Dewchurch, Little

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English Heritage

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1931

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47-48

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'Dewchurch, Little', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 1: South West (1931), pp. 47-48. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=124323 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


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18 DEWCHURCH, LITTLE (D.c.)

(O.S. 6 in. XLVI, N.W.)

Little Dewchurch is a parish 5 m. S.S.W. of Hereford.

Ecclesiastical

(1). Parish Church of St. David, stands on the W. side of the parish. The walls are of local sandstone with ashlar and dressings of the same material. The West Tower was built c. 1360–70, but the rest of the church was re-built in 1869–71.

Architectural Description—The Chancel has re-set in the N. wall a 13th-century lancet-window. The N. wall of the Nave, which may be partly ancient, has a re-used 14th-century head to the eastern window; it is of two trefoiled ogee lights in a square head. The second window in the S. wall is also of the 14th century, re-set; it is of two trefoiled ogee lights in a square head with moulded reveals.

The West Tower (8¼ ft. square), is of late 14th-century date, and of four stages, divided externally into two, with a moulded plinth and embattled parapet with carved gargoyles at the angles; the middle merlon on the E. is pierced with a cruciform loop; the walls are ashlar-faced. The ground-stage has a doorway in the E. wall, with double-chamfered jambs and modern arch. The W. window is modern. The second stage has, in the W. wall, a small square-headed window. The third stage is divided by a modern floor; it has, in the S. wall, a small square-headed window, partly blocked. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a window of two lights in a square head; the lights are ogee-headed in the E. and S. walls and triangular-headed in the N. and W. walls. This stage has a pointed barrel-vault of stone, running N. and S. and divided into four bays by chamfered ribs; the middle rib on the E. springs from an octagonal post standing on the window-sill.

Fittings—Bells: five, 1st by John Finch, 1656; 2nd mediæval and inscribed in Lombardic capitals "Eternis annis resonet campana Johannis." Churchyard Cross: S. of church—square chamfered base with ogee-headed niche in W. face, on three steps, lower part of square shaft with chamfered angles, 14th-century. Monuments: In churchyard—against W. wall, (1) to Richard Greene, 1702, and Katherine his daughter, 1689, headstone; (2) to Martha, 1709, and Mary, 1710–11, daughters of Phillip James, double headstone; (3) to Richard Garen (?), minister, late 17th-century, broken slab. Seating: In tower—in second stage, 17th-century bench with moulded top and shaped brackets and legs.

Condition—Good.

Secular

(2) Court Farm, 150 yards E.N.E. of the church, is of two storeys with attics and cellar, the walls are timber-framed and the roofs are covered with tiles. The house appears to have been re-built late in the 16th century, but two crutch-trusses of mediæval date survive from the older house. The W. wing was added early in the 17th century, and at the end of the century an addition was made at the E. end. Inside the building there is exposed timber-framing and the ceilings have exposed beams and joists. The two ground-floor rooms in the W. wing have plaster ceilings with moulded panels, the northernmost having small birds and stars in addition. Two crutch-trusses are visible at the first-floor level, the westernmost having an inserted tie and queen-posts. On this floor is a 16th-century fireplace with chamfered stone jambs and wood lintel, and in the W. wing is a fireplace with a four-centred chamfered head.

(3). Smithy, cottage, ¼ m. E. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and timber-framing, and the roof is covered with slates. It was built in the 17th century, and has modern additions. Inside the building there are stop-chamfered ceiling-beams and exposed timber-framing.

Condition—Fairly good.

(4). Upper Cwm, two tenements, nearly ½ m. E.N.E. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and timber-framing and the roofs are covered with tiles and slates. It was built in the 17th century, and has an early 18th-century addition at the N. end and some modern additions.

Condition—Poor.

(5). The Friars, house, ½ m. E. of the church, is of two storeys with cellars; the walls are of rubble and the roof is covered with slates. It is of L-shaped plan, and was built in the 17th century on the lower walls of an earlier building. It has been much modernised, but contains some exposed ceiling-beams and a 17th-century door.

Condition—Poor.

(6). Catson, cottage, about ¾ m. N.E. of the church, is of one storey with attics; the walls are timber-framed and plastered and the roofs are thatched. It was built in the 17th century, and has exposed timber-framing and ceiling-beams.

Condition—Fairly good.

(7). Cottage, at Carey, 2 m. E.S.E. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and timber-framing and the roof is covered with tiles. It was built in the 17th century, and has a modern addition. Inside the building are exposed ceiling-beams and timber framing.

Condition—Fairly good.



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