House of Lords Journal Volume 16
14 April 1697

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 16: 14 April 1697', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 16: 1696-1701 (1767-1830), pp. 152-159. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=13508 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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DIE Mercurii, 14 Aprilis.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Londin.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. Elien.
Epus. Hereford.
Epus. Norwic.
Epus. Gloucestr.
Epus. Asaph.
Epus. Cicestr.
Dux Cumberland.
Joh'es Sommers Miles, Ds. Custos Magni Sigilli.
Dux Leeds, Ds. Præses.
Dux Norfolke.
Dux Devon, Ds. Senescallus.
Dux Somerset.
Dux Ormond.
Dux St. Albans.
Dux Bolton.
March. Halifax.
Comes Lindsey, Ds. Magnus Camerarius.
Comes Oxon.
Comes Bridgewater.
Comes Northampton.
Comes Warwick.
Comes Manchester.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Chesterfield.
Comes Sunderland.
Comes Sandwich.
Comes Essex.
Comes Bathe.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Maclesfeld.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Portland.
Comes Monmouth.
Comes Montagu.
Comes Marleborough.
Comes Torrington.
Comes Scarbrough.
Comes Warrington.
Comes Romney.
Comes Rochford.
Comes Tankerville.
Ds. Willughby Er.
Ds. Lawarr.
Ds. Berkeley Ber.
Ds. Morley.
Ds. Fitzwalter.
Ds. Hunsdon.
Ds. Howard Esc.
Ds. Raby.
Ds. Byron.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Culpeper.
Ds. Clifford.
Ds. Lucas.
Ds. Granville.
Ds. Arundell Tr.
Ds. Osborne.
Ds. Dartmouth.
Ds. Godolphin.
Ds. Jeffreys.
Ds. Cholmondeley.
Ds. Weston.
Ds. Herbert.
Ds. Haversham.

PRAYERS.

Relief of Creditors in Cases of Escapes, &c. and to prevent Abuses in Prisons, Bill.

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual Relief of Creditors in Cases of Escapes, and for preventing Abuses in Prisons and pretended Privileged Places."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, with the Amendments and Provisos, shall pass?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with Amendments to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Richard Holford and Mr. Meredith:

To return the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence to their Lordships Amendments.

Tin and Drugs, Bill.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the lessening the Duty upon Tin; and granting an Equivalent for the same, by a Duty upon Drugs."

After some Time, the House was resumed.

And the Earl of Rochester reported, "That the Committee had gone through the said Bill; and think it fit to pass, without any Amendment."

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the lessening the Duty upon Tin; and granting an Equivalent for the same, by a Duty upon Drugs."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

ORDERED, That the Commons have Notice, the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

Malt, &c. for Duties on, Bill.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Duties upon Malt, Mum, Sweets, Cyder, and Perry, as well towards carrying on the War against France, as for the necessary Expence of His Majesty's Household, and other Occasions."

After some Time, the House was resumed.

And the Earl of Stamford reported, "That the Committee had gone through the said Bill; and think it fit to pass, without any Amendment."

Poor Laws, for supplying Defects in, Bill.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for supplying some Defects in the Laws for the better Relief of the Poor of this Kingdom."

After some Time, the House was resumed.

And the Earl of Stamford reported, "That the Committee had gone through the said Bill; and think it fit to pass, with the Addition of a Proviso."

Which, being read Twice, was agreed to; and ORDERED, That the said Proviso be engrossed.

D. Richmond versus Brown and Hyron, for arresting Holcolmb:

The House being informed, upon Oath, "That Richard Holcomb, menial Servant to his Grace the Duke of Richmond, was arrested, by William Brown Bailiff, at the Suit of John Hyron, contrary to the Privilege of Parliament:"

Brown to be attached;

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Serjeant at Arms attending this House, his Deputy or Deputies, do forthwith attach the Body of the said William Brown, and bring him in safe Custody to the Bar of this House; and this shall be a sufficient Warrant on that Behalf.

To Peter Persehouse Esquire, Serjeant at Arms attending this House, his Deputy or Deputies, and every of them.

and Hyron to attend.

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That John Hyron shall be, and he is hereby, required to attend this House Tomorrow at Ten of the Clock in the Forenoon.

Duty on Leather, Bill.

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for laying a Duty upon Leather for the Term of Three Years; and making other Provision for answering the Deficiencies as well of the late Duties upon Coals and Culm, as for paying the Annuities upon the Lottery and for Lives, charged on the Tonnage of Ships, and the Duties upon Salt."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

ORDERED, That the Commons have Notice, the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

Message from H. C. to return the Bill for Partitions of Jointtenancy.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Montague and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the easier obtaining Partitions of Lands in Coparcenary, Jointtenancy, and Tenancy in Common; and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the Lords Amendments made therein.

Report from the Admiralty Committee.

The Lord Herbert of Chirbury reported from the Lords Committees appointed, on the Second of December last, to inquire into the several Matters relating to the Admiralty, "That, in Pursuance of an Order of the Seventeenth of March last, their Lordships had given several Questions to the Commissioners of the Admiralty, relating to the Thoulon Squadron, not being intercepted, getting into Brest Harbour, in May, One Thousand Six Hundred Ninety-six; and have received their Answers, in Writing, to the same. After which, their Lordships sending for the said Commissioners, in order to confer with them on some of the said Answers; their Lordships could not receive that Satisfaction, by reason the Commissioners who did then appear did not conceive themselves enabled to discourse, or make any Answers as a Board; but desired the Questions might still continue to be put in Writing, and be answered in Writing as before: Which their Lordships conceiving to be an endless and unnecessary Work, it was not thought fit to proceed any farther with them; but to report the Matter specially; (videlicet,)

Answers from the Commissioners of Admiralty.

"Admiralty Office, 31st March, 1697.

"By the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of England, Ireland, &c.

"Answers to the following Questions of the Right Honourable the Lords Committees, in Pursuance of an Order of the 29th Instant.

QUESTIONS. ANSWERS.
"1st. What Steps you made towards securing Sir George Rooke in his Return from Cadiz, or for intercepting the Thoulon Squadron?" 1st. There could be no Steps made towards the securing Sir George Rooke, or intercepting the Thoulon Fleet, but by sending out the Ships from The Downes, which were all that could possibly be got together at that Time from any Part of England; the Numbers and Strength whereof will appear by Sir Cloudesly Shovell's List, of the 13° April, many of which were victualled for Eight and Twelve Months, and appropriated for convoying Ships to The East and West Indies, and other Foreign Trades, which had lain long languishing under an Embargo; and had these Ships proceeded, England would have been lest wholly unprotected, at a Time when it was notoriously known that the French had a considerable Army ready to invade this Kingdom, to be backed by their whole Fleet, according to the Advices delivered in.
But, if the Fleet had been sent to meet Sir George Rooke, it might have been upon great Uncertainty; for (as appears by the Copies of his Orders, which have been since seen) though he had resolved, upon the Intelligence he had then received, to come Home, yet, upon his meeting with other Intelligence of the Strength of the Enemy, he might have changed his Resolutions as to his Return; for there was no Advice of his being sailed till he arrived off of The Lizard; and it might have been reasonably expected that he would, at the Time of his Sailing, have sent Notice of it Express by Land from Cadiz, and by a Frigate so soon as he was clear of The Bay; as also, by his sending another Frigate before the Fleet immediately upon his coming into The Soundings; and it was upwards of Forty Days from the Date of his Letter giving an Account that he was ready to sail, to the Receipt of that Advice of his being off The Lizard.
"Besides all this, it was plain, the Orders for Sir Geo. Rook's coming Home were sent so as that he received them the Eighteenth of February; in Point of Time so early, that, had he sailed then, he might have been here, in all human Probability, at least Forty Days before the Thoulon Fleet; the onsequence of which would have been, that this Nation would have been freed from all anxious Thoughts about him, and there would have been Time abundantly sufficient to pursue any Design of intercepting the Enemy; though by Experience it has been found, at the Beginning of this War, that even when the Fleet of England lay off Brest, in the Summer Season, the Thoulon Squadrongot into that Port without being intercepted."
"2d. Why you countermanded, by your Order of the 15° April, 1696, your Order of the 11th of the same April, to Sir Cloudesly Shovell?" "2d. A general Apprehension at that Time of the French Fleets being joined, and of their coming into The Channel; and the Ships in The Downes, for Want of those in the River and upon the Coast of France, being thought too weak, the King gave His Directions for their being stopped till they were all joined, signified by Mr. Russell."
"3d. What was done in Pursuance of the Order of the 25° April, 1696, which was a Repetition of the Order of the 11th of the same April?" "3d. In Pursuance of the Order of the 25th of April, the Fleet did sail so soon as the Wind was fair."
"4th. If you did not think fit that Sir G. Rook should come into The Downes, as by your Orders (sent to Plymouth) of the 3d, 6th, and 24th, of March, 169&frac56, appears; why did you not send your Orders to Plymouth, or elsewhere, to countermand the aforesaid Orders?" "4th. There were Orders at Portsmouth to stop him there, where it was taken for granted he would call; it being customary for all Fleets and Squadrons coming into The Channell to send in at Porsmouth and Plymouth; and the more to be expected at that critical Juncture of Affairs, when every Hour might occasion the altering the Orders sent to him: And he thought it very reasonable to do the same, as appears by his Letter of the 23d of April; and accordingly he lay by Six Hours off The Isle of Wight, and sent his Yacht into St. Hellen's; but sailed before the Orders reached him."
"5. Why, if you expected an Insult from the French at Spithead, as appears by your Letter of the 3d March, 169&frac56, to Sir G. Rooke, did you order him to repair to The Downes, with some of his Ships, and leave others of them at Spithead?" "5th. There being no such Letter found as that of the 3d March to Sir Geo. Rooke; it is supposed, their Lordships mean an Order to him of that Date: And the Reason that Orders were given for the Ships not in a Condition for the Sea to remain at Spithead, and to keep themselves in a constant Posture of Defence, was only till such Time as the Winds would permit them to go into Portsmouth Harbour, to be resitted; and as for the small Frigates, they were designed to go to Sea upon Occasion, to gain Intelligence of the Motion of the Enemy."
"6th. Why, having so many Ships ready in The Downes for the main Fleet, they were not sent to join Sir Geo. Rooke, to intercept the Thoulon Squadron coming into Brest; you having had Intelligence of his Arrival off The Lizard, the 22th April, 1696?" "6th. Sir Geo. Rook's Letter, off of The Lizard, was dated the 22th of April, received the 24th at Night; and the Commander in Chief of the Fleet in The Downes had his Orders to sail to Spithead on the 25°, which was as great Dispatch as could possibly be made."
"7th. Did you ever give any Orders for the main Fleet in The Downes, or any Part thereof, to proceed to meet Sir Geo. Rooke?" "7th. There was no Orders given to all or any Part of the Fleet to meet Sir Geo. Rooke, except the Cruisers to look out for him, till Advice was received of his Arrival off of The Lizard; and then all the Ships in The Downes were directed to Spithead, in order to join him: And the Reasons why they were not before sent, it's conceived, are sufficiently set forth in the beforegoing Answer to the First Question. All which Transactions had they not been thought for His Majesty's Service, when considered before Him, it is to be presumed, there would have been other Directions given."
And having now answered the several Questions sent to us by their Lordships; we beg Leave to observe, That we thought we had little Reason to expect being called in Question for our Proceedings of the last Year, after having so happily got together, in Four Days Time, such a considerable Fleet for the Preservation of the Kingdom, so visibly and so iminently in Danger.

By Command of their Lordships.

"Wm. Bridgeman.
Russell.
H. Preistman.
R. Rich.
Jn°. Houblon.

"April 13°, 1696.

"A List of the Ships to proceed with me to Spithead, which are now in The Downes.

"First Rate:
Victory.
London.
Second Rate:
Sandwich.
Dutchess.
Albemarle.
St. Michael.
Ossory.
Third Rate:
Cumberland.
Devonshire.
Elizabeth.
Hampton Court.
Expedition.
Foreign Convoy, Lyon.
Norfolk.
Northumberland.
Foreign Convoy, Sterling Castle.


Foreign Convoys.
Fourth Rate:
Lincoln.
Advice.
King's Fisher.
Colchester.
Southampton.
Prince of Orange.
Windsor.
Newcastle.
Tyger.
Princess Ann.
Loyall Merchant.
Fire Ships:
Crescent.
Fortune.
Vulture, Foreign Convoy.
Griffin.
Hawke, Foreign Convoy.
Owner Love.
St. Vincent.
Fly Brigantine.

"Examined,

"Wm. Bridgeman."

"Admiralty Office, 5th April, 97.

"By the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of England, Ireland, &c.

"Answers to the following Questions of the Right Honourable the Lords Committees, in Pursuance of an Order of 31th March last.

"8th. Why did you continue your Orders from the 3d to the 24th March, 9⅚, to Sir Geo. Rooke, for his sailing into The Downes, when, besides your conjectural Knowledge (as some of your Board termed it), you received certain Notice from the Duke of Shrewsbury, upon the said 24th March, that the King had sent for the Fleet to return from Cadiz the 27th of January before; besides the Directions given you by His Majesty at Kensington, March 1st, for the lodging Orders for Sir Geo. Rooke at Portsmouth and Plymouth?" "8th. If this Article is not answered in the last Paper given to their Lordships; and if the Meaning of this further Question is, "Why Orders were not sent to stop Sir Geo. Rooke at Portsm°. or Plymouth;" it is conceived, it would not have been reasonable, to have had a Part of the Fleet at Portsmouth or Plymouth, and another Part in The Downes, when the Enemy was expected with their Fleet in The Channell, and might have got between and hindered their Conjunction. The King's Directions of the 1st March were those which were sent to Sir G. Rooke the 3d; a Copy of which lies before your Lordships."
"9th. What was the Reason, why you did not agree with the Reasons given you by Sir George Rooke, in his Letter of the 23th of April, 96, for his going into Spithead, rather than coming into The Downes?" "9th. There was no Need of agreeing with Sir Geo. Rooke; there being Orders lodged at Portsmouth, of the 10th of April, for his remaining there; and it was taken for granted (as is said in our former Paper) that he would call at Spithead, in Hopes of meeting such Orders as he seemed so much to desire."
"10th. Why you ordered Sir Geo. Rook to send One Ship only into Spithead; and whether then any Orders did lie at Portsmouth for Sir George; and what these Orders were?" "10th. We find no Orders to Sir Geo. Rooke for sending any Ship or Ships to Spithead but that of the 3d of March; there were Orders lodged at Portsmouth for Sir Geo. Rooke, dated the 10th of April; both which Orders your Lordships have before you. And it was a great Surprize to hear of his being passed that Port without having received them."
"11th. How the Fleet, which was in The Downs when Sir Geo. Rooke came thither, came to be in such Unreadiness, both as to Men and Provisions, as Sir Geo. Rooke complains of in divers Letters, and particularly the 30th of April, and 2d May, 1696?" "11th. It is more to be wondered at, they were in so good a Condition; considering the early Season of the Year, and the great Expedition used in the getting them out of the River, to prevent their being locked up by an Easterly Wind; the Fear of which made it absolutely necessary, in that Hurry, to put on Board them great Numbers of Soldiers, for Want of Seamen to carry them to The Downes."
"12th. What Danger would it have been to the Kingdom, to have sent the Fleet in The Downes, April 11th, 96, to Torbay, or before Brest?" "12th. It is conceived, this Question is in a great Measure answered before; but, if not, what may be further said in that Matter is, that if the Ships in The Downes had been then sent to Torbay, or before Brest, the Danger to the Kingdom would have been, the landing Thirty Thousand French, with the late King James at the Head of them, so much at that Time dreaded by all honest Men; however it falls out to be our Lot to be called in Question now, for doing what was thought so signal a Service then. Besides, if the Ships in The Downes had gone into the Sea, they would (according to the Intelligence then) have more probably met the Enemy's Fleet than Sir Geo. Rooke."
"13th. What did you, in order to the intercepting the Fleet of French Merchant-men bound to St. Mallo's and Havre d' Grace, &c. of which Notice was given you by Sir G. Rook's Letter, dated 22d April, 1696?" "13th. Having ordered all the Strength to join Sir Geo. Rooke (which he yet seemed to think too little); there could no more be done than was by the Orders of the 27th of April, directing him to intercept that Trade he gave an Account of; which nevertheless he might have done without it; and, it is conceived, he ought so to have done.

"By Command of their Lordships.

"Wm. Bridgeman.
H. Priestman.
Jn°. Houblon.
Kendall."

"Admiralty-Office, 12th April, 1697.

"By the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of England, Ireland, &c.

"Answers to the following Questions of the Right Honourable the Lords Committees, in Pursunae of an Order of the 5th April, 1697.

QUESTIONS. ANSWERS.
"1st. What Date you mean by those Words ["at that Time"] in your Answer to the First Question, pursuant to the Order of the 29th March last?" "1st. By that Time, is meant, during the Continuance of the Fleet in The Downes."
"2d. Whereas you delivered in a List of 49 Ships in The Downes, commanded by Sir Cloudesly Shovell, April 13th, 1696; it is desired to know the Station of each of those particular Ships; as also the Condition of each of them, both as to Victuals and Men, from the 2d March, 9⅚, to 29th April, 1696?" "2d. The Stations and Conditions are annexed (fn. *) ."
"3d. What your Intelligence was, of the Danger of an Invasion from Abroad, between the 11th and 29th April, 1696?" "3d. By a Letter received the 11th of April, there was Advice that the French Fleet had been seen the Fifteenth of March before Barcelona; and it was generally reported, the said Fleet was at The Streights' Mouth the 20th of March, which was strengthened by a Letter received the 15th of April, from Guernsey, advising that the Thoulon Fleet was expected by the First, at Bell Isle; in which Letter they confidently say, their Intention is for our Channell."
"4th. Upon what Intelligence was your Apprehension of the French Fleets being joined on the 15th April, 1696?" "4th. The Apprehensions were grounded upon the foregoing Intelligences, and the general Opinion of most Persons."
"5th. Whereas you say, at the Conclusion of your Paper, that you had happily got together, in Four Days Time, a considerable Fleet for the Preservation of the Kingdom; it is desired to know of what Number of Ships that Fleet consisted, and of what Ships particularly by Name; and in what Station and Condition those Ships were at that Time as to Men and Victuals; and when that Time was, that you call the Four Days?" " (fn. *) 5th. Orders were sent the 23d February, 9&frac5/6;, at Three in the Morning; and the annexed List shews what Ships sailed with Admiral Russell from The Downes, the 27th in the Morning; what Ships joined him from Portsmouth, the River, and the Northward, the same Day off the Back of The Goodwin; and what Ships joined him the 28th from Plymouth; as also what Ships were under his Command on the Coast of France the same Day, with their Stations and Conditions."

"By Command of their Lordships.

"Wm. Bridgeman.
Russell.
H. Preistman.
Jn°. Houblon.
Kendall."

"Admiralty-Office, 12 April, 1697.

"By the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of England, Ireland, &c.

Answer to the following Question of the Right Honourable the Lords Committees, in Pursuance of an Order of the 9th Instant.

QUESTION.
"At what Time the great Numbers of Soldiers, mentioned in your late Answer to the 11th Question, were embarked; and at what Time they were difembarked?" "They were embarked the Second and Third of April; and upon the 18th, Directions were sent to Sir Cloudesly Shovell. to cause the said Soldiers to be sent back from The Downes in Tenders to Blackstakes, where some of them arrived the 25th.

"By Command of their Lordships.

"Wm. Bridgeman.
Russell.
H. Preistman.
Jn°. Houblon.
Kendall."

His Lordship also reported, "That the Committee sent some Questions relating to the same Matter, to Sir Geo. Rooke; to which he returned Answers, as follows, (videlicet,)

"1. If Sir Geo. Rooke had any other Order than the King's, for his coming from Cadiz?" "1. I had no Orders for my coming from Cadiz but the King's, of the 27th January, 169⅚."
"2. What Strength he had at Cadiz; and what Proportion it bore in relation to the Thoulon Squadron?" "2. I had at Cadiz, when the several Detachments to strengthen the Turkey Convoy, &c. were returned and joined, thirty-two Ships of Line, which, by all the Lists and Accounts I received from France, Spain, and Engl'd, were not Two Thirds in Proportion to the Strength of the Thoulon Squadron."
"3d. If he had known the Service he was designed for, where he would have joined the Fleet he was to meet?" "3d. I do not know what is meant by the Service I was designed for; but, if it be the intercepting the Thoulon Squadron from getting into Brest, no Doubt but the most Western Ports had been the fittest Rendezvous for that Service."
"4th. What Force he met, both of English and Dutch, in The Downes when he came there?" "4th. I found, on my Arrival in The Downes, between Sixty and Seventy Sail of English and Dutch Men of War."
"5. In what Condition he found His Majesty's Ships in The Downes, when he came there with his Squadron?" "5. I found several of the King's Ships in Want of Men and Stores, as will more particularly appear by the Weekly Accounts before your Lordships."
"6. Where he met his First Orders in The Channell; if he received any Order to call at Spithead, and where he received it?" "6. I met my Orders of the 3d, 6th, and 24th March, for my proceeding to The Downes, within Twelve Hours one of another, off of Plymouth and Dartmouth; but the Order for my stopping at Spithead never yet came to my Hands."
"7. If he did not write to the Admiralty, and give his Reasons why it was better to stay at Spithead than go into The Downes; and if he did, what Answer was sent him by the Admiralty?" "7. I offered some Reasons to the Lords of the Admiralty, in my Letter of the 24th April, as I take it, why I thought it better for the Service to stop at Spithead, than proceed to The Downes; but I could receive no Orders in Answer to that Letter, by reason I arrived in The Downes very near as soon as it could come to their Lordships Hands in London.

Message from H. C. with a Bill.

A Message from the House of Commons, by Sir Thomas Littleton and others:

Who brought up a Bill, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty a further Subsidy of Tonnage and Poundage upon Merchandizes imported, for the Term of Two Years and Three Quarters; and an additional Land Tax for One Year, for carrying on the War against France;" to which they desire their Lordships Concurrence.

Subsidy of Tonnage and Poundage, and additional Land Tax, Bill.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for granting to His Majesty a further Subsidy of Tonnage and Poundage upon Merchandizes imported, for the Term of Two Years and Three Quarters, and an additional Land Tax for One Year, for carrying on the War against France."

Co. Radnor versus Vandebendy & al.:

After hearing Counsel, upon the Petition and Appeal of the Right Honourable Sarah Countess Dowager of Radnor, Relict of the late Right Honourable Robert Roberts Esquire, who was Son and Heir of the Right Honourable John Earl of Radnor deceased, from a Decree of Dismission made by the Court of Chancery, the Thirteenth Day of March last, in a Cause there depending, wherein the Petitioner was Plaintiff, against John Vandebendy Esquire, Sir John Rotheram Serjeant at Law, and others, Defendants; as also upon the Answers of John Vandebendy and Serjeant Rotheram put in thereunto:

Judgement affirmed.

After due Consideration of what was offered thereupon, it is ORDERED and Adjudged, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Petition and Appeal of Sarah Countess Dowager of Radnor shall be, and is hereby, dismissed this House; and that the Decree of Dismission therein complained of shall be, and is hereby, affirmed.

Hawkers and Pedlars Bill.

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the House shall be put into a Committee, to consider of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for licensing Hawkers and Pedlars, for a further Provision for Payment of the Interest of the Transport Debt due for the reducing of Ireland," To-morrow, after the hearing Counsel to some Part of the Bill relating to Stock-jobbing.

Booth versus E. of Warrington.

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That To-morrow, the First Business, this House will hear Counsel, upon the Petition of Cecill Booth Esquire, and the Answer of the Earl of Warrington.

Message from H. C. with a Bill.

A Message from the House of Commons, by Sir Joseph Tiley and others:

Who brought up a Bill, intituled, "An Act to restrain the Number and ill Practice of Brokers and Stock-jobbers;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Stock-jobbing, to restrain, Bill.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to restrain the Number and ill Practice of Brokers and Stock-jobbers."

Merchants of London versus Stock-jobbing, Bill.

Upon reading the Petition of sundry Merchants and others, Traders in the City of London, on Behalf of themselves and many others; praying to be heard, by Counsel, before the passing of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to restrain the Number and ill Practice of Brokers and Stock-jobbers:"

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Petitioners shall be heard To-morrow, at Ten of the Clock; and any other Persons who shall think themselves concerned therein.

Luxford versus Wych.

After reading the Petition of John Wych Esquire, shewing, "That, by an Order of this House, of the Nineteenth of March, One Thousand Six Hundred Ninety-six, Richard Luxford had Liberty to attend the Lords Committees appointed to consider of his Petition;" and praying, "That the said Luxford may attend, in Custody of a Keeper, until he gives Bail to answer the Petitioner's Demands:"

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Order of the Nineteenth of March last shall be, and is hereby, set aside; and that the said Richard Luxford do attend the said Committee, when ordered, in the Custody of a Keeper of The Fleet Prison.

Receipt of Exchequer, ancient Course of, to observe, Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the better Observation of the Course anciently used in the Receipt of Exchequer."

ORDERED, That the said Bill shall be committed to a Committee of the whole House, To-morrow.

Five Lords present. to proceed on Business.

ORDERED, That To-morrow, at Ten of the Clock, so soon as Five Lords are present, the House shall proceed on Business.

Adjourn.

Dominus Custos Magni Sigilli declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Jovis, (videlicet,) decimum quintum diem instantis Aprilis, hora decima Aurora, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Footnotes

* Memorandum, The List of the Ships, with the Stations and Conditions mentioned to be annexed, being not read, are not entered; but remain in the Parliament Office.