Amersham

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1912

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'Amersham', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Buckinghamshire, Volume 1: South (1912), pp. 1-14. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=121011 Date accessed: 26 July 2014.


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SCHEDULE A.

AN INVENTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL MONUMENTS IN SOUTH BUCKINGHAMSHIRE

ACCREDITED TO A DATE ANTERIOR TO 1700, arranged by Parishes.

(Unless otherwise stated the dimensions given in the Inventory are internal.)

1. AMERSHAM.

(O.S. 6 in. xliii. N.W.)

Ecclesiastical

(1). Parish Church of St. Mary, N. of the High Street, is built of flint, the tower of flint mixed with stone. The roofs of the Drake chapel and S. chapel are covered with slate and the other roofs with lead. The Chancel, the Nave, except the western bay, and the Transepts were built probably in the 13th century; c. 1310 the nave was lengthened, the South Aisle added, and, a little later, the North Aisle was built. The West Tower and the North Chapel, E. of the N. transept, were added probably c. 1480, and the South Porch was built later in the same century. The Drake Chapel, originally the vestry, N. of the chancel, was added in the 17th century, and enlarged in the 19th century; the South Chapel, or organ-chamber, and the North Vestries were built and the whole church was considerably altered and restored also in the 19th century.

The arches in the nave, opening into the transepts, are especially interesting on account of their unusual form. The brasses in the chancel are worthy of note.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (40½ ft. by 16½ ft.) has an E. window of five lights with tracery, all modern except a few of the inner jamb-stones. In the N. wall a round-headed doorway, of late 17th-century date, opens into the Drake chapel, and a 15th-century four-centred arch, with moulded jambs, bases and capitals, opens into the N. chapel. In the S. wall the three windows retain only some old jamb-stones; the two western windows form a clearstorey and were probably re-set when the chancel was made higher in 1870: in the middle of the wall is a modern doorway, and further W. a modern arch opens into the S. chapel. The 13th-century chancel arch was heightened in 1870, and is two-centred, of two chamfered orders, with halfoctagonal responds, repaired with modern Bath stone. The Drake Chapel (45½ ft. by 21½ ft., E. half, and 16 ft., W. half) contains only modern detail. The North Chapel, formerly the Raans Chapel, and used as a mortuary until 1908 (19 ft. by 17½ ft.) has, in the E. wall, a recess, probably a blocked single-light window of the 15th century. In the N. wall is a modern arch, with a doorway in it opening into the N. vestry, and a modern window above it. In the W. wall is a moulded two-centred 15th-century arch, opening into the N. transept; the bases and jambs have been partly cut away for a former screen. The South Chapel, including the two arches opening into the S. transept, is modern, but some old jamb-stones are re-set in the windows. The Nave (74½ ft. by 16½ ft.) has, on each side, an arch, probably of the 13th century, opening into the transept, and an arcade of four bays, of early 14th-century date; the arches opening into the transepts were pointed like those of the arcades, but in 1870 the present stilted, three-centred arches of two chamfered orders were found in the walls and restored; they were evidently heightened for a rood-loft, probably in the 15th century, but the head of the N. arch is of 13th-century stones, re-set. The N. arcade has two-centred arches of two chamfered orders, octagonal columns, half-octagonal responds, and moulded bases; the S. arcade resembles the other, but has square pillars with attached semi-circular shafts; in both arcades the pillars were taken down, restored and replaced in 1870; much of the stonework, including the capitals of the N. arcade, has been entirely renewed. The clearstorey is probably of the 15th century, and has five N. and five S. windows, each of two cinque-foiled lights in a square head; the moulded segmental rear arch and the inner jambs are original, the other stonework is modern. The North Transept (21½ ft. by 16½ ft.) has, in the E. wall, near the N. end, a 13th-century lancet, with rebated and chamfered outer jambs, restored; it was blocked with brick when the N. chapel was built in the 15th century, and opened out by moving back the N. wall of the chapel in 1908. In the N. wall of the transept is a large window of three lights and tracery with 14th-century splayed inner jambs which have small shafts; the rest is modern. In the W. wall is a 14th-century window, restored; it is of two lights and tracery under a moulded head and a moulded external label with volute stops; S. of the window an arch opens into the N. aisle, and is of two chamfered orders, all modern, except the N. jamb. The South Transept (21 ft. by 16½ ft.) has, in the S. wall, a modern window with a tomb recess (see Fittings) below it. In the W. wall is a trefoiled lancet, probably of the 14th century, with a chamfered two-centred segmental rear arch; the external stonework is much restored; the arch opening into the S. aisle is modern, except a few stones in the double-chamfered S. jamb. The North Aisle (10½ ft. wide) has three N. windows and one W. window, all modern, except a few of the inner jamb-stones. The South Aisle (10½ ft. wide) has, in the S. wall, at the E. end, a 14th-century window of three lights and tracery, much restored; the S. doorway is modern; W. of it is a small 15th-century doorway with chamfered jambs and pointed head; it is now blocked, but opened originally into a staircase which led to a former upper storey of the porch; it is set low, and indicates the original lower level of the floor: further W. are three windows of two lights; the first has only a few old stones re-set in the inner jambs; the other two windows are of the 14th century, much restored, the westernmost being high up in the wall. In the W. wall is a 15th-century doorway, with chamfered jambs and pointed head, now blocked, formerly the entrance to the stair-turret of the tower. The West Tower (13½ ft. by 13 ft.) is of two stages, with an embattled parapet, and a stair-turret in the S.E. angle. The 15th-century tower arch is two-centred and of two moulded orders; the jambs, bases and capitals are similar to those of the arch between the chancel and N. chapel. The W. doorway and window are modern. In the S. wall is a modern doorway to the stair-turret; over the doorway is a skew arch from the stair-turret to a former gallery floor, and near the arch, visible only outside, is a blocked rectangular opening; the turret is lighted by original loops and the N., S. and W. walls of the ringing-chamber have each an original loop with a four-centred head. The bell-chamber has two modern windows in each wall. The South Porch has only modern detail. The Roof of the nave is of late 14th-century date, and has traceried trusses, with moulded tie beams and braces, traceried spandrels and moulded purlins and ridge; the panels and ribs are modern; the stone corbels, carved as figures of angels and heads, are original. The roofs of the N. and S. transepts are similar to that of the nave, but only one truss in the N. transept and the three trusses in the S. transept are original; three head-corbels in the N. transept, and two in the S. transept are also original. The other roofs are modern, but in the S. aisle are five original corbel-heads over the arcade. In the tower are some old plain timbers in the floor of the ringing-chamber. The S. porch has a 15th-century vaulted roof with moulded ribs, carried on corner shafts having moulded bases and capitals; the bosses are carved with Tudor roses, foliage and grotesque faces, all of clunch.

Fittings—Brasses and Indents. Brasses: In chancel—on N. wall, (1) of Henry Brudenell, 1430, and Eleanor, his wife, daughter of Hugh Preston, man's figure broken below waist, inscription partly filled with white composition; see indent (1). In chancel—on S. wall, (2) of John Drake, 1623, kneeling figure of child, separate plates with inscription and verse; see indent (2). In N. aisle—on N. wall, (3) of Thomas Carbonell, 1439, and Elizabeth, his wife, 1438, woman's figure slightly broken, with inscription; see indent (3); (4) of John de la Penne, 1537 (date added after brass was cut), and Elizabeth, his wife, daughter of Peter Hally, 1521, with inscription; on W. wall, (5) figure of civilian, head missing, probably c. 1440. In S. transept—on E. wall, (6) to Richard Champeneys, draper, 1439, inscription only, much worn. Indents: In nave—at E. end, partly hidden by pulpit, (1) figures of a man and woman, and two shields; see brass (1). In S. transept—(2) figure of child with two inscription plates; see brass (2). In N. transept—at E. end, (3) figures of a man and woman, with inscription plate; see brass (3). Chests: two, in vestry, one, panelled, inscribed T.H. H.M., 17th-century: the other small, plain, with three locks and staples, probably late 16th-century. Door: to ringing chamber from stair-turret of tower, oak, battened, with strap hinges, 15th-century. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In S. transept—in recess in S. wall, (1) stone slab with floriated cross, at base of cross two shields hung from projecting arms, raised border at W. end and on S. side, worn away from the other edges, c. 1350. In chancel—S. of altar platform, (2) part of slab, with raised cross, possibly 14th-century; on S. side, (3) of Montagu, son of Sir William Drake, of Shardeloes, 1698, and Jane (Garrard), his wife, 1724, large recess with black marble sarcophagus, medallions with busts, etc.; on N. side, (4) of Francis Drake, bust in niche, shield with arms above it, inscription undated, late 17th or early 18th century; (5) to Henry Curwen of Workington, 1636. In the Drake chapel— on W. wall, (6) tablet to Joan, wife of Sir Francis Drake of Esher, and daughter of William Tothill of 'Sharlees' (Shardeloes), 1625. Floor-slab: In N. chapel—to Sir Heneage Proby, lord of the manor of Raans, 1662, and Helen, his wife, daughter of Edward Allen, 1678. Piscinæ: in N. chapel, modern copy of original 15th-century piscina: in S. chapel, removed from chancel, with moulded jambs and lancet-pointed, cinque-foiled head, shelf at back, late 14th-century. Recess: in S. wall of S. transept, for tomb, with moulded, four-centred arch, 14th-century. Tiles: in floor of tower, nineteen, about 4 in. square, with patterns, hunting scenes, shields, one with a cross, another with mill-rind cross, and part of inscription, (RICAR) D ME FECIT, late 14th-century. Miscellanea: now in the Rectory garden, part of lancet-head, 13th-century, like that in N. transept; moulded stone and label, 14th-century; arch-stones, 15th-century.

Condition—Good; much restored.

Secular

(2). Panelling and Well-house at the Rectory, ¼ mile N. of the church: the Rectory is of c. 1725, but contains some Panelling of early 17th-century date in one room, probably from the former house. The well-house in the garden, now disused, is timber-framed with brick filling, and probably of the 17th century; it was lengthened at a later date and a large tank was built in the floor. The roof has original king-post trusses and cambered tie-beams with curved braces. The turning post is fixed to the trusses, it was formerly worked by a horse, and has a double-grooved drum at the top for the chains.

Condition—Of panelling, good; of wellhouse, fairly good.

(3). The Brewery, N. of the church, is of two storeys, built probably in the 16th century, but entirely re-faced with 18th and 19th-century brick. The roof is tiled. At the S. end is a chimney stack of 16th-century brick, with remains of arched panels on the E. and W. sides. Inside the house are a few old ceiling-joists, and, on the first floor, is an early 16th-century stone fireplace with moulded jambs and a flat four-centred arch in a square head with traceried spandrels. The Brewery offices, S. of the house, are probably of the same date, but have been re-faced, and retain only a few original ceiling-joists.

Condition—Good.

High Street, N. side, from E. to W.:—

(4). House, formerly the Grammar School, now shops, offices, and a dwelling-house, is of two storeys. The walls are timber-framed, but have been almost entirely re-faced with modern brick. The roofs are tiled. The original building, probably of early 16th-century date, is of rectangular plan, facing S.; at the back is a small E. wing, added probably in 1625, and there are other wings of later dates. The S. front has been re-faced, and has a modern parapet, but part of the soffit of an original bressumer is visible, and probably the upper storey formerly projected; on a modern arch over the entrance is the date 1625. The southern part of the E. side of the house is gabled, and shows the original timber-framing; the E. wing is of timber and brick of later date; at the back the E. wing is gabled, and the main block, at the E. end, has nogging of unusually large bricks (14 by 6½ by 3½ in.). Interior:—There are some chamfered ceiling-beams on the ground floor. The upper storey of the original building was one long room, now divided into four rooms and offices; the four 16th-century queen-post trusses in the roof have cambered tie-beams and curved struts, and the hollow chamfered arches below the collar-beams have sunk spandrels; some of the curved braces are missing, and two ends of the tie-beams are hung on modern iron straps, in front of the large modern windows which cut into the roof.

Condition—Good.

(5). House, now a shop, at the E. corner of Church Street, is of two storeys, built probably in the 17th century, and partly re-faced with modern brick and plaster. The roof is tiled. On the W. side the upper storey retains the original timber-framing, and has two gables. On the ground floor is a 17th-century battened door, and the shop has a chamfered ceiling-beam.

Condition—Fairly good.


Amersham, Plan Shewing Positions of Monuments Described

Amersham, Plan Shewing Positions of Monuments Described

(6). House, at the W. corner of Church Street, is of two storeys, built probably in the 15th century, and timber-framed with plaster filling; the roof is tiled. The plan is rectangular, with a long range of brick and timber stables and outbuildings at the back. The front is covered with plaster, and has a half-hipped gable, cut down from its original shape. The timbers of the upper storey on the E. side have ogee struts, and the lower storey is of modern brick. The staircase has old oak steps and flat, shaped balusters. The original king-post trusses in the roof have cambered tie-beams with curved four-way braces carrying central purlins under the collar-beams.

Condition—Fairly good.

(7). The Market Hall, was built by Sir William Drake of Shardeloes in 1682, as recorded on a stone tablet at the W. end of the building. It is of two storeys, and of rectangular plan; the walls are of brick, with stone dressings; the roof is tiled. The lower storey, paved with stone, is open and has on each of the longer sides an arcade of six bays with rectangular brick piers and plain semi-circular arches with stone keys, a stone string at the springing and another above the arches; the stone quoins have rusticated joints. The upper storey, of red and blue bricks with cemented quoins, has six square windows on each side, with wood frames, mullions and transoms, and iron casements with square leaded panes. Below the two middle windows on the S. side is a stone achievement of arms, Drake impaling Montague. On the N. side the E. bay of the lower storey is blocked by the stairs and lock-up, and three of the windows on the first floor are blocked. At the W. end is an arcade of two bays, the two windows above it are blocked, and between them is the stone tablet with a monogram and the date 1682; the E. end is similar, but the N. arch is blocked by the lock-up. Under the eaves all round is a wood cornice with modillions; the roof is hipped at each end and is flat at the top, with an octagonal wood turret in the middle. The turret has an arched opening on each side, and a pyramidal lead roof with a turned finial; it contains a clock, and a bell inscribed 'C. H. [Christopher Hodson] made me 1682.' At the foot of the staircase in the N.E. corner, leading to the first floor, are some original turned balusters and two short handrails; on one side the balusters are modern. The meeting-room on the first floor has a panelled dado with bolection mouldings; at the W. end is a dais, the W. wall is panelled, and has on it a large painting of the arms of Charles II., with the king's initials. The stairs leading to the roof have original moulded handrails and turned balusters; the roof is of oak, with large king-post trusses.

Condition—Fairly good outside, a few of the bricks are decayed. The interior is bad and needs general repair. The tiles of the roof have slipped from the ridge, leaving holes, which expose the timbers to the weather. (fn. 1)

(8). The Gables, W. of the Market Hall, is a house of two storeys and an attic, built probably in the second half of the 16th century, and now covered with cement. The roofs are tiled. The plan is rectangular, facing S., with modern additions at the back. The front has two curvilinear gables with pinnacles at the apices; on the ground floor are two projecting bays, finished with a moulded cornice; in the W. bay is a mullioned window, and in the E. bay a doorway and small modern window; above them, on the first floor, are two similar bays, with mullioned windows and a moulded cornice; the attic windows in the gables are mullioned. A room on the ground floor has a fireplace of late 16th-century date, of Totternhoe stone, with moulded jambs and a three-centred arch in a square head; the room above it has an elaborate oak fireplace and overmantel of c. 1640; the jambs have enriched pilasters, and above the carved mantelshelf are three Caryatid pilasters with arched panels between them; the jambs, shafts and arches are covered with arabesque patterns, and the spandrels are carved with eagles; the moulded cornice has a carved frieze. One room on the ground floor and two on the first floor are lined with oak panelling of late 16th or early 17th-century date.

Condition—Good.

(9). House, adjoining (8) and (10), is of two storeys and an attic, built of timber and brick probably in the first half of the 17th century; it was re-fronted and heightened in the 18th century, and a room was added at the back in 1803. The roofs are tiled. The front is covered with plaster, and has a large covered gateway at the W. end. A wing at the back, containing the kitchen, etc., is of old timber and brick, now covered with whitewash; it is gabled at the N. end, and has a central chimney stack, partly of early 17th-century brick. The kitchen has a chamfered beam in the ceiling, and a large open fireplace with corner seats; in the room above it is a 17th-century cupboard-door of oak battens.

Condition—Good.

(10). Tresco House, is of two storeys, built probably early in the 17th century, on an L-shaped plan, with the main block facing the street, and the short wing on the N.W. The front has been re-faced with 18th-century brick; the W. end retains the original timber-framing, with brick filling; the back of the main block, with three gables, is also original, but has been white-washed, and there are some original outbuildings at the N. end. The roofs are tiled. On the first floor is some oak panelling of early 17th-century date and a panelled overmantel, of a slightly later period, with bolection moulding and half-round pilasters, probably part of a larger design.

Condition—Fairly good.

(11). House, now a shop, about 60 yards W. of the Market Hall, is of two storeys, covered with plaster; the roof is tiled. It was built in the 16th century, or possibly at an earlier date, and may have been part of the house on the W. (See (12).) The plan is rectangular, with a modern addition of one storey in front, forming the shop. On the E. side is a chimney stack built of thin bricks, with one square shaft, set diagonally. In the front room on the ground floor is a large fireplace, and in the back room is a moulded ceiling-joist of 16th-century or possibly earlier date. On the first floor is a fireplace with a roughly-made overmantel of plaster, consisting of two round-headed arches, with keystones, abaci, etc., in low relief; in the front room one of the trusses of the roof is visible, with queen-posts, cambered tie-beam and curved strut.

Condition—Fairly good.

(12). House, now a shop, adjoining (11), is of two storeys and an attic, built probably in the 16th century, on a rectangular plan; the short wing on the N.E., making the plan L-shaped, was probably added in the 17th century. In front the upper storey is of original timber, now covered with plaster, the lower storey has been re-faced; at the W. end is a large gateway, and at the E. end is a wide gable with a gabled dormer window W. of it. The back is also gabled and covered with plaster. The E. wing is lower than the older part of the house, and is of brick and timber; the roofs are tiled. The shop is lined on two sides with late 16th or early 17th-century panelling, now painted, and on the first floor is a panelled door of the same date. The oak staircase is original, and the roof-trusses are similar to those in (11).

Condition—Fairly good.

(13). House, about 110 yards W. of the Market Hall, is of two storeys, built of brick and timber in the 17th century, but now much altered; the roof is tiled. The building is set back from the street, and has, in front, an original gable and a one-storeyed modern shop. The central chimney stack is of thin bricks. Inside the house are some old ceiling-beams and a large open fireplace.

Condition—Fairly good.

(14). The Elephant and Castle Inn, is of two storeys and an attic, built probably early in the 17th century, and timber-framed, much altered and covered with modern rough-cast. The roof is tiled. The front has two gables, and at the E. end a rectangular chimney stack is of thin bricks and has a moulded base.

Condition—Fairly good.

(15). House, 270 yards W. of the Market Hall, now three cottages, is of two storeys and an attic, built of brick and timber early in the 17th century, much altered and re-faced with brick in the 18th century. The roof is tiled. The plan was originally of half-H shape, but the space between the wings has been enclosed. At the back the gable at each end is original; the gable in the middle is modern. The central chimney stack is of 17th-century brick; another stack at the E. end is of slightly later date.

Condition—Good.

(16). House, opposite the Almshouses, is of two storeys, the upper storey partly in the roof, with two dormer windows. It was built probably in the 17th century and is timber-framed, partly whitewashed; the brick filling at the back is modern; the roof is tiled.

Condition—Good.

(17–19). Houses, three, adjoining, are each of the 17th century. The easternmost house, 400 yards W. of the Market Hall, is of two storeys, encased with flint and brick in the middle of the 17th century; the two gables in front are of brick and timber; the central chimney stack, of thin bricks, appears to be of earlier date than the flint walls. The second house, No. 78, now two shops, is of two storeys and an attic, almost entirely re-faced with modern brick; the two gables at the back, and two dormer windows in front are of original brick and timber. The westernmost house is of two storeys, built of brick, now much restored and enlarged; the chimney stack is original. The roofs of all the houses are tiled.

Condition—Fairly good.

(20–23). Houses, four, now twelve small cottages, known as 'Turpin's Row', are of two storeys, built in the 17th century. The easternmost house stands at right angles to the others, and has a modern brick front and E. side; the back is of 17th-century timber construction, with plaster filling; the remains of a projecting chimney stack and fireplace, now external, show that the building formerly extended further towards the N. The second house, now five cottages, is of brick, and has the date 1678 on the central chimney stack. The third house, now three cottages, was probably of half-H plan, as shown by the heavier beams at each end of the S. front; the middle cottage has lighter beams and was apparently built out flush with the others at a later period; the brick filling is probably of late 17th or early 18th-century date. The plan of the westernmost house, now three cottages, is L-shaped; the upper storey is of brick and timber, the lower storey partly of modern brick; the three chimney stacks, of which probably only the middle stack is original, are all restored at the top. The roofs of all the houses are tiled. One or two rooms in each house have original beams in the ceilings.

Condition—Fairly good.

(24). The Town Mill and House, now a flour mill, but originally a paper mill, are at the W. end of the street. The Mill is of two storeys, the House of two storeys and an attic; the mill and back part of the house were built at the beginning of the 17th century, or possibly earlier, of brick and timber, the mill being partly weather-boarded and restored with modern brick; the front block, of about the same size as the original house, is of red brick with black headers, and was added late in the 17th century, when the W. wall of the older block was re-faced with similar brick. The roofs are tiled. The plan is L-shaped; the short wing faces S., and the mill, which forms the long narrow wing on the E. side, extends towards the N. The S. front has a plain string-course between the storeys; the lower storey has a doorway in the middle with two windows and a narrow recess, or blocked window, on each side; the upper storey has similar windows. At the back of the house the lower storey is restored with modern brick; the upper storey has a wide mullioned window of eight lights, and the attic has an original dormer window, of three lights, with a gabled head. The W. end of the house has two gables, with a chimney stack in the middle of the southern gable and a flat string-course at the level of the upper floor; the older or N. block retains an original door-frame and a mullioned window on the ground floor. The E. end resembles the W. end, but the mill covers the N. half, and is gabled at both ends. The interior of the mill has been altered, but some of the original rough timbers and wall-posts are visible; the roof also retains some old timbers, but has been much restored; one beam is dated 1700, when a new 'Pitt wheel' was put in, and another beam 1701, when a 'new stone' was set.

Condition—Fairly good.

S. side, from W. to E.:

(25). Little Shardeloes, stands in a garden at the W. end of the street, and is a house of two storeys and an attic, built of brick, formerly whitewashed or plastered. The roofs are tiled. The plan is roughly of half-H shape, facing N. The main block is of late 17th-century date; the S.E. wing was added in the 18th century, and the S.W. wing in the 19th century. The N. Elevation has three gables, and in the middle a two-storeyed porch, also gabled; the doorway is round-headed, with projecting abaci and keystone, and has a moulded architrave with frieze, cornice and pediment. The E. Elevation has, flush with the wall, two gables, the S. gable incomplete; behind that on the N., set back from the wall, is a higher gable above the roof; a projecting string-course, with a moulded lower edge, marks the level of the first floor; the line of junction with the S.E. wing is marked by a straight joint. The S. Elevation of the main block has two original gables; an original doorway on the ground floor is said to have been the former main entrance, and has an old oak door with strap hinges; on the W. side of the S.E. wing is a gable above the roof, set back from the wall below it. The chimney stack near the W. end of the original part of the house is of late 17th-century brick.

Condition—Good; some ivy on the walls.

(26–27). The Swan Inn and House, W. of it, are each of two storeys and an attic, and are dated, the Swan Inn 1671, and the house 1678. The House is rectangular, gabled on each side, and retains much of the original timber-framing with brick filling, partly whitewashed; on the N. front the lower storey is of modern brick. The chimney stack on the W. side is probably original. Over a fireplace on the first floor is the date 1678. The staircase to the attic is of old oak. The Swan Inn is of irregular plan, with a shallow projecting wing at each end in front, and modern additions at the back. The front is re-faced with modern brick; each wing is gabled and has a modern two-storeyed bay window. At the back some of the original timber-framing of the upper storey remains. The rectangular central chimney has a panel on the S. side bearing the date 1671. Some of the rooms have stop-chamfered beams in the ceilings.

Condition—Good.

(28). House, probably formerly an inn, now two cottages, adjoining (27), is of two storeys and an attic, built late in the 17th century and altered in the 18th century. The front is of red brick with black headers, and has a large covered gateway, inserted or made higher in the 18th century; W. of the gateway are two original windows with central mullions and transoms; other original windows have been blocked. The W. end of the building now forms one of the cottages, and is re-fronted with modern brick. At the back, E. of the gateway, is an original projecting chimney stack. On the ground floor are two wide fireplaces, partly blocked, and stop-chamfered beams in the ceilings. At the E. end is an oak staircase with an original battened door at the bottom, and three similar doors at the top; a second staircase also has an original door at the top. The upper rooms show the constructional timbers.

Condition—Fairly good.

(29). Almshouses, six, are of one storey, endowed and built in 1657 by Sir William Drake, Baronet, of Shardeloes, as recorded by a tablet on the N. wall. The walls are of brick; the roofs are tiled.

The building is a good dated example of 17th-century brickwork.

The houses form three sides of a courtyard, with a wall and gateway on the fourth side. There are two houses in each wing. The gabled ends of the E. and W. wings face the street; in each is a large round-headed recess, flanked by shallow pilasters with moulded caps and bases, supporting a moulded entablature, all in brick; the central gateway is of similar detail, but the head has been restored. Courtyard elevations:— The E. and W. elevations have each two doorways, with four-centred heads, and three mullioned windows; the S. elevation has a central archway opening into a passage through the wing; on each side of it is a doorway and a three-light window similar to the others; above the archway is a gable containing, in a moulded frame, the stone tablet which records the foundation of the almshouses; over the frame is a cornice on consoles, and a broken pediment enclosing a cartouche with the arms of Drake. All the dressings of windows and doorways are of plaster, and a moulded brick string-course crosses the gable and is carried round the three sides of the building under the eaves. Outer elevations:—The S. elevation has a gable over the central archway and one at each end, with a window of two lights under it; on each side of the archway is a blocked recess with a four-centred arch of brick, and beyond the recess is a wide, projecting chimney stack, tapering to a single square shaft with moulded head and base; in the stack is a small window. The E. and W. elevations have each two chimney stacks like those on the S. elevation, also with windows, and behind each stack is a small gable at right angles to the main roof. A moulded brick string-course is carried round outside the building, in the same way as in the courtyard. Inside the houses are fireplaces with large four-centred openings.

Condition—Good.

(30). House, No. 79, is of two storeys and an attic, built of brick and timber c. 1660, and restored in the 19th century. The roof is tiled. Two windows on the first floor retain original central mullions and transoms; others have been blocked and painted to resemble them; the attic is lighted by two hipped dormer windows.

Condition—Structurally, fairly good.

(31–32). Houses, two, adjoining, now five tenements, are each of two storeys, built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century. The tiled roof is ridged from end to end, over both buildings. The plan of the western house, adjoining (30), was originally L-shaped; the space between the wings has been partly filled in by a modern addition. The front is covered with whitewash, through which some of the original timber-framing can be traced; the windows are mullioned; at the E. end is a high gateway cutting into the upper storey and indicating that the house may have been a coaching inn. The central chimney stack has been restored above the roof. One of the staircases is of old oak, and has an original battened oak door at the foot. The ceilings of the ground floor have stop-chamfered beams, and an original cupboard remains, next to the chimney stack. One arched truss is visible in the western half of the roof. The plan of the second house is rectangular, with a wing at the back, projecting slightly from the W. half of the main block, and some low modern additions. In front the lower storey is of modern brick; the upper storey is timber-framed, with modern brick filling; there are three gables, and the windows have original mullioned frames. At the back the projecting wing is gabled, and the W. half of the elevation is of original brick and timber. On the ground floor the ceilings have stop-chamfered beams, and the central newel oak staircase, from the ground floor to the attic, is original. One fireplace on the first floor has moulded jambs and a four-centred arch in a square head. The timber construction is visible in most of the walls on the first floor, and the timbers of the roof can also be seen.

Condition—Of structure, fairly good; of roof and ceilings, poor.

(33). House, adjoining (32), is of two storeys, built probably early in the 17th century, of brick and timber, enlarged and altered in the 19th century. The roof is tiled. The front is now plastered, and at the E. end is a high covered gateway. On the ground floor one fireplace is original, with a lintel apparently of stone, and some original ceiling-beams are visible.

Condition—Good.

(34). House, No. 61, now three tenements (see Plate, p. 12), is of two storeys and an attic, built of brick and timber, on flint foundations, in the first half of the 16th century, heightened and altered late in the 17th century. The roof is tiled. The front is covered with modern plaster, and has a large covered gateway at the E. end; the four gabled dormer windows are probably of late 17th-century date. The rectangular chimney stack has four detached octagonal shafts, with moulded bases, and attached oversailing caps. Inside the house are some original moulded beams, a battened oak door and two wide fireplaces, one being of stone, now painted, with moulded jambs and four-centred arch in a square head. The oak newel staircase is also original.

Condition—Good.

(35). House (see Plate, p. 12), is of two storeys, built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century, of brick and timber, now much restored. The plan is L-shaped; the longer wing has two gables in front, the shorter wing is gabled at the S. end. Both the chimney stacks are restored. Inside the house some timbers in walls and ceilings, several oak battened doors and the small oak staircase are original. The partition walls of the upper storey are partly of wattle and daub.

Condition—Good.

(36). House, No. 47, is of two storeys, timber-framed, with brick filling, covered with plaster, and partly restored with modern brick; the roof is tiled. It was built in the 15th century, enlarged about the middle of the 16th century, and again in the 17th and 19th centuries.

The house is especially interesting on account of the mediæval work that remains.

The plan is of half-H shape, with E. and W. wings, of unequal width, projecting towards the S.; the original building had a large hall of one storey, with the solar in the W. wing, which was lengthened in the 16th century, when the central chimney stack was added; the lower, narrower E. wing was built probably early in the 17th century, when part of the hall was destroyed, and an upper floor inserted in the remaining part. The N. Elevation is in three bays, the upper storey having a gabled projection at each end; the middle bay is on flint foundations, probably of the 15th century, and has a small central gable; in the W. bay, which is on similar foundations, the timber-framing of the lower storey is of the 15th century; two panels have curved struts and the other timbers are vertical. The central chimney stack is of the 16th century, and has a square base and four semi-octagonal shafts on a stepped plinth. The E. and W. Elevations retain the original timber-framing of the upper storey, but have been partly restored on the ground floor; a mullioned window in the W. wall is probably of the 16th century. The S. Elevation has gabled ends to the E. and W. wings; the middle part is modern, with a central gable and an old oak mullioned window of three lights, re-set, and much decayed. The upper storey of the E. wing formerly projected on the W. side facing the courtyard, but has been under-built with modern brick; one mullioned window, of two lights, and a gabled dormer window, which appears above the modern additions, are probably original. The W. wing has, on the E. side, a modern gallery with an outer staircase; the original E. wall is timber-framed and has, at the S. end, a 16th-century doorway, now blocked, with chamfered jambs and a four-centred head; under the eaves above the doorway are three bays of a 15th-century oak screen, with trefoiled arches and tracery in a square head, possibly part of the original house, but not in situ. At the S. end of the wing the W. half of the lower storey is open and the upper storey is timber-framed. Interior:—On the ground floor are some chamfered beams in the ceilings, supported, in one room, on curved brackets. In the E. wing the W. half of the ceiling in the front room is of open timbers, probably of the 16th century, and may show the original extent of the 15th-century hall; the E. half is covered with plaster; the southern half of the W. wing has an open timber ceiling of the 16th century, divided into three bays by chamfered beams resting on curved posts. There is a narrow staircase of oak in the middle of the E. wing. On the first floor, in the main block, part of the roof is evidently that of the original hall, with an oak moulded cornice, about 2 ft. above the 16th-century floor, stop-chamfered principals and purlins, and curved wind-braces; under the wall-paper at the E. and W. ends can be traced curved struts forming arches; that at the W. end has been partly cut away for the 16th-century chimney stack. In the roof of the E. wing in front is a queen-post truss with a cambered tie-beam on curved posts with curved brackets, and there are purlins with wind-braces in the sloping sides of the roof; at the back are three old tie-beams; that in the middle is straight, the others are cambered. In the W. wing are several battened oak doors, and two 15th-century queen-post trusses with curved struts, larger than those in the other wing, and open rafters, formerly covered with plaster. In the N. room of the same wing is a 16th-century fireplace with moulded jambs and a four-centred arch in a square head under a moulded shelf, apparently of stone, painted. At the back of the wing the walls are of wattle and daub.

Condition—Of the inhabited part of the house, fairly good; the back of each wing is disused and out of repair; a new window is to be inserted in place of the old window in the S. elevation.

(37). The King's Arms Hotel, is of three storeys, built probably in the 16th century, of brick and timber, now much altered. The roof is tiled. The plan is L-shaped; the front is modern, with a large original gateway at the W. end, heightened to admit stage coaches in the 18th century. At the back are three gables, and the S. end of the short wing is gabled. A room on the ground floor has an original moulded ceiling-beam. A stable at the back of the building is probably also of the 16th century.

Condition—Good.

(38–39). Houses, two adjoining, are of two storeys, built probably late in the 16th century, and timber-framed, with filling partly of brick, partly of plaster. The roofs are tiled. The western house has, in front, a gable at the E. end of the overhanging upper storey. The second house has two gables in front, and the upper storey projects at the W. end; the bressumer is probably original, but is painted; the E. end is faced with modern brick, and has a high covered gateway, open to the ridge of the roof, of which two queen-post trusses can be seen.

Condition—Good.

(40–41). Houses, two adjoining, now shops, are of two storeys. The western house is timber-framed, with plaster filling, and is probably of the 16th century, now much restored; in front are three gables, and the upper storey formerly projected, but has been under-built. A long outbuilding at the back is timber-framed with brick filling, and has heavy roof trusses. The second house was built probably in the 17th century, but has been re-faced with modern brick; there is one gable in front. The roofs are tiled. Both houses have original oak ceiling-beams on the ground floor.

Condition—Good.

(42). The Crown Hotel, is of two storeys, built probably early in the 17th century, of brick, re-fronted and much altered in the 19th century. The roof is covered with slate. The N. front has a large gateway with original timbers. Inside the house are some original ceiling-beams on both floors, and two of the rooms have panelling of early 17th-century date.

Condition—Good; much restored.

Union Street, W. side

(43–44). Houses, two, about 110 yards S. of the High Street; the northern house, now three tenements, is of two storeys and an attic, of late 17th-century date, but altered in the 18th century; the plan is rectangular, with a small wing at the back. The E. front is of red and black bricks, but at the S. end the upper storey has some timber-framing, possibly of earlier date than the brickwork; in the N. half is a rubbed brick pilaster with a moulded capital; the upper windows have original oak mullions and transoms, and the two dormer windows have gabled heads. The S. side and the back of the house are gabled and timber-framed with brick filling; the wing has two original window-frames. The roofs are tiled. Some chamfered beams remain in the ceilings. The southern house, now three tenements, is of two storeys, built probably in the 16th century or earlier; the plan is L-shaped, with the wings projecting towards the N. and W. The E. front is of late 17th-century red and black bricks, the back of original brick and timber, with some weather-boarding. The roofs are tiled. In front, on the first floor, the mullioned window-frames are original. The central chimney stack is original and has oversailing courses at the top. The roof at the S. end of the house is of earlier date than the front wall; the truss between two rooms has a heavy cambered tie-beam, and a king-post with four-way braces supporting a central purlin under the collar-beams.

Condition—Fairly good.

(45). House, now two cottages, is of two storeys, built probably late in the 16th or early in the 17th century. The plan is of an irregular L-shape; the small wing on the S. was formerly set back from the front of the main block, but has been built out flush with it. The front has two bays of original timber-framing, with brick filling, which is modern in the lower storey; the two gabled dormer windows are apparently original; at the S. end the wall is of modern brick and flint, and the ends of the joists show at the level of the first floor. The N. end of the house is of old timber and brick; at the back are modern additions. The roofs are tiled, and the original roof-timbers can be seen inside the house.

Condition—Fairly good.

(46–47). Cottages, two, detached, on the S. side of a narrow lane leading out of the street, are of two storeys, built probably in the 17th century, of brick and timber; the roofs are tiled. The ends are gabled, with a projecting chimney stack at the E. end of each cottage.

Condition—Poor.

E. side

(48–49). Houses, two, adjoining. The southern house is of two storeys and an attic, built of brick; the roof is tiled: in the middle of the front is a round-headed terra-cotta panel with a round frieze and curved pediment; on the panel are the initials and date 1695 W.H.K.; in the frieze is a shield with arms. The northern house is of two storeys, built of brick and timber, probably in the middle of the 17th century; the roof is tiled: the lower storey in front is of modern brick; the central chimney stack has been restored above the roof: inside the house are stop-chamfered beams in the ceilings and some original timbers in the walls.

Condition—Fairly good.

(50–51). Houses, two, are each of two storeys, built of brick and timber in the 17th century; the roofs are tiled. The upper storey of the southern house formerly projected, but has been under-built with modern brick, and the bressumer covered with tiles. The chimney stack at the back is original. The second house is gabled in front.

Condition—Fairly good.

(52–53). Houses, two, adjoining, are of late 17th-century date. The southern house, formerly the Workhouse, now a shop, is of two storeys and an attic, built of brick; the roof is tiled and hipped at the S. end. The front is covered with modern plaster, and there are four dormer windows. The S. side of the house is gabled and has an original window in the attic. The back has a central gable and projecting chimney stack, also original. In the ceilings are some chamfered beams. The northern house now five cottages, is of two storeys, built of red brick, with black headers, and has a string-course at the first floor level; the roof is tiled. In front two of the windows on the ground floor have original oak mullions and transoms, and rectangular leaded lights, with ornamental fastenings, and two windows on the first floor are also original. The central chimney stack is of late 17th-century brick. Inside the house the ceilings have original beams, there are old oak stairs, and, in the upper rooms, some rough oak doors.

Condition—Of first house, good; of second house, fairly good.

Broadway, N. side

(54). The Old Malthouses, are of two storeys, built of brick and timber; the roofs are tiled. They are probably of the 16th or 17th century, but there is little detail by which to assign a definite date to them. They consist of an L-shaped block of buildings, the longer wing extending towards the N.; the S. end, now used as a dwelling, is restored with modern brick; the upper storey at the N. end retains the original timber-framing in the E. and W. walls.

Condition—Disused, except S. end; structurally good.

(55). Cottage, now two dwellings, 160 yards E. of the Market Hall, is of two storeys, timber-framed, and covered with plaster, built probably c. 1570. The plan is rectangular, the ends are gabled. The central chimney stack has two circular shafts with moulded bases and ornamented sides, unusually massive for so small a building; the tops have been removed.

Condition—Fairly good.

S. side

(56). The Griffin Hotel and Outbuildings at the back. The Hotel is of three storeys, re-built or much altered late in the 17th century, but probably incorporating remains of a building of earlier date. The plan is of half-H shape, facing N., with the wings at the back, and the main block pierced by a large central gateway. The front is of red and black bricks; the back is plastered, and has three gables. The roofs are tiled. Some chamfered oak ceiling-beams remain on the ground floor. The Outbuildings include stables and a barn, which are probably of late 16th or early 17th-century date: the long range of stables, on the E. side of the yard, is of two storeys, the upper timber-framed, with modern brick filling, the lower re-faced with modern brick; the large barn, S.E. of the stables, is of timber, and the roof has heavy queen-post trusses.

Condition—Good.

(57). House, probably formerly an inn, now divided into four dwellings, Nos. 19–22, was built probably early in the 17th century, of brick and timber, now much restored. The roofs are tiled. The plan is L-shaped, with a central gateway in the longer wing, opening into a square courtyard at the back. The head of the gateway is gabled at the back, and E. of it are three gables, covered with plaster. The original timber-framing is visible only in the upper storey of the middle part of the house, now Nos. 20 and 21. E. of the gateway, in front, is a chimney stack with three square shafts set diagonally. Old ceiling-beams, some panelled oak doors, one moulded battened door and a wide fireplace remain inside the house.

Condition—Fairly good.

(58). Houses, two, now divided into three tenements, Nos. 8–10, are each of two storeys and an attic, built in the second half of the 17th century, of brick and timber, now much restored. The roofs are tiled. The eastern house, Nos. 8–9, has, in front, three original mullioned windows on the first floor, and two gabled dormer windows. The central chimney stack has panelled sides. The western house, No. 10, is re-faced with modern brick, except the attic floor, which is timber-framed and has two gables. The central newel staircase, of oak, is original.

Condition—Fairly good.

(59). Cottage, 270 yards E. of the Market Hall, is of two storeys, the upper storey partly in the roof, built probably in the 17th century. The lower storey is of brick, the upper timber-framed, with a gabled semi-dormer window. The roof is tiled.

Condition—Fairly good.

Bury End, S. side of the road

(60). Bury Farm, at the E. corner of the road to Beaconsfield, is a house of two storeys, built about the middle of the 16th century, of brick, now covered with rough-cast in front; the roof is partly of slate and partly tiled. The original plan was rectangular, or possibly with a S.W. wing, which has been altered or re-built; modern additions have been made at the back and at the E. end. The ground floor originally contained a central hall with the parlour on the W. and the kitchen on the E.; the old ceiling-beams remain in the rooms, but some are encased. The original outer door way, now the inner doorway of the lobby, at the back of the house, is of oak, with moulded jambs, flat, four-centred arch, and spandrels carved with flat strap-ornament. Some original fireplaces have been partly blocked; that in the kitchen has a heavy cambered beam over it. In the upper rooms is some oak panelling of late 16th or early 17th-century date.

Condition—Good.

N. side

(61–62). Cottages, two, are each of two storeys, built probably in the 17th century. The western cottage has been almost entirely refaced with modern brick, only the W. end and gable are partly of original brick and timber. The second cottage has a modern brick front; the other walls are covered with plaster. The roofs are tiled. Each cottage has old ceiling-beams and a large fireplace.

Condition—Poor.

(63). The Chequers Inn, is of two storeys, built probably late in the 17th century. The front has been re-faced with modern brick; at the back the lower storey is of flint, the upper storey of brick with three gables, and the windows have small old frames. The roof is tiled. A large open fireplace and some beams inside the house are original.

Condition—Good.

Amersham Common

(64). Stanley Wood House, 11/8 miles E.N.E. of the church, is of two storeys and an attic, built probably c. 1678, the date appearing on a chimney, but now almost entirely re-faced with modern brick or covered with rough-cast. The plan was apparently originally L-shaped, the wings extending towards the E. and S.; modern additions on the N. and E. have made it T-shaped. The S. end of the S. wing is gabled and the attic is lighted by a window of two lights with moulded frame and mullion, probably original; a similar window, now blocked, is on the E. side of the wing. The S. side of the E. wing has painted timbers, with rough-cast filling in the lower storey and tile-hanging in the upper storey; the N. side is of original timber-framing with brick filling. The roofs are tiled. The rectangular chimney stack in the E. wing has a moulded cornice, and in a panel on the S. side are the initials and date I. H. 1678; the stack in the S. wing was of similar detail but has been much restored. The hall in the S. wing has old oak posts in the E. wall, and a room on the S. has a large moulded fireplace, covered with cement, and an encased beam in the ceiling. At the end of the original part of the E. wing is a large open fireplace and an old chamfered beam, re-worked. In the E. wall of the upper storey is visible a heavy truss, with cambered tie-beam and curved braces.

Condition—Good.

(65). Reeves' Farm, house and barn, S.E. of (64). The House, of two storeys and an attic, was built probably early in the 17th century, but has been almost entirely re-faced with modern brick; the roofs are tiled. The plan is L-shaped, with wings extending towards the E. and S. The E. wing alone retains the original brick and timber; the N. side is gabled and has an original doorway on the ground floor, and mullioned windows of two lights on each floor. The projecting chimney stack at the E. end is probably of late 17th-century date. The central chimney stack in the S. wing, of thin bricks, is rectangular, with V-shaped shafts on two sides and a modern head. Some chamfered ceiling-beams are original. The Barn, N.W. of the house, is probably of early 17th-century date, timber-framed and weather-boarded, with framed trusses in the roof, from which some of the timbers are missing.

Condition—Fairly good; the attic floor of the house is unsafe.

(66). Barker's Farm, E. of No. 65, is a house of two storeys, partly of timber and cement, the timbers covered with modern boards, and partly re-faced with modern brick. On the N. front the upper storey projects at the W. end, and some of the supporting joists are original. The roofs are tiled. The house was built early in the 17th century, but has been much enlarged and altered; the plan of the original building contained only two rooms on the ground floor, with chamfered joists carried across the ceiling of both rooms. In the W. room is a wide fireplace, and the timbers are visible in the walls. The staircase, of early 17th-century date, with moulded balusters, was probably brought from elsewhere. The old trusses of the roof, with cambered tie-beams and braced purlins, are visible.

Condition—Good.

(67). Raans Farm, originally the manorhouse of Raans, about 1¾ miles N.E. of the town, is of two storeys, partly of brick, partly of flint with brick quoins. The roof is tiled. It was built c. 1540, and the plan of the original house was of half-H shape, the main block facing W., with a projecting central porch in front and short wings projecting towards the E. at the back; these wings are almost entirely replaced by modern additions.

The house is an interesting example of a 16th-century building; the brick doorway of the porch and some original stone-mullioned windows are noticeable.

On the W. Elevation the gabled central porch is of two storeys, and the outer doorway has moulded jambs and a four-centred arch under a square head, with sunk spandrels and a moulded label, all of brick; over it is a square stone carved with a shield of arms, probably of Proby, mantled helm and crest: the inner doorway has moulded oak jambs with stops, and a four-centred arch under a square head; the door is of eight panels, with moulded styles, plain rail, strap-hinges and knocker: the window above the entrance is original, and of three four-centred lights, with moulded stone mullions and jambs, under a square head with a moulded stone label; other windows, in the sides of the porch on the first floor, are blocked, but the four-centred lights can be seen inside; in the apex of the gable is a small circular window, now blocked. On each side of the porch, on the ground floor, are two square modern windows, and about 2 ft. above them are the moulded stone labels of the original windows: the upper storey has four windows, each of three lights; one window is modern, the others are cemented, probably over the original stone. Under the eaves is a moulded brick cornice, restored with wood above the modern window. A moulded stone plinth extends the length of the wall and is continued round the porch. The S. Elevation is faced with flint and has brick quoins; it has one gable, from the apex of which the roof slopes on the E. side to the level of the first floor; a small part of the original S.E. angle of the main block appears below the eaves; the doorways and windows are irregularly placed, and are probably re-set: below the gable is an original four-light window, now blocked, with moulded stone jambs and mullions, and a four-centred brick relieving arch; partly under it, on the ground floor, is a modern window, and under the lower slope of the roof, on the E., is a blocked doorway with chamfered brick jambs, four-centred arch and square head; E. of the doorway is a single-light window, and above it a three-light window with stone mullions and moulded label, all original. The E. Elevation has been much altered, and the walls are almost entirely covered with plaster; one three-light window remains, with original stonework and moulded label; it is now blocked, and above it are two windows of two lights, without labels, of which only the heads are original. A low projection at the N.E. corner is of the same width as the former wing and is of old bricks, probably re-used. The N. Elevation is of brick, partly covered with plaster and much hidden by ivy. The single gable has a small circular brick window, now blocked; on the ground floor is an original two-light window, and near it, lower down in the wall, a single, four-centred light. In the eastern extension on this side are two original stone windows of two lights, with moulded labels; both are blocked. On the E. side are two rectangular chimneys of original thin bricks. Interior:—In the kitchen the wide fireplace has been partly blocked, and a small cupboard in the wall has an original door. Two rooms on the first floor have overmantels, each of six richly moulded panels in bolection-moulded framing, and one room has moulding round the fireplace, some panelling, and a door, of late 17th-century date.

Condition—Good.

(68). Woodside Farm, stands on high ground about 1 mile N.E. of the church, and is of two storeys, built of brick. The roofs are tiled. The original house was built early in the 17th century; it was enlarged c. 1680, and again enlarged and much restored late in the 18th or early in the 19th century. The plan was originally rectangular, facing N., with a projecting chimney stack on the S.; the addition of c. 1680 is a continuation of the building towards the W., projecting slightly towards the N.; the modern extension forms a wing on the S.W., and some low buildings have been added S. and E. of the original house, making the present plan roughly of half-H shape. The N. (front) Elevation is almost entirely of 18th-century brick; the E. end has been re-faced with modern brick, but a post in the wall marks the E. corner of the original building, which was evidently timber-framed. The S. Elevation is modern, the wall between the wings in the middle having been re-faced. The W. Elevation has, at the N. end, red bricks with black glazed headers, of late 17th-century date; the S. end is modern. The E. Elevation is modern. The chimney stack at the back of the original house has been made lower and is not used. The addition has a chimney stack at the W. end. Interior:—In the original building is a large fireplace with chimney corners, old chamfered beams in the ceilings, and over the dairy at the E. end is a chamber said to have been a secret meeting-place of the Quakers in the 17th century; a blocked doorway on the first floor, and what appears to be a blocked trap door in the same room were probably the original entrances; a doorway opens into it from the one-storeyed addition at the back of the house. In the late 17th-century addition are some chamfered ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

Footnotes

1 Since this account was written the Market Hall has been completely restored. (Dec., 1911.)


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