Goodrich

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1931

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'Goodrich', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 1: South West (1931), pp. 73-82. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=124334 Date accessed: 26 July 2014.


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29 GOODRICH (E.d.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)LI, S.W., (b)LI, S.E., (c)LIV, N.W., (d)LIV, N.E.)

Goodrich is a village and parish 5 m. S.W. of Ross and 13½ m. S. of Hereford. The principal monuments are the church, castle and Flanesford priory.

Ecclesiastical

d(1). Parish Church of St. Giles, stands near the middle of the N. part of the parish. The walls are of local sandstone-rubble except those to the W. tower and S. porch, which are of ashlar; the roofs are covered with slate. The 13th-century N. arcade indicates the existence of a church with a N. aisle at this date. Early in the 14th century the W. bay of this arcade was re-built, the N. arcade of the chancel built and the outer walls of the Chancel, Nave, North Chapel and Aisle, built or re-built; about the middle of the same century the South Porch and West Tower were added. In the 17th century the S. wall of the W. tower was re-built or refaced. The Organ Chamber is modern. The building has been restored in modern times.


The Church, Plan

The Church, Plan

Architectural Description—The Chancel and Nave (67¾ ft. by 17 ft.) are continuous and are structurally undivided. The upper part of the E. wall has been re-built and the S. wall has some modern refacing externally. In the E. wall is a late 15th-century window of five trefoiled ogee lights with vertical tracery in a flat segmental-pointed head with a moulded label; the mullions are modern. The N. arcade of the chancel is in two bays and of early 14th-century date; the arches are segmental-pointed and of two orders, the outer chamfered and the inner rounded; the two columns are octagonal and the E. respond semi-octagonal, all with moulded capitals and bases; the arcade of the nave is of four bays and continuous with that just described; it is of the 13th century, but the two middle arches have been cut back and altered; the other arches are two-centred and of two chamfered orders; the two eastern columns are cylindrical, with moulded capitals and bases; the third column is of the 14th century, like those of the chancel-arcade, and the W. respond has a corbel-capital of the same date and character. In the S. wall, at the E. end, is a modern archway opening into the organ-chamber; farther W. there are three windows, the easternmost is a 'low-side' window with a square head, now blocked and probably of the 14th century, and the other two are both modern as is also the S. doorway.

The North Aisle (15¾ ft. wide) has a modern E. window. In the N. wall are three modern windows, and between them are two old blocked windows; the N. doorway is also blocked and has a four-centred head probably of late 14th-century date. In the W. wall is a mid 14th-century window of three trefoiled ogee lights with net tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label with stops carved with bishops' heads; it has some slight external repairs.

The West Tower (9 ft. square) is of late 14th-century date and is in one stage surmounted by a tall octagonal broach spire; internally it is of four storeys. Between the nave and the tower is a doorway, re-built except the chamfered N. jamb. In the N. wall is a doorway with square jambs and flat ogee head. In the S. wall are two small square-headed lights, one to the ground-storey and the other lighting the second storey. In the W. wall, a former window to the first storey has been converted into a doorway approached from the outside by a flight of modern stone steps; the top storey has a small square-headed light. The spire has, in each of the cardinal faces, an original dormer window, each formerly of two trefoiled ogee lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred head under a gabled top; all the mullions, except to the E. window, are now missing. The upper part of the spire is modern.

The South Porch was added about the middle of the 14th century. The outer entrance has jambs and two-centred arch of two wave-moulded orders. In the E. wall is a window of two trefoiled ogee lights with a quatre-foiled spandrel in a two-centred head, and to the S. of it is a doorway with chamfered jambs and two-centred head. In the W. wall is an original window of two uncusped ogee-headed lights.

Fittings—Bells: six, tenor mediæval and inscribed in 'black-letter' "Ave Maria Gracia Plena"; 5th with churchwardens' names and I.P. 1672. Churchyard Cross: S.E. of porch, short length of octagonal shaft with initials and date T.W., W. B., 1692, and a sundial on stepped base. Door: In tower—to N. doorway nail-studded, with ogee-shaped head and hung on two strap-hinges. Glass: In N. aisle—in modern E. window, incorporated with modern glass, fragments, including, in heads of main lights, a few portions of canopy-work; in tracery (a) angel holding quartered shield-of-arms (1) and (4) Lisle, (2) and (3) Tyes; (b) and (c) angels with modern heads holding a shield of Cantilupe and a modern shield of the royal arms; (d) angel holding quartered shield-of-arms in yellow stain, (1) and (4) Talbot, (2) and (3) Le Strange; (e) angel with spear and nails, head modern; (f) angel with head modern holding crown of thorns, a staff and a sponge, all 15th-century. Monuments and Floor-slab: Monuments: Under easternmost arch of arcade (1) altar-tomb (Plate 44) apparently re-set and probably shortened, with arcaded sides; N. and S. sides each in four bays, E. end in one bay and W. end in three bays with cinque-foiled two-centred arches with trefoiled two-centred arches with trefoiled spandrels and attached shafts with simply foliated capitals and moulded bases with continuous upper members; moulded top slab, re-set upside down with W. end cut back, c. 1280. In churchyard—E. of S. porch, (2) to Thomas Tovey, 1708, and Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Pa . . . 1682, table-tomb (Plate 44) with moulded top slab, inscription-panel with festoon and E. end with cartouche-of-arms, W. end with two inscription-panels with partly defaced inscriptions; S.W. of tower (3) to John Flecher, 1670, and Thomas Fletcher, 1699, table-tomb with shaped consoles at angles and inscription-panels on sides and ends; (4) to Thomas Fletcher, 1708, table-tomb of similar design to (3); (5) to Joyce, daughter of John Miles, 1677, headstone carved with strapwork and bunches of grapes, on reverse side, to Judeth, daughter of William Hannis (?), 1706; (6) to Alis, wife of William Vaughan, 1678, and Thomas his son, 167., headstone carved with hour-glass, fleur-de-lis and bunches of grapes; (7) to . . . er Richards, 1662–3, headstone with partly defaced inscription; W. of tower, (8) to Richard, son of Richard Dawyer, 1707, headstone; S. of nave (9) to Edward Phelps, 1702, headstone; (10) to William Banford, 1711, headstone; by S. porch, (11) part of headstone dated 1609; S. of chancel, (12) to Mary (?), daughter of John Edwards, 1708. Floor-slab: In church—under communion table, to Thomas Swift, vicar, 1658, to Godwyn Vaughan, 1684–5, and Martin Johnson, A.M., vicar, 1710. Plate: includes a cup (Plate 57) of 1617, with baluster-stem and bowl covered with conventional foliage and strapwork pattern in repoussé; upper part of base inscribed "Jonath Swift, S.T.D., Decan Eccles Sti. Patr. Dubln hunc calicem Eccles de Goderidge sacrum voluit"; underside of base inscribed "Tho. Swift hujus Eccles Vicar notus in historiis ob ea quae fecit et passus est pro Caro 1 mo ex hoc calice aegrotantibus propinavit Eundem calicē Ionath Swift, S.T.D., Decan Eccles Sti. Patr. Dubln. Thomae ex filio nepos huic Eccles in perpetuum dedicat 1726"; a cup (Plate 57) inscribed "Warren Tyler, William Boughan, Churchwardens, 1665," but without dateletter.

Condition—Good.

Secular

b(2). Goodrich Castle and moat, stands on the S. bank of the Wye, on the N. side of the parish. The walls are of local sandstone rubble and ashlar. The earliest surviving work in the castle is the square keep, on the S. side of the enclosure which was built c. 1160– 70. The castle is mentioned in the Pipe Roll of 1186. A square enclosing wall with towers at the angles was built round the keep early in the 13th century, and of this work the E. curtain, the sedile in the chapel, and the foundations of the S.W. tower still survive. The castle was extensively re-built c. 1300, and to this date belong the existing angle-towers, the chapel, gatehouse and curtains, the internal domestic buildings and the bridge. The addition of the outer ward with the barbican followed soon after in the 14th century. Various minor alterations, including a building W. of the gatehouse, were made in the 15th century. From early in the 14th century, the castle belonged to the Talbots. During the Civil War it was held first for the parliament by Captain Kyrle and afterwards for the king by Sir Henry Lingen and was besieged and taken in 1646. The defences were afterwards "slighted" by order of the parliament, and the castle has ever since remained in ruins. It is now in charge of H.M. Office of Works, which has carried out extensive works of repair and excavation within recent years.

The Castle is the most extensive ruin of its class in the county and is an important example of military architecture.


Goodrich Castle

Goodrich Castle

The Keep (14 ft. square internally and 29 ft. square externally) stands on the S. side of the inner enclosure and was built c. 1160–70. It is of three stages (Plate 98), is faced with ashlar and has clasping buttresses of slight projection at the angles and a pilaster buttress in the middle of each face. The ground-stage has, in the E. wall, remains of an original loop, and above it remains of an opening broken through the wall. In the N. wall is a 15th or 16th-century doorway, with chamfered jambs and segmental-pointed head. The original entrance to the keep is at the first-floor level, in the N. face, and must have been approached by an external staircase; it has a round arch of two plain orders with moulded or chamfered external and internal labels; the jambs have each two attached shafts with scalloped capitals and moulded bases; the doorway is blocked and has a window of two trefoiled lights inserted in the filling. Between the first and second floors is a circular staircase in the N.W. angle entered by a square-headed doorway, with a segmental tympanum and a barrel-vaulted passage with remains of a recess or garde-robe in the W. wall. At the second-floor level is a string-course with cheveron-ornament. In the E. wall, at this level, is a doorway of c. 1300, with the head broken away; it formerly communicated, by a bridge, with the S.E. tower. The N. and W. walls have each an original window of two round-headed lights in a round outer order with a label; the jambs differ in the two windows but both have cheveron-ornament and moulded imposts; between the lights of the W. window is a shafted pier, but this is missing in the N. window. The doorway from the turret-staircase has a segmental tympanum, with a groove on the face and a segmental cutting on the soffit.

The Gatehouse (Plate 102), at the N.E. corner of the building, is of c. 1300, and consists of a long gate-hall flanked by the chapel on the S. and a round tower and corridor on the N. The gate-hall is entered by a main archway with rounded jambs and segmental-pointed head; near the middle of the building is a second segmental pointed archway of two orders, the inner rounded and the outer chamfered; between these archways are two portcullis-grooves and a vaulted roof with chamfered ribs and two slots. The inner archway has three segmental-pointed ribs, and between it and the middle arch is a higher vaulted roof with two chamfered ribs. The extension on the outer face of the gatehouse has a stone vault of which only the springers remain; the S. springer of an added outer archway also remains. In the S. wall is a raking joint, of doubtful purpose, built up when the addition was made, and farther out are the sockets for the roller-bearings of the drawbridge. The first floor forms a room with a garde-robe in the N.W. corner and a short passage in the N.E. corner leading to the N.E. tower. The E. wall has remains of the arrangements for raising and lowering the portcullises. In the S. wall are remains of a fireplace. In the W. wall is a window with a trefoiled head, and on the outside face are the marks of the low gable of a destroyed building, perhaps of the 15th century. In the N. wall is a window-embrasure. The round tower, on the N. of the gatehouse, stands on a square base with battering spurs. The S.E. side of the tower has been broken away. The ground floor contains a rectangular apartment with a quadripartite vault and moulded ribs. It is lit by a loop and two narrow windows and has a fireplace with a pyramidal hood resting on corbelling. The upper part of the tower is ruined. Extending W. from the ground stage is a long corridor with a barrel-vault and chamfered ribs; it terminates in a garde-robe.

The Chapel Tower is of three stages including the basement and is of rectangular form with a round E. end. It was built c. 1300. The E. end stands on a square base with spurs at the E. angles. The room in the basement has a semi-octagonal E. end with a narrow window in the E. wall. The chapel itself (Plate 101), on the ground floor, is of similar form to the basement. In the E. wall are remains of a 15th-century window of three trefoiled lights with vertical tracery in a segmental-pointed head; in the recess is the base of the altar. Across the E. end, at the spring of the semi-octagonal apse, is a segmental-pointed arch of two moulded orders, the inner springing from moulded and shafted corbels. In the N.E. wall of the apse is a locker with rebated jambs, square head and a shelf. In the S.E. wall is a piscina with a trefoiled head, grooves for a shelf and a broken drain; adjoining it is a re-set 13th-century sedile (Plate 60) with a trefoiled head, under a round moulded label; the jamb-shafts have gone but the moulded caps remain. In the N. wall is a large embrasure with a small square-headed window opening into the gatehall; in the W. side of the embrasure is a staircase leading up to a timber gallery, added in the 15th century, at the W. end of the chapel and also to the building added to the W. of the gatehouse. Farther W. in the side walls are the two 15th-century corbels, carved with angels holding shields, which supported the front of the gallery; below them are the two 15th-century piscinae, which served the two altars, W. of the screen; they have trefoiled ogee heads. In the S. wall is a window-embrasure with a segmental-pointed head of two chamfered orders and a chamfered rib behind it; on the E. reveal are traces of red painting; the window is of one trefoiled light; a second embrasure, farther W., is larger, with a skewed opening to a trefoil-headed window in the E. curtain. In the W. wall is a 15th-century window of three trefoiled lights in a segmental-pointed head with a moulded label; the W. doorway, of c. 1300, has jambs and triangular head of two moulded orders. The third stage is partly ruined but retains portions of window-embrasures and, in the N. wall, part of a fireplace with a stone hood; in the W. wall is a window of one trefoiled light. At the S.W. angle of the building is a turret-staircase.

The East Curtain is of early 13th-century date, up to the sills of the ground-floor windows; it was heightened c. 1300, and again, by the addition of a parapet, in the 15th century; projecting from it is a large garderobe tower of c. 1300, and against the internal face of the wall was a long rectangular building. This building, of c. 1300, was originally of one storey, with the wall walk included under its pent-roof; probably in the 15th century an additional storey was built with a low-pitched gabled roof and a lead flat at the back of the added parapet of the curtain. In the northern part of the wall are three window-embrasures of c. 1300, and below two of them are the remains of a 13th-century loop; between the two southern windows are the remains of a 15th-century fireplace with a hearth. The three garde-robes are set in a projection with splayed angles on a rectangular base; the southernmost has rounded jambs and the others chamfered jambs, all with segmental-pointed heads; there was a fourth garde-robe on the level of the parapet. The upper part of the curtain is badly ruined but contains remains of embrasures and cruciform loops. The inner wall of this range has been largely destroyed, but retains the bases of three doorways; within the area is a large square tank, and at the S. end is an oven, which blocks a skewed opening, commanding the courtyard and the doorway to the S.E. tower.

The South-East Tower (Plate 99) is of c. 1300, round externally, with a rectangular wing at the back and standing on a square base with high spurs; it is of three stages with a string-course below the parapet. The interior is of octagonal form, the basement-stage being lit by loops in square-headed external recesses, towards the E. and S. The second stage has windowembrasures with seats, towards the N. and W.; on the W. splay of the N. embrasure are carved a hart and a swan, and on the N. splay of the W. embrasure a large figure of a man (Plate 40) in late 14th-century costume, with a falcon on the right wrist; at his feet is a dog; W. of the N. embrasure is a trefoil-headed recess with a drain. In the S.E. side are the remains of a fireplace with a stone hood. The third stage is reached by a staircase on the W. external face, formerly covered by a roof. It contains the remains of a fireplace, in the E. wall, similar to that in the stage below, and a drain, with a trefoiled head, above that in the stage below. There are two windowembrasures, and the doorway from the external stair has rounded jambs and triangular head. In the N.W. angle is a staircase leading to the parapet-walk. The parapet of the rectangular wing remains and is pierced by loops.

The South Curtain is brought out to a point mid-way between the angle-towers; the short stretches of wall adjoining the angle-towers were built with them, but the salient middle portion is of another build, of slightly later date, and has a deep battering plinth; the E. side-portion contains a window. The middle part has remains of a window-embrasure and a turret-staircase. The space between the curtain and the keep was roofed in and approached by a corridor adjoining the S.E. angle of the keep. Against the E. face of the keep is a building of c. 1300, formerly of two storeys. The lower storey, or dungeon, is below ground-level and is approached by a narrow passage and staircase with two doorways at the N. end. The room itself has a segmental-pointed barrel-vault with cross-ribs of rounded section. The room above has been destroyed, but the marks of the pent-roof remain on the S. wall. The space between the keep and the S.W. tower was the kitchen and has a fireplace, flanked by ovens, in the S. wall; at the back of the E. oven is a third oven partly destroyed by a later furnace, between the keep and the curtain. In the W. wall are arrangements for a tank and sink.

The South-West Tower is of c. 1300, round externally and standing on a restored square base with spurs. It is of three stages, semi-octagonal internally and closed in towards the N. by a wall. Below the existing tower are the foundations of a 13th-century tower, also round externally but of smaller diameter; it bears the impression of former bond-timbers. The basement-stage is approached by a staircase in the N. wall, opening into the hall. This stage has two embrasures, that in the W. wall being transformed into a doorway, in the 15th-century: this doorway communicated with a spiral staircase, of the same date, leading down into the outer ward. The ground or second stage has two loopembrasures commanding the adjoining curtains and two window-embrasures with stone seats. The N. wall has two doorways opening to the hall; they have jambs and segmental-pointed heads of two orders, the outer chamfered and the inner rounded; the doorways are set in a shallow recess with a segmental-pointed head. The third stage is approached by a staircase on the E. face of the tower. In the N. wall is a passage leading to a garde-robe at the N.W. angle, and to the parapet-walk of the W. curtain. In the N.W. wall is a trefoil-headed recess with a drain; there are remains of two window-embrasures, and, on the S. side, the remains of a fireplace with a stone hood; the jambs and corbels are moulded. A fourth stage, above the garde-robe passage, has three windows, and in the N. wall a staircase to the parapet.

The West Curtain is of c. 1300, and has lost most of its external face; the construction of this face is similar to that of the S. curtain, the middle portion, equating with the hall, having a battered plinth and being of slightly different date from the end-portions, which were built with the adjoining angle-towers; projecting from the middle is a large buttress, at the back of the fireplace, with an additional buttress, below it, of later date. S. of the buttress are two windows each of one trefoiled light with a transom; N. of the buttress are remains of a similar window. These windows lit the Great Hall (65 ft. by 27½ ft.) which adjoins the southern part of the curtain; at the back of the buttress are remains of a fireplace with a corbelled hood. In the inner wall, the doorway, at the S. end, has jambs and triangular head of two orders, the inner rounded and the outer chamfered, with a moulded label; farther N. are two windows and the remains of a third; they had segmental-pointed heads and moulded labels. Some of the moulded roof-corbels remain in both walls. The N. wall is not bonded into the curtain; it has a late 14th-century inserted doorway with moulded jambs and segmental-pointed head, and opens into a vestibule containing a staircase leading down to the basement storey of the N. range; above this room was a small chapel, of which the trefoil-headed piscina and part of the sedile remain, in the S. wall; in the outer or curtainwall are the remains of garde-robes.

The North-West Tower is of c. 1300, and of three stages, generally similar in form to the other angletowers. The tower was severely damaged in the siege and the outer face has largely fallen. The lowest stage has remains of a fireplace in the E. wall and of two window-embrasures. The second stage has remains of two window-embrasures, but of the third stage only the junctions with the curtains remain.

The North Curtain is of c. 1300, and is pierced by three single-light windows, all formerly with trefoiled heads, and, in one case, a transom. At a lower level is a sally-port with an outer doorway with rounded jambs and triangular head and, on the inner face, two chamfered arches, a portcullis-groove and the rebate and hook for an inner door. Within the western part of the curtain is a two-storeyed building (Plate 100), with an opening into the N.W. tower. It has a cross-wall near the N. end carried on two arches and a central pier carried down through both storeys. The basementstorey contains the entrance to the sally-port; in the S. wall, near the E. end, is a trefoil-headed recess, with a sink and arrangements for a feed-pipe. The ground-storey formed a large solar, entered at the W. end of the S. wall by a doorway with jambs and segmental-pointed arch of two orders, the inner rounded and the outer chamfered. The arcade which forms a sort of screen, near the W. end, has two segmental-pointed arches of two moulded orders with a common relieving arch and label over the two arches; the arches spring from moulded corbels and an octagonal central pier with a moulded capital and base. Between the E. end of the hall and the gatehouse, was a two-storeyed building, added in the 15th century to connect the solar and the chapel. In the S. wall was a large open arch of which the bases of the two semi-octagonal responds remain.

The Courtyard, in the middle of the castle, is of roughly rectangular form and had covered walks along the E. and W. sides. Against the N. range is a large rectangular well, sunk 169 ft. below the courtyard-level.

The Outer Defences of the castle consist of an outer ward on the W. and N. fronts and a barbican covering the approach to the gatehouse. The Barbican is of semi-circular plan and was built in the 14th century. It is entered on the S. by a small gatehouse flanked by round turrets faced with ashlar. In the outer part are three slots for the counterpoises of the drawbridge and in the E. wall is the socket for the drawbridge-pivot. E. of the gatehouse is a small chamber, with the remains of a window commanding the entrance. In the wall on the N.E. of the barbican are remains of a garde-robe.

Between the barbican and the main gatehouse is a sloping Causeway and a bridge (Plate 103) of two spans, the latter of early 14th-century date; the eastern span has segmental-pointed arches, of three chamfered orders with a label; the roadway rests on an arch of the same form, with chamfered ribs. The inner span has a half arch only butting against the gatehouse; the outer walls only are continued across, the space between being spanned by a drawbridge; built into the S. arch is a screen-wall, probably of later 14th-century date; it contains a doorway with a shouldered head. The three slots for the counterpoises of the drawbridge have been filled in, at a later date, and corbelling inserted for a permanent wooden bridge.

The Outer Ward is enclosed by much ruined walls of the 14th century, with small drum-towers at the S.W. and N.W. angles. In the S.W. tower are remains of a garde-robe; the N.W. tower was rather larger and contained a polygonal chamber. Within the ward, on the W. side, are remains of stable-buildings.

Within the castle are preserved numerous worked and moulded stones including the joggled voussoirs of an arch, 13th-century capitals, 15th-century spandrels of window heads, carved with angels, a dragon, etc. A few fragments of slip-tiles and painted glass are also preserved.

The Moat is rock-cut and is carried round the S. and E. faces of the castle, the N. and W. faces being defended by the steep slopes of the ground. The moat has an average width of 90 ft., and an average depth of 28 ft. A small subsidiary ditch or moat is carried round the barbican; it is about 17 ft. wide.

Condition—Good, in charge of H.M. Office of Works.

d(3). Flanesford Priory (Plate 104), buildings and fish-pond, stands ½ m. N.E. of the church. The priory of St. John the Baptist was a small house of canonsregular of St. Augustine, founded in 1346, by Sir Richard Talbot. The surviving building flanked the S. side of the cloister and has a projecting S. wing adjoining the E. end; it is now used as a barn. The walls are of local sandstone rubble and ashlar with dressings of the same material and the roofs are covered with tiles. The main building, formerly of two storeys, was probably the frater-range, the frater being on the first floor; it has, however, certain unusual features, such as the entrance at the W. end and the fireplace, which make this attribution doubtful. That the cloister lay to the N. of it is proved by the survival of the weathering and corbels of its roof; its extent is probably represented by the existing quadrangle of the farm-buildings.

The Main Building (76¼ ft. by 24¾ ft.) is of mid 14th-century date, and is now of one storey except at the E. end where a framed partition and two floors, of the 16th century, have been inserted. The ground floor has in the E. wall an original square-headed window. In the N. wall is a modern barn doorway, and farther W. is a small square-headed window. The weathering of the cloister-roof extends the whole length of the wall, and below it are the corbels of the wall-plate; at the E. end is the broken junction of a wall formerly running N. In the S. wall, at the E. end, is a blocked doorway with a square head; there are remains of a second doorway farther W. and two square-headed windows, of two lights; beyond these is the modern barndoorway; near the W. end of the wall is a single-light square-headed window. In the W. wall is a doorway with a shouldered head. The first floor has in the E. wall a window formerly of two cinque-foiled lights with tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded rear-arch; the mullion is missing. In the N. wall, near the E. end, are remains of a single-light window, and farther W. a fireplace with moulded jambs and a broken stone hood resting on corbels of grouped shafts with capitals; the hearth rests on corbelling, beyond it are the remains of a 15th-century window of three trefoiled lights in a square head and a 14th-century window of one cinque-foiled light. At the E. end of the S. wall is a doorway with a two-centred head; farther W. is a range of four 14th-century windows each originally of two trefoiled lights with quatre-foiled tracery in a two-centred head; all the mullions are missing, and of the westernmost window only part of the head remains; between the two easternmost windows is a niche with a cinque-foiled head. In the W. wall, now covered by a modern building, is a 14th-century doorway (Plate 13) with moulded jambs, two-centred arch and label; flanking it are niches with cinque-foiled heads and moulded labels; beyond the niches and at a higher level are windows with two-centred heads, partly blocked and partly cut away; above the doorway and niches are the corbels for a former roof. The 16th-century roof of the E. part of the building is of queen-post type.


Goodrich, Flanesford Priory

Goodrich, Flanesford Priory

The South Wing is of two storeys. The ground floor has a doorway with a square head, and above it are two doorways; these were contained in a narrow building, running E., of which the start of the side remains. Farther S. is a blocked square-headed window in the lower storey. The S. end has two square-headed windows, the lower blocked. In the thickness of the W. wall is a staircase entered by a doorway, with a shouldered head at the ground-floor level; the staircase is lit by two windows and a quatre-foiled opening.

The Fish-pond lies to the S.W. of the house.

Condition—Fairly good.

d(4). Vicarage, house, 60 yards S.E. of church, is of two storeys with attics and cellar. The walls are of ashlar and sandstone rubble and the roofs are covered with slates. The house has been extensively modernised, but the S.E. block was probably built in the 17th century. The S. front of this block appears to have been refaced with ashlar early in the 18th century. Above the doorway is a carved shield-of-arms, perhaps for Starkie. Inside the building are some chamfered ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good, much altered.

d(5). Cottage (Plate 22), 100 yards S.W. of church, is of two storeys; the walls are of stone rubble and ashlar, and plastered timber-framing; the roofs are of stone and modern slates. It was built in the first half of the 17th century and extended later in the same century, when the E. front was refaced with ashlar. The building has been modernised and there is a modern addition at the N. end. The W. front has some exposed timber-framing enclosing a window and blocked doorway. Inside the building there are some stop-chamfered ceiling-beams and exposed timber-framing.

Condition—Fairly good.

d(6). Old Court, house, 150 yards S.W. of the church, is of two storeys, with cellars; the walls are of stone rubble and timber-framing and the roofs are covered with modern slates. There is documentary evidence of an earlier building on the site, the present L-shaped house dating from late in the 16th century; there are modern additions on the E., S. and W. The E. and W. ends of the N. wing have exposed timber-framing; the doorway at the E. end of the S. wall of this wing has an original square frame. The N. wall has been restored, but towards the W. end are two small two-light windows with moulded heads and mullions. Inside the building there are some stop-chamfered ceiling-beams and exposed timber-framing. The barn, S.W. of the house, has a re-used 16th-century door with large ornamental strap-hinges.

Condition—Good.

(7). Geddes, house, about 1 m. N.N.W. of the church, is of two storeys with attics and cellars. The walls are of local stone ashlar and rubble, and plastered timber-framing; the roofs are covered with slates. The middle block of the house is of mid 16th-century date; the S. wing was added c. 1630–40, and the first floor was partly re-built towards the end of the century. The N. wing, incorporating the N.E. angle of the earlier building, and the staircase in the S. wing are modern. The W. front of the original building is of rubble and has a doorway at the N. end with a segmental-pointed head; the doorway to the S. has a square-moulded label and a 16th-century door with six moulded panels; the window between the doors has a moulded label, and over the N. door are two small blocked square-headed windows. The N. face of the S. wing is of ashlar with moulded strings above and below the first floor; the doorway has moulded jambs and square head. The S. side of this wing is of ashlar with similar strings above and below the first floor, which is of later date than the ground floor; some of the window frames are of c. 1700, and the original doorway has been fitted with a modern window. The chimney-stacks at the E. and W. ends of the wing have diagonal shafts. Inside the building the middle block has exposed timber-framing and stop-chamfered beams and joists. The W. room in the S. wing has a plaster ceiling with a moulded cornice carried round the ceiling-beams; above the fireplace is a plaster ornament of two laurel wreaths in square moulded panels and a festoon of drapery above; all of c. 1630–40. On the first floor is a similar plaster ceiling. There is some exposed timber-framing in this wing. Both wings have roofs of queen-post construction.

Condition—Good.

a(8). Newhouse Farm (Plate 105), now three tenements, 1,100 yards W.N.W. of the church, is of three storeys with cellars. The walls are of sandstone rubble with ashlar dressings; some of the internal walls are timber-framed; the roofs are covered with modern slates. The house is dated 1636, and was built as the vicarage by the Rev. Thomas Swift. The plan is Y-shaped with the wings radiating N., S.E. and S.W. At the end of the S.W. wing is a semi-octagonal projecting bay, and against the N.E. side of the S.E. wing is a two-storeyed porch. West of the N. wing is a two-storeyed late 17th-century addition which replaced an earlier addition; there is a low modern extension to this wing. The interior has recently been altered for use as three tenements; the walls have been lowered and the roofs re-built. The building has a chamfered plinth and moulded stringcourses. The windows are of one to four lights with square heads. The main entrance is through the two-storeyed porch (Plate 14) in the N.E. wall of the S.E. wing; the upper floor is carried on two monolithic Doric columns; the abaci are inscribed T (?) P., S.S., 1636. The porch roof is modern; the doorway has moulded jambs and a four-centred arch in a square-head. The two-storeyed late 17th-century addition to the N. wing has a gable with a flat coping having shaped corbels at the lower ends. The walls incorporate old material and, on the first floor, there is a three-light window.


Goodrich, Newhouse Farm

Goodrich, Newhouse Farm

The S.W. wing has a modern doorway at its junction with the N. wing. The S.W. wall has a square-headed doorway with chamfered jambs to the basement; the three upper floors of the projecting bay have, in each face, square-headed windows with chamfered jambs having three, two and one lights. The main wall-face is gabled with shaped corbels. The doorway in the S.E. wing has stop-chamfered jambs and four-centred head. Inside the building there is a fireplace with a four-centred arched head and chamfered jambs; above are two shaped corbels supporting the stone breast to the fireplace above. The ceiling-beams are stop-chamfered. The staircase retains the original steps and panelled casing. In the N. wall of the late 17th-century addition is a doorway with a stop-chamfered frame; the door has vertical moulded battens with strap hinges. The first floor has some exposed timber-framing and stop-chamfered door-frames. In the ground floor of the S.W. wing there is a chamfered beam and, across the opening to the bay, a moulded beam. The second-floor fireplace is of stone and has a four-centred head.

Condition—Fairly good.

c(9). Old Mill, ¾ m. W. of church, is of three storeys; the walls are of sandstone rubble and the roof is covered with corrugated iron. It is a rectangular building dating from the 17th century, but largely re-built with old material; the eastern end is mostly original. It is now used as a barn, and the mill is not in working order. Inside the building there are stop-chamfered joists and a collar-beam roof with side purlins.

Condition—Poor.

c(10). Barn, at Old Forge on the River Wye, nearly 1 m. S.W. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of sandstone rubble with ashlar dressings and brick; the roofs are covered with stone slates. It was built in the first half of the 17th century; later in the same century the roof was carried down over a one-storeyed extension on the E. side. The doorway on the W. front has chamfered jambs and segmental head and is fitted with a 17th-century nail-studded door. The two-light windows have wooden frames and mullions. The ceiling-beams are stop-chamfered and the roof is of collar-beam construction with chamfered purlins.

Condition—Ruinous.

c(11). Huntsham Court, house and barn, about 1¼ m. S.S.W. of the church. The house is of three storeys and basement; the walls are of ashlar and the roofs are covered with modern slates. The house was begun c. 1620–30 on an L-shaped plan, with a porch on the W. side of the S. wing. A few years later a gabled addition was built on the E. side and a wing added to the S. and W. At the end of the 17th century a gabled extension was built in the N.E. angle and the existing block S. of the main S. wing either added or re-built. Early in the 18th century additions were made to the N.E. and S.W. The passage at the S.E. corner is modern, and there have been modern alterations to the interior. The main entrance is through a small porch, reached by a flight of steps in the middle of the original S. wing. The porch (Plate 13) is open on three sides, each having a chamfered three-centred arch carried on circular columns and semi-circular responds, all with moulded caps and bases and with a deep-moulded cornice above. The doorway has moulded jambs and four-centred head and is fitted with a nail-studded door. N. of the door is a square-headed five-light window with chamfered jambs and square-moulded label; the basement and first-floor windows are similar, but the basement has no label. The N. and E. fronts of the N. wing have the original windows to the basement, ground and first floors with similar detail to those on the W. front; the mid 17th-century addition has windows similar to those of the original building. The chimney-stack at the E. end has a moulded capping. The E. wall of the early 18th-century addition at the N.E. corner has a square-headed bolection-moulded doorway. The original S. front is partly hidden by the late 17th-century addition. It and the addition have windows similar to those already described, as has also the mid 17th-century wing.

Inside the building, the middle portion originally had a large hall, now divided by modern partitions. Part of the original ceiling, with moulded panels enclosing fleurs-de-lis, remains, and in the westernmost room of the N. wing there is a similar ceiling with two moulded beams. In the basement are some stop-chamfered beams.

The Barn, E. of the house, is of the same date and built of ashlar, repaired with rubble; the roofs are of modern tiles. The N. wall has a door with a segmental-pointed head and, to the W., a two-light window with a wooden frame, and a blocked window to the top stage. The E. and S. walls have blocked windows, and the W. wall has a square-headed two-light stone window and part of a small re-used bull's-eye window.

Condition—Good.

c(12). House, about 80 yards S.W. of (11), is of three storeys with attics; the walls are of roughly coursed and squared sandstone and the roof is of corrugated iron. It is a rectangular building dating from c. 1620–30, but is now gutted and used as a barn. At the apex of the E. gable is a square chimney-stack with a diagonal shaft with a moulded capping. The doorway in the E. wall has a square head, and the first floor has a square-headed window of two lights with a moulded label. The N. wall has a blocked square-headed three-light window; above is a blocked three-light window and a two-light window. In the middle is a large gabled dormer, with a flat coping and gable pinnacle, enclosing a bull's-eye window. The W. wall has a blocked three-light window to the ground floor, a two-light window to the first floor, and a bull's-eye window in the gable. The S. wall has similar three-light windows, and on the second floor a two-light window in a gabled dormer. Inside the building there is a fireplace in the E. wall at first-floor level, with chamfered jambs and square head, and carried on shaped stone corbels. Some of the original stop-chamfered beams remain; the roof is of collar-beam construction.

Condition—Poor.

c(13). The Stalls, house, about 300 yards N. of (11), is of two storeys; the walls are of roughly squared and coursed sandstone-rubble and timber-framing and the roof is covered with modern slates. It is of mid 17th-century date with a modern one-storeyed addition on the S. side. The W. wall has exposed timber-framing and two blocked square-headed three-light windows. Inside the building is a stop-chamfered ceiling-beam and exposed joists.

Condition—Poor.

c(14). Barn, a few yards N. of (13), is of two storeys; the walls are of sandstone rubble with ashlar dressings and timber-framing, and the roof is covered with stone slates; it was built in the 17th century. The building is open on the E. side except for a timber-framed partition. The N. wall is pierced by three rows of looplights. Inside the building the first floor is carried on two cambered and stop-chamfered tie-beams and two square stop-chamfered vertical posts. The roof has tie-beams, trussed rafters and collars.

Condition—Good.

c(15). Rudge's Barn, 200 yards N. of (14), is partly of one and partly of two storeys. The walls are of sandstone-rubble with ashlar dressings and timber-framing with brick nogging and weather-boarding; the roofs are of stone slates and modern slates. The original building was rectangular with a N.W. porch and was built in the first half of the 17th century. A two-storey wing was added on the N.E., probably in 1693; low later additions were built on each side of the porch and the roof carried down over them; the roofing on the N.E. is now missing. The S.W. gable has a bull's-eye window and the walls are pierced with loops. At the N. corner of the N.E. wing is a stone inscribed R. U. 1693. The roof to the main building is in five bays with tie-beams, trussed rafters and collars.

Condition—Fair.

d(16). Mainoaks, house and barn, 700 yards E. of (15), and nearly 1 m. S. of the church. The House is of two storeys and basement; the walls are of sandstonerubble with ashlar dressings, and some timber-framing; the roofs are covered with slates. It is of 15th-century origin, and a crutch and part of the E. wall remain of this date; in the 16th century it was almost entirely re-built on an L-shaped plan. The S. wing was added early in the next century, and towards the end of the century the E. wall was partly refaced and a stair inserted in the S. end of the building; modern additions and alterations include a W. extension to the S. wing and a low extension to the S. of the E. wing. At the E. end of the S. front is an inserted late 17th-century ashlar chimney-stack with a moulded capping. The E. end of the E. wall has exposed timber-framing; the rest of this wall is probably mediæval in origin, but has been refaced with 17th-century ashlar; a gabled dormer with a two-light square-headed window was inserted in the 17th century. Near the E. end of the S. wall of the N.E. wing is a segmental-headed window with eight diamond-shaped wooden mullions. Inside the building there is a considerable amount of exposed timber-framing and some stop-chamfered ceiling-beams and joists. The late 17th-century staircase at the S. end of the house has moulded string and turned balusters. At the E. end of the E. wing is a fireplace with a wide flat arch. On the first floor of the S. wing at the head of the stairs is a 17th-century panelled door and a strip of re-used carved frieze with the date 1629. Spanning the building on the S. side of the main chimney is a large truss built up on a mediæval crutch which springs from the ground floor and forms a rough two-centred arch beneath the present roof; at the S. end of the house the wind-braced roof has collars and side purlins; the E. wing has a tie-beam, king-post and collar.

The Barn, N. of the house, is of 16th-century date with an early 17th-century extension on the S. The walls are of roughly squared and coursed ashlar, and rubble and the roofs are covered with tiles and slates. Some of the original windows are blocked; the remaining ones have four or five lights with diamond-shaped mullions of wood; the upper range in the E. wall are loop-lights. The W. door has monolithic head and jambs. The N. gable has a bull's-eye window. The roof is in four bays with trusses of queen-post type. The 17th-century addition has, in the W. wall, two two-light square-headed windows. In the S. wall is a door to the first floor with an elliptical head, and a two-light square-headed window similar to that in the W. wall. The roof is of collar beam and side-purlin construction.

Condition—Good.



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