House of Lords Journal Volume 17
22 February 1704

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 17: 22 February 1704', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 17: 1701-1705 (1767-1830), pp. 447-453. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=14740 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


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DIE Martis, 22 Februarii.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Arch. Ebor.
Epus. London.
Epus. Wigorn.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Eliens.
Epus. Lich. & Cov.
Epus. Norwic.
Epus. Petrib.
Epus. Gloucestr.
Epus. Oxon.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. St. Asaph.
Ds. Custos Magni Sigilli.
Ds. Godolphin, Thesaurarius.
Comes Pembroke, Præses.
Dux Devonshire, Senescallus.
Dux Somerset.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Northumberland.
Dux Bolton.
Dux Bedford.
Dux Newcastle.
Dux Marlborough.
Comes Carlisle, Marescallus.
Comes Jersey, Camerarius.
Comes Kent.
Comes Bridgewater.
Comes Northampton.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Bolingbroke.
Comes Manchester.
Comes Rivers.
Comes Peterborow.
Comes Winchilsea.
Comes Kingston.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Thanet.
Comes Scarsdale.
Comes Essex.
Comes Anglesey.
Comes Sussex.
Comes Feversham.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Nottingham.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Portland.
Comes Torrington.
Comes Scarbrough.
Comes Bradford.
Comes Romney.
Comes Orford.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Weymouth.
Ds. Lawarr.
Ds. Ferrers.
Ds. Howard Eff.
Ds. North & Grey.
Ds. Grey W.
Ds. Lovelace.
Ds. Mohun.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Culpeper.
Ds. Lucas.
Ds. Rockingham.
Ds. Berkeley.
Ds. Cornwallis.
Ds. Osborne.
Ds. Ossulstone.
Ds. Dartmouth.
Ds. Stawell.
Ds. Guilford.
Ds. Ashburnham.
Ds. Lempster.
Ds. Weston.
Ds. Herbert.
Ds. Haversham.
Ds. Sommers.
Ds. Bernard.
Ds. Halifax.
Ds. Granville.
Ds. Gernsey.
Ds. Gower.

PRAYERS.

Sword-blade Company, Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to discharge the Governor and Company for making hollow Sword Blades in England, of the Sum of Eighteen Thousand Eight Hundred Sixty-four Pounds, Seven Shillings, One Penny Half-penny, by Mistake overcharged in the Purchase-money for several forfeited and other Estates and Interests in Ireland, purchased by them."

ORDERED, That the Consideration of the said Bill be committed to the Lords following; (videlicet,)

Ds. Godolphin, Thesaurarius.
Comes Pembroke, Præses.
Dux Devonshire, Senescallus.
Dux Somerset.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Northumberland.
Dux Bolton.
Dux Bedford.
Comes Carlisle, Marescallus.
Comes Jersey, Camerarius.
Comes Kent.
Comes Bridgewater.
Comes Northampton.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Bolingbroke.
Comes Manchester.
Comes Peterborow.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Winchilsea.
Comes Kingston.
Comes Thanet.
Comes Sunderland.
Comes Scarsdale.
Comes Essex.
Comes Anglesey.
Comes Feversham.
Comes Nottingham.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Portland.
Comes Torrington.
Comes Scarbrough.
Comes Orford.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Weymouth.
Arch. Ebor.
Epus. London.
Epus. Wigorn.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Eliens.
Epus. Lich. & Cov.
Epus. Norwic.
Epus. Petrib.
Epus. Gloucestr.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Oxon.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. St. Asaph.
Ds. Lawarr.
Ds. Ferrers.
Ds. Howard Eff.
Ds. North & Grey.
Ds. Grey W.
Ds. Lovelace.
Ds. Mohun.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Culpeper.
Ds. Rockingham.
Ds. Berkeley.
Ds. Cornwallis.
Ds. Osborne.
Ds. Ossulstone.
Ds. Dartmouth.
Ds. Stawel.
Ds. Guilford.
Ds. Ashburnham.
Ds. Weston.
Ds. Herbert.
Ds. Haversham.
Ds. Sommers.
Ds. Bernard.
Ds. Halifax.
Ds. Granville.
Ds. Gernsey.
Ds. Gower.
Ds. Harvey.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them; to meet on Tuesday the Nine and Twentieth Day of this Instant February, at Ten a Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Sir P. Tyrril's Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to vest the Manor of Hanslop and Castlethrop, and all other the Lands and Hereditaments of Sir Peter Tyrrill Baronet, and Thomas Tyrril Esquire, his Son, in the County of Bucks, in Trustees, to sell Part thereof, for Payment of Debts; and to settle other Lands and Hereditaments there, being of an equal Value, in Lieu of Lands to be sold."

ORDERED, That the Consideration of the said Bill be referred to the Lords Committees aforenamed; their Lordships, or any Five of them; to meet at the same Time and Place.

Sir J. Cooped and Henley's Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable Sir John Cooper Knight, and Anthony Henley Esquire, to make a Partition, and grant building Leases, of several Messuages and Tenements in Lincolne's-InnFields, in the Parishes of St. Giles in the Fields and St. Clement's Danes, in the County of Midd'x."

ORDERED, That the Consideration of the said Bill be referred to the Lords Committees aforenamed; their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet at the same Time and Place.

Barbier & al. Nat. Bill.

The Earl of Stamford reported, from the Lords Committees, the Bill, intituled, "An Act to naturalize "Daniel Barbier, John Kerron du Chesne, and others," as fit to pass, with some Amendments.

Which were read Twice, and agreed to; and Andrew Richier was added by the House, as an Amendment to the said Bill: Which was agreed to; and the Bill ordered to be engrossed, with the said Amendments.

Message from H. C. to return Jarman's Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Freeman and others:

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the vesting of Nine Messuages, in the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields, in the County of Middl'x, being the Estate of William Jarman and Mary his Wife, in Trustees, to be sold; and for settling, in Lieu thereof, a Messuage and certain Lands, in Whipsnade, Tottrenhoe, and Studham, in the County of Bedford;" and to acquaint this House, that they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Papers concerning the Scottish Conspiracy.

Then the House proceeded to read the Papers delivered in by the Earl of Nottingham the 19th Instant, relating to the Scottish Conspiracy; (videlicet,)

Letters from Mr. Stanhope to Mr. Secretary Hedges, with an anonymous one to him.

"Extract of a Letter from Mr. Stanhope to Mr. Secretary Hedges, dated Hague, 920; July, 1703.

"After I had sent my Letters to the Post Tuesday Night, I received the enclosed; which I send you with the Cover, just as I received it: Nor do I know, or can guess, from whom it came. However, the Contents are of such Concern, that I think it my Duty to transmit it to you. I have only this One Remark to make upon it, that it is dated as from Amsterdam, and marked on the Outside Two Stivers for the Post; whereas the Letters from Amsterdam constantly pay Three."

"For the Right Honourable Mr. Stanhope, Envoy and Plenipotentiary from the Queen of England, at The Hague.

"Amsterdam, July 15th, 1703.

"Honoured Sir,

"There is something pernicious to our Queen and Her Government working in England, Scotland, and Ireland; for here are great Remittances of Money from Paris and from Lisle: To the Duke of Hamilton, 50,000 Pistoles; to Sir Robert Hamilton Knight, 25,000 Pistoles; to William Worth Esquire, 25,000 Pistoles: These Two latter are in Ireland. Most of this Money is already drawn for. This Money has passed through my Hands. To appear in this, would ruin me and my Partners. However, this I thought my Duty. Adien."

"Extract of a Letter from Mr. Stanhope to Mr. Secretary Hedges, dated at The Hague, 2031; August, 1703.

"I have heard nothing more of Remittances to Scotland from this Country, Lisle, or any other Part, since the mystical Letter, of which about Two Months ago I sent you the Original. Nothing is come since of that Kind to my Knowledge, either from the same or any other Hand; but since, what has lately happened in that Country makes it suspicious there was some Ground for that First Advice. I will try if, among my Friends at Amsterdam, I can make any farther Discovery; in order to which, if you could send me back that same Letter I sent you, it might be of Use, by the Lights it might give us by the Hand and Character."

"Mrs. Fox's Letter to the Earl of Nottingham.

Mrs. Fox's Letter to the Earl of Nottingham.

"Your Lordship having been pleased to say, "That you would acquaint the Queen with the Reasons I gave for my going and coming back from France," makes me, with the greatest Submission, humbly beg to know, if I may hope the Queen will graciously commiserate my unhappy State, that made me choose so distant a Retreat, and which obliged me, by Necessity, to return.

"I call God Almighty to witness, (to my Knowledge) I never offended the Queen or this Government, except in my coming to England; which Fault was occasioned by my Ignorance and Necessity; being told, "That, since I went with a Pass to France, I safely might return." The Certainty of my wanting Bread in a strange Country if I stayed longer (my little Fortune being in England), and all Commerce being stopped under so great a Penalty, it was impossible for me to hope to get a License, or any Return of Money.

"This, my Lord, I protest, before Almighty God, was the Occasion of my coming, and the only Cause; but, if I am so unfortunate to be represented under an unjust Character, I beg it, as a common Justice, that I may appear Face to Face with my Accuser; your Lordship will then easily judge of my Innocency. But, if nothing but my coming out of France be alledged against me, I can only throw myself at Her Majesty's Feet, and, with the greatest Humility, humbly implore Her Mercy.

"If your Lordship's great Goodness can extend so far to have Compassion for me, it will be the greatest Charity; for Eight Weeks close Consinement, the Change of Air, and drinking differently, has thrown me into so great a Disorder, that to give me Liberty is almost to give me Life; which I should ever, in the most humble Manner, acknowledge as such; being, with the greatest Submission and Veneration,

Jan. 2d, 1704.

"My Lord,

"Your Lordship's most humble and respectful Servant,

"Frances Fox."

"Commission to Lord Lovat, to be Colonel of a Regiment in Scotland.

Commission from the Pretender to L. Lovat, as Colonel of a Regiment in Scotland.

"(L. S.) James R.

"James the Eighth, by the Grace of God, King of Scotland, England, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c. To Our Right Trusty and Well-beloved Symon Lord Lovat, Greeting. We, reposing especial Trust and Confidence in your Loyalty, Courage, and good Conduct, do, by these Presents, constitute and appoint you to be Colonel of a Regiment of Foot, to be raised for Our Service in Our ancient Kingdom of Scotland, and Captain of a Company in the said Regiment. You are, therefore, to take the said Regiment as Colonel, and the said Company as Captain, into your Care and Charge; and duly to exercise as well the Officers as Soldiers thereof in Arms, and to do your utmost Endeavours to keep them in good Order and Discipline: And We do hereby command them to be obedient to you, as their Colonel and Captain; and you to observe and follow such Orders and Directions as you shall from Time to Time receive from Us, or any your superior Officers, according to the Rules and Discipline of War, and in Pursuance of the Trust and Confidence We have hereby reposed in you.

"Given at Our Court at St. Germain's, the 25th Day of February, 1703, and in the Second Year of Our Reign.

"By His Majesty's Command.

"Middleton."

"The Four Gibberish Letters.

Gibberish Letters.

"To my Lord 3.

"Dunes, Morion, mouasadan, lopais emisi pori Savney berin, ca domafadan Menzion dizomerin celo fandar herentiona Zamada, ca sa duso genazadan rezzion Mulin, Olezza Celtis sedi sa percitilis moni Zannimioni Scozon ta bizendar fortidoinenni dus oso Masar Samonin gronion devandi hationes nemegeis Momendi, Zaposi mosion dunis molai manafa Moserrion Torci, ci bizadi sa Mon mentido dunais Ozendionisi, tamen serafad Marones aden punationes senender nu Zamisada, quan bizadi poden airar coni madian mezallioni rozadoi, co sedi veri marzion celo, Ozenafa ta norien dubadi vafanai zan Scoza banton tabeis, Sani zerri munioni co Sennaredi biristi, dan sovi hationes, so marones omegani Zafanda pori premesses, quan unaldri Zessultion Sennaredi Zunon mofiliari, Zaden pozi Mongarezzioni Sani Zerrais etringisi garrioni, ta Vession Celti; point L'argent, point de Swisse, Sebadi sa positili povolei Scozi, cosi Zunaldri jandioni dezota Zornais adenta Silci Seneder innadini mo filiares, aden Cuvantes agrazar Sena coleriones hes piazad ad uni Mezallanai Zaden vandanai, egano Zozenafa gori Preladinis Richlieu masi zonerrioni mezalludos dubadi Zezitan tamin movillion sa lezion, an Scoza, Samogan cosi volar sebistin rozioneis, ta nungi sebadi casion monisti maniando zaden mogomuli Zoticion ventioni, ta Silci Senneradi sumption nungan Celtais, norien Seneradi bonnerion mulisti Zanchefa, Zaden £. 100,000, an Scoza remared Cilion an Flandris; aden suni Rhenion; bizadi tolinden sandir emais argusionisi Zaden men curafad vafar arcules pero zenni rezzioni ca domared Rosioni Celtei Segondi cedafa, Zaden Solioni prositien manafa quan men andisafad emas Argusiones domaradan mension tolindin, talo norien mangodi, mosizegules adiones ponderandi, pisa Sebodi mon, ta banta pordiones ottanender Mongeur vageis balansanldizan artioni Zaden Zurioni Scozei, Zaden eguli Zarezzion celoni voianidi, con cura, Vos Morionezzan carar, aden nagozar ennin andision, duni solari sofensioni, Zadeno repanar ilcios co sebodi libavion dizomeri

"Morion,

June 1st, 1703.

"Vos Morionezza,

"Figellissimo Eslavanti.

"P. S. Vos Morionezza rezalaros Cordeggion enni parcodi Panafan tules calminies enni dremudi."

"To my Lord 7.

"Morion,

"Meda ben tomi gondellion rithman Morioni 3. Menicasudos can zafad subreni Monderion, enno Sibilarin a Zontion dezramienti Zerri gosioni, co zapresan, Tias gradionedi, sahieri zebandioni dunedi ta zafan onnin beruda momendiari zagursioni zabanta dilalin aspartion todeis circulon, anon Junos segar eperdion dubedi, mosi disamienta Zonderri dunemes ca medarodon apisian fobindi Zolezzei zan unnerso Zenno randar hes Malisti proantes andurando, bondia cansibemeden diserrin sel nu profadan mendunion sberadon vonon anonnisi visionais, aden spetiandi sennadioni bennanti sunnicos ottamenta Zuropi bozonder, vonon propotiones, aden solumenta Zafinorodon onniosi, coneggi gunna pisudes libander risumenti duni senionili Zaden volnadi Masioni vona duressiones abermando peculia duna Zacondri prevaladan birezzan diberi Sennadioni ta poligia Scozis Zeverodon nu sa Zonniendi rupedi sanu regonar algunin ogettion seni senionili verbioni, pisiamenti, zaden degorias Zennota crudion Sassoni sa sevin Esbargadon glirar ottamenta senon amsindi sebreni reggionl, Zenno zenni, nusa dubedi zabalar egulin ogettion livandioni vero Tias, pisiamenti vero nadin Berinuda, Zaden Padioni vero Merigian ca baccata dozumendioni Saissonias dimentifadan fenai Scozes safon aventuda Zannoveri pluno Zagurion amentan nonelli dues pligadunes bisunisi bontais, enrica nu decontan, mosi parcion Magaristin durarassar, nami fortindi recasar; guni cedion ochessi nami morionil sennaridi, recasion tani Zabanta sigiones, toda Monados dubender rezziones nonon sorar aden lizar monin omendion co duso ladozozan medar regionessan galisin parcioni degorasi Zanscoza, nulinga V. Mor. cios pisadion egulinden: ebandan, cinicos sennadi Zapropin anbantar ennin ebition odressis, ci nuzafaden dunin provasion sa Zacmilin, Bola hes potar cofedi Zamando peroni hisi, Zacronin novar rubessiones suni ca dubender sa Monin carellan departar cosi sebadi ditambioni hieristin congurdion; sa Celtis olezza decroni pontavad Magaristin avolsion apostandi zemin lugerion, astanti monin anition morinisi Zagezendais, enno pusabilisi Scozon, aden onuctri pruragion an zerri Ronioni, nami sender luzatra, nen vafar ottasindes Birones abrenar Sionell lugerion, enno Zambimanar sa hierin congurdion denetandi senemes peroni Zerraisadurassionisi Zancais anrezander corando Zunamenton hatadon senni dipisudi Zaden comentioni diprovasias; saten as tanti hierin attadion senon rezzioneis antambo Medarod birian prozzandi banta Zoramenta, Zenno surbandiones noduni vafada, sunnerchus coden Bafarisi, coholien Zanimadi zosion sa mon anpudado, cosi libar Novagon meportioni medarod sa Morionil icion codenationi pori revicuda Zemberudos, cosi Zannablar Celtes an bonair guferniones odressi, Zenno tarar Badafes bontisi sionell ci fender nami pusanes nu Zottar provioni dirimion enno pusar sennin lugonon, Jubioni Ebadafeis redusado, celtes dubenodender commanar Saissonisi Zonais anagudi, co bonton sedi pluno pisatili trazanta Tuigin canni Zanderri Saissones, amar sunoden embemezer tasi dubenonder Sara Monsortameden, anpellar sennin Momension aden emes asilar, sara mepordameden an Zenni mull Zosioni, delegelli Zampulsion hes pucharod Jadar Ottamenta suni Scozan aden nigar vingion calen partar despernili debiasioni casi medafa V. Mor. anomerion sibilarin gosioneis astanton, talo Zafa nuden pluni codenco Mobilar, V. Mor mosi Zanorar ta Zampellames Morilin dunin ardion, enno sagadion an travadioni gosioneis nonon assadioni bennanti Zaden degoradion men anferar reverdioni protini semi

"Morion

June 1st, 1703.

"Vo. Mor.

"Figillissimo Eslavanti.

"To Philotheus.

"Sir,

"Dunadan vona zonni Movellion cofedi, solari gunen orradion afa ricar zemberementa duna Ligusen ifadod men alibar, eparbus cadudi men medafad nu penulin demenzion, ovenar agunas sa desendiles cosinen Menzanai zezeton Onellia dunender semaidais, Provisionsi grabasa subrenes Oramuda, ca vasavan medameden Movellion tolindi povellionisi bantais, ifadod hes fenai sendiles, tazafan nunelles parciona zolibar ces deparderod ender Monados seni Marrioni zaden proansia mes safandi, cenza ta sender casqui proantes ci pori Sunecion sionel maladioneis Nami, fuluandan odresses enna debizantes ta zonci debender depunion marrir nu cenzadan familiarin adian erri Masioni cafedi nen Monados didevitar mosi hes grasir, adio zoden Marrimirodon, ebandameden suni tada gravines seramenta cosi sebander medada Zeno cosi sunecistes horioni sender odressis pradameden gronionisti zelu cerudi zenno tepionia an Carudi decritar. Mentazion Maladioneis senon nuzifadod animar ungori Luzameden antini iudion cosi trazzionudi Breda, nu semen, Tias gradionedi ansa camisi peristionais cosi carlo bizuni Zatembo degad gronuden dicibar aden senai zorares dan agauer tricistion suni teras disomines aden positina sannicosiles, cosi senemes an Monistisi peristionas semin sahes rospecularueden ta fendar an mulien pradistisi sennenes, dan Janncrionisi senais semeganti circules paradosci Zatembo febander Molaris Mulionezza an erri ridionia zaden onellia rezafadan adonindi rezzion Nungi diridemado zaden ci boladan mes sa far amendioni fender pusatilindes an onni spetiamenti sendi hes nen fazarodon suni puniarion cozanimameden lugerion semin, enno vozameden son birionisti mosi Garameden nuzan benar nami vesbrenen emis rozion virilis cosi sedi paradus banton onuchis emanarod cosi proandi Nogafa senin garidionezzan povellionisi cunais, ci zoden dezerarodon enno cosi taderod Medar monais dezotudusi movellion onuchin an onnais cosilisi sa Zalimannen nen sunt tazarodi zaden alibarodi delli penniarando lumindes aden anctiles emigias erri prodegion aldudi Morionil nami sennadi masioni seni; zaden acempion, Nen curtaramed errin azeluda conungi pesad poligian senin, adio sen gannulius enno parista nu pederadan errin asumendion fiendilin: cuvata zennes adalguda livia Mareden ta sebodi plumon, sendi zabanta Casimannion, femender suni zegulim stapoin coden hais ci nonza dezaltar fadan mosi zarracar onnion enno disportar hes; ci zafan Marrion perinili sedi sanicosilindi sonen feriandi suntazannion; co zungi supozabado cogudes Berinudos oden vafabadizan Scoza, Zenno nen olamaredi zan odri merigia, bola tadu diventia zozunaremes, erri rezzion sacen duonell ojettamenta sebander sanni Zoriandozennin ebition, co ventuni hes ageramed, bennando delli misi, non semi sarado, duni zamendeoni sa far sa monin casuda zennoduni Lugereoni zaden birias hes anderi can Jourelli Colunatas pon cogurin dinotitian canen febady Zacondrel etri saberi Juriessei co regulinden dunafad venerion cuneis monon mosi nuson sibilaristen, dan,

"V. M."

"Madame,

"An Barando Zaplomenta V. M. colata bonton alazorei V. M. Pontafas men adizar, Sebondi Pensionuda zemin Ovenafa Zaprendi mogo nolin enni ferionin coporadden acona seni facudos aden nenin mangaudia ligazudos so cardionis toran V. M. aden Berinudos seni Vasselgion onni menzion dubami den hi luzar sedi ta conunca Rozion benorod dubimia Zassani meligar senes airoles, nen decarozod vafar banta zan Seni dubimia zaslavar vorin luzerion mosi pori radition tobi logadoi Seni garundi men andizafad nen dubadi zoremar cosion conen Sensridi zan polemudi seni, pratar hen labafa ta sebadi Solumindi prassi tazemon airotes degitameden guni pordion olingi nunca Zosemeden nadellion suni noron libuda ta conjurion afandi Sinion zonderri casamed Celtian an bini Sagudioni cosioneis noron, ridisafad ta doubadi nuploni zespar vafamared banta Zanseni biria mosi pori moniande guni cosion dezota Lopar Senin bansafad senai sannicosilindi zes frenai can hen palafata Cardion dinorin afamared, alazarindi ridisafad ta cujamed nola pratudes errais cei sabadi ligasus Senis aslavar ca Casamared Bansiones dunerionis moni ai Zenni buneorioni V. M. aprezanta sa zalazorenin Ortadion bunzafa nen ovurdadad, hen colar aploni zan rezioni cohen vafafad Sa Malonin, his sedi debiorundi biron dagarodias enni Suni con V. M. Zacridioni pilamares abonafa Morion Momerion raliguneis in hortudon emeis taden afa nuploni lionar V. M. mosi zojunar an abansion gabar erra zodumenta ca zaposabander pori zubreni gondellion cadunder morindi Merzion andegria moubolenti parcioni sunoneis voron medar enni bozar Rosionis casuda sani berin zodian ventionis zuos pervelion sedi Zoramuda dizares

"V. M.

London, Octob, 819;,

Figellissimo Omilindi

Sunonei aden Eslavanti.

"Philarchus."

"The Letter of the late Queen, at St. German's, to L. M. Y.

Letter from the late Queen, at St. Germain's.

"May 20th.

"You may be sure that, when my Concerns require the Help of my Friends, you are One of the First I have in my View. I am satisfied, you will not be wanting for any Thing that may be in your Power, according to your Promise; and you may be assured of all such Returns as you can expect from Me and Mine. The Bearer, who is known to you, will tell you more of My Friendship to you, and how much I rely on yours for Me and those I am concerned for.

"M.

"To L. M. Y."

Letters from the Duke of Queensberry to the Queen.

"Extract of a Letter from the Duke of Queensberry to the Queen.

"Holy Rood House, Aug't 11th, 1703.

"I presumed lately to acquaint Your Majesty, "That I had seen some Letters from a Gentleman come from France, in which he spoke with some Assurance of overturning the Government here." Since that Time, those who received the Letters asked Liberty from me to meet that Gentleman, that they might try if they could learn any Thing that might be useful to Your Majesty's Service: Which I yielded to; and One of them had a long Conference with him, of which I have given Your Majesty an Account, in a Memorial herewith transmitted; and I beg of Your Majesty, that it may be kept as secret, and made known to as few, as may be. I am not yet allowed to name the Persons; but, if Your Majesty commands me, I must obey.

"God knows whether the Story be true or false; but my Author is a Man of that Quality and Integrity, that I dare assure Your Majesty there is neither Mistake nor Trick on his Part. And this I must say farther, that there are several Points related in the Memorial that are otherwise confirmed; for I have seen a Letter to Brigadier Maitland, from One of his Officers, wherein he tells him, "That he had Intelligence of a Highland Hunting, where Six Hundred of the best of the Laird of Grant's Men were to be in Arms; and the Duke of Hamilton and the Marquis of Athol were to be there." This Letter I have sent to Mr. Nairn. Major General Buchan acknowledges, "That one Mackenzie was put into The Bastile before he came away." Besides, the total Desertion of all the Cavaliers, except my Lords of Balcaras and Wigtoun and Dunmore, at that Instant, when these last Orders came from France, and their joining in all Things contrary to the Prerogative of the Crown, with the Vote this Day of arming of the Country, do mightily instruct this Declaration; and it agrees pretty well with the Advertisement Mr. Stanhope had about Money to be sent hither. But, whatever is in the Matter, I thought it my Duty to represent it to Your Majesty.

"I must beg Leave to know from Your Majesty, if that Person shall apply to me, and be willing to own what he has said, how I shall use him. It is strange enough, that in his Circumstances he should have said so much; and it can hardly be expected, that he will forfault what he may expect from France, without getting some Terms from Your Majesty."

"Extract of a Letter from the Duke of Queensberry to the Queen.

"Holyrood House, September the 25th, 1703.

"I have seen that Person of whom I formerly made Mention to Your Majesty; he confirms all that he had said to those Persons who had dealt betwixt us, and adds many Things more. He says, "He was let into all the Secrets of the Correspondence of Scots-men with St. Germain's;" and tells plainly, "That very many do correspond there." I am bound to tell Your Majesty (though I ought not to believe him), that he says, "He saw a Letter last Winter, written by my Lord Tarbat to my Lord Middleton; bearing, that he was made Secretary of State; and that, in a short Time, the Duke of Queensberry was to be shifted out, so as he was to be sole Secretary, and would have all the Management of Scots Business in his Hands; that, to secure their Friends, there would be a general Indemnity past, and the North Country and Highlands would be made all of a Piece; that the Duke of Queensberry had received Five Thousand Pounds from the Family of Hanover; that my Lord Middleton said, "He knew the Duke of Hamilton was capable to be bribed; but did not believe the Duke of Queensberry would have taken Money." He declares, "That Mr. Ogelby of Boyn has frequent Correspondence, which he begun when he went over to France about his Marble;" yet I must do this Gentleman the Right to tell Your Majesty, that he did behave himself fairly in the Parliament; and there was none of the Gentlemen, who called themselves Cavaliers, that did keep their Words so well to me as he did. He declares, "That there were Three Letters written by the late Queen at St. German's; whereof One was directed to the Duke of Hamilton, as Earl of Arran, which was delivered by one Captain James Murray; the other was committed to the Person himself, to deliver to the Duke of Gordon, which he actually did, before he had entered into any Correspondence with me; and the Third was directed to the Lord Murray, now Marquis of Athol, which was not delivered when he began this Correspondence; and that he found the Way to be Master of that Letter before it was delivered;" which he gave to me, and I have transmitted to Your Majesty without breaking the Seal, which is clear the Effigies of the King Your Majesty's Father. This Person is willing to come to London, and to give what Accounts he knows, provided he may do it secretly; and he offers to return to France, and discover all the Correspondence and Designs; but says, "If he falls under Observation, or that he be discovered, he runs the Risque to be broke on the Wheel." He says, "What Money is transmitted yet from France, is only for the Use of some particular Persons; and that it comes by Bills to London, and brought hither in Specie.

"I confess, it is hard to think how one should know, or be ready to reveal, so much; yet the delivering of that principal Letter, and the shewing his own Commission, under the Hand and Seal of the Prince of Wales, as King James the Eighth and Third, which, he says, was the First Paper sealed with his new Seal; these do give Credit to what else could not have been so well trusted. And he says, "He has a Commission as Major General from the French King, which lies there, that it might give no Offence, till once the Forces designed were raised." I thought it necessary to entertain him with some Money, till Your Majesty do signify Your farther Pleasure about him."

Letter from Hamilton to General Maitland, about a Rising in the North.

"To the Right Honourable Brigadier General Maitland, Governor of Fort William; to the Care of Captain Maitland, Agent to the aforesaid Brigadier's Regiment at Edinburgh.

"Right Honourable,

"I wrote to you Tuesday last, in Answer to your Letter to me; but I neglect to acquaint you of our News here. The Thing is, there is a Match of Hunting to be, as is said, against the Second next Month, amongst several of our great Folks; particularly the Duke of Hamilton is to be there, the Marquis of Atholl, and our Neighbour the Laird of Grant, who has ordered Six Hundred of his Men in Arms, in good Order, with Tartan-coats, all of One Colour and Fashion. This is his Orders to his People in Strathspey. If it be a Match at Hunting only, I know not; but I think it my Duty to acquaint you, whatever may fall out, of any such Body of Men in Arms, particularly in our Northern Parts. My humble Duty to your Lady. I am,

"Right Honourable,

"Your obedient Servant,

Inverness, 23d July, 1703.

"James Hamilton."

"Mr. Keith's Narrative, Jan. 3d, 1703/4.

Mr. Keith's Narrative.

"My Lords,

"Though it has been my Misfortune to know Things very disagreeable to my Inclinations and Principles, but which neither my Notion of Honour, nor the natural Duty I owe to my Relations and Friends, would before allow me to divulge, or make known to your Lordships; yet, left my Infirmity, in pushing a Principle of Honour too far, should in the least prejudice the Service I owe to my Sovereign the Queen, or Her Government, I thought it the wisest and safest Course, to lay the following Narration of Matter of Fact before your Lordships; and to depend entirely upon your Honour, in treating me as a Gentleman, who always (fn. *) has, to the best of (fn. *) my Knowledge, acted as a Man of Honour and good Principles, with an impartial Regard to all the World.

"Captain John Murray, who arrived here from France in June last, being my very near Relation and Friend, communicated to me the following Story:

"That Captain Simon Frazer and himself were come over with joint Instructions and Credentials from the Courts of France and St. German's, including an indefinite Promise of Money and Arms, to support an Insurrection in Scotland, for King James the Eighth.

"The Families and Persons they were to address themselves to were, as I understood, entirely left to their own Prudence and Choice, according as they could inform themselves of People's Inclinations; nor did I hear of any Letter they had, except from my Lord Perth to his Son my Lord Drummond; for I understood the Draught of their general Credential Letter from St. German's was such, as not only required Duty and Allegiance from every individual Person to whom it should be produced, but also an entire Belief of these Two Gentlemens Relations of Things; which Contrivance was designed, not only to avoid the Inconveniency of writing to some, and not to others; but also for the greater Encouragement, Safety, and Security, of such who should engage themselves by their Words of Honour to these Gentlemen, which was held equivalent to any Writ. After Captain Murray had related this Matter, with some Difficulty he prevailed with me to see his Colleague Frazer, who lodged then at an Inn in Fen Church Strect; and he told me the same Story, only with more Vanity, being mighty proud of the Assurances the French King had given him, from His own Mouth, to support him in this Undertaking, let the Number of Men be never so small.

"I, knowing the State of Britain a little better than any of them, was very sensible of the Folly and Madness of their vain and presumptuous Attempt; wherefore, so soon as I got my Uncle Captain Murray by himself, I thought it my Duty to endeavour all I could, for his own Safety, to make him give over his Part of the Matter: But, instead of prevailing with him, he endeavoured as much as was possible to engage me to go down to Scotland with them; he and Frazer both judging that I might be a proper Instrument to sound the Inclinations of the Duke of Hamilton, the Earls of Erroll and Marischall, all whom they designed to assault: But they soon perceived it was in vain to attack my Principles upon that Side; and so, after several Meetings, we parted, without any other Agreement or Condition, but that Murray should give me an Account, as far as was safe, by Letters, of what passed in Scotland.

"The First Letter I had was from Durham; which contained nothing but an Account of their Arrival there, and of Captain Murray's Design to leave Frazer at Newcastle, who, because of his Circumstances, was to take some private Way of getting into The Highlands of Scotland with Safety. I had afterwards several Letters from Murray, dated at Edinburgh, wherein he complained much of the Crossness of his Affairs in general; and particularly, that the Duke of Hamilton, the Earls of Erroll and Marischall, instead of being Friends to his Affairs, proved its greatest Enemies; and I remember in One Letter he said, "That he found there was more Ground than he expected, for what I had told him concerning the Difference of People's Thoughts and Inclinations now, from what they were in the late Reign." I had also several Letters from his Brother Robert Murray to the same Purpose; but they all referred particular Accounts to Frazer, who was then upon his Road hither; and who sent for me, so soon as he came to Town, to Clarke's House, where he lodged. I was several Times with him, both at his Lodgings and the Tavern; he had a Brother of his own and one Captain Frazer along with him; the last came from France with him, and is his close Attendant. The Accounts he gave me are as follows; and the several Figures prefixed serve to mark so many different Meetings, for the knowing more distinctly what passed each Time.

"1. "As to my public Affair, said he, the Highlanders were not so frank as I expected; however, I have engaged some, having carried them to my Lord Drummond's House, where we held a Council, by virtue of our Credential Letters, and have concerted Matters as far as was possible; but we found that there was no engaging People upon simple Assurances and Promises; wherefore there was a Necessity for my returning to France, to have some other Course taken for making it more effectual; nor can I think of any, said he, but forthwith to send such Supplies of Money and Arms as shall be found necessary: As for your Uncle Captain Murray's Affair with the Gentlemen of The Low Country, I can give you no Account; for we were all so taken up in dispatching my Business with the Highlanders, in order to my speedy Return, that he was scarce begun to move in any Thing, before I came off. But he will certainly see you as he passes this Way; so that I must refer you to him for that Part of the Story, which you will know sooner than I can myself."

"2. "Who do you think, said he, was with me Yesterday, but Ferguson, who entertained me with a long Story of Politicks; the Sum of which was, "That the Duke of Marlborough and my Lord Treasurer knew every Thing that passed at St. Germain's, by a Correspondence with the Duke of Berwick;" of whom (meaning the D. of Berwick), Ferguson told me, "He knew as much as could take his Head in France;" but would tell me nothing of Particulars. "I did not, indeed, (said Frazer) jealous the D. of Berwick; but I have all along been afraid of my Lord Middleton's corresponding with some great Men here in England, upon a Design of getting King James the 8th called Home by the Parliament; which, said he, is so ridiculous a Project, that, if it is entertained by the D. of Marlborough or my Lord Treasurer, they can do it for no other End, but to impose and put a Sham upon my Lord Middleton, or any Man that could be guilty of so much Simplicity." This, to me, was so odd a Story, that I asked him, "What Ground he had for these Suspicions of my Lord Middleton?" He answered, "He could not indeed prove it upon my Lord Middleton; but that he had Reason to suspect him, not only because of the Opposition he made against his coming over at this Time; but also that he perceived my Lord Middleton's Creatures and Emissaries on this Side the Water built all their Arguments upon modeling the Minds of the People for a Restoration, opposing and ridiculing any Thing of Force by Arms; without which, (said he) the Thing is plainly impossible."

"3. "I asked Him, "How it came that Captain Murray had done nothing during the Time they had been absent from one another, especially at Edinburgh; the Parliament being then met, and a great Concourse of People there?" He answered, "That Murray had, by very indirect and hidden Ways, got some Person to sound the Inclinations of the D. of Hamilton, the D. of Athol, the Earl of Seafield, and my Lord Tarbat; but that there was nothing to be expected from any of them; so that he did not think it fit to make any farther Trial, for Fear of a Discovery.."

"4. "Now, said he, that I have told all that concerns my Public Affair, I will surprise you a little with an Account how I have been able to live these Two Years by-past, having no Estate of my own; so he pulled out of his Pocket-book some very passionate and obliging Letters of my Lord Leven, assuring him of the greatest Friendship, and that he had always £. 500. at his Command." I asked him, "How long this Acquaintance and Correspondence had been betwixt them?" He answered, "That they had been acquainted a great while; but the First Money ever he had received from my Lord Leven was when he went last Abroad; and that, if it had not been for £. 200. he got at that Time from him, he should not have known how to have lived: For whatever Party he may be of (said he) that is nothing to me; such a Friendship as this is not to be neglected. It is true (said he) I have had at this Time £. 150. of my Lord Drummond; but that would never have done my Business, if my Lord Leven at this Time had not been so kind to advance me £. 100. more." "But, said I, does my Lord Leven know what you are about?" Yes; know! said he; you shall see how I manage your great Men;" and so he pulls out the Duke of Queensberry's Pass from Scotland. "It was my Lord Leven (said he) that brought this Duke and me together; and they both know my Business; nor can they blame me, since my Circumstances are so desperate. The Duke indeed did all he could to reclaim me; promising me my Pardon from the Queen, and a Company in the Troops. But I answered him, "That I could not at this Time accept of his kind Offers; but that, if my present Attempt failed, I would then heartily comply, and do him what Service I could: And sure no Man can blame me, to do what I can for myself, if this Design fails for the Service of my Prince. I was last Night (said he) with the Duke of Queensberry; who tells me, "That Affairs don't go so easily with him as he could wish; he swears, That, if the Queen don't continue him to have the Direction of all Scottish Affairs, he is resolved to go Home, and live quietly at his own Country Seat." In the First Case, he has promised me all Favour imaginable, whenever I please to come Home and live peaceably; but, ifthe last be his Fate, he says, it is indifferent to him what Disturbance I make. In short, said he, I laugh at all these Things; and design to make no other Use of him but to get me a Pass for Holland, which he has promised."

"5. Our last Meeting was the Day he went off; there was nothing material occurred, more than what I have here related to your Lordships: In every minute Circumstance of which, I have been so particular, that there was no avoiding a little Confusion; which I hope your Lordships will pardon, upon the Consideration that I have taken most Care, in telling not only the real Truth, but even the verbal Expressions, so far as my Memory could preserve them; and, I believe, I may venture to say, That, except such who have been present and concerned in this Matter, there are none who can give you a clearer Account of the Rise and Progress of the whole Story thus far. For my own Part, I have all along kept myself free from meddling either by Word or Writ in the Matter; nor could any Thing have made me conceal it so long, but Captain Murray, who is my Uncle and particular Friend, being concerned in it; whose Life if it can but be saved, I don't despair, with your Lordships Assistance, to discover every particular Man that has been concerned in it; for, if Captain Murray be within the Island, as I can't doubt but he is, so far as Honour will allow, or your Lordships can desire me, I am willing to serve the Queen and Government in this Matter, without the Expectation or Hope of any Thing, but that Her Majesty the Queen and your Lordships may be satisfied of my Duty and real Affection to the Government, as well as my being a Man of Honour and good Principles."

***Memorandum, There were several other Papers delivered in, which the Lords thought not material.

And, upon Consideration thereof, the following Orders were made:

Committee to examine further concerning the Scottish Conspiracy:

"ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Lord Steward, the Duke of Somerset, Earl of Sunderland, Earl of Scarborough, Lord Viscount Townshend, Lord Wharton, and Lord Somers, shall be, and are hereby appointed to be, a Committee to examine farther into the Scottish Conspiracy; and have hereby Power to send for Persons and Papers as they shall see Cause; and they, or any Four of them, to meet, when, where, and as often as, they shall think fit and report to the House when they please; and that the Papers now before the House relating therennto be delivered to the said Committee."

Campbell and Mrs. Fox, to be committed to the Black Rod:

"It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, his Deputy or Deputies, do forthwith take into his or their Custody or Custodies the Bodies of Colin Campbell and Mrs. Frances Fox (now in the Messengers Hands); and that they be not allowed Pen, Ink, or Paper, nor any Person or Persons to speak with them, without Leave from the Lords Committees appointed to examine into the Scottish Conspiracy."

Persons committed for the Conspiracy, to be closely confined.

"It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That all the Officers or Keepers in whose Custody any Person or Persons, who are committed in relationto the Scottish Conspiracy, do keep the Prisoner or Prisoners in their Custody in safe and close Confinement; and not allow any Person or Persons to speak with them, nor allow them Pen, Ink, or Paper, without Leave of this House."

Adjourn.

Dominus Custos Magni Sigilli declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Mercurii, vicesimum tertium diem instantis Februarii, hora undecima Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Footnotes

* Sic.