Bridport

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1952

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'Bridport', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Dorset, Volume 1: West (1952), pp. 43-52. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=127199 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


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14 BRIDPORT (C.d.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XXXVIII, N.W. (b)XXXVIII, S.W.)

Bridport is a municipal borough on the river Brit 15 m. W. of Dorchester. It now includes parts of the parishes of Allington, Bradpole, Bothenhampton, Burton Bradstock and Symondsbury. The church, the Unitarian Chapel, the Town Hall, the Chantry and Downe Hall are the principal monuments.

Ecclesiastical

b(1) Parish Church of St. Mary stands on the W. side of South Street. The walls are of local rubble and ashlar with dressings of the same material; the roofs are covered with tiles and lead. A church of cruciform plan was built in the first half of the 13th century and of this much of the North and South Transepts remains. A recorded dedication in 1362 may refer to a rebuilding of the chancel. Work seems to have been in progress in 1397 and it was perhaps at this time that a general rebuilding was begun with the Crossing, Central Tower and South Nave Chapel; the rebuilding of the Nave and Aisles no doubt extended into the 15th century and the South Porch is of the same period. There was a dedication in 1403. Large windows were inserted in the transepts in the 15th century and a recorded dedication in 1486 may refer to another rebuilding of the chancel. The church was drastically restored in 1860, when the Chancel andChapels were rebuilt and the nave and aisles extended two bays to the W.

The central tower and transepts are of some architectural interest.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (29¾ ft. by 14¾ ft.) and the North and South Chapels are modern.

The Central Tower (13 ft. square) is of c.1400 and of four stages, with a N.W. stair-turret, an embattled parapet and pinnacles. The crossing has, in each wall, a two-centred arch with the main mouldings continued down the responds, which have each three attached shafts with moulded bases and capitals enriched with paterae; the inner shafts are triple and from them spring the diagonal ribs of the modern plaster vault. The second stage has a small rectangular light in the E. wall and a similar but modern light in the W. wall. The third stage has, in the E. and N. walls, a window of one square-headed light. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a partly restored window of two trefoiled lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred head with moulded reveals and label with returned stops.

The North Transept (23½ ft. by 12¾ ft.) has, in the E. wall, an early 13th-century arcade of two bays with two centred arches of two orders, the inner moulded and the outer chamfered; they spring from attached shafts with moulded bases and capitals; the capitals of the middle pier have simple leaves in addition; the moulded labels have a leaf-stop at the N. end and a stop with vine-leaves and grapes in the middle; the S. arch opens into the N. chapel, but that on the N. is a wall-arch only and under it is a 13th-century lancet-window with moulded splays. In the N. wall is a much restored 15th-century window of five cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head with moulded reveals and label. In the W. wall is a modern doorway with a modern or restored lancet-window above it; further S. is an arch of c.1400, two-centred and of three moulded orders; the responds have each four attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases; the main capitals have paterae.

The South Transept (23¼ ft. by 13½ ft.) has, in the E. wall, two arches; the northern is of c.1400, two-centred and moulded; the responds have each three attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases; the main capitals have paterae; the southern arch is a wall-arch similar to that in the N. transept, but all the capitals have simple leaf or reed-ornament; it encloses a restored lancet-window similar to that in the N. transept. In the S. wall is a much restored 15th-century window of six cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head with moulded reveals, shafted splays and a label. In the W. wall is an arch of c.1400, similar to the corresponding arch in the N. transept; further S. is a 13th-century lancet-window with moulded splays and with the opening enlarged.

The Nave (77½ ft. by 14¼ ft.) has early 15th-century N. and S. arcades, originally of four bays but now with two modern bays to the W. The two-centred arches are moulded with the main mouldings partly continued down the piers and responds, which have attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases; the main capitals have paterae.

The North Aisle (11 ft. wide) has, in the N. wall, six windows, each of three cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head with moulded reveals, labels and head-stops; the second is largely and the two westernmost windows entirely modern, but the others are of early 15th-century date, much restored. In the N.E. angle is an octagonal stair-turret, communicating with the central tower by a passage with a stone roof on corbelling.


Bridport, the Parish Church of St. Mary

Bridport, the Parish Church of St. Mary

The South Aisle (10½ ft. wide) has in the E. bay an archway of c.1400; it has responds and two-centred arch of two continuous moulded orders; the S. doorway, of the same date, has hollow-chamfered jambs and two-centred arch; above it is a modern arch opening into the upper storey of the porch; further W. are four windows similar to those in the N. aisle; the two westernmost are modern.

The South Chapel of the Nave (13¾ ft. by 10 ft.) has, in the S. wall, a partly restored window similar to those in the aisles.

The South Porch is of c.1400 and of two storeys with carved paterae, heads and gargoyles to the parapet and a chimney at the S.W. angle. The outer archway has moulded jambs and partly restored two-centred head with a label. The upper storey has, in the S. wall, a three-sided oriel-window with concave corbelling and moulded capping; the main face has a window of two trefoiled lights with tracery in a square head; the side faces have each a loop-light.

The Roofs of the aisles are of pent-form, with chamfered timbers, probably of the 16th or 17th century; one of the carved corbels appears to be old.

Fittings—Brass: see Monument (6). Font: octagonal bowl with quatre-foiled panel in each face, moulded lower edge, octagonal stem with trefoil-headed panel in each face, hollow-chamfered base, 15th-century. Hatchment: In S. transept, on E. wall, of Bull, 18th-century. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In N. transept—(1) cross-legged effigy in mail with long surcoat, shield on left, remains of sword, feet on lion, flat-topped mail cap, mid 13th-century, much patched and restored, face modern; on E. wall, (2) to John Bishop M.D., 1762, Susannah his child, 1730, and Mary his wife, 1781, wall-monument of white and veined marble with cornice, apron and shield-of-arms now illegible. In S. transept—on W. wall, (3) to Samuel Bull, 1777, white and veined marble wall-monument with cornice, urn and swags; on S. wall, (4) to Josiah Northcote Tead, 1807, and Mary (Palmer) his wife, 1803, black and white marble wall-monument by T. E. Wood, Chelsea. In S. nave-chapel—on E. wall, (5) to Katherine (Davys), widow of Robert Frampton, rector of Dunhead, 1705, tablet with cherub-heads, urn, etc.; (6) to Edward Coker, slain at the Bull Inn, 1685, tablet with brass plate and shield-of-arms in wooden frame. In churchyard—N. of N. chapel, (7) to Joseph, 1769, and John, sons of Richard and Mary Roberts, Phoebe, wife of Giles Roberts, 1810, and Phoebe their daughter, obelisk with ball finial on pedestal-base with steps, one face of the obelisk with a shield-of-arms and the panelled faces of the pedestal with inscriptions and a figure group of the Good Samaritan carved in low relief, late 18th or early 19th-century, "erected by Chambers"; S. of chancel, (8) to Anthony Pearse, 1690–1, table-tomb; (9) to Mary, widow of Anthony Pearse, 1692, table-tomb; S. of S. chapel, (10) to William Burt, 1680, and Cicely, wife of William Burt, 1696, table-tomb; N. of N. transept, (11) to Walter Hallet, table-tomb, probably early 18th-century; N. of nave, (12) to William Chilcot, 1692, table-tomb; (13) to Robert Bishop, 1678, Mary, daughter of Robert Bishop, 1678, Thomas, 1701, and Thomas, 17.., sons of Samuell Bishop, and Thomas, son of Robert Bishop, 1701, table-tomb; (14) to Eddeth, wife of Robert Bishop, 1684–5, Robert Bishop sen., 1684, Mary wife of Samuell Bishop, 1687, and Robert infant son of same, 1687, table-tomb; W. of nave, (15) headstone with date 1670. Floor-slabs: In crossing—(1) to Lewis Alford, 1712, and Mary, his wife: (2) to John Allford, 172., inscription much worn; (3) to William Bull, and another, probably 18th-century, much worn; (4) to John Ellery, 1790, Mary his wife, 1771, and Mary Golding their daughter. In N. transept—(5) to Dulcebelle, wife of Sir Thomas Aston, 1677, with shield-of-arms and enrichments; (6) to Elizabeth Burtt and others, 18th-century, much worn. In S. transept—(7) to Richard, son of Richard and Elizabeth Button, 1720; (8) to Francis... den, 18th-century, much worn; (9) to Elizabeth, wife of John Hounsell, 1773. Piscina: In N. transept—in E. wall, recess with trefoiled head, 13th-century. Plate: includes a cup, a paten, a flagon and two alms-dishes all of 1827. Royal Arms: painted on boards, of Victoria. Sundial: on E. buttress of S. porch—scratch dial. Weather-vane: On tower—gilt metal cock (Plate 54), 17th or 18th-century. Miscellanea: Against W. wall of S. porch—carved stone with three niches surmounted by decayed tabernacle work and flanked by buttresses, deep central niche with holes for iron grate, side niches with weathered figures, defaced half-angel under central niche, 15th-century, said to have come from the chapel of St. Andrew at the High Cross.

b(2) Parish Church of St. Swithun, Allington, now in the Borough of Bridport, stands on the W. of North Allington near the junction with West Allington. The walls are of stone from quarries at Bothenhampton, faced with stucco with ashlar dressings. It is a building of 1827 in neo-Greek style, rectangular on plan, with a pedimented Doric Portico on the E. with circular Bell-Turret over. The doorways are square-headed and have simple moulded architraves, and the windows have semi-circular heads. There is an entablature round the building with plain frieze, except over the portico where the full Doric members, triglyphs, mutules and guttae, appear; the low parapet wall is plain. Inside, the altar is at the W. end and there is no structural demarcation between Chancel and Nave.There is an entrance Vestibule with Vestry to the S. of it.

Fittings—Bells: two; 1st probably 19th-century; 2nd by T. Mears, London, 1827. Books: bible, leatherbound, 1777. Communion table: of mahogany, possibly contemporary with the church. Gallery: at the E. end, front with moulded top-rail, pierced interlacing-arch trellising and solid panels below supported on iron pillars with moulded caps; there is a projecting bay in the middle, panelled and with fluted corners, and on it the Royal Arms and a painted inscription recording the rebuilding of the church in 1827. Plate: includes a cup, the foot enriched with embossed foliage, given by Mrs. Peach, 1827, a flagon (Plate 31) given by members of the Fox family, 1827, a stand-paten given by Mrs. Dorothy Way, 1734, altered and enlarged in 1827, an alms-dish, 1827, and a pewter flagon inscribed T.B.W. 1694. Pulpit: to N. of altar, with moulded panels and fluted angles. Royal Arms: on gallery-front, carved in wood, of Victoria.

b(3) Wesleyan Methodist Chapel stands on the E. side of South Street near the junction with East Street. The walls are of rubble, faced with stucco on the W. front. It was built in 1838. There is a forecourt on the W. flanked N. and S. by three-storey houses contemporary with the chapel making a small formal layout to the street. The building is rectangular on plan with a recess at the E. end for the organ. The pedimented W. front has the middle bay of three set back to contain two fluted Ionic columns-in-antis flanking a square-headed entrance doorway with eared architrave and a round-headed window above; the side bays each with flanking pilasters contain segmental-headed windows below and round-headed above. Inside, the organ-recess has an arched head springing from pilasters with Corinthian caps.

Fittings—Books: bible, leather-bound, Pitt Press, 1844. Gallery: round the N., S. and W. sides, panelled front with moulded shelf, dentils and console brackets, divided into bays by fluted strip-pilasters. Pulpit: (Plate 27) from Charmouth parish church (q.v.), 17th-century.

The Houses N. and S. of the forecourt are stuccoed and the roofs are covered with slates. The fronts facing inward have central square-headed doorways with moulded eared architraves and windows with flat cornices carried on shaped brackets.

b(4) West Bay Methodist Chapel stands near the shore, 13/8 m. S. of the parish church. The walls are of rubble with the E., S. and W. fronts faced with stucco and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built early in the 19th century. There is a projecting N. porch of wood with panelled sides, full entablature with narrow modillions and concave canopy-shaped roof with small finial; the windows have round heads.

b(5) Unitarian Chapel (Plate 88) stands on the N. side of East Street near the junction with Barrack Street. The walls are of brick and rubble with ashlar dressings and the roofs are covered with slates. It was built in 1794. The plan is rectangular, orientated N. and S.; the main entrance is to the S. under an open semi circular porch composed of two free-standing Ionic columns and pilasters with plain entablature on a stylobate of two steps; the doorway is flanked by narrow lights with fanlight over. The windows have round heads and are symmetrically arranged, one on either side of the porch and three on first-floor level; there is a plain shallow eaves-cornice. The interior has a moulded plaster cornice otherwise it is plain.

Fittings, unless described otherwise, are probably contemporary with the chapel—Chairs: pair, mahogany, with turned legs and solid panelled backs with rounded tops, mid 19th-century. Communion Rails: below the pulpit, U-shaped on plan, with moulded rail and turned balusters. Gallery: with panelled front supported on Ionic columns of marbled wood. Monument: on N. wall above pulpit, to Rev. Thomas Howe, 1820, wall-tablet of black and white marble with cornice. Pulpit: with standard; in middle of N. wall, of wood veneered, with plain sides, canted angles containing fluted pilasters, cornice and stepped base on hollow-curved bracket; the standard is flanked by narrow reeded pilasters and has a cornice-mould at the top.

b(6) Baptist Chapel stands on the E. side of Victoria Grove 100 yards N. of West Street. The walls are of rubble with stucco W. front and the roofs are covered with slates. It was built in 1841. The plan is rectangular. The pedimented W. front has pilasters at the two angles, a pedimented entrance porch in the middle and two tall narrow windows with round heads. The interior is plain.

Fittings—Gallery: at W. end, panelled front, supported on wood columns with moulded caps. Pulpit: with similar panelling.

a(7) Walling between the gardens of Allington Vicarage and that of No. 9 Parsonage Road, 1,150 yards N.N.W. of Bridport church, is said to be part of the mediæval church of St. Swithun, Allington. It is of rubble, about 7 ft. high and extends from E. to W. Incorporated in it is a portion of cusped stonework.


Bridport, Plan showing the Position of Monuments

Bridport, Plan showing the Position of Monuments

b(8) Friends' Meeting House and Almshouses, on the E. side of South Street 30 yards S.E. of the church, form four sides of a small courtyard. The building is of one and two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered. The Meeting House was given by Daniel Taylor to the Society of Friends in 1697 and the adjoining buildings were handed over by him to trustees to be used as almshouses. The range on the W. side, to the N. of the Meeting House, was built in the 15th century. The N. range was built in the 16th century and the Meeting House, on the S., is said to have been a barn and is perhaps of the 17th century. The building has been altered in the 18th century and more modern times and the Meeting Room on the E. side is a modern addition. The Meeting House has an early 18th-century window in the W. wall with a wooden frame, mullion and transom; there are four windows of similar date in the N. wall, all of two lights and the two lower also with transoms. There are some similar windows on the E. side of the building. In the S. wall of the N. range is a 16th-century stone doorway with a four-centred head. Inside the building, the Meeting House has galleries on the E. and N. sides; the latter is supported on three old timber posts. The N. part of the W. range originally formed one room and has late 15th-century moulded wall-plates and central beam, with carved paterae; the room has been sub-divided by 17th-century panelled partitions. There is also an old partition on the N. side of the entrance-passage. The upper storey retains an original roof-truss with curved braces and curved wind-braces. The N. range retains some 16th-century moulded ceiling-beams. On the upper floor are the jambs and lintel of a blocked fireplace. Parts of the roof-trusses are exposed, as are some curved wind-braces.


Bridport, Friends Meeting House & Daniel Taylor Almshouses
South Street

Bridport, Friends Meeting House & Daniel Taylor Almshouses South Street

Secular

b(9) Town Hall (Plate 89) stands at the junction of East Street and South Street 330 yards N. of the parish church, on the site of the former Chapel of St. Andrew. The building is of two storeys; the walls are of brick with stone dressings and the roofs are covered with slates. It was built in 1785–6 to the design of William Tyler, R.A., and the clock and cupola were added some twenty years later at the expense of Sir Evan Nepean. The craftsmen responsible for the work were, David Fudge, bricklayer, plasterer and tiler, James Hamilton of Melcombe Regis, Portland stone mason, John Conway, William and John Bearn, carpenters and joiners, Abraham Selwood for the leadwork, Ben. Galpin, painter and glazier, and Edward Dare who made the wrought-iron balustrade of the staircase. The plan is T-shaped with the cross-wing fronting East Street; the ground floor has arcading of semi-circular arches round and originally accommodated an open market, the S. wing has now been filled in. The main N. front has five bays of arcading, the middle three project and are of rusticated stonework; the projection is carried up in brick and pedimented at roof level to form a central feature, in it on the first floor is a Venetian window with a stone panel below the sill carved with the arms of the Borough; in the tympanum of the pediment is a circular window; each of the flanking areas of wall contains a plain rectangular window on the first floor. The E. and W. return walls are each of three bays, with a plain rectangular window on the first floor flanked by round-headed niches; the E. window is now blocked. Over the middle of the N. cross-wing is a clock-tower and open cupola with eight columns, renewed in 1825, supporting a lead-covered dome and weather-vane. The S. wing has four bays of arcading on either side and three on the S. Inside, the town hall occupies most of the first floor; there is a raised dais towards the S. end in a three-centred arched opening with moulded archivolt springing from the entablatures of Ionic columns and half-columns framing lobbies open to the hall on either side of the dais; the remaining walls have a panelled dado. The panelling and decoration of the dais were added in 1897; the fireplace is modern.

b(10) East Bridge, at the E. end of East Street, is of ashlar and consists of one arched span. It was built by J. and T. Gale in 1784 and subsequently widened. There is a plain parapet wall with chamfered coping to which is fixed a metal plate with the names of the builders and the date.

b(11) The Chantry, house on the W. side of South Street, 180 yards S. of the church, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of coursed rubble and the roofs are covered with stone slates. The building dates from the 14th or 15th century and its original purpose is unknown; in some respects it resembles the isolated tower-houses of semi-defensive character. The E. front has a projecting porch-wing of two storeys; the outer entrance has moulded jambs and two-centred head; the inner doorway has hollow-chamfered jambs and four-centred head. Near the top of the building is an oversailing course above which the wall is set back. The windows are of 18th century or modern date. On the W. side is a fireplace projection with a splayed capping. Inside the building, some heavy chamfered ceiling-beams are exposed. Near the middle are remains of the original spiral staircase to the first floor; it is of stone and is entered by a doorway with hollow-chamfered jambs and four-centred head; beside this is a recess with a cusped ogee head. Further W. is a 16th or 17th-century muntin and plank partition. The open fireplace in the S.W. room has a chamfered lintel and a shelf carried on octagonal corbels. In the N.W. room is a fireplace with moulded jambs and four-centred arch in a square head with a moulded cornice. On the first floor the room over the porch is entered by an archway with hollow-chamfered jambs and two-centred head; in the S. wall is an original recess with an ogee head and remains of a drain, cut back. A doorway on this floor retains its hollow-chamfered jambs and four-centred head; a window in the W. wall, now blocked, is set high up and has a steeply splayed sill; it is perhaps original.


Bridport, the Chantry

Bridport, the Chantry

b(12) House, called the Castle and now the Art Gallery and Museum, on the E. side of South Street 110 yards S. of East Street, is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble with freestone dressings and the roofs are covered with tiles and slates. It was built in the first half of the 16th century and is said to have been the house of the chantry-priest of St. Leonard. It was damaged by fire in 1876 and was given to the town in 1932. The W. front has a moulded string-course between the storeys; the windows are of three and five four-centred lights with moulded reveals; two of these windows, one on each floor, have incipient cinque-foiled cusping on the heads of the lights. The two-storeyed porch is semi-octagonal on plan and has an outer archway with moulded jambs and four-centred head; the inner doorway also has moulded jambs and four-centred head. The upper storey has windows similar to those on the rest of the front, one of four lights on the face and one of two lights in each return. The porch has a gable corbelled out over the splayed angles of the building. Inside the building there is an original fireplace with moulded jambs and four-centred head and, on the first floor, a corbel carved with a half-angel holding a book.

b(13) Downe Hall, standing to the N. of the town 650 yards N.N.E. of the parish church, is of three storeys with lower wings and basement. The walls are of local rubble and Portland stone ashlar and the roofs are slate-covered. It is said to have been built by Capt. Downe in 1789; in 1893 considerable alterations were made, three-storey bays were added to the E. and W. of the main block, the main entrance was moved from S. to N., the centre of the N. front being rebuilt to receive it, and the hall which had previously held the staircase was remodelled; at the same time the wings were altered and rearranged internally and the W. wing refenestrated. The house is now divided into flats.

The S. front (Plate 78) is symmetrical with a lofty central block flanked by low wings designed as pavilions with short connecting screen-walls. The main block is ashlar-faced with rusticated ground floor setting forward in the centre to form a base for four Ionic pilasters two storeys in height with pedimented entablature containing a circular window in the tympanum, on either side the entablature is carried across the front with balustraded parapet; all the windows are plain with square heads, those on the first floor have delicate iron balconies; the semi-circular porch, now glazed, was added in or before 1807. The wings are of ashlar on the S., the windows are round-headed and the short recessed screen-walls have balustraded parapets. The original work in squared and coursed rubble on the other fronts is plain and mostly with square-headed windows, but the late 19th-century additions are partly in ashlar and of some elaboration. The interior arrangement has been altered and the original main stair removed entirely. The hall retains two original wrought iron fan-lights; in the dining-room is bolection-moulded panelling of c.1700 brought from another house in 1893. On the ground floor of the W. wing are two reset early 19th-century white marble fireplaces (Plate 48), one with a central frieze-panel carved in low relief with Abraham's sacrifice and urns and foliage at either end, this retains the original grate, the other carved in bolder relief with Erato in the panel and nymphs and flowers at the sides; this wing also contains a small 19th-century cast-iron hourglass-shaped grate. In the drawing-room is a reset fireplace of 16th-century Italian style.

b(14) House, on the S. side of East Street 100 yards E. of the town-hall, is of three storeys. The walls are of brick in Flemish bond with some stucco. It was built late in the 18th century. There is a balcony over the shop-front supported on three fluted Ionic columns. The ground floor sash-window has a semicircular head, the remainder have square heads in gauged brick. There is a stone dentil-cornice at eaves-level and a parapet.

b(15) House, No. 74 on the S. side of East Street 325 yards E. of the town-hall, is of two storeys with attics. The walls are of brick in header bond with ashlar dressings and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built probably in the third quarter of the 18th century. The street front has a stone plinth and rusticated quoins; it is symmetrical, of five bays with the middle three projecting slightly and topped with a pedimental gable; the entrance doorway with semicircular head is flanked by fluted and reeded Ionic columns supporting a pedimented modillion-cornice, over it is a stone Venetian window in an Ionic frame on console-brackets and above in the pediment a circular window with moulded architrave and four key-stones. The flanking windows have moulded eared architraves and key-stones. The modillion-cornice at the wall-head follows the slopes of the pediment, the horizontal member being omitted with the exception of short returns at either side supported on console-brackets; there is a panelled parapet-wall butting against the sides of the pediment. A plain W. extension of this front, probably of the same build, contains a carriage-way and rooms over.

Inside there is a late 18th-century fireplace-surround (Plate 48) of statuary marble with inlay of coloured marble to simulate fluting in the side strips and frieze; in the frieze-panels are bas-relief carvings of an urn and wine-jars. It contains a mid-19th-century castiron grate of unusual design.

b(16) House, on the S. side of East Street 500 yards E. of the town-hall, is of two builds, the N. block is of three storeys, the S. of two with attics. The N. has brick walls partly cement-rendered with rusticated stone quoins and roofs covered with stone-slates; in the S., the walls are of rubble and the roofs are slate-covered.

The N. block was built in the 18th century and is now divided into three tenements; it has a dentilcornice and hipped roof, the original windows have key-stones.

The S. block was built in the 16th century and is said to have formed part of the Hospital of St. John the Baptist. It retains of a number of altered original windows and in the S. end is a window of one pointed light in a square head. On the E. side, at the first-floor level, is a projecting three-sided orielwindow on stone corbelling; it has two lights with rounded heads on the face and one on each return. Inside the building, the room at the N. end has original moulded ceiling-beams and plates.

b(17) Houses, at the E. end of East Street between East Bridge and the railway, a group of four, stuccofronted and with slate-covered roofs. They were built c.1840. The W. house has three panelled pilasters on the street front. They have low-pitched pyramidal roofs and projecting eaves on widely spaced brackets; the sash windows have square heads.

b(18) House, No. 115 East Street, on the N. side 450 yards E. of the town-hall, is of two storeys with attics. The walls are of ashlar and local squared and coursed stone, the roofs are tile-covered. It was built in the 18th century; the N. extension is later. The S. front has plain pilasters at either end, moulded eaves-cornice and hipped roof with two dormers; the doorway in the centre has a moulded architrave, plain frieze and a cornice on shaped brackets; the windows have moulded architraves.

b(19) House, No. 79 East Street, on the N. side 330 yards E. of the town-hall, is of two storeys with attics. The walls are of squared and coursed local stone and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built in the first half of the 18th century; the main entrance was altered at the end of the same century. The S. front is symmetrical, the doorway is in the middle and has a round head with fanlight and panelled reveals; the windows have flat arches with keystones and are fitted with flush-framed sashes. There is a dentil-cornice and panelled parapet-wall.

b(20) Ringstead House, on the N. side of East Street 210 yards E. of the town-hall, and the similar house adjoining on the E. are of three storeys with cellars. The walls are of brick and the roofs are slate-covered. They were built as terrace-houses in the first half of the 19th century; a modern shop-front has been inserted on the ground floor of the E. property. The remaining original doorway has a round head; there are lofty rectangular sash windows, with a balcony with iron balustrade to the first floor, a string at second-floor level and a cornice and parapet at the wall-head.

b(21) Literary and Scientific Institute, house on the N. side of East Street next to the Unitarian Chapel (5), is of two storeys with basement. The main front is of ashlar, the others are of brick cement-rendered. It was built in the first half of the 19th century. The ground floor of the S. front is rusticated and contains to one side the entrance doorway with flanking Doric columns set within the thickness of the wall to support a semi-circular arch over, the head contains an ornamental fanlight; the windows are round-headed, and they, with the arched doorway, have rusticated voussoirs. The first-floor windows are set high above a deep plain frieze and have moulded archivolts and imposts, the impost mouldings being continued across the wall-face as a string. At eaves-level there is a cornice with parapet.

b(22) House, Nos. 41 and 43 East Street, 20 yards W. of (21), is of two storeys. The walls are of cob and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built in the 17th century.

b(23) House, Nos. 37 and 39 East Street, immediately W. of (22), is of two storeys. It is a 17th-century building of stone and timber-framing but the front has been refaced in the 18th century.

b(24) House, No. 9 East Street and 30 yards N.E. of the town-hall, was formerly the George Inn and is of two storeys. The walls are of stone and timber-framing. It was built in the 17th century, but the front (Plate 124) has been refaced late in the 18th century when the two well-preserved bowed shop-fronts were erected with the bow-windows above them; the fasciaboard above flanked by foliated scrolls was added in the 19th century. Inside the building are some original moulded ceiling-beams.

b(25) Grove House, in Rax Lane, 115 yards N.N.E. of the town-hall, is of three storeys. The walls are of red and straw-coloured brick and part stucco, the roofs are slate-covered. It was built early in the 19th century and has been modernised; the E. wing has been largely rebuilt. The S. front of the main block is symmetrical, with entrance doorway in the middle under an open porch with Roman Doric columns, antae and entablature. The windows have gauged-brick flat arches. The N. front has stucco pilasters at either end and a central doorway with three-quarter columns; the windows have moulded stone architraves. Inside there is an original fireplace.

b(26) Granville House, on the N. side of West Street 100 yards N.W. of the town-hall, is of two storeys with attics. The walls are of brick in header bond with ashlar dressings and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built about the middle of the 18th century; the entrance porch and doorway were remodelled early in the 19th century. The S. front is symmetrical, with rusticated stone quoins; the doorway in the middle has a shallow porch with free-standing Doric columns; the central window on the first floor has a rusticated moulded stone architrave, the other windows are plain with flat gauged-brick arches and all have key-stones. There is a bracket-cornice and panelled parapet-wall pierced for balustrading in the centre. Inside, the fixtures and fittings mostly date from the 19th century.

Monuments (27–46)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 18th century and of two storeys; the walls are of brick and the roofs are tiled or slate covered.

b(27) House, at the junction of West Street and Victoria Grove, was built in the 18th century and has flush-framed sashes.

b(28) House, adjoining (27) on the W., has a stucco S. front. The doorway in the middle has a semi-circular head containing a fanlight and a cornice on brackets, over it on the first floor is a Venetian window; the remaining four windows have square heads and key-stones and contain tripartite sash frames.

b(29) House, adjoining (28) on the W., is of three storeys.

b(30) House, on the S. side of West Street 230 yards W. of the town-hall, has a shop front of c. 1800. The doorway has a fanlight over, and on the first floor is a Venetian window; there is a dentil-cornice at eaves-level.

b(31) House, on the S. side of West Street, 150 yards W. of the town hall, has rusticated stone quoins, a Venetian window on the first floor, and a dentil-cornice at eaves-level.

b(32) House, 10 yards E. of (31), with modern shop-front, has rusticated stone quoins, entrance doorway with fanlight, a Venetian window on the first floor and a dentil-cornice and panelled parapet-wall. Blue headers are used decoratively in the brickwork between the windows.

b(33) House, 35 yards E. of (32), with modern shop-front, retains an original doorway with segmental head and fanlight flanked by engaged Composite columns with entablature over.

b(34) House, on the S. side of West Allington 480 yards W.N.W. of the town-hall, has on the ground floor round-headed sash windows in brick wall-arches with round heads. There is a panelled parapet-wall. The shop-front in the W. end with foliated scroll-work over the fascia was inserted probably about the middle of the 19th century (compare (24) above).

b(35) House, on the S. side of West Allington, 700 yards W. of the town-hall, was built c. 1800. The doorway in the middle of the symmetrical N. front has panelled reveals and a fanlight within a semi-circular brick arch.

b(36) Houses, four, on the N. side of West Allington 800 yards W.N.W. of the town-hall, are stucco-fronted. They were built to a uniform design c. 1840 (Plate 45). Two retain unaltered their verandahs the full width of the ground floor with delicate iron standards and trellis-work supporting shaped canopies; there are similar covered-porches to the entrances. The shallowpitched roofs have wide eaves with widely spaced brackets.

b(37) Houses, a group on the N. side of West Allington to the W. of Park Road, are stucco-fronted. They were built shortly before the middle of the 19th century. The roofs are low pitched with wide eaves with shaped brackets.

a(38) Range of four tenements, on the W. side of North Allington, 5/8 m. N.W. of the church, has walls of squared and coursed local stone. It was built in the 17th century. It retains two doorways with chamfered segmental heads, one with label over, and a number of two, three and four-light stone-mullioned windows. Inside there are exposed chamfered ceiling-beams and a plank partition.

a(39) House, immediately N.W. of (38), with walls of rubble, was built in the 17th century but has been extensively modernised. Inside, it retains some exposed chamfered ceiling-beams, a plank partition and three original door frames.

a(40) House, on the E. side of North Allington 910 yards N.W. of the church, has walls of squared and coursed local stone. The original symmetrical front has a central doorway with flanking fluted columns supporting a pediment framing a semi-circular fanlight. There is a dentil eaves-cornice.

b(41) House, on the N. side of the junction of North Allington and West Street, 600 yards N.W. of the church, is stucco-fronted. It was built in the second quarter of the 19th century. The S.W. front has pilasters at either end; the middle bay is set forward and contains the entrance doorway flanked by Doric columns recessed within the thickness of the wall with full Doric entablature over. The roof is of low pitch with wide eaves on shaped brackets.

b(42) George Hotel, on the W. side of South Street opposite the town-hall, is of three storeys. The walls are of coursed rubble. On the ground floor the windows have stone architraves, and there is a Venetian window on the first floor. At eaves-level there is a dentil-cornice.

b(43) House, two tenements, Nos. 16 and 18 South Street, 280 yards N. of the church, was built in the 17th century. It is timber-framed but has been partly refronted in brick.

b(44) House, on the S. side of East Street, 170 yards E. of the town-hall, is of three storeys; the walls are of ashlar and squared rubble and the roofs are covered with slates. It was built probably c. 1840. The N. front is symmetrically designed; it has a moulded plinth, quoins, moulded strings at first and second-floor levels, a heavy stone cornice and low parapet. The doorway in the centre has engaged Roman Doric side-columns and entablature and is flanked by windows, one on each side, with moulded architraves and cornices carried on heavy consoles. The first-floor windows are in surrounds comprising Ionic side-pilasters on pedestals carrying full entablatures; the pedestals stand on the moulded string at first-floor level and their capping-mouldings are continued across the front to form the sills to the windows. The second-floor windows have moulded architraves. The E. front is blank and the S. and W. are largely concealed. Inside, the staircase, cornices and some of the fittings are original.

b(45) Houses, Nos. 48–56 on the W. side of West Bay Road, 750 yards S. of the church, are stuccofronted. They were built c.1840 and comprise four houses linked by one-storey porches. The treatment of the fronts varies, two have pilasters at either end, a third is divided into two panelled bays by pilasters and elliptical wall-arches. Three retain verandahs with trellis-work supports to the canopies over, now glazed. The roofs are of low pitch with wide eaves on shaped brackets.

b(46) Bridport Arms Hotel, at West Bay nearly 1½ m. S. of Bridport church, incorporates a 17th-century rubble building with a thatched roof, at the N. end. Inside the building is an original fireplace with a cambered bressummer.



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