Broadwindsor

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1952

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52-56

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'Broadwindsor', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Dorset, Volume 1: West (1952), pp. 52-56. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=127200 Date accessed: 30 August 2014.


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15 BROAD WINDSOR (B.c.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XIX, S.W. (b)XIX, S.E. (c)XX, S.W. (d)XXVIII, N.E. (e)XXIX, N.W.)

Broadwindsor is a village and parish on the N.W. border of the county 3 m. W. of Beaminster. The church, Childhay and the earthwork on Lewesdon Hill are the principal monuments.

Ecclesiastical

e(1) Parish Church of St. John the Baptist stands in the village. The walls are of flint and local stone rubble with ashlar and dressings of the same material; the roofs are covered with lead. The S. arcade of the Nave was built late in the 12th century and a N. arcade, aisle and chapel were built early in the 13th century. The S. clearstorey was built late in the 14th century. The South Aisle was largely rebuilt in the 15th century and the West Tower was added during the same period, the stair-turret being a rather later addition. The rebuilding of the church, with the exception of the chancel, to the designs of J. E. Giles of Taunton, proposed in 1848, was not carried out, but the church was drastically restored in 1868 by Allen of Crewkerne, when the nave and aisles were extended one bay to the E., the Chancel and North Aisle rebuilt, the N. arcade reconstructed and extended and the North Vestry and South Porch added.

Architectural Description—The Nave (51¾ ft. by 20¼ ft.) has a partly modern and partly reconstructed N. arcade of five bays; the four western arches are mainly of early 13th-century materials and are two-centred and of two chamfered orders; the cylindrical shafts and moulded capitals of the third and fourth columns are also of 13th-century materials, together with the moulded shaft-corbel of the W. respond resting on a king's head. The S. arcade is of five bays and of late 12th-century date except the E. bay and the first column which are modern; the arches are two-centred and of one chamfered order; the columns are cylindrical with scalloped capitals and moulded bases with defaced spur-ornaments; the W. respond has an attached half-column; the E. respond incorporates old material including the capital. The clearstorey is modern or rebuilt and has on each side five modern or entirely restored windows of late 14th-century character.


The Church, Plan

The Church, Plan

The South Aisle (5 ft. wide) has a modern E. bay. The embattled parapet has some old grotesque figures. In the S. wall are four windows, the easternmost modern; the second and third windows are of the 15th century, partly restored, and of three cinque-foiled lights in a square head with moulded external reveals; the westernmost window is of the same period and of three cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head with moulded reveals; the restored and reset S. doorway is of 14th-century character and has moulded jambs and two-centred head. In the W. wall is a modern window.

The West Tower (9½ ft. square) is of the 15th century and of three stages with an added stair-turret and an embattled parapet with eight carved grotesque figures. The tower-arch is modern. The reset late 14th-century W. doorway has moulded jambs and two-centred head; the W. window is modern except for the moulded jambs. The second stage has a blocked window in the N. wall and a single-light window in the W. wall, modern externally. The bell-chamber has a square-headed window in the N. wall; the other windows are modern. The newel of the stair-turret is carried up and finished with a capital, supporting the roof. The ceiling of the ground-stage of the tower has moulded beams forming sixteen panels with carved bosses at some intersections.

Fittings—Bells: six; 1st by Bilbie, 1800; 2nd, by Bilbie, 1790; 3rd, 15th-century, from Salisbury foundry, and inscribed, "Sancta Maria ora pro nobis"; 4th, 15th-century, Exeter foundry, and inscribed "Est michi collatum Ihc istud nomen amatum"; 5th by Robert Norton of Exeter, early 15th-century and inscribed "Sancte Gabriel ora pro nobis". Benefactors' Tables: In nave—on W. wall, (1) of Edmund Hallson, 1839, in semi-circular-headed frame, inscription with angel and cherubs' heads painted in colour, signed F. Frath (?) of Bridport. In S. aisle—on S. wall, (2) of John Stanton, 1795, framed painting on boards. Font: square bowl of Purbeck stone with diagonal and chequer designs on faces, moulded under edge to take the rounded stem with four attached shafts, moulded base of local stone, late 12th or early 13th-century. Monuments: In chancel—on N. wall, (1) to Edith (Studley), wife of Hugh Gundry, 1695–6, sunk stone tablet. In tower—on S. wall, (2) to Edmund Hallson, late armourer-sergeant to the 1st or King's Dragoon Guards, 1839, Mary wife of John Gorman and daughter of Edmund and Mary Hallson, 1826, and Edmund Hallson Gorman their son, 1834, wall-monument of white and grey marbles with clustered flanking columns, trophy-of-arms and standing figure of dragoon beside his horse; (3) above (2) and similar to it, the inscription is illegible. In churchyard—S. of S. aisle, (4) to John Hext, 1624 (?), . . . Donne, 1664, and John Hext, 1633, table-tomb. Painting: In second stage of tower —on boards, painted figures of Moses and Aaron under arches, 17th-century. Piscinae: In N. aisle—in E. wall, recess with trefoiled ogee head and label and sex-foiled drain, 14th-century, reset. In S. aisle—in E. wall, recess with moulded jambs, trefoiled ogee head, label and round drain, 14th-century, reset. Plate: includes two silver-plated flagons, one dated 1831. Pulpit (Plate 27): of oak, seven sided with buttressed and pinnacled angles, two ranges of panels, upper with conventional foliage, enriched middle rail, 16th-century, cornice and base modern. Royal Arms: painted and framed, 1783. Miscellanea: Incorporated in S. wall of S. aisle, stone with four sunk circles, mediæval.

b(2) Church of the Holy Trinity, at Blackdown 2½ m. W.N.W. of the parish church (1), was built as a chapel of ease in 1839–40. The walls are of rubble with ashlar dressings and the roofs are slate-covered. The plan is a rectangle, with Chancel and Nave under one continuous roof which has projecting eaves and E. and W. gables with fretted barge-boards; at the W. end is a bell-cote; there is a small N. Vestry and a S. Porch. The E. window consists of three lancets, in a two-centred head internally; the remaining windows are each of one light with two-centred head and moulded label over. Inside there is a shallow plaster vault with moulded cornice in the nave and a W. gallery with external access.

Secular

d(3) Homestead Moat, E. of Whetham Mill Cross and over 1 m. W. of the parish church.

b(4) Childhay, house and outbuildings, is about 2 m. N.W. of the parish church. The House is of two storeys; the walls are of local rubble, ashlar-faced and the roofs are covered with tiles and slates. The main Hall-block, the Kitchen-wing to the N. of it and the E. Porch between the two wings were built late in the 15th century. In the 17th century the Hall-block was largely rebuilt, the kitchen-wing extended to the W. and a one-storey wing added on the N. side. The house has been extensively modernised and there are modern extensions on the S. and a modern W. porch.

The E. Porch is a good example of late mediæval work.

The E. front has a gabled wing at the N. end with an original moulded plinth. There are two two-light 17th-century windows to the ground floor and a four-light transomed window to the first floor all with moulded labels. The two-storeyed late 15th-century Porch (Plate 62) has a moulded plinth and an embattled parapet with gargoyles carved as follows:—(a) two figures holding a grotesque mask, (b) a crouching man with a cross-bow (?), (c) two men wrestling and (d) two beasts eating a man. The outer archway has moulded jambs and four-centred arch in a square head with quatre-foiled spandrels and a label with carved stops of a man's head and a man playing a bagpipe. The inner doorway has moulded jambs and four-centred arch and is fitted with an old battened door. The upper storey has, in the E. wall, an altered window of two square-headed lights with a label and head-stops; in the S. wall is a window of one trefoiled ogee light with plain shields in the spandrels and a label. The main block, to the S., has 17th-century windows of one, three or four four-centred lights. The exposed part of the W. wall has been largely refaced in brick and has two reset 17th-century windows with square heads to the lights. The inner doorway of the modern porch has chamfered jambs and two-centred head.

Inside the building, the kitchen has an open timbered ceiling and an original fireplace with moulded jambs and four-centred arch in a square head with foliated spandrels; the walls have a dado of 17th-century panelling; the doorway from the screens is original and has moulded jambs and four-centred head. In the middle room of the main block are three wooden panels painted with a landscape and two leopards' faces, probably of c. 1700. The room over the kitchen has a fireplace with moulded jambs and square head.

The Dairy, W. of the house, and formerly a cottage, is of mid 17th-century date and retains a four-light stone window with a label. The Barn, N. of the house, was built in the 16th century. It is ashlar-faced and of eight bays; the roof is of collar-beam type and there are two doorways with wooden four-centred heads in the N. wall.

b(5) Blackdown House, nearly 2½ m. W. of the parish church, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of coursed local rubble and ashlar, and the roofs are covered with slates. The house was built towards the end of the 17th century, but little more than the N. and S. external walls of this building remain; extensive alterations and additions were made in the 19th century. The original portion of the S. front contains the main entrance with four-centred opening in a square head under a pediment supported on console brackets, all much restored, over it is a panel with the initials and date P.M.I. 1697; the ranges of two-light stonemullioned windows on ground and first floors have continuous labels over; the three dormers are modern. The N. elevation retains a number of original two, three and four-light stone mullioned windows. Inside there are stop-chamfered beams and a plank partition reset under the main stair.

d(6) Racedown, house nearly 2¾ m. W.S.W. of the parish church (1), is of three storeys; the walls are of local brick in Flemish bond with blue headers and ashlar dressings and the roofs are covered with slates. The original house was built by John Pretor Pinney c. 1785, and the wings were added subsequently; the porch is modern.

The original E. front is symmetrical; the porch is flanked by sash windows consisting of a wide middle light and narrow side lights in a Roman Doric frame, with fluted frieze with oval medallions and cornice. At first-floor level is a flat string. The windows on first and second floor have moulded architraves, that over the entrance has in addition a plain frieze and cornice. There is a stone cornice at eaves-level returning round the building and a parapet-wall. The windows in the remaining fronts are similar to those on the upper floors of the E. elevation, with the exception of some on the second floor which are round, with moulded architraves and four keystones. There are broad panelled chimney-stacks on the N. and S. ends.

Inside the building there are original plaster dentil-cornices and some fittings of the period, including, in the hall, fluted pilasters and two niches with shell-heads and, in the S. room, a fireplace and overmantel and a similar niche reset.

Monuments (7–42)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are covered with thatch, tiles or slates. Some of the buildings have exposed ceiling-beams and original fireplaces.

b(7) Schoolhouse Farm, house nearly ½ m. W.S.W. of (4).

a(8) Cottage at Synderford, about 3¼ m. W. of the parish church.

b(9) Netherhay Farm, house on the S.W. side of the road over 2 m. N.W. of the parish church, retains a number of original mullioned windows with labels; the doorway has moulded jambs and four-centred head; above it is a stone with the date 1638. There is a staircase wing at the back.

b(10) Cottage, 20 yards N.W. of (9), retains an original mullioned window.

b(11) Drimpton Farm, house ¼ m. S.E. of (9), has been much altered.

b(12) Lower Drimpton Farm, house 140 yards S.W. of (11), was rebuilt in the 18th century but incorporates a 17th-century doorway with moulded jambs and four-centred arch in a square head; it is flanked by 18th-century columns supporting a pediment.

b(13) House, on the N.E. side of the road 80 yards E. of (11), retains three original stone-mullioned windows. The outbuilding to the W., formerly a cottage, retains an original stone window.

b(14) West Swillett's Farm, house nearly 2 m. N.N.W. of the parish church, retains two original four-light windows with labels. Inside the N. wing are three pieces of modelled plasterwork, including a rosette and a fleur-de-lis.

b(15) Sandpit Farm, house 1,100 yards S. of (14), was built late in the 15th or early in the 16th century and included a one-storey hall in the existing S. wing. The upper floor was inserted early in the 17th century when the N. cross-wing was added. The house retains a number of 17th-century stone-mullioned windows with labels. The original roof is of four bays and is smoke-blackened; the trusses are of heavy collar-beam type with curved braces and curved wind-braces forming trefoiled arches.

b(16) House, 250 yards S.E. of (15), retains most of its original stone windows. On the W. front the windows of the lower range have moulded labels and are of two, three and four lights. Inside the building are some original muntin and plank partitions.

b(17) Lower Sandpit Farm, house 260 yards S.W. of (16), has been much altered. Inside the building is a fire-back dated 1680. In the E. wall of the stable are some reused mediæval stones.

b(18) Blagdon Farm, house about 1,600 yards N.N.W. of the parish church, has been much altered.

c(19) Manor Farm, house on the S. side of the road at Little Windsor over 1 m. N. of the parish church, has been much altered but retains some original stonemullioned windows.

c(20) Cottage, 100 yards E. of (19).

c(21) Cottage, four tenements, on the E. side of the road 30 yards S. of (20).

c(22) Cottage, on the W. side of the road 30 yards S.W. of (21).

c(23) Potwell Farm, house over 1¼ m. N.N.E. of the parish church, has an 18th-century extension on the S. It retains some original stone-mullioned windows, one with a label.

c(24) Baker's Mill, house over 2 m. N.E. of the parish church, retains an original four-light window with a label.

c(25) Dibberford, house 1,150 yards S.W. of (24), was built probably in the 16th century and retains some original stone-mullioned windows, the lower ones with labels. Inside the building are some original moulded ceiling-beams and a large fixed press probably of the 17th century.

c(26) North Dibberford, house 1¾ m. N.E. of the parish church, has been considerably restored. It retains some original three and four-light stone-mullioned windows with labels and a doorway with four-centred head and label, all much repaired.

c(27) South Dibberford, house 770 yards E.S.E. of (25), was built probably c. 1600, but substantially rebuilt late in the 17th century. It retains some original stone-mullioned windows with labels. Inside the building is a muntin and plank partition.

c(28) Cottage (Plate 43), 100 yards S.E. of (27).

e(29) Horn Park, house over 1½ m. E.S.E. of the parish church, retains two original stone windows of four lights with labels.

e(30) Wantsley Farm, house about 1 m. E.S.E. of the parish church, retains a number of original stonemullioned windows with labels. The outer and inner doorways of the porch have moulded jambs and four-centred arches in square heads. The Barn, N.W. of the house, is probably of the same period.

e(31) Lower Park Farm, house (Plate 39) 980 yards N.N.E. of the parish church, retains a number of original stone-mullioned windows with labels. The porch has an outer archway with moulded jambs, square head and label.

e(32) House, on the W. side of the road 100 yards N.E. of the parish church, has been much altered but retains two original stone windows.

e(33) House, with shop, on the E. side of the road 100 yards S.E. of the parish church.

e(34) Cottage, immediately S. of (33).

e(35) Cottage, immediately S. of (34).

e(36) House, on the W. side of the road 170 yards S.S.E. of the parish church.

e(37) Cottage, on the S.E. of the road-junction 240 yards S.S.E. of the parish church.

e(38) House, 10 yards W. of (37), retains some original stone-mullioned windows.

d(39) House, on the S. side of the road 130 yards S.W. of the parish church, has an added back wing. The house retains some original stone-mullioned windows, two with labels.

d(40) House, immediately S.W. of (39), has been much altered.

d(41) Cottage, two tenements 30 yards W. of the parish church, retains an original three-light window.

d(42) Cottage, ¼ m. W.N.W. of the parish church.

c(43) Tunnel, 17/8 m. E.N.E. of the parish church, with the N.W. entrance in this parish, the S.E. in Beaminster, see under Beaminster (60).

Earthworks


Earthwork on Lewesdon Hill

Earthwork on Lewesdon Hill

d(44) Earthwork on Lewesdon Hill (about 900 ft. above O.D.), about ¾ m. S. of the parish church, forms an enclosure rather over 2½ acres in internal area. This site consists of a comparatively narrow hill with a flat curved top some 330 yards long by an average width of about 45 yards. The S.W. and most of the E. scarp is precipitous; while that on the N. is less steep. At the S. end there is a natural ramped causeway and at the W. end there is a natural causeway connecting Lewesdon Hill with Burstock Down. At the W. end, crossing the causeway, are traces of a slight ditch some 24 ft. below the ground level of the summit, and having traces of an outer bank. In a similar position on the sloping causeway at the S. end is a slight flattening of the slope, or suggestion of a berm, which may represent a similar cross ditch, now filled up. At this level, also, are slight traces of a berm continuing along the S.W. scarp for a few yards. Along most of the N. scarp are intermittent traces of a berm about 20 ft. below the upper ground level, which may represent the site of a former ditch now filled up. It ceases abruptly at its E. end, where the scarp becomes sufficiently precipitous to have rendered a ditch unnecessary. A few yards E. of the W. entrance are what may be traces of an inner rampart to the main scarp; but, as there has been digging for and removal of gravel from the floor of the enclosure, it is not safe to attach much importance to this apparent rampart.

The whole area has been much damaged by the removal of gravel and timber and the obliterating effect of leaf-mould, as the entire defences are wooded. On the N. side is a trackway which would appear to be of later date. The sunken way running from this track up the hill-side to a point some 95 yards E. of the W. entrance is modern. There is an apparent berm near the base of the S.W. scarp.

e(45) Lynchet, on the N.E. slope of the hill 1¼ m. E.S.E. of the parish church, forms a single terrace extending for about 220 yards.



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