It had not been made for the Day at all."

Cross examined.

Q. "What are you?"

A. "By Profession an Attorney."

Q. "Had you ever been employed upon any of this Business before?"

A. "No."

Q. (By a Lord) "It was on Saturday that you observed the Bed-Curtains shaking, what View had you of it?"

A. "I could see the further Part of the Bed."

Q. "Was it so open that you could see whether Persons were there?"

A. "I have no Doubt they were not upon the Bed, because there was a Chair in the Nook."

Q. "You were not by when Fenton described her sitting on the Bed?"

A. "No."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Mr. Garthwaite was again called in, and examined as follows:

Q. "Have you lived with Mr. Wilmot ever since the 25th of April?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you ever see Mrs. Wilmot there since?"

A. "No."

Q. "Did you know of any Correspondence between them?"

A. "No."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Mr. Mills, of Counsel for Mr. Wilmot, informed the House, "That the several Deeds recited in the Bill, were admitted by the Counsel for Mrs. Wilmot."

Then Mr. Graham, of Counsel for Mrs. Wilmot, was heard on her Behalf.

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

Then the said Bill was read a Second Time.

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill, on Tuesday next.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Veneris, vicesimum tertium diem instantis Martii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Veneris, 23o Martii 1792.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Carliol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Dux Norfolk, Marescallus.
Dux Portland.
Comes Suffolk & Berkshire.
Comes Kellie.
Comes Lauderdale.
Comes Elgin.
Comes Glasgow.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Ailesbury.
Comes Norwich.
Comes Strange.
Viscount Stormont.
Ds. Grenville, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Cathcart.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Amherst.
Ds. Kenyon.
Ds. Fisherwick.
Ds. Fife.
Ds. Douglas of Douglas.

PRAYERS.

Gillespie against Hussey and Bogle.

The Answer of Adeliza Hussey and Charles Bogle Esquire, her Husband, to the Appeal of William Gillespie, Manufacturer in Anderstoun, was this Day brought in.

Simpson against Ker, et al.

After hearing Counsel in Part in the Cause, wherein William Simpson Esquire, of Viewfield, is Appellant, and Mrs. Henrietta Anne Kerr and others, are Respondents:

It is Ordered, That the further Hearing of the said Cause be put off to Wednesday next; and that the rest of the Causes be removed in Course.

Yoxford, &c. Roads Bill.

The Lord Cathcart reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair the several Roads, or Branches of Road, leading from the Parishes of Yoxford, Saxmundham, and Benhall, in the County of Suffolk, to the Town of Aldeburgh, in the said County," was committed: "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made one Amendment thereto."

Which Amendment was read by the Clerk, as follows; (videlicet)

Pr. 36. Line 10. After ("Act") insert Clause (A)"

And be it further enacted, That the principal Money to arise from the Sale of any Lands, Tenements, or Hereditaments, which shall be purchased for the Purposes of this Act, of any Bodies Politic, Corporate or Collegiate, Corporation Aggregate or Sole, Feoffees in Trust, Guardians, Committees, or other Trustees, or from any Feme Covert or Femes Covertes, or other incapacitated Person or Persons, shall be paid to such Person or Persons as they shall respectively nominate to receive the same in Trust, with all convenient Speed to be re-invested in the Purchase of other Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments, which shall be conveyed and settled to and upon and subject to the like Uses, Trusts, Limitations, Remainders, and Contingencies, as the Lands, Tenements, or Hereditaments which shall be purchased from them respectively by the said Trustees and their Successors, were respectively settled, limited, or assured at the Time of such the purchasing the same, or so many thereof as at the Time of making such Conveyances and Settlements shall be existing, or capable of taking Effect."

And the said Amendment being read a Second Time, was agreed to by the House.

Curtis et al. Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of Edward Curtis, of the Parish of Clifton, in the County of Gloucester, and Hannah his Wife, on Behalf of themselves and their Infant Children, and the Reverend James Allen Clerk, and Margaret Willoughby his Wife, praying Leave to bring in a Bill for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be and is hereby referred to the Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer and Mr. Justice Gould, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill; and after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon under their Hands, and whether all Parties concerned in the Consequences of the Bill have signed the Petition; and also that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Sir G. Kynnyndmond et al: Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of Sir Gilbert Elliot Murray Kynnyndmond, of Minto and of Melgund and Kynnyndmond, Baronet, Hugh Elliot Esquire, His Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of Dresden, The Reverend Robert Elliot, Rector of Wheldrake, in the East Riding of the County of York, Clerk, Isabella Elliot Spinster, Eleanor Lady Auckland, formerly Eleanor Elliot, the Wife of William Lord Auckland, of the Kingdom of Ireland, and the said William Lord Auckland for his Interest, praying Leave to bring in a Bill for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be and the same is hereby referred to the Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer and Mr. Baron Hotham, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill; and after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon under their Hands, and whether all Parties who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill have signed the Petition; and also that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Balliol College Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for carrying into Execution an Agreement between the Master and Scholars of Balliol College, in the University of Oxford, and the Mayor and Commonalty and Citizens of the City of London, for vesting in the said Mayor and Commonalty and Citizens, and their Successors, certain Ground and Buildings in the Parish of Saint Lawrence Jewry, London, and for securing to the said Master and Scholars, and their Successors, certain yearly Rents in lieu thereof."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Pepys and Mr. Ord:

To carry down the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence thereto.

Schroder's Naturalization Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for naturalizing Herman Schroder."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers:

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

Gairdner against Fullerton's Representatives, et al.

The House being, moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing the Cause wherein Ebenezer Gair dner is Appellant, and the Representatives of the deceased George Fullerton Esquire and others are Respondents:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Cause, by Counsel at the Bar, on the first vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed.

Gillespie against Hussey and Bogle.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing the Cause wherein William Gillespie is Appellant, and Adeliza Hussey and Charles Bogle Esquire, her Husband, are Respondents:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Cause, by Counsel at the Bar, on the first vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed.

Writs of Mandamus, &c. Bill respecting.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to be put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to explain and amend an Act made in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne, intituled, "An Act for rendering the Proceedings upon Writs of Mandamus and Informations in the Nature of a Quo Warranto more speedy and effectual; and for the more easy trying and determining the Rights of Offices and Franchises in Corporations and Boroughs;" and for the Lords to be summoned:

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the said Bill.

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Cathcart reported from the Committee, That they had gone through the Bill, and made some Amendments thereto, which he was ready to report when the House will please to receive the same."

Ordered, That the said Report be received on Monday next.

Lords summoned

Ordered, That all the Lords be summoned to attend the Service of the House on Monday next.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Lunæ, vicesimum sextum diem instantis Martii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Lunæ, 26o Martii 1792.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar.
Archiep. Ebor.
Epus. Londin.
Epus. Duresm.
Epus. Bath. & Wells.
Epus. Petriburg.
Epus. Hereford.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Litch. & Cov.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Glocestr.
Epus. Carliol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Dux Norfolk, Marescallus.
Dux Dorset, Senescallus.
Dux Somerset.
Dux Leeds.
March. Salisbury, Camerarius.
March. Buckingham.
March. Townshend.
March. Abercorn.
Comes Coventry.
Comes Kellie.
Comes Lauderdale.
Comes Elgin.
Comes Balcarras.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Graham.
Comes Brooke & Warwick.
Comes Guilford.
Comes Hardwicke.
Comes Fauconberg.
Comes Chatham.
Comes Uxbridge.
Comes Strange.
Comes Fortescue.
Comes Digby.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Falmouth.
Viscount Wentworth.
Viscount Hampden.
Viscount Sydney.
Ds. Grenville, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Willoughby Br.
Ds. St. John Blet.
Ds. Howard de Walden.
Ds. Clifton.
Ds. Cathcart.
Ds. Torphichen.
Ds. Hay.
Ds. Middleton.
Ds. Onslow & Cranley.
Ds. King.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Boston.
Ds. Vernon.
Ds. Amherst.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Gage.
Ds. Walsingham.
Ds. Grantley.
Ds. Carteret.
Ds. Grey de Wilton.
Ds. Sommers.
Ds. Delaval.
Ds. Hawkesbury.
Ds. Dorchester.
Ds. Heathfield.
Ds. Kenyon.
Ds. Mulgrave.
Ds. Douglas of Douglas.
Ds. Douglas of Lochleven.

PRAYERS.

Brydges' Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of Samuel Egerton Brydges, of the Middle Temple London, Esquire, praying Leave to bring in a Bill, for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be and the same is hereby referred to Mr. Justice Gould and Mr. Baron Hotham, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill, and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon, under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Govan against Boyd.

Upon reading the Petition and Appeal of Archibald Govan, of London, Merchant; complaining of an Interlocutor of the Lords of Session in Scotland, of the 6th of March 1792; and praying, "That the same may be reversed, varied, or altered, or that the Appellant may have such other Relief in the Premises, as to this House, in Their Lordships' great Wisdom, shall seem proper; and that Spencer Boyd, Brother and Heir of James Boyd, deceased, may be required to answer the said Appeal:"

It is Ordered, That the said Spencer Boyd may have a Copy of the said Appeal, and do put in his Answer thereunto in Writing on or before Monday the 23d Day of April next; and Service of this Order upon the said Respondent, or upon his known Counsel or Agent in the Court of Session in Scotland, shall be deemed good Service.

Wyndham and Edwyn's Petition to change Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of George Wyndham and Charles Edwyn Esquires; setting forth, "That the Petitioners having presented a Petition to Their Lordships for Leave to bring in a Bill, for the Purposes in the Petition mentioned, Their Lordships were pleased to refer the Consideration thereof to Mr. Baron Perryn and Mr. Justice Buller: That Mr. Baron Perryn is gone on the Western Circuit, and Mr. Justice Buller is gone on the Northern Circuit, and they are not expected to return to Town in Time to enable the Petitioners to procure the Judges' Report, before the last Day appointed by Their Lordships for receiving Reports on private Bills;" and therefore praying Their Lordships, "To refer the said Petition to the two Judges who go the Home Circuit:"

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be, and is hereby referred to Mr. Justice Gould and Mr. Baron Hotham, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill; and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also, that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Yoxford, &c. Roads Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair the several Roads or Branches of Road leading from the Parishes of Yoxford, Saxmundham, and Benhall, in the County of Suffolk, to the Town of Aldeburgh, in the said County."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, with the Amendment, shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with an Amendment to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Walker and Mr. Spranger:

To return the said Bill, and acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the same, with one Amendment, to which Their Lordships desire their Concurrence.

Gibson and Johnson against Martin, et al. in Error.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing Counsel, to argue the Errors assigned upon the Writ of Error wherein Thomas Gibson and Joseph Johnson are Plaintiffs and Richard Master and others are Defendants:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Errors argued by Counsel at the Bar, on the First vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed.

Gibson and Johnson against Hunter, in Error.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing Counsel to argue the Errors, assigned upon the Writ of Error wherein Thomas Gibson and Joseph Johnson are Plaintiffs and Robert Hunter is Defendant:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Errors argued by Counsel at the Bar, on the First vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed.

Report, E. India Judicature:

The Lord Cathcart reported from the Lords Committees, appointed to examine the several Lists delivered in at the Table, in pursuance of the Directions of an Act passed in the Twenty-sixth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for the further Regulation of the Trial of Persons accused of Offences committed in the East Indies, and for other Purposes therein mentioned, "That the Committee had met and examined the said Lists, and that the Titles of the following Lords were the only Titles that appeared upon Ten Lists:

Duke of Norfolk, E. M.

Duke of Bedford.

Duke of Bridgewater.

Earl of Suffolk.

Earl of Carlisle.

Earl of Abingdon.

Earl Poulett.

Earl of Cholmondeley.

Earl of Elgin.

Earl of Effingham.

Earl of Harrington.

Earl of Hardwicke.

Earl of Radnor.

Earl Spencer.

Earl of Uxbridge.

Earl Talbot.

Bishop of London.

Bishop of Bangor.

Bishop of St. Davids.

Bishop of Gloucester.

Bishop of Carlisle.

Lord Le Despencer.

Lord St. John of Bletsoe.

Lord Clifton.

Lord Hay.

Lord King.

Lord Ducie.

Lord Brownlow.

Lord Grey de Wilton.

Lord Heathfield.

Lord Verulam.

Lord Douglas of Douglas.

Lord Gage.

Lord Douglas of Lochleven."

Then it was moved, "That the Clause in the said Act, directing that the Names of such Persons who shall appear to hold or to have held any of the Offices or Employments therein specified, shall be struck out of the said Report;" be now read.

The same was accordingly read by the Clerk.

Titles referred to a Committee.

Ordered, That the said Titles be referred to a Committee, to report the Names of those who shall appear to hold, or to have held, any of the Offices or Employments specified in the said Act.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Writs of Mandamus, &c. Bill respecting.

The Lord Cathcart (according to Order) reported the Amendments made by the Committee of the whole House, to the Bill, intituled, "An Act to explain and amend an Act made in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne, intituled, "An Act for rendering the Proceedings upon Writs of Mandamus, and Informations in the Nature of a Quo Warranto, more speedy and effectual, and for the more easy trying and determining the Rights of Offices and Franchises in Corporations and Boroughs."

The said Amendments were read by the Clerk as follow; (videlicet)

Pr. 1. L. 23. Leave out ("Hilary") and insert ("Trinity")

Pr. 2. L. 6. Leave out ("Eight") and insert ("Six")

L. 8. Leave out ("Eight") and insert ("Six")

L. 37. Leave out ("Eight") and insert ("Six")

Pr. 3. L. 1. After ("aforesaid") insert Clause (A) Clause (A) "And be it further enacted, by the Authority aforesaid, that if any Person or Persons against whom any such Information as aforesaid shall be exhibited, shall derive Title under an Election, Nomination, swearing into Office or Admission by any Person or Persons, the Title of such Person or Persons against whom such Information shall be exhibited, shall not be defeated or affected by reason or on account of any Defect in the Title of such Person or Persons, so electing nominating, swearing into Office, or admitting, in case such Person or Persons under whom Title shall be derived as aforesaid, was or were in Exercise de facto of the Franchise or Office (in virtue of which he or they so elected, nominated, sworn in, or admitted) at a Period of Six Years at least, previous to the Time of filing such Information, and his or their Title shall not have been questioned, by any legal Proceeding carried on with Effect."

L. 11. After ("Person") insert ("on any Day or Days, except Christmas Day, Good Friday, and Sunday")

In the Title of the Bill.

L. 1. Leave out from ("Act") to ("in") in Line 7, and insert ("for the Amendment of the Law in Proceedings upon Information") and in the same Line after ("in") leave out ("the")

L. 8. Leave out ("a") and in the same Line after ("Warranto") leave out to the End of the Title."

And the said Amendments, being read a Second Time were agreed to by the House.

Cooksey, reprimanded and to be discharged after entering into Recognizance for his good Behaviour.

The Order of the Day being read for the Serjeant at Arms to bring Richard Cooksey in Custody to the Bar of the House this Day; and for the Lords to be summoned:

He was brought to the Bar accordingly; and acknowledging his Offence, and expressing himself sincerely sorry for the same:

Ordered, That Mr. Richard Cooksey having made Acknowledgement towards this House, and to the Earl of Coventry, for his said Offence, and expressed himself sincerely sorry for the same, be reprimanded at the Bar, and that he be continued in the Custody of the Serjeant at Arms, until he enter into a Recognizance to His Majesty, before the Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench, himself in the Sum of Five hundred Pounds, and two Sureties in the Sum of One hundred Pounds each, for his good Behaviour towards the Earl of Coventry for Three Years, and that having entered into such Recognizance, he be discharged, paying his Fees.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Martis, vicesimum septimum diem instantis Martii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Martis, 27o Martii 1792.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Carliol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Dux Leeds.
Comes Lauderdale.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Mount Edgcumbe.
Ds. Willoughby Br.
Ds. Cathcart.
Ds. King.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Boston.
Ds. Amherst.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Gage.
Ds. Sommers.

PRAYERS.

Writs of Mandamus, &c. Bill respecting:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to explain and amend an Act made in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne, intituled, "An Act for rendering the Proceedings upon Writs of Mandamus, and Informations in the Nature of a Quo Warranto more speedy and effectual, and for the more easy try ing and determining the Rights of Offices and Franchises in Corporations and Boroughs."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, with the Amendments, shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with Amendment to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Walker and Mr. Spranger:

To return the said Bill and acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the same with some Amendments, to which Their Lordships desire their Concurrence.

National Debt Reduction Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hobart and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty the Sum of Four hundred thousand Pounds, to be issued and paid to the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, to be by them placed to the Account of the Commissioners for the Reduction of the National Debt;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Brewers Excise Frauds Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hobart and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual preventing of Frauds in the Revenue of Excise, by Common Brewers;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Tea Certificates Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hobart and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for repealing certain Regulations with respect to Certificates on exporting Tea to Ireland or America;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Auctioneers Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hobart and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to compel Auctioneers to declare whether Sales have been held under the Notices now required to be given by Law;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Body Warrants Excise Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hobart and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for the better Execution of certain Warrants issued for the apprehending and committing Persons convicted of Offences against the Excise Laws;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Knooke Enclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Goddard and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing and allotting in Severalty, the Open and Common Fields and Downs, Common Meadows, Common Pastures, and Commonable Places in the Parish of Knooke, in the County of Wilts;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Six Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Turner's Patent Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by General Murray and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for vesting in James Turner, his Executors, Administrators, and Assigns, the sole Use and Property of a certain Yellow Colour of his Invention, throughout that Part of Great Britain called England, the Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, for a limited Time;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Canvey Embankment Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Branscombe and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually embanking, draining, and otherwise improving the Island of Canvey, in the County of Essex;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Chapel Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Howard and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for repairing and improving the Road from the Town of Chapel en le Frith, to or near to Enterclough Bridge, in the County of Derby, and also the Road from the Village of Hayfield to Marple Bridge, in the said County, and also the Road from the Village of Glossop, to a certain Gate called Claylands Gate, in the Township of Longdendale, on or near to the Side of the Turnpike Road leading from Moltram to Woodhead, in the County Palatine of Chester;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Walton Enclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Pochin and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open Fields, Meadows, Pastures, Commons, and Waste Grounds within the Parish of Walton-in-the-Woulds, in the County of Leicester;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Redmile Enclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Pochin and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open Common Fields, and other Commonable Lands within the Parish of Redmile, in the County of Leicester;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Middleton Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Burdon and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair the Road leading from the Hoodgate, at the West End of the Town of Middleton in Teesdale, in the County of Durham, to the Gate in the new Enclosure called The Edge, near the Collieries called West Pitts, in the Parish of Saint Andrew's Auckland, in the same County; and also a Branch from the said Road, at or near the Head of the Town of Egleston, to Egleston Bridge, over the River Tees;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Langport, &c. Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir John Trevelyan and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for continuing and amending two Acts of the Twenty-sixth Year of King George the Second, and the Eighteenth Year of His present Majesty, for repairing, amending, and widening the Road leading from the Red Post, in the Parish of Fivehead, through the Towns of Langport and Somerton to Butwell, and several other Roads therein mentioned, in the County of Somerset; and for repairing, amending, and widening certain other Roads within the said County;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Kingston Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Finch and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually amending, widening, and keeping in Repair the Road from the Town of Kingston-upon-Thames, in the County of Surrey, to a place called Sheetbridge near Petersfield, in the County of Southampton;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The Seven last mentioned Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Wilmot's Divorce Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to be put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to Dissolve the Marriage of John Wilmot Esquire, with Fanny Sainthill his now Wife, and to enable him to Marry again, and for other Purposes therein mentioned:"

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Friday next.

Report, East India Judicature:

The Lord Cathcart reported from the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Titles of the Lords that have appeared upon Ten or more Lists reported from the Committee Yesterday; and to report the Names of those who shall appear to hold or to have held any of the Offices or Employments, specified in an Act made in the Twenty-sixth Year of His present Majesty, for the further Regulation of the Trial of Persons accused of certain Offences committed in the East Indies; and for other Purposes therein mentioned: "That the Committee had met and examined the Titles of the Lords contained in the List referred to the Committee by Their Lordships, and that it doth not appear to them that any of the Lords whose Titles are contained in the said List, now holds any Civil Office of Profit under the Crown, during His Majesty's Pleasure, or now holds, or heretofore held any of the Offices or Employments mentioned in the said Act of Parliament, as Disabilities from serving according to the said Act, excepting the Earl of Effingham, who holds the Employment of private Secretary to Her Majesty the Queen, and also excepting the Lord Douglas of Lochleven, who holds the Office of Chamberlain to Her said Majesty."

It was moved, "To agree with the Committee in the said Report."

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

E. Effingham & Ld. Douglas of Lochleven struck out of List:

Ordered, That the Names of the Earl of Effingham, and the Lord Douglas of Lochleven, be struck out of the said List.

Titles to be transmitted to Clerk of the Crown.

Ordered, That the said Titles be transmitted to the Clerk of the Crown in His Majesty's High Court of Chancery or his Deputy, by the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain under his Hand and Seal, pursuant to the Directions of the said Act.

Sir J. Duff against Skene.

The House being informed, "That George Skene of Skene, Esquire, Respondent to the Appeal of Sir James Duff Knight, one of the Freeholders of the County of Aberdeen, had not put in his Answer to the said Appeal, though duly served with the Order of this House for that Purpose."

And thereupon an Affidavit of Thomas Cranstoun Writer to the Signet, of the due Service of the said Order, being read;

Ordered, That the said Respondent do put in his Answer to the said Appeal, peremptorily in a Week.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Mercurii, vicesimum octavum diem instantis Martii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Mercurii, 28o Martii 1792.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Carliol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Comes Exeter.
Comes Lauderdale.
Comes Elgin.
Viscount Sydney.
Ds. Grenville, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Cathcart.
Ds. Middleton.
Ds. King.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Douglas of Douglas.

PRAYERS.

Govan et al.: against Boyd.

The Answer of Spencer Boyd of Pinkhill, to the Appeal of Archibald Govan and his Attornies, was this Day brought in.

Simpson against Kerr et al.:

After Hearing Counsel for the Appellant, as well on Friday last as this Day, upon the Petition and Appeal of William Simpson Esquire, of Viewfield, complaining of Three Interlocutors of the Lord Ordinary in Scotland, of the 31st of January, and 2d of March 1789, and 2d of February 1791, also of two Interlocutors of the Lords of Session there, of the 10th of December 1790, and 18th of January 1791, and also of an Interlocutor of the Lord Ordinary on the Bills, of the 31st of May 1791; and praying, "That the same might be reversed, varied, or amended, or that the Appellant might have such other Relief in the Premises, as to this House, in Their Lordships' great Wisdom should seem meet;" as also upon the Answer of Mrs. Henrietta Anne Kerr, and others, nominated and appointed by the most Honourable Jean Marchioness of Lothian, deceased, put in to the said Appeal:

And Counsel appearing for the Respondents in the said Appeal:

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

Interlocutors affirmed.

Ordered and Adjudged by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Petition and Appeal be and is hereby dismissed this House, and that the said Interlocutors therein complained of, be and the same are hereby affirmed.

Proceedings on East India Judicature Act.

It was moved, "That the Order made Yesterday for striking out the Names of the Earl of Effingham, and the Lord Douglas of Lochleven, out of the List of the Lords nominated and appointed, pursuant to the Directions of an Act passed in the 26th Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for the further Regulation of the Trial of Persons, accused of certain Offences committed in the East Indies, and for other Purposes therein mentioned; and also, The Order for the Titles to be transmitted to the Clerk of the Crown in His Majesty's High Court of Chancery, or his Deputy, by the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, under his Hand and Seal, pursuant to the Directions of the said Act, might be now read."

The same were accordingly read by the Clerk.

Ordered, That the said Orders be reversed.

Ordered, That the Titles of the Lords contained in the said List, be again referred to the Committee which was appointed to report the Names of those who shall appear to hold, or to have held any of the Offices or Employments specified in the said Act:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

National Debt Reduction Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty, the Sum of Four hundred thousand Pounds, to be issued and paid to the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, to be by them placed to the Account of the Commissioners for the Reduction of the National Debt."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Brewers' Excise Frauds Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual preventing of Frauds in the Revenue of Excise, by common Brewers."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Auctioneers' Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to compel Auctioneers to declare whether Sales have been held under the Notices now required to be given by Law."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Body Warrants Excise Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the better Execution of certain Warrants, issued for the apprehending and committing Persons convicted of Offences against the Excise Laws."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Tea Certificates Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for repealing certain Regulations with respect to Certificates, on exporting Tea to Ireland or America."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Langport, &c. Roads Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for continuing and amending two Acts of the Twentysixth Year of King George the Second, and the Eighteenth Year of His present Majesty, for repairing, amending, and widening the Road leading from the Red Post, in the Parish of Fivehead, through the Towns of Langport and Somerton to Butwell, and several other Roads therein mentioned, in the County of Somerset; and for repairing, amending, and widening certain other Roads within the said County."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

E. Exeter.
E. Lauderdale.
E. Elgin.
V. Sydney.
L. Bp. Bangor.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Grenville.
L. Cathcart.
L. Middleton.
L. King.
L. Walpole.
L. Brownlow.
L. Douglas of Douglas.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Kingston Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually amending, widening, and keeping in Repair the Road from the Town of Kingston-uponThames, in the County of Surrey, to a Place called Sheetbridge near Petersfield, in the County of Southampton."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Tuesday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Middleton Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair, the Road leading from the Hoodgate, at the West End of the Town of Middleton, in Teesdale, in the County of Durham, to the Gate in the New Enclosure called the Edge, near the Collieries called West Pitts, in the Parish of Saint Andrew's Auckland, in the same County; and also a Branch from the said Road, at or near the Head of the Town of Egleston, to Egleston Bridge, over the River Tees."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Canvey Embankment Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually embanking, draining, and otherwise improving the Island of Canvey, in the County of Essex."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Tuesday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Chapel Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for repairing and improving the Road from the Town of Chapel en le Frith, to or near to Enterclough Bridge, in the County of Derby; and also the Road from the Village of Hayfield to Marple Bridge, in the said County; and also the Road from the Village of Glossop to a certain Gate called Clayland's Gate, in the Township of Longdendale, on or near to the Side of the Turnpike Road leading from Mottram to Woodhead, in the County Palatine of Chester."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Friday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Walton Enclosure Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for dividing, and enclosing the Open Fields, Meadows, Pastures, Commons, and Waste Grounds, within the Parish of Walton-in-the-Woulds, in the County of Leicester."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Turner's Patent Bill.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for vesting in James Turner, his Executors, Administrators, and Assigns, the sole Use and Property of a certain Yellow Colour of his Invention, throughout that Part of Great Britain called England, the Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, for a limited Time."

Derby Paving Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Lord George Cavendish and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for paving, cleansing, lighting, and otherwise improving the Streets, Lanes, and other Public Passages and Places within the Borough of Derby; and for selling a certain Piece of Waste Ground situate within the said Borough, called Nun's Green, towards defraying the Expence of the said Improvements;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Govan et al. against Boyd.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing the Cause wherein Archibald Govan, and his Attornies are Appellants and Spencer Boyd is Respondent:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Cause by Counsel at the Bar, on the First vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed.

Griffiths' Petition to change a Judge.

Upon reading the Petition of Thomas Griffiths Esquire, setting forth, "That a Petition of the said Thomas Griffiths was presented to this House on the 16th Day of this instant March, praying Leave to bring in a private Bill, for the Purposes therein mentioned; which Petition Their Lordships were pleased to refer to the Consideration of Mr. Justice Gould and Mr. Baron Hotham: That Mr. Justice Gould is still on the Circuit, and the Day of his return being uncertain the Petitioner is apprehensive there may not be Time to obtain the Report of the Judges on the said Bill, within the Period limited by Their Lordships' for receiving such Reports;" and therefore praying Their Lordships, "That the said Petition may be referred to the Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer instead of the said Mr. Justice Gould, or that he may be otherwise relieved as to Their Lordships shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be and is hereby referred to the Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer and Mr. Baron Hotham, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill, and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Campbell, Leave to withdraw Petition for a Bill, and substitute another:

Upon reading the Petition of John Campbell Esquire, of Blythswood, Lieutenant-Colonel of His Majesty's Ninth Regiment of Foot; setting forth, "That the Petitioner on the first Day of this instant March presented his Petition to Their Lordships, praying Leave to bring in a Bill, for the Purposes therein mentioned; which Petition was referred to the Consideration of Mr. Justice Ashhurst and Mr. Justice Wilson, both of whom are now absent upon the Public Service: That the Petitioner observing that an Error has been made in transcribing his said Petition, he is now desirous of withdrawing the same, and substituting another Petition in its Place;" and therefore praying, "That he may be at Liberty to withdraw his said Petition, and to substitute another in its Place, and that the same may be referred to the Consideration of the Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer and Mr. Baron Hotham, both of whom are now at Home, instead of Mr. Justice Ashhurst and Mr. Justice Wilson, who are now absent:"

It is Ordered, That the Petitioner be at Liberty to withdraw his said former Petition, and substitute another instead thereof, as desired.

Petition presented, and referred to Judges.

Accordingly, upon reading the Petition of John Campbell Esquire, of Blythswood, Lieutenant-Colonel of His Majesty's Ninth Regiment of Foot; praying Leave to bring in a Bill, for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be and is hereby referred to the Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer and Mr. Baron Hotham, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill, and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

North Grimston Enclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Lord Downe and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing and enclosing certain Open Fields and Grounds within the Parish of North Grimston, in the East Riding of the County of York;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Middleton Tyas Lane Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Lord Downe and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to continue the Term of two Acts of the Seventeenth Year of King George the Second, and the Eleventh Year of His present Majesty, for repairing the Road leading from the End of Middleton Tyas Lane, over Gatherly Moor, to Greta Bridge, and from thence to Bowes, in the North Riding of the County of York;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Leeds and Wakefield Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Lord Downe and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of two Acts of the Thirty-first Year of King George the Second, and Tenth Year of His present Majesty, so far as relates to the Road from Leeds to Wakefield, in the County of York;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Kinghorn, &c. Harbour Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Colonel Wemyss and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for improving the Communication between the County of Edinburgh, and the County of Fife, by the Passages or Ferries across the Frith of Forth, between Leith and Newhaven, in the County of Edinburgh, and Kinghorn and Bruntistand, in the County of Fife; and for rendering the Harbours and Landing Places more commodious;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Four Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Yoxford, &c. Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Dudley North and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair, the several Roads or Branches of Road leading from the Parishes of Yoxford, Saxmundham, and Benhall, in the County of Suffolk, to the Town of Aldeburgh, in the said County;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to Their Lordships' Amendment made thereto.

Peterborough Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Benyon and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair the Road leading from Swanspool Bridge, in the City of Peterborough, to the Town of Thorney, in the Isle of Ely, in the County of Cambridge; and for altering the Course of some Part of the said Road;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Wyrley Canal Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Pulteney and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for making and maintaining a Navigable Canal, from or from near Wyrley Bank, in the County of Stafford, to communicate with the Birmingham and Birmingham and Fazeley Canal, at or near the Town of Wolverhampton, in the said County; and also certain Collateral Cuts therein described, from the said intended Canal;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said two Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Jovis, vicesimum nonum diem instantis Martii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Jovis, 29o Martii 1792.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Carliol. Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Viscount Stormont.
Ds. Cathcart.
Ds. King.

PRAYERS.

Peterborough Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair, the Road leading from Swanspool Bridge, in the City of Peterborough, to the Town of Thorney, in the Isle of Ely, in the County of Cambridge, and for altering the Course of some Part of the said Road."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

V. Stormont. L. Bp. Carlisle. L. Cathcart.
L. King.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Redmile Enclosure Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for dividing, and enclosing the Open Common Fields, and other Commonable Lands, within the Parish of Redmile, in the County of Leicester."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Wednesday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Wyrley Canal Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for making and maintaining a navigable Canal, from or from near Wyrley Bank, in the County of Stafford, to communicate with the Birmingham and Birmingham and Fazely Canal, at or near the Town of Wolverhampton, in the said County; and also certain Collateral Cuts therein described, from the said intended Canal."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Monday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Kinghorn, &c. Harbour Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for improving the Communication between the County of Edinburgh, and the County of Fife, by the Passages or Ferries cross the Frith of Forth, between Leith and Newhaven, in the County of Edinburgh, and Kinghorn and Bruntisland, in the County of Fife; and for rendering the Harbours and Landing Places more commodious."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

North Grimston Enclosure Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for dividing and enclosing certain Open Fields and Grounds, within the Parish of North Grimston, in the East Riding of the County of York."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Wednesday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Leeds and Wakefield Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of Two Acts of the Thirty-first Year of King George the Second, and Tenth Year of His present Majesty, so far as relates to the Road from Leeds to Wakefield, in the County of York."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Tuesday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Leo et al. Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of Daniel Leo, of Bath, in the County of Somerset, Esquire, and Letitia his Wife, one of the Sisters and Co-heiresses of John Davies, late of Llanerch in the County of Denbigh, Esquire; and Mary Puleston, of Wrexham in the said County of Denbigh, Widow, the other of the Sisters and Co-heiresses of the said John Davies; praying Leave to bring in a Bill, for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be and is hereby referred to the Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer and Mr. Justice Gould, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill, and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case with their Opinion thereupon under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Gilbert against Browne:

Upon reading the Petition of Jonathan Browne, Defendant in a Writ of Error depending in this House, wherein Charles Gilbert is Plaintiff; setting forth, "That the Plaintiff has not assigned Errors within the Time limited by Their Lordships' standing Order;" and therefore praying, "That the said Writ of Error may be Non-pros'd, with such Costs as to Their Lordships shall seem meet:"

Writ of Error non-pros'd, with Costs.

It is Ordered, That the Petitioner do forthwith enter a Non-pros on the said Writ of Error, as desired; and that the Record be remitted to the Court of King's Bench, to the End Execution may be had upon the Judgement given by that Court, as if no such Writ of Error had been brought into this House; and further that the Plaintiff in Error, do pay or cause to be paid to the Defendant in Error, the Sum of Forty Pounds for his Costs, by Reason of the Delay of the Execution of the said Judgement.

Derby Paving Bill, Petition against.

Upon reading the Petition of the several Persons whose Names are thereunto subscribed, on Behalf of themselves and others, being Freeholders, Owners, or Occupiers of Houses, Lands, and Tenements, or Burgesses within the Borough of Derby, taking Notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act for paving, cleansing, lighting, and otherwise improving the Streets, Lanes, and other Public Passages and Places within the Borough of Derby; and for selling a certain Piece of Waste Ground, situate within the said Borough, called Nun's Green, towards defraying the Expence of the said Improvements;" and praying Their Lordships, "That they may be heard by themselves or Counsel against such Parts of the said Bill, as may injure or affect them, and that the same may not pass into a Law, as it now stands, or that the Petitioners may have such other Relief in the Premises, as to Their Lordships shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

East India Judicature Act, Committee touching, revived.

Ordered, That the Committee appointed to report the Names of those Lords, who shall appear to hold, or to have held any of the Offices or Employments specified in an Act made in the 26th Year of His present Majesty, for the further Regulation of the Trial of Persons accused of certain Offences committed in the East Indies, and for other Purposes therein mentioned; be revived, and meet To-morrow.

Middleton Road Bill.

The Lord Bishop of Carlisle reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair, the Road leading from the Hoodgate at the West End of the Town of Middleton in Teesdale, in the County of Durham, to the Gate in the New Enclosure, called the Edge, near the Collieries called West Pitts, in the Parish of Saint Andrews Auckland, in the same County; and also a Branch from the said Road, at or near the Head of the Town of Egleston, to Egleston Bridge, over the River Tees," was committed: "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Langport, &c. Roads Bill.

The Lord Bishop of Carlisle made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for continuing and amending Two Acts of the Twenty-sixth Year of King George the Second, and the Eighteenth Year of His present Majesty, for repairing, amending, and widening the Road leading from the Red Post, in the Parish of Fivehead, through the Towns of Langport and Somerton, to Butwell, and several other Roads therein mentioned, in the County of Somerset; and for repairing, amending, and widening certain other Roads within the said County," was committed.

National Debt Reduction Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty the Sum of Four hundred thousand Pounds, to be issued and paid to the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, to be by them placed to the Account of the Commissioners for the Reduction of the National Debt:"

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Cathcart reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Brewers' Excise Frauds Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual preventing of Frauds in the Revenue of Excise by Common Brewers."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Cathcart reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Tea Certificates Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for repealing certain Regulations with respect to Certificates on exporting Tea to Ireland or America."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Cathcart reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House without any Amendment."

Auctioneers' Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to compel Auctioneers to declare whether Sales have been held under the Notices now required to be given by Law."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Cathcart reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to Report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Body Warrants Excise Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the better Execution of certain Warrants issued for the apprehending and committing Persons convicted of Offences against the Excise Laws."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Cathcart reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House without any Amendment."

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Veneris, tricesimum diem instantis Martii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Veneris, 30o Martii 1792.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Carliol.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Comes Kellie.
Comes Lauderdale.
Comes Graham.
Viscount Stormont.
Ds. Grenville, Unus Primariorum Secretariorum.
Ds. Willoughby Br.
Ds. Cathcart.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Boston.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Gage.
Ds. Sommers.
Ds. Fife.

PRAYERS.

Jameson et al. against Russell and Sawes.

After hearing Counsel in Part in the Cause wherein John Jameson and others are Appellants, and John Russell and John Sawes are Respondents:

It is Ordered, That the further hearing of the said Cause be put off to Monday next; and that the rest of the Causes be removed in Course.

Bills passed by Commission.

The Lord Chancellor acquainted the House, "That His Majesty had been pleased to issue a Commission to several Lords therein named, for declaring His Royal Assent to several Acts agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament."

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Then Three of the Lords Commissioners, being in their Robes, and seated on a Form placed between the Throne and the Woolsack, the Lord Chancellor in the Middle, with the Lord Archbishop of Canterbury on his Right Hand, and the Earl Graham and the Lord Grenville on his Left, commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to signify to the Commons, "The Lords Commissioners desire their immediate Attendance in this House, to hear the Commission read."

Who being come, with their Speaker;

The Lord Chancellor said,

My Lords, and Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

His Majesty, not thinking fit to be personally present here at this Time, has been pleased to cause a Commission to be issued under the Great Seal, and there by given His Royal Assent to divers Acts which have been agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament, the Titles whereof are particularly mentioned; and by the said Commission hath commanded Us to declare and notify His Royal Assent to the said several Acts, in the Presence of you the Lords and Commons assembled for that Purpose; which Commission you will now hear read."

Then the said Commission was read by the Clerk, as follows; (videlicet)

GEORGE R.

George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth: To our right trusty and and right well-beloved the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and to Our trusty and well-beloved the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses, and the Commissioners for Shires and Burghs of the House of Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, Greeting: Whereas We have seen and perfectly understood divers and sundry Acts agreed and accorded on by you Our loving Subjects, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and the Commons in this Our present Parliament assembled, and endorsed by you as hath been accustomed, the Titles and Names of which Acts hereafter do particularly ensue, (that is to say) "An Act for raising a certain Sum of Money by Loans or Exchequer Bills, for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and ninety-two." "An Act for raising a further Sum of Money by Loans or Exchequer Bills, for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and ninety-two." "An Act to continue the Laws now in Force for regulating the Trade between the Subjects of His Majesty's Dominions and the Inhabitants of the Territories belonging to the United States of America, so far as the same relate to the Trade and Commerce carried on between this Kingdom and the Inhabitants of the Countries belonging to the said United States." An Act for providing a Workhouse for the Reception of the Poor of the Parish of Stone, in the County of Stafford, and for regulating and employing the Poor therein." "An Act for taking down the Church, Chancel, and Tower, belonging to the Parish of Saint Mary Magdalen, in Bridgnorth, in the County of Salop, and for re-building the same, and for enlarging the Burial Ground of the said Parish." An Act for altering, raising, widening, repairing, and preserving, the Road leading from the North End of the Turnpike Road called The Coal Road, near West Auckland, in the County of Durham, to the Elsdon Turnpike Road at or near Elishaw, in the County of Northumberland, and for erecting, building, and making necessary and convenient Bridges, Mounts, and Batteries upon the same." "An Act for continuing the Term and altering and enlarging the Powers of an Act of the Thirteenth Year of His present Majesty, for repairing the Road from Cherrill, through Calne to Studley Bridge, and from Cherrill to the Three Mile Burrough at the Top of Cherrill Hill, in the County of Wilts, and for more effectually amending the Turnpike Road from Chittoe Heath to the Town of Calne." "An Act for enlarging the Term and altering the Powers of an Act made in the Eleventh Year of His present Majesty's Reign, for repairing and widening the Roads from Hand Cross to Corner House, and from thence to the Turnpike Road leading from Horsham to Steyning, and from Corner House aforesaid, to the Maypole in the Town of Henfield, in the County of Sussex, and also for keeping in Repair a certain Branch of Road leading from the Direction Post, near a certain Place called The Crab Tree, in the Parish of Beeding, otherwise Seal, through the Parishes of Nuthurst and Horsham, to the Town of Horsham, in the said County." "An Act for enlarging the Term of an Act of the Tenth Year of His present Majesty, for repairing and widening the Road from Upton, in the Parish of Ratley, to the North End of Bridge Street, in the Town of Great Kington, and from thence to the Guide Post at the Town of Wellesbourne Hastings, in the County of Warwick." "An Act for repairing and widening the Road leading out of the Turnpike Road from Dover, through Folkestone to Hythe, at a certain Place called Canterbury Lane, within the Liberty of the Town of Folkestone, to a certain Place in the Parish of Folkestone called Mudshole, and for making a new Road from thence through a certain Field called Yaldergates, through Rainden Wood over Swingfield Minnis through Denton, and for repairing and widening the Road from thence to the Direction Post on Barham Downs, in the Parish of Barham, at the Four Vents." "An Act for enlarging and altering the Terms and Powers of two Acts of Parliament made and passed in the Eighteenth and Twenty-second Years of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Second, for repairing the High Road leading from Boroughbridge, in the County of York, through Northallerton, in the same County, to Croft Bridge, on the River Tees, and from thence through Darlington, in the County of Durham, to the City of Durham, and for reducing the said Acts into one, and for the more effectually repairing and keeping in Repair the said Road." An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair the several Roads or Branches of Road leading from the Parishes of Yoxford, Saxmundham, and Benhall, in the County of Suffolk, to the Town of Aldeburgh, in the said County." "An Act for dividing and allotting several Open and Common Lands and Grounds within the Parish of Avebury, in the County of Wilts." "An Act for dividing and enclosing certain Commons or Waste Lands, being Parts of Mendip, Lyatt, and Dinder Hill, within the Parishes of Croscombe and Dinder, in the County of Somerset." An Act to enable Gilbert Trowe Beckett Esquire, and his Issue Male, to take the Name and bear the Arms of Turner, pursuant to the Will of Martha Turner Widow, deceased." "An Act for naturalizing Richard Walker." "An Act for naturalizing John Alphonso Doxat and Charles Frederick Brandt." "An Act for naturalizing John Mark Gourgas and James Soret." "An Act for naturalizing John William Hentig and Jacob Anderson." "An Act for naturalizing Herman Schroder." "And albeit the said Acts by you Our said Subjects the Lords and Commons in this Our present Parliament assembled, are fully agreed and consented unto, yet nevertheless the same are not of Force and Effect in the Law without Our Royal Assent given and put to the said Acts; and forasmuch as for divers Causes and Considerations, We cannot conveniently at this Time be present in Our Royal Person, in the Higher House of Our said Parliament, being the Place accustomed to give our Royal Assent to such Acts as have been agreed upon by you Our said Subjects the Lords and Commons, We have therefore caused these Our Letters Patent to be made, and have signed the same; and by the same do give and put Our Royal Assent to the said Acts, and to all Articles, Clauses, and Provisions therein contained, and have fully agreed and assented to the said Acts; Willing that the said Acts, and every Article, Clause, Sentence, and Provision therein contained, from henceforth shall be of the same Strength, Force, and Effect, as if We had been personally present in the said Higher House, and had openly and publicly in the Presence of you all assented to the same: And We do by these Presents declare and notify the same Our Royal Assent as well to you the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons aforesaid, as to all others whom it may concern: Commanding also, by these Presents, Our right trusty and well-beloved Counsellor Edward Lord Thurlow, Our Chancellor of Great Britain, to seal these Our Letters Patent with Our Great Seal of Great Britain; and also, commanding Our most dear and entirely beloved Son and most faithful Counsellor George Prince of Wales; Our most dear Sons and faithful Counsellors Frederick Duke of York, William Duke of Clarence; Our most dear Brother and faithful Counsellor William Duke of Gloucester; the Most Reverend Father in God Our right trusty and well-beloved Counsellor John Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate and Metropolitan of all England; Our said Chancellor of Great Britain; Our right trusty and right well-beloved Cousin and Counsellor Charles Earl Camden, President of Our Council; Our right trusty and entirely beloved Cousin and Counselsellor Granville Marquis of Stafford, Keeper of Our Privy Seal; Our right trusty and right entirely beloved Cousins and Counsellors John Frederick Duke of Dorset, Steward of Our Household; Charles Duke of Richmond; James Duke of Montrose, Master of Our Horse; Our right trusty and entirely beloved Cousins and Counsellors James Marquis of Salisbury, Chamberlain of Our Household; Thomas Marquis of Bath, Groom of Our Stole; Our right trusty and right well-beloved Cousin and Counsellor John Earl of Chatham, First Commissioner of Our Admiralty; and Our right trusty and well-beloved Counsellors William Wyndham Lord Grenville, One of Our Principal Secretaries of State; Charles Lord Hawkesbury, and Lloyd Lord Kenyon Our Chief Justice assigned to hold Pleas before Us, or any Three or more of them, to declare and notify this Our Royal Assent in Our Absence in the said Higher House, in the Presence of you, the said Lords and the Commons of Our Parliament, there to be assembled for that Purpose, and the Clerk of Our Parliaments to endorse the said Acts, with such Terms and Words in Our Name, as is requisite, and hath been accustomed for the same; and also to enroll these Our Letters Patent, and the said Acts in the Parliament Roll, and these Our Letters Patent shall be to every of them a sufficient Warrant in that Behalf: And finally, We do declare and will, that after this Our Royal Assent given and passed by these Presents, and declared and notified as is aforesaid, then and immediately the said Acts shall be taken, accepted, and admitted good, sufficient, and perfect Acts of Parliament and Laws to all Intents, Constructions, and Purposes, and to be put in due Execution accordingly; the Continuance or Dissolution of this Our Parliament, or any other Use, Custom, Thing, or Things to the contrary thereof notwithstanding: In Witness whereof, We have caused these Our Letters to be made Patent.

Witness Ourself at Westminster the Thirtieth Day of March, in the Thirty-second Year of Our Reign.

By the King Himself, signed with His own Hand.

"Yorke."

Then the Lord Chancellor said,

In Obedience to His Majesty's Commands, and by Virtue of the Commission which has been now read, We do declare and notify to you the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and Commons, in Parliament assembled, That His Majesty hath given His Royal Assent to the said Acts in the Commission mentioned; and the Clerks are required to pass the same in the usual Form and Words."

Then the Clerk Assistant, having received the Money Bills from the Hands of the Speaker, brought them to the Table, where the Deputy Clerk of the Crown read the Titles of those and the other Bills to be passed, severally, as follow; (videlicet)

1. "An Act for raising a certain Sum of Money by Loans or Exchequer Bills, for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and ninety-two."

2. "An Act for raising a further Sum of Money by Loans or Exchequer Bills, for the Service of the Year One thousand seven hundred and ninety-two."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant, in these Words; (videlicet)

"Le Roy remercie ses bons Sujets, accepte leur Benevolence, et ainsi le veult."

3. "An Act to continue the Laws now in Force, for regulating the Trade between the Subjects of His Majesty's Dominions, and the Inhabitants of the Territories belonging to the United States of America, so far as the same relate to the Trade and Commerce carried on between this Kingdom and the Inhabitants of the Countries belonging to the said United States."

4. "An Act for providing a Workhouse for the Reception of the Poor of the Parish of Stone, in the County of Stafford; and for regulating and employing the Poor therein."

5. "An Act for taking down the Church, Chancel and Tower, belonging to the Parish of Saint Mary Magdalen in Bridgnorth, in the County of Salop; and for rebuilding the same, and for enlarging the Burial Ground of the said Parish."

6. "An Act for altering, raising, widening, repairing and preserving the Road leading from the North End of the Turnpike Road called The Coal Road, near West Auckland, in the County of Durham, to the Elsdon Turnpike Road at or near Elishaw, in the County of Northumberland; and for erecting, building, and making necessary and convenient Bridges, Mounts, and Batteries upon the same."

7. "An Act for continuing the Term, and altering and enlarging the Powers of an Act of the Thirteenth Year of His present Majesty, for repairing the Road from Cherrill, through Calne to Studley Bridge, and from Cherrill to the Three Mile Borough at the Top of Cherrill Hill, in the County of Wilts; and for more effectually amending the Turnpike Road from Chittoe Heath to the Town of Calne."

8. "An Act for enlarging the Term, and altering the Powers of an Act made in the Eleventh Year of His present Majesty's Reign, for repairing and widening the Roads from Hand Cross to Corner House, and from thence to the Turnpike Road leading from Horsham to Steyning, and from Corner House aforesaid, to the Maypole in the Town of Henfield, in the County of Sussex; and also for keeping in Repair a certain Branch of Road leading from the Direction Post near a certain Place called The Crab Tree, in the Parish of Beeding, otherwise Seal, through the Parishes of Nuthurst and Horsham, to the Town of Horsham, in the said County."

9. "An Act for enlarging the Term of an Act of the Tenth Year of His present Majesty, for repairing and widening the Road from Upton, in the Parish of Ratley, to the North End of Bridge Street, in the Town of Great Kington, and from thence to the Guide Post at the Town of Wellesbourne Hastings, in the County of Warwick."

10. "An Act for repairing and widening the Road leading out of the Turnpike Road from Dover, through Folkestone to Hythe, at a certain Place called Canterbury Lane, within the Liberty of the Town of Folkestone, to a certain Place in the Parish of Folkestone called Mudshole; and for making a new Road from thence, through a certain Field called Yaldergates, through Rainden Wood over Swingfield Minnis, through Denton; and for repairing and widening the Road from thence to the Direction Post on Barham Downs, in the Parish of Barham, at the Four Vents."

11. "An Act for enlarging and altering the Terms and Powers of two Acts of Parliament, made and passed in the Eighteenth and Twenty-second Years of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Second, for repairing the High Road leading from Boroughbridge, in the County of York, through Northallerton in the same County, to Croft Bridge on the River Tees, and from thence through Darlington, in the County of Durham, to the City of Durham, and for reducing the said Acts into one; and for the more effectually repairing and keeping in Repair the said Road."

12. "An Act for amending, widening and keeping in Repair the several Roads or Branches of Road leading from the Parishes of Yoxford, Saxmundbam, and Benhall, in the County of Suffolk, to the Town of Aldeburgh, in the said County."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant in these Words; (videlicet)

"Le Roy le veult."

13. "An Act for dividing and allotting several Open and Common Lands and Grounds within the Parish of Avebury, in the County of Wilts."

14. "An Act for dividing and enclosing certain Commons or Waste Lands, being Parts of Mendip, Lyatt, and Dinder Hill, within the Parishes of Croscombe and Dinder, in the County of Somerset."

15. "An Act to enable Gilbert Trowe Beckett Esquire, and his Issue Male, to take the Name and bear the Arms of Turner, pursuant to the Will of Martha Turner Widow, deceased."

16. "An Act for naturalizing Richard Walker."

17. "An Act for naturalizing John Alphonso Doxat, and Charles Frederick Brandt."

18. "An Act for naturalizing John Mark Gourgas, and James Soret."

19 "An Act for naturalizing John William Hentig, and Jacob Anderson."

20 "An Act for naturalizing Herman Schroder."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant, in these Words; (videlicet)

"Soit fait comme il est desiré."

Then the Commons withdrew.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Sunderland Keelmen Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hobart and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for establishing a permanent Fund for the Relief and Support of Skippers and Keelmen, employed in the Coal Trade on the River Wear, in the County of Durham, who by Sickness or other accidental Misfortunes, or by old Age, shall not be able to maintain themselves and their Families, and also for the Relief of the Widows and Children of such Skippers and Keelmen;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Turkdean Enclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hobart and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open Fields, Downs, Commons, and Commonable Lands within the Parish of Turkdean, in the County of Gloucester;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Broadwell Enclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hobart and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open and Common Fields, Common Meadows, Common Pastures, Commonable Lands, and Waste Grounds within the Parish of Broadwell, in the County of Gloucester;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Uffington Enclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir John Thorold and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing, and enclosing the Common and Open Fields, Meadows, Commonable Lands, and Waste Grounds, in the Parish of Uffington, in the County of Lincoln;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Four Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Brewers' Excise Frauds Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual preventing of Frauds in the Revenue of Excise, by Common Brewers."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Auctioneers' Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to compel Auctioneers to declare whether Sales have been held under the Notices, now required to be given by Law."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Body Warrants Excise Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the better Execution of certain Warrants, issued for the apprehending and committing Persons convicted of Offences against the Excise Laws."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Tea Certificates Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for repealing certain Regulations with respect to Certificates on exporting Tea to Ireland or America."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Middleton Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair, the Road leading from the Hoodgate, at the West End of the Town of Middleton in Teesdale, in the County of Durham, to the Gate in the new Inclosure called the Edge, near the Collieries called West Pitts, in the Parish of Saint Andrew's Auckland, in the same County; and also a Branch from the said Road, at or near the Head of the Town of Egleston, to Egleston Bridge over the River Tees."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Langport, &c. Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for continuing and amending two Acts of the Twentysixth Year of King George the Second, and the Eighteenth Year of His present Majesty, for repairing, amending, and widening the Road leading from the Red Post in the Parish of Fivehead, through the Towns of Langport and Somerton, to Butwell, and several other Roads therein mentioned, in the County of Somerset; and for repairing, amending, and widening certain other Roads within the said County."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to the Six preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Walker and Mr. Spranger:

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Chapel Road Bill.

The Lord Cathcart reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill intituled, "An Act for repairing and improving the Road from the Town of Chapel-en-le-Frith, to, or near to Enterclough Bridge in the County of Derby; and also the Road from the Village of Hayfield to Marple Bridge, in the said County; and also the Road from the Village of Glossop to a certain Gate called Clayland's Gate, in the Township of Longdendale, on or near to the Side of the Turnpike Road leading from Mottram to Woodhead, in the County Palatine of Chester," was committed: "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Peterborough Road Bill.

The Lord Cathcart made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair, the Road leading from Swanspool Bridge, in the City of Peterborough, in the Town of Thorney, in the Isle of Ely, in the County of Cambridge; and for altering the Course of some Part of the said Road," was committed.

Walton Enclosure Bill.

The Lord Cathcart also reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open Fields, Meadows, Pastures, Commons, and Waste Grounds, within the Parish of Walton-in-the-Woulds, in the County of Leicester," was committed: "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee, and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House without any Amendment."

Knooke Enclosure Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for dividing and allotting in Severalty the Open and Common Fields and Downs, Common Pastures, and Commonable Places in the Parish of Knooke, in the County of Wilts."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

E. Kellie.
E. Lauderdale.
E. Graham.
V. Stormont.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Bp. Bangor.
L. Bp. St. David's.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Grenville.
L. Willoughby Br.
L. Cathcart.
L. Sandys.
L. Boston.
L. Brownlow.
L. Harrowby.
L. Gage.
L. Sommers.
L. Fife.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Monday next, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Wilmot's Divorce Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of John Wilmot Esquire, with Fanny Sainthill, his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And the Lord Cathcart reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and made some Amendments thereto, which he was ready to report when the House will please to receive the same."

Ordered, That the said Report be received on Monday next.

Duke and Duchess of York's Establishment Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Earl of Mornington and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable His Majesty to make Provision for the Establishment of their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of York and Albany, and also to settle an Annuity on Her Royal Highness, during the Time of her Natural Life, to commence from the Decease of his said Royal Highness, in case her said Royal Highness shall survive him;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Buckingham Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hobart and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for continuing and amending two Acts of the Seventeenth Year of King George the Second, and the Ninth Year of His present Majesty, so far as relates to repairing the Road from the Town of Buckingham, to the North Extent of the Parish of Hanwell, in the County of Oxford;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Two Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Tonge et Ux. Leave for a Bill:

After reading and considering the Report of the Judges to whom was referred the Petition of Henry Tonge Esquire, and Ann Eliza his Wife, praying Leave in bring in a Private Bill, for the Purposes therein mentioned:

It is Ordered, That Leave be given to bring in a Bill, pursuant to the said Petition and Report.

Bill read.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable the Trustees in the Settlement executed on the Marriage of Henry Tonge Esquire, and Ann Eliza his Wife, to sell and dispose of a Capital Messuage or Mansion House, and other Hereditaments in the County of Somerset, and to lay out the Money arising from the Sale thereof, in the Purchase of Old South Sea Annuities, upon the Trusts of the said Settlement."

Middleton Tyas Lane Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to continue the Term of two Acts of the Seventeenth Year of King George the Second, and the Eleventh Year of His present Majesty, for repairing the Road leading from the End of Middleton Tyas Lane, over Gatherley Moor to Greta Bridge, and from thence to Bowes, in the North Riding of the County of York."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Monday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Report, East India Judicature:

The Lord Cathcart reported from the Lords Committees, to whom was re-committed the Report made from the Committee on the 27th of this instant March, appointed to consider the Titles of the Lords that appeared upon the List reported from the Committee on Monday last; and to report the Names of those who shall appear to hold any of the Offices or Employments specified in an Act made in the Twenty-sixth Year of His present Majesty, for the further Regulation of the Trial of Persons accused of certain Offences committed in the East Indies; and for other Purposes therein mentioned: "That the Committee had met, and examined the Matter to them referred, and that it doth not appear to them, that any of the Lords, whose Titles are contained in the said List, now holds any Civil Office of Profit under the Crown, during His Majesty's Pleasure, or now holds, or heretofore held any of the Offices or Employments mentioned in the said Act of Parliament, as Disabilities from serving according to the said Act."

It was moved, "To agree with the Committee in the said Report."

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Titles to be transmitted to Clerk of the Crown.

Ordered, That the said Titles be transmitted to the Clerk of the Crown in His Majesty's High Court of Chancery, or his Deputy, by the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, under his Hand and Seal, pursuant to the Directions of the said Act.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Sabbati, tricesimum primum diem instantis Martii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Sabbati, 31o Martii 1792.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Carliol. Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius. Ds. Cathcart.

PRAYERS.

Duke and Duchess of York's Establishment Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable His Majesty to make Provision for the Establishment of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of York and Albany; and also to settle an Annuity on Her Royal Highness during the Time of Her Natural Life, to commence from the Decease of His said Royal Highness, in case Her said Royal Highness shall survive him."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Monday next.

Turkdean Enclosure Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open Fields, Downs, Commons, and Commonable Lands within the Parish of Turkdean, in the County of Gloucester."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

L. Bp. Carlisle. L. Cathcart.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Monday the 16th Day of April next, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Broadwell Enclosure Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open and Common Fields, Common Meadows, Common Pastures, Commonable Lands, and Waste Grounds, within the Parish of Broadwell, in the County of Gloucester."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Tuesday the 17th Day of April next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Buckingham Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for continuing and amending two Acts of the Seventeenth Year of King George the Second, and the Ninth Year of His present Majesty, so far as relates to repairing the Road from the Town of Buckingham to the North Extent of the Parish of Hanwell, in the County of Oxford."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Wednesday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Chapel Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for repairing and improving the Road from the Town of Chapel en le Frith to or near to Enterclough Bridge, in the County of Derby; and also the Road from the Village of Hayfield to Marple Bridge, in the said County; and also the Road from the Village of Glossop to a certain Gate called Claylands Gate, in the Township of Longdendale, on or near to the Side of the Turnpike Road leading from Mottram to Woodhead, in the County Palatine of Chester."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Peterborough Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair the Road leading from Swanspool Bridge, in the City of Peterborough, in the Town of Thorney, in the Isle of Ely, in the County of Cambridge; and for altering the Course of some Part of the said Road."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Walton Enclosure Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for dividing and enclosing the Open Fields, Meadows, Pastures, Commons, and Waste Grounds, within the Parish of Walton-in-the-Woulds, in the County of Leicester."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to the Three preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, ordered to be sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Walker and Mr. Spranger:

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Lunæ, secundum diem Aprilis, jam prox. sequen., horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.