House of Lords Journal Volume 14
5 January 1691

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 14: 5 January 1691', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 14: 1685-1691 (1767-1830), pp. 616-618. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=13341 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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DIE Lunæ, 5 die Januarii.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. London.
Epus. Durham.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. St. Asaph.
Epus. Rochester.
Epus. Oxford.
Dux Cumberland.
Ds. President.
Dux Norffolke.
Dux Somersett.
Dux Ormond.
Dux Northumberland.
Dux Bolton.
Marq. Hallifax.
Ds. Mag. Camerarius.
Ds. Senescallus.
Ds. Camerarius.
Comes Oxford.
Comes Shrewsbury.
Comes Kent.
Comes Derby.
Comes Huntingdon.
Comes Bedford.
Comes Pembrooke.
Comes Bridgewater.
Comes North'ton.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Mulgrave.
Comes Rivers.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Kingstone.
Comes Thanett.
Comes Bath.
Comes Aylesbury.
Comes Sussex.
Comes Feversham.
Comes Nottingham.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Fauconberge.
Comes Monmouth.
Comes Marleborough.
Comes Warrington.
Comes Scarborough.
Viscount Newport.
Viscount Weymouth.
Viscount Hatton.
Viscount Sidney.
Viscount Longueville.
Ds. Willoughby.
Ds. Delawarr.
Ds. Morley.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Howard Eff.
Ds. North.
Ds. Chandos.
Ds. Lovelace.
Ds. Herbert.
Ds. Jermin.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Culpeper.
Ds. Lucas.
Ds. Lexington.
Ds. Berkeley.
Ds. Granville.
Ds. Cornwallis.
Ds. Crew.
Ds. Keveton.
Ds. Dartmouth.
Ds. Godolphin.
Ds. Cholmondley.
Ds. Ashburnham.

PRAYERS.

Message from H. C. with a Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Lord Marquis of Winchester and others:

Who brought up a Bill, intituled, "An Act for granting to Their Majesties several additional Duties of Excise, upon Beer, Ale, and other Liquors, for Four Years, from the Time that an Act for doubling the Duty of Excise upon Beer, Ale, and other Liquors, during the Space of One Year, doth expire;" to which they desire their Lordships Concurrence.

Additional Excise Duties for Four Years, Bill.

Hodie 1a et 2a vice lecta est Billa, "An Act for granting to Their Majesties several additional Duties of Excise, upon Beer, Ale, and other Liquors, for Four Years, from the Time that an Act for doubling the Duty of Excise upon Beer, Ale, and other Liquors, during the Space of One Year, doth expire."

ORDERED, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House, presently.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the said Bill.

The House was resumed.

And the Earl of Bridgewater reported, "That the Committee had gone through the Bill, without any Amendment."

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, "An Act for granting to Their Majesties several additional Duties of Excise, upon Beer, Ale, and other Liquors for Four Years, from the Time that an Act for doubling the Duty of Excise upon Beer, Ale, and other Liquors, during the Space of One Year, doth expire."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass into a Law?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. that the Lords agree to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Miles Cooke and Mr. Keck:

To let them know, that this House hath passed the said Bill, without any Amendment.

Bill to put in stricter Execution the Act to prohibit Trade with France.

The Lord Cornwallis reported from the Committee, the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual putting in Execution an Act for prohibiting all Trade and Commerce with France," with One Amendment.

The Question was put, "Whether the Report shall be now read?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

The Amendment was read Twice; the Clause in the former Bill read, for selling in Pewter.

The Question was put, "Whether to agree with the Committee in that Amendment?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, "An Act for the more effectual putting in Execution an Act, intituled, An Act for prohibiting all Trade and Commerce with France."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass into a Law?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with Amendments to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Miles Cooke and Mr. Keck:

To carry down the said Bill, and to desire their Concurrence to the Amendment.

Message from thence, for a Conference on the Bill for Suspension of the Navigation and Corn Acts.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Harcourt and others:

To desire a Conference, touching the Amendments made by their Lordships to the Bill, intituled, "An Act for suspending that Part of the Act of Navigation, and also that Part of the Act for Exportation of Corn, which obliges English Ships to sail with English Seamen."

To which the House agreed, and sent for the Commons in; and told them, "The Lords agreed to a Conference; and appointed the same to be presently, in the Painted Chamber."

Then the House named these Lords following to be Managers of the Conference:

D. Bolton.
M. Hallifax.
E. Pembrooke.
E. Thanett.
E. Nottingham.
E. Rochester.
E. Warrington.
E. Scarborough.
Viscount Newport.
Viscount Weymouth.
L. Bp. London.
L. Bp. Sarum.
L. Cornwallis.
L. Dartmouth.
L. Godolphin.

Message from H. C. that they agree to the Bill for a strict Prohibition of Commerce with France.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Vincent and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual putting in Execution an Act, intituled, An Act for prohibiting all Trade and Commerce with France;" and to acquaint them, that they have agreed to the Amendment.

Conference on the Bill for Suspension of the Navigation and Corn Acts.

The Commons being come to the Conference, the House was adjourned during Pleasure, and the Lords went to the Conference.

Which being ended, the House was resumed.

Report of it.

And the Managers reported, "That the Commons have agreed to all the Amendments except the Proviso (B), which they disagree to."

The Proviso was read; and the House moved, to insist upon the Proviso.

(fn. *) Which the House agreed to.

Message to H. C. for another Conference on the Bill.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Miles Cooke and Mr. Keck:

To desire a present Conference, in the Painted Chamber, upon the Subject-matter of the last Conference.

The Messagers return with this Answer.

Answer.

That the Commons will give a present Conference, as is desired.

Report of it.

The Commons being come, the House was adjourned during Pleasure, and the Lords went to the Conference; which being ended, the House was resumed.

And the Duke of Bolton reported, "That, according to Command, he had told the Commons, That their Lordships insisted upon the Proviso (B)."

Elections, for speedier Determination of, Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, "An Act for the speedier determining of Questions touching Elections of Members to serve in Parliament."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall be committed?"

It was Resolved in the Negative.

The Question was put, "Whether the Bill shall be read the Third Time?"

It was Resolved in the Negative.

Message from H. C. for another Conference on the Bill for Suspension of the Navigation and Corn Acts.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Harcourt and others:

To desire a Conference, upon the Subject-matter of the last Conference.

To which the House agreed.

And they were called in; and told, "The Lords agree to a Conference; and appoint the same to be presently, in the Painted Chamber."

The same Managers as before.

The Commons being come to the Conference, the House was adjourned during Pleasure, and the Lords went to the Conference.

Which being ended, the House was resumed.

Report of it.

And the Earl of Pembrooke reported, "That the Commons have agreed to the Clause insisted on, that, instead of the Penalty of Ten Pounds, they shall suffer Six Months Imprisonment without Bail or Mainprize."

The House was moved, to adhere.

The Amendment was read by the Clerk.

The House moved, to insist upon the Clause.

The Question was put, "Whether to adhere to the Proviso as sent to the Commons?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Committee to draw Reasons for the Lords insisting on their Proviso to the Bill.

Marq. Hallifax.
Earl Pembrooke.
Earl Rochester.
L. Cornwallis.
L. Godolphin.

Were appointed to draw Reasons for the Conference.

The House adjourned during Pleasure; and the Lords withdrew, to draw the Reasons.

The House was resumed.

And the Earl of Rochester reported the Reasons to be given at the Conference, as follows:

Lords Reasctis:

"The Lords adhere to their Proviso:

"Because, the Penalty proposed therein, and sent down by the Lords, being distributed to the Informer, Poor of the Parish, and the Chest at Chatham, it makes it the Interest of all those Parties to discover any Concealments or harbouring of Seamen, they being all to partake of the Benefit of that Penalty; but the sending of such as conceal or harbour Seamen to Prison only will make Men less careful in making Discoveries, when they are to receive no Benefit thereby, and may tend rather to fill the Gaols with Prisoners than the Fleet with Seamen; and if One Seaman conceal another, the One of them at least cannot go to Sea for Three Months."

Message to H. C. for another Conference about it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Miles Cooke and Mr. Keck:

To desire a present Conference, upon the Subjectmatter of the last Conference.

The Messengers return with this Answer:

Answer.

That the Commons will give a Conference, as desired.

The same Managers as before.

The Commons being come, the House was adjourned during Pleasure, and the Lords went to the Conference; which being ended, the House was resumed.

And the Duke of Bolton reported, "That they had delivered the Bill and Reasons, as commanded."

Hitherto examined this 7th of January, 1690, by us,

Huntingdon.
J. Bridgewater.
Craven.
Herbert.
Culpeper.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, to robe.

The House was resumed.

His Majesty, being arrayed in His Royal Robes and Regal Crown, ascended His Throne, all the Peers being in their Robes: The Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod was commanded to signify His Majesty's Pleasure to the Commons, "That they presently attend His Majesty."

Who being come; the Speaker made a short Speech, relating to the Bills to be passed.

Bills passed.

Then the Clerk of the Parliaments received the Two following Bills from the Hand of the Speaker, and brought them to the Table, where the Clerk of the Crown read the Titles; (videlicet,)

"1. An Act for the encouraging the distilling of Brandy and Spirits from Corn, and for laying several Duties on Low Wines or Spirits of the First Extraction."

"2. An Act for granting to Their Majesties several additional Duties of Excise, upon Beer, Ale, and other Liquors, for Four Years from the Time that an Act for doubling the Duty of Excise upon Beer, Ale, and other Liquors, during the Space of One Year, doth expire."

The Clerk of the Parliaments pronounced the Royal Assent, in these Words,

"Le Roy et la Reyne, remerciant les loyall Subjects, et acceptant leur Benevolence, et ainsi le veulent."

In like Manner these Bills following were passed:

"3. An Act for appointing and enabling Commissioners to examine, take, and state, the Public Accompts of the Kingdom."

"4. An Act for preventing vexatious Suits against such as acted for Their Majesties Service."

"5. An Act for raising the Militia of this Kingdom for the Year One Thousand Six Hundred Ninety and One, although the Month's Pay formerly advanced be not re paid."

"6. An Act for the more effectual putting in Execution an Act, intituled, An Act for prohibiting all Trade and Commerce with France."

"7. An Act for Relief of poor Prisoners for Debt or Damages."

To which Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced in these Words,

"Le Roy et (fn. *) le Reyne le veulent."

"8. An Act to enable Thomas Earl of Aylisbury and Elizabeth Countess of Aylisbury his Wife to make Provision for Payment of Debts, and to make Leases of their Estates."

"9. An Act for incorporating the Proprietors of the Water-works in Yorke Buildings, and for the encouraging, carrying on, and settling, the said Waterworks."

"10. An Act for vesting certain Lands (the Estate of Thomas Manwareing Gentleman) in Trustees, to be sold, for the Payment of Debts."

"11. An Act to enable John Rosseter Esquire to sell Lands, for Payment of Debts."

To which Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced in these Words,

"Soit fait come il est desiré."

Then His Majesty made the Speech following:

King's Speech.

"My Lords and Gentlemen,

"Having lately told you that it would be necessary for Me to go into Holland much about this Time, I am very glad to find that the Success of your Endeavours to bring this Session to a happy Conclusion has been such that I am now at Liberty to do it; and I return you My hearty Thanks for the great Dispatch you have made in finishing the Supplies you have designed for carrying on the War, which it shall be My Care to see duly and punctually applied to that Service for which you have given them: And I do likewise think it proper to assure you, that I shall not make any Grant of the forfeited Lands in England or Ireland, till there be another Opportunity of settling that Matter in Parliament in such Manner as shall be thought most expedient.

"My Lords and Gentlemen,

"As I have Reason to be very well satisfied with the Proofs you have given Me of your good Affections in this Session of Parliament, so I promise Myself the Continuance of the same at your Return into your several Countries. And as every Day produces still fresh Instances of the Restlessness of our Enemies both at Home and Abroad, in designing against the Prosperity of this Nation, and the Government established; so I do not doubt but that the Union and good Correspondence between Me and My Parliament, and My earnest and constant Endeavours for your Preservation on the one Hand, joined with the Continuance of your Zeal and Affection to support Me on the other, will, by the Blessing of GOD, be at all Times too strong for the utmost Malice and Contrivance of our common Enemies."

Then the Speaker, by His Majesty's Command, said,

"My Lords and Gentlemen,

"It is His Majesty's Pleasure that you adjourn yourselves unto the One and Thirtieth Day of March next. And I am further commanded by His Majesty to acquaint you, That it is not His Majesty's Intention that you should then fit; but, if there shall be Occasion, He will give you timely Notice by His Proclamation."

Then His Majesty was pleased to withdraw; and the Commons went to their House.

Then,

House adjourned.

Robertus Atkins, Miles de Balneo, Capitalis Baro de Scaccario, Orator Procerum, declaravit præsens Parliamentum adjournandum esse usque in diem Martis, videlicet, tricesimum primum diem Martii prox. sequent. Dominis sic decernentibus.

Footnotes

* Origin. to which.
* Sic