House of Lords Journal Volume 11
11 October 1665

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 11: 11 October 1665', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 11: 1660-1666 (1767-1830), pp. 684-689. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=14466 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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DIE Mercurii, 11 die Octobris.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Arch. Cant.
Epus. London.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. Lyncolne.
Epus. Exon.
Epus. Sarum.
Ds. Cancellarius.
Ds. Thesaurarius Angl.
Ds. Camerarius Hospitii.
Comes Oxon.
Comes Pembrooke.
Comes Nottingham.
Comes Bridgwater.
Comes North'ton.
Comes Newport.
Comes Sandwich.
Viscount Say & Seale.
Viscount Mordant.
Ds. Arlington.
Ds. Awdley.
Ds. Delawar.
Ds. Chandos.
Ds. Sandes.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Chandos.
Ds. Hunsdon.
Ds. Lovelace.
Ds. Coventry.
Ds. Lucas.
Ds. Gerrard de Brand.
Ds. Crofts.
Ds. Berkley de Strat.
Ds. Ashley.

PRAYERS.

Order for Thanks to the King and the L. Chancellor, for their Speeches; and to desire they may be printed and entered, in the Journal.

The Lord Chamberlain moved, "That His Majesty might have humble Thanks presented Him from this House, for His Gracious Speech to both Houses of Parliament Yesterday, in Christ's Church Hall; and to desire that His Majesty would please to give Order for the Printing and Publishing of it."

Which was accordingly ordered; and the Lord Chamberlain is appointed to move His Majesty for delivering out of a Copy of His said Speech, to the End it may be entered into the Journal Book of this House.

It is further ORDERED, That this House returns Thanks to the Lord Chancellor, for His Speech Yesterday in Christ's Church Hall; and desires his Lordship to cause the same to be printed and published; and that it be entered into the Journal Book of this House.

Bill for uniting Churches in Cities, &c.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, "An Act for uniting Churches in Cities and Towns Corporate."

ORDERED, That the Consideration of this Bill be committed to these Lords following:

Comes Oxon.
Comes Nottingham.
Comes Bridgwater.
Comes North'ton.
Comes Newport.
Comes Sandwich.
Arch. Cant.
Epus. London.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. Lyncolne.
Epus. Exon.
Epus. Sarum.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Chandos.
Ds. Hunsdon.
Ds. Lovelace.
Ds. Lucas.
Ds. Gerard Brand.
Ds. Ashley.

Their Lordships, or any Five; to meet To-morrow, at Three of the Clock in the Afternoon, in the Astronomy School; and have Power to adjourn themselves to what other Place and Time as they please.

Message from H. C. with Votes, offering to assist the King against the Dutch, and thanking Him for His Care of the D. of York.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Thomas Tomkins and others; who brought up Two Votes, passed the House of Commons, whereto they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Votes were read, as follows:

1st Vote.

"Resolved, &c".

"That the humble and hearty Thanks of this House be returned to His Majesty, for His Care and Conduct in the Preservation of His People, and the Honour of this Nation; and that this House will assist His Majesty, with their Lives and Fortunes, against the Dutch, or any others that shall assist them in Opposition to His Majesty."

2d Vote.

"Resolved, &c".

"That the humble Thanks of this House be also returned to His Majesty, for the Care He hath of the Person of His Royal Highness the Duke of Yorke."

Agreed to.

ORDERED, That this House agrees with the House of Commons in these Votes to be presented to His Majesty.

The Answer returned was:

Answer.

That this House doth very chearfully concur with the House of Commons in the Two Votes now brought up, to be presented to His Majesty.

The House to attend the King with them.

ORDERED, That this whole House do wait upon His Majesty in a Body, to present these Votes unto Him.

And the Lord Chamberlain is appointed to attend His Majesty presently, to know what Time He will please to appoint for that Purpose.

Message to H. C. for their House to go at the same Time.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir William Childe and Sir Nathaniell Hobart:

To let them know, that this House resolves to attend the King in a Body, to present the Votes agreed upon this Day, and to desire that they would do the like: Further to signify unto them, that this House hath sent to the King, to know His Pleasure concerning the Time.

The Messengers return with this Answer:

Answer.

That the House of Commons will go likewise in a Body to attend the King, at such Time as His Majesty shall please to appoint.

King's Speech.

"His Majesty's most Gracious Speech to both Houses of Parliament, in Christ's Church Hall, Yesterday."

"My Lords and Gentlemen,"

"I am confident you all believe, that if it had not been absolutely necessary to consult with you, I would not have called you together at this Time, when the Contagion hath so spread itself over so many Parts of the Kingdom. I take it for a good Omen, to see so good an Appearance this Day; and I doubt not every Day will add to your Number. And I give you all My Thanks, for your Compliance so far with My Desires."

"The Truth is, as I entered upon this War by your Advice and Encouragement, so I do desire that you may as frequently as is possible receive Information of the Conduct and Effects of it; and that I may have the Continuance of your chearful Supply for the carrying it on. I will not deny to you, that it hath proved more chargeable than I could imagine it would have been. The Addition they still made to their Fleets, beyond their First Purpose, made it unavoidably necessary for Me to make proportionable Preparations, which GOD hath hitherto blessed with Success in all Encounters. And as the Enemy have used their utmost Endeavours, by Calumnies and false Suggestions, to make themselves Friends, and to persuade others to assist them against us, so I have not been wanting to encourage those Princes who have been wronged by the Dutch, to recover their own by Force; and, in order thereunto, have assisted the Bishop of Munster with a very great Sum of ready Money, and am to continue a Supply to him, who is now in the Bowels of their Country with a powerful Army. These Issues, which I may tell you have been made with very good Conduct and Husbandry (nor indeed do I know that any Thing hath been spent that could have been well and safely saved); I say, this Expence will not suffer you to wonder, that the great Supply which you gave Me for this War in so bountiful a Proportion is upon the Matter already spent, so that I must not only expect an Assistance from you to carry on this War, but such an Assistance as may enable Me to defend Myself and you against a more powerful Neighbour, if He shall prefer the Friendship of the Dutch before Mine."

"I told you, when I entered upon this War, that I had not such a brutal Appetite, as to make War for War-sake. I am still of the same Mind; I have been ready to receive any Propositions that France hath thought fit to offer to that End; but hitherto nothing hath been offered worthy My Acceptance: Nor is the Dutch less insolent; though I know no Advantage they have, but the Continuance of the Contagion. GOD ALMIGHTY, I hope, will shortly deprive them of that Encouragement."

"The Chancellor will inform you of all the Particulars."

The Lord Chancellor's Speech.

L. Chancellor's Speech.

"My Lords; and you the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses, of the House of Commons;"

"The King is not content, you see, to leave you to yourselves, to make a State of the War, and the Success that hath attended it, by your own Observation, and the general Communication of all that hath fallen out, which in Truth hath left few Men ignorant of any Thing, who have had any Curiosity to inform themselves; but takes Care that you be informed by Himself, that you may know all that He knows, that so you may be able to give Him your Counsel upon the clearest Evidence."

"In order to this, it will not, I hope, be unreasonable or ungrateful to you, to refresh your Memory, by looking some Years backwards, even to the Time of His Majesty's happy Restoration, that we may take the better Prospect of the Posture we are now in, and how we have come into it. What Inclinations His Majesty brought Home with Him to live in Amity with His Neighbours of Holland, though He had received Indignities enough from them, and in Truth had been little less proscribed there than He had been in England, needs no other Manifestation, than that He chose that Place to embark Himself in, when He was pressed by the Two Neighbour Kings, from whom He had received more Civilities, to have made Use of their Ports."

"It cannot be denied but that His Reception in Holland was with great Civility and Lustre, and a sufficient Evidence that they had a full Sense of the high Honour His Majesty had vouchsafed to them, and the Departure from thence was with equal and mutual Satisfaction in each other; which made many Men the more wonder, that, albeit the Ambassadors who were to follow had been nominated before the King left The Hague, there was so long an Interval before their Arrival here, that the Two Neighbour Kings and many other Princes had finished Their Embassies of Congratulations, before we had heard any more from The United Provinces."

"You all remember how long it was before the Armies were disbanded, and the Fleets paid off; during which Time His Majesty lived upon His Credit, and easily contracted a great Debt, for the meer Support of Himself and His Household, which was not so easily discharged afterwards. There was One Thing that exceedingly surprized Him, when He found (which will be incredible to Posterity) that a triumphant Nation, that had made itself terrible to Christendom, by having fought more Battles than all the Neighbour Kingdoms and States together had ever done in so few Years, and seemed to be in a Posture ready to fight them over again, that had so long reigned over the Ocean in formidable Fleets, should, at the Time of His Majesty's happy Return, as if on the sudden all their Arms had been turned into Plough-shares, and their Swords into Pruning-hooks, not have in all the Magazines, in all the Stores, Arms enough to be put into the Hands of Five Thousand Men, nor Provision enough to set out Ten new Ships to Sea; which His Majesty did not desire should be known to His best Neighbours, how little soever He suspected their Affections, nor did indeed so much as make it known to His Parliament; but made it His First Care, without the least Noise, and with all imaginable Shifts, to provide for the full Supply of those important Magazines and Stores, which have been ever since replenished as they ought to be."

"He had not the least Imagination, that any of His Neighbours would wantonly affect to interrupt the happy Calm that He and themselves enjoyed; and therefore resolved to retrench the vast Expence of the Navy, under which He found the Nation even to groan, and out of that good Husbandry to provide for more necessary Disbursements. Yet, that the World might not think that He had abandoned the Ocean, and that the Memory of the glorious Actions the English had so lately performed upon it might not vanish in an Instant, after He had provided such a Guard as the Narrow Seas never ought to be without, in the Spring He sent a strong Fleet against the Pirates of Argiers and Tripoli (who had grown to that Strength and Boldness that they interrupted the whole Trade of Christendom), as the only Enemies He would choose to have."

"It was a Design of great Glory and equal Expence, crowned in the End by GOD ALMIGHTY with the Success we could wish, and with an entire Submission to the English Flag, and as great Security to all His Majesty's Subjects in their Trade as the Engagement and Honour of Infidels can give; and this Agreement ratified with all Formality (the like whereof had never been before) by the Great Turke Himself."

"Hereupon the King again renewed His Resolution for a further Retrenchment of His Naval Expence, even to the lessening the Guard in the Narrow Seas, His Merchants in all Places receiving less Interruption in their Trade than they had in any former Time undergone, until He received Intelligence from The Straights, that the faithless People of Argiers, who had so lately submitted to Him, had committed new Insolencies upon some of His Subjects, or rather upon Foreign Persons taken by His Subjects into their Protections, and which the Turkes pretended they might do without Violation of the Treaty. But His Majesty, resolving to admit none of those Elucidations, lost no Time in sending a new strong Fleet into the Mediterranean Sea, to chastise those persidious Pirates; and after a chargeable War made upon them for near or full Twelve Months, and after having taken several of their Ships from them, and upon the matter blocking them up in their Harbours, He received a Second Submission from them, with better and more advantageous Conditions than the former."

"I must not omit One Circumstance, that about this Time the Dutch, who received much more Prejudice and Damage from the Turkes than the English had done, besought His Majesty, that He would Once more send a Fleet into those Seas against those Pirates, and that it might upon all Occasions join with one they were likewise ready to send out to the same Christian End, and for the Extirpation of those Sea Robbers; and within a very short Time after the English Fleet was gone, they likewise sent De Ruyter with a good Fleet thither, which was so far from any Conjunction with us, that when our Ships chaced any Argier Men near them, they never offered to obstruct their Flight, but quickly made it manifest that they rather brought Money with them to buy a dishonourable and disadvantageous Peace, than to make a War upon them."

"Matters standing thus, the King's Fleet being gone into The Straights against the Turkish Pirates, and there remaining few Ships in the Narrow Seas, we began every Day to hear of Depredations by the Dutch upon our Merchants in all Parts. Instead of delivering up the Island of Poleroone in The East Indies, as by the Treaty they ought to have done, they, by their Naval Power in those Parts, hindered our Ships to take in their Lading of such Merchandize as the Factors had provided and made ready for their Freight, upon Pretence that those Ports where the Merchandize was ready to be embarked were in the Dominions of some Princes who they had declared to be their Enemies, and so they would not suffer any Traffic to be maintained with them; and they published the like Declaration, and challenged the same Sovereignty, in Affrica, and by virtue thereof would not suffer our Ships to trade upon that Coast, where we had a Trade long before the Dutch had any Footing in those Parts."

"These Insolencies made that Noise in the World, that the English Merchants felt the Effects of it in all Places, till it reached the Ears of the Parliament, which in April was Twelve Months presented the same to His Majesty, and besought Him that He would take some speedy and effectual Course for the Redress of those Wrongs, Dishonours, and Indignities, which were the greatest Obstructions of our Trade; and declared, that, in the Prosecution thereof, they would with their Lives and Fortunes assist His Majesty against all Opposition whatsoever."

"My Lords and Gentlemen,"

"You very well remember, that though His Majesty was very well pleased with the great Zeal you shewed for the Advancement of Trade, He was far from resolving to make a War upon the Warmth of that Declaration; but told you, that He would examine and peruse the particular Complaints which had been represented to His Parliament, and would thereupon demand Justice and Reparation from The States Generall; which Demand He appointed His Minister residing there to make in a short Time after. What Effect that candid Way of Proceeding found, is enough known to the World: Instead of other Application, they declared themselves wonderfully offended with the Declaration of the Parliament, with many insolent Expressions, suitable to the Manners of a Commonwealth. They gave present Order for equipping a very great Fleet, and the raising many Land Soldiers, making greater Preparations for War than they had done in many Years before. They had made a Complaint to His Majesty that a Captain of One of the Ships which His Majesty had lent to the Royal Company had, in his Voyage thither, taken a Fort belonging to them, near Cape Verte, for which they demanded Satisfaction. The King assured them, that He had not the least Commission or Authority from Him for so doing; that he expected him Home very speedily; and then he should be sure to undergo that Punishment which the Nature of his Offence required, when the Matter should be examined; and they should be sure to receive full Reparation. This satisfied them not; but, in a great Fury, they resolved to send forth a strong Fleet to Guyney, and granted a Commission (which they took Care to publish) to the Commander in Chief, to make War upon the English in those Parts, and to do them all the Mischief they could."

"The King found Himself now obliged, in what Straight soever, to provide for the Protection of His Subjects in those Parts, and for the Support of that Trade, which, I doubt, is not enough taken to Heart, and the Value thereof not enough understood; and, in order thereunto, with great Speed, caused a Fleet to be made ready for that Expedition, under the Command of his Highness Prince Rupert, who was under Sail for the Voyage, when His Majesty found it necessary to stop the Prince's further Prosecution of it, upon good Intelligence that the Dutch had appointed their Admiral, with a Fleet of Fifty Sail, to convoy the other Fleet designed for Guyney through The Channell, in Contempt of His Majesty, who had a very small Fleet in Readiness; and that De Ruyter was likewise sent out of The Straights, from prosecuting the Turkes, to make War upon the English in Guynney, when at the same Time they had earnestly pressed the King, upon many Professions of Desire to prevent a War, that Prince Rupert's Fleet might stay in Harbour, as theirs should do, till some Means might be found for an Accommodation of all Differences; and, in Truth, this very difficult Stratagem, of pretending one Thing and intending another, of promising with all Solemnity and never resolving to perform, of swearing this Day not to do a Thing when they had served their Turn by having done it Yesterday, that nobody could know, is the highest Pinacle of their Wisdom of State, by which they govern their Affairs, and delude their Neighbours."

"The Winds were not favourable to this triumphant Design. And now the King found the Value of the Vote and Declaration of His Parliament; it was a rich and a massy Vote, which in a short Time He coined into Two Hundred Thousand Pounds ready Money, in the Chamber of the City of London, with which He gave Order forthwith to make ready more Ships; and the Duke going himself to the Fleet, by his indefatigable Industry, with incredible Expedition, added so many good Ships to those under the Command of Prince Rupert, that in November he put himself on Board the Fleet, resolving to stop the Dutch, if the Wind gave them Leave to pursue their former Resolution, which, from the Time the Duke was known to be at Sea, they fairly declined, and were content rather to be safe in their own Harbours, than to look to the Security of their Merchants. It was high Time now to seize upon as many of their Ships as came in our Way, to satisfy the Damages we had Reason to believe we should sustain from De Ruyter's Expedition into Guyney with the Commission mentioned before; but there was not the Lading of One Ship sold, or disposed of, till His Majesty received full Information of De Ruyter's having begun the War upon the Coast of Affrica, by seizing upon our Ships, taking our Forts, and committing all the Acts of Hostility which his Commission directed him unto; His Majesty likewise at the same Time receiving new Advertisement of their Refusal to deliver up the Island of Poleroone to Him, which they were bound to by their Treaty. And will you not wonder, after all this, at the Confidence of these Men; and more, that any Neighbour Prince should have that Confidence in them, as to declare, that the King our Master is the Agressor, that He first began the War?"

"From this Time the War began to be more in Earnest, and to be carried on at another Expence. Though his Royal Highness ventured himself in November, in a Fleet consisting of little more than Fifty Ships, to stop the Dutch from passing through The Channell; yet, in April (which was within few Days after your Prorogation at the End of your last Session), he went again to Sea, with a much stronger Fleet, and more proportionate to the great Preparations the Enemy had made; and even after he was gone to Sea, upon great Additions of Strength every Day made by the Dutch, more good Ships were sent to reinforce the Fleet; insomuch as, upon that glorious Third of June, when they had the Courage to visit our Coatts, after the Duke had in vain called upon them at their own Doors, and took many of their Merchants Ships in their Sight, the English Fleet consisted of very few less than One Hundred Sail. The Action and Blessing of that Day hath been celebrated in all the Churches in England, and in the hearty Devotions of all true Englishmen; and therefore I shall say no more of it here, save only, that whether the public Joy then, even upon the solemn Thanksgiving-day, was superior to the universal Consternation that spread itself over the Nation before, I appeal to the Breasts of all here present. We, who had the Honour to be near the King at that Time, observed Him to be in that Agony that cannot be expressed, an Agony Himself could not have long endured, even when, by all the Intelligence He received Hourly from the Coast, He had Reason to assure Himself of the Victory. In that great Action, we sunk, burned, and took, Eighteen good Ships of War, whereof Half were the best they had, with the Loss of One single small Ship of ours, but of many noble and gallant Persons, of too much Value to be ventured (if there had not been a greater Venture) against such Trash, and whose Memories ought ever to be preserved, and extolled, and made precious to Posterity. No Diligence was omitted, but all imaginable Expedition used, in refreshing, repairing, and setting out the Fleet again; in order to which, the King Himself made a Journey thither, and stayed till he He saw all ready, and fit to sail; but then, no Intreaty, no Importunity, could prevail with Him to venture His Brother again, though his Family and all Preparations for the Voyage were still on Board. His Majesty too well remembered, and still felt, the Impressions He had undergone the Third of June; and having got His Brother into His Arms again, He would not return without him, committing the Charge of the Fleet to the Earl of Sandwich, who had acted so good a Part in it."

"Within few Days after, the Beginning of July, the Earl of Sandwich went again to the Coast of Holland, with a Fleet in no Degree inferior with the former, and rode before The Texell, to invite the Dutch to a new Engagement, they having used all the Arts at Home to conceal the Loss and Dishonour they had undergone, and pretended to be very ready and solicitous for another Battle, when there was no Appearance of their Purpose to come out: And, upon sure Intelligence that the East India Fleet was coming about by the North, he received Orders to go for Norway, upon such Encouragement as was not made good; so that he was disappointed of the Expectation he had very reasonably carried with him thither, and at a Season when that Climate gives little Encouragement to abide in those Seas. I am not yet to enlarge upon that Matter, till we hear a better Account from some of our Friends; however, though he could not meet with their whole Fleet as he endeavoured to do, yet he hath had the good Fortune, in Two Encounters, to take Eight of their great Ships of War, Two of their best East India Ships, and about Twenty of their Merchant Ships, all under the Protection of their Fleet, or ought to have been; and was then, by Tempest, and other Reasons which no Wisdom of his could prevent, obliged to put into our own Harbours."

"I do not mention the great Number of Prisoners we have taken, an Army of Prisoners, who in Truth do us more Harm at Land than ever they did at Sea; and are a Charge that never sell under our Estimate and Computation. I would not be understood that we had entered upon a War, and never thought of Prisoners, and sick and wounded Men; but that the Prisoners and wounded Men should bring upon us so prodigious an Expence, and of which we can yet see no Bottom, insomuch as in One Place, I think Colchester, that Charge comes to Twelve Hundred Pounds the Week; I say, such an Expence never came into our Computation."

"The King tells you, He hath enabled the Prince and Bishop of Munster to demand Justice from those who have so notoriously oppressed him with such outrageous Circumstances of Insolence and Scorn as are enough known to the World; and he hath demanded it bravely, in such an Equipage as hath not been made for little Money, in which he can take as well as ask Satisfaction."

"After all this, since there is a Justice due to the worst Enemies, we must do them this Right, that they do not at all seem weary of the War, they do not discover the least Inclination to Peace."

"It is true, the French King hath offered His Mediation; and truly, if He intends no more than a Mediation, it is an Office very worthy the most Christian King. I wish with all my Heart that (as a Mediator) He would make equal Propositions, or that He would not so importunately press His Majesty to consent to those He makes, upon an Instance and Argument that He holds himself engaged by a former Treaty (of which we never heard till since the Beginning of this War, and had some Reason to have presumed the contrary) to assist the Dutch with Men and Money if His Majesty doth not consent."

"His Majesty tells you, that He hath not an Appetite to make War for War-sake, but will be always ready to make such a Peace as may be for His Honour and the Interest of His Subjects; and no Doubt it will be a great Trouble and Grief to Him, to find so great a Prince, towards whom He hath manifested so great an Affection, in Conjunction with His Enemies. Yet even the Apprehension of such a War will not terrify Him to purchase a Peace by such Concessions as He would be ashamed to make you acquainted with; of which Nature you will easily believe the Propositions hitherto made to be, when you know that the Release of Poleroone in The East Indies, and the Demolishing the Fort of Cabo Corso upon the Coast of Guynney, are Two, which would be, upon the Matter, to be content with a very vile Trade in The East Indies, under their Controul, and with none in Guynney; and yet those are not Propositions unreasonable enough to please the Dutch, who reproach France for interposing for Peace, instead of assisting them in the War, boldly insisting upon the Advantage the Contagion in London and some other Parts of the Kingdom gives them, by which, they confidently say, the King will be no longer able to maintain a Fleet against them at Sea, and as if GOD ALMIGHTY had sent this heavy Visitation upon the Kingdom on their Behalf, and to expose it to their Malice and Insolence."

"They load us with such Reproaches as the Civility of no other Language will admit the Relation. The Truth is, they have a Dialect of Rudeness so peculiar to their Language and their People, that it is high Time for all Kings and Princes to oblige them to some Reformation, if they intend to hold Correspondence or Commerce with them."

"My Lords and Gentlemen,"

"You see in what Posture we stand with reference to our Neighbours Abroad, who are our declared Enemies. Their Malice and Activity to make others declare themselves so too, the great Preparations they make, and even Declarations that they will have another Battle, towards which they have in Readiness an equal Number of new, greater, and better Ships to those they have lost, furnished with larger and greater Artillery, so that, if they were to be manned with any other Nation than their own, they might be worthy our Apprehension. What Preparations are to be made on our Part, you can best judge."

"I have fully obeyed the Command that was laid upon me, in making you this plain, clear, true Narrative of what hath passed. I have no Order to make Reflexion upon it, nor any Deduction from it. The King Himself hath told you, that the noble unparalleled Supply you have already given Him is upon the Matter spent; spent with all the Animadversions of good Husbandry that the Nature of the Affair will bear. What is more to be done, He leaves entirely to your own generous Understandings; being not more assured of any Thing that is to come in this World, than that the same noble Indignation for the Honour of the King and the Nation, that first provoked you to inflame the King Himself, will continue the same Passion still boiling in your loyal Breasts, that all the World may see, which they hoped never to have seen, that never Prince and People were so entirely united in their Affections, for their true, joint, inseparable Honour, as the only, sure, infallible Expedient to preserve their distinct several Interests."

"My Lords and Gentlemen,"

"Having yet only presented you a short View of your Foreign Enemies, it may not be altogether unseasonable that you take a little Prospect of those at Home; those unquiet and restless Spirits in your own Bowels, upon whose Infidelity, I doubt, your Enemies Abroad have more Dependence than upon their own Fleets. I must appeal to every one of your Observations, whether the Countenances of these Men have not appeared to you more erected, more insolent, in all Places, since the Beginning of this War, than they were before. In what Readiness they were, if any Misfortune had befallen the King's Fleet (which they promised themselves), to have brought the Calamity into your Fields and into your Houses, is notoriously known."

"The horrid Murderers of our late Royal Master have been received into the most secret Counsels in Holland; and other infamous prostituted Persons of our Nation are admitted to a Share in the Conduct of their Affairs, and maintain their Correspondence here, upon liberal Allowances and Pensions. Too many of His Majesty's Subjects, who were lent by this Crown to assist and defend this ungrateful State against their Enemies, have been miserably wrought upon, for the keeping a vile mean Subsistence, rather than Livelihood, to renounce their Allegiance, and become Enemies to their native Country; some of whom have wantonly put themselves on Board the Enemy's Fleet, without Command or Office, purely out of Appetite, and Delight to rebel against their King, and to worry their Country. It is great Pity these Men should not be taught, by some exemplary Brand, that their Allegiance is not circumscribed within the Four Seas; but that they have Obligations upon them of Duty and Loyalty towards the King, in what Part soever of the World they shall inhabit."

"Their Friends at Home, impatient of long Delays for the Successes they had promised themselves, and for the Succours which others had promised to send to them, made no Doubt of doing the Business themselves, if they could appoint but a lucky Day to begin the Work; and you had heard of them in all Places upon the Third of the last Month (their so much celebrated Third of September), if the great Vigilance and indefatigable Industry of the good General, who is always active for the King's Safety and the Peace of the Kingdom, had not Two Days before apprehended the seditious Leaders, and given Advertisements for the securing others in most Parts of the Kingdom; by the Confessions of many of whom, their wicked Design is enough manifested, and ready for Justice; yet some of the principal Persons are not yet taken, and some others got themselves rescued after they were apprehended."

"My Lords and Gentlemen,"

"Let it not, I beseech you, be said of us, what was heretofore said of the Senate of Rome, when they were prosperous enough, and when they had obtained greater Victories over their Enemies Abroad than we have done, Excellentibus Ingeniis citiùs defuit Ars, quâ Civem regant, quÀm quâ Hostem perdant. Let not those Scorpions be kept warm in our Bosoms till they sting us to Death: Let not those who hate the Government, would destroy the Government, be sheltered under the Shadow and Protection of the Government."

"It is possible, and GOD knows it is but possible, that some Men, who are not Friends to this or that Part of the Government (for you are not to believe that they always discover what in Truth they are most angry with), who would not buy those Alterations they most desire at the Price of a Civil War, they would bring it fairly about, wait for a godly Parliament, and do all by their Consent: Yet those Persons must not take it ill that we cannot desire they should ever have it in their Power to bring those Alterations to pass, by these Means they now seem to abhor; and I do heartily wish, I am sure they will not be the worse Men nor the worse Subjects for it, that they would a little reflect upon what is past, remember how much they have outdone, more than they intended to have done; nay, what they heartily abhorred the Thought of doing; and they will then find, the only Way to preserve themselves innocent is to keep their Minds from being vitiated by the First Impressions, by Jealousies, Murmurings, and Repinings, and above all, by their Conversations with those Men, or Indulgence towards them, who would sacrifice the Peace of the Kingdom to their own Ambition, Pride, and even to their Humour.

If you carefully provide for the suppressing your Enemies at Home, which will put you to little other Expence than of Courage, Constancy, and Circumspection, you will find your Enemies Abroad less exalted, and in a short Time more inclined to live in Amity with you than to make War upon you, especially when they see you do in Bello Pacis gerere Negotium; and that you take the carrying on the War to Heart, as the best and the only Expedient to produce a happy and an honest Peace."

Bill to be prepared for the better preventing the Plague.

Whereas it is evident, by the fresh and sad Experience which most Persons now have through this Kingdom, that the Increase and Spreading of the Pestilence is in Part through the Defect of the Law in that Case made and provided:

It is therefore ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That His Majesty's Attorney General be, and is hereby, appointed to prepare a Bill, to be offered to this House, for the fuller supplying of the said Defects in the Law relating to the Pestilence.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque in diem craftinum, videlicet, diem Jovis, 12um diem instantis Octobris, hora decima Aurora, Dominis sic decernentibus.