House of Lords Journal Volume 62
11 May 1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 62: 11 May 1830', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 62: 1830, pp. 361-380. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16345 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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Contents

Die Martis, 11 Maii 1830.
Hamerton's Divorce Bill.
Mullins et al. v. Townsend.
Navy Pay Bill.
Richmond Lunatic Asylum (Dublin) Bill.
Standon Inclosure Bill.
Stafford Improvement Bill.
Kingston-upon-Hull & Hedon Road Bill.
Charminster Inclosure Bill.
Wareham Roads Bill.
Portman Market Bill.
Sankey Brook Navigation Bill.
Little Bolton Improvement Bill.
Hollingrake's Patent Bill.
St. Helens & Runcorn Gap Railway Bill.
Peebles Roads Bill.
Cromford Bridge Road Bill.
Derby Roads Bill.
Manchester Improvement Bill.
Tweed Fisheries Bill.
Monks Risborough Inclosure Bill.
Dunham Bridge Bill.
Ashburton Roads Bill.
Tiverton Roads Bill.
New Sarum Poor Rates Bill.
Port Crommelin Harbour Bill.
Great Dover Street, &c. Improvement Bill.
Bogs Draining (Ireland) Bill.
Hollingrake's Patent Bill referred to a Select Comee:
Comee to appoint a Chairman.
Foreign Trade with China, Account of, delivered, & referred to
East India Com ee.
East India, &c. Trade, Petitions from Prescot & Belfast for opening, referred to East India Com ee.
Corn Spirits, Petitions against additional Duty on:
Clackmannanshire Union Agricultural Society: Shilbourne: Shilmalier:
Gorey:
Bantry:
Forth:
Bargy:
Scarawalsh:
Ballaghkeen:
Tullamore.
Criminal Laws, Petitions from Great Yarmouth & Great Bardfield for Alteration of.
Newspapers, (Ireland,) Petition of Newspaper Proprietors against further Duty on.
Hops, Accounts respecting, Ordered.
Northern Road Commissioners, Petition of Trustees of Hitchin Road & Inhabitants of Bedford against Appointment of.
Tithe Laws, Petition from Gissing for Alteration of.
Poor Laws, Petition from Ireland for Extension of, to Ireland.
Sir G. Chetwynd's Estate Bill:
Message to H. C. with it.
Peebles Statute Labour Bill:
Blacktoft, &c. Inclosure Bill:
Whitesheet Hill Road Bill:
Messages to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to the 3 preceding Bills.
Leeds & Selby Railway Bill:
Message to H. C. with Amendments to it.
East India Comee, further Report of Evidence.
Pensions granted, & Salaries abolished, Accounts respecting, Ordered forthwith.
Shakerley's Divorce Bill.
Parochial Registers (Scotland) Bill.
Rawlings's Estate Bill, Monck to attend the Com ee.
Franklen's Estate Bill, Witnesses to attend the Com ee.
9th Report from Appeal Com ee.
Bulkley v.Wilford, Appellant's Petition for further Time for his Case, referred to Appeal Com ee.
Russell v. D. of Bedford et al: Same v. same: Appellant's Petition to advance the Causes, referred to Appeal Com ee.
Richardson to enter into a Recogee on Burns & Griers' Appeal.
Sir M. P.Stewart v. Porterfield.
The Provost of Dingwall et al. v. Mackenzie & Munro.
Bp. London's Estate Bill.
Ashbourne & Sudbury Roads Bill.
Foston Bridge Road Bill.
Mansfield & Chesterfield Road Bill.
Limerick Hospital Bill.
Motions relative to the Poor Laws &
their Administration, moved & withdrawn.
Comee on Wayte's Petition for a Bill to annual the Marriage of Elizabeth Hickson.
East Retford Election Bill:
Witnesses discharged from further Attendance on it.
Werneth, &c. Roads Bill.
Adjourn.
Footnotes

Die Martis, 11 Maii 1830.

DOMINI tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Dux CUMBERLAND.
Archiep. Cantuar
Ds. Lyndhurst,
Cancellarius.
Epus. Londinen.
Epus. Lich. et Cov.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Bristol.
Epus. Carliol.
Epus. Roffen.
Epus. Oxon.
Ds. De Clifford.
Ds. Willoughby de Broke.
Ds. Petre.
Ds. Clifton.
Ds. Teynham.
Ds. Colville of Culross.
Ds. Napier.
Ds. Boyle.
Ds. King.
Ds. Monson.
Ds. Montfort.
Ds. Grantham.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Montagu.
Ds. Braybrooke.
Ds. Gage.
Ds. Auckland.
Ds. Dawnay.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. Rolle.
Ds. Bayning.
Ds. Ribblesdale.
Ds. Fitz Gibbon.
Ds. Carbery.
Ds. Dufferin & Claneboye.
Ds. Dunalley.
Ds. Ellenborough.
Ds. Arden.
Ds. Sheffield.
Ds. Barham.
Ds. Mont Eagle.
Ds. Manners.
Ds. Hill.
Ds. Meldrum.
Ds. Melbourne.
Ds. Prudhoe.
Ds. Ormonde.
Ds. Glenlyon.
Ds. Ravensworth.
Ds. Bexley.
Ds. Penshurst.
Ds. Wharncliffe.
Ds. Feversham.
Ds. Tenterden.
Ds. Clanwilliam.
Ds. Durham.
Ds. Skelmersdale.
Comes Bathurst, Præses.
Comes Rosslyn, C. P. S.
Dux Norfolk, Marescallus.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Leeds.
Dux Wellington.
March. Lansdowne.
March. Salisbury.
March. Bute.
March. Anglesey.
Comes Derby.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Winchilsea & Nottingham.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Albemarle.
Comes Rosebery.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Hardwicke.
Comes De Lawarr.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Mansfield.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Malmesbury.
Comes Caledon.
Comes Limerick.
Comes Charleville.
Comes Harewood.
Comes Minto.
Comes Verulam.
Comes Brownlow.
Comes Morley.
Comes Beauchamp.
Comes Howe.
Comes Stradbroke.
Comes Vane.
Comes Amherst.
Vicecom. Arbuthnott.
Vicecom. Maynard.
Vicecom. Duncan.
Vicecom. St. Vincent.
Vicecom. Melville.
Vicecom. Lorton.
Vicecom. Gordon.
Vicecom. Goderich.

PRAYERS.

Hamerton's Divorce Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the further Consideration and Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of William Medows Hamerton Esquire with Isabella Frances his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes; and for the Lords to be summoned;

Counsel were accordingly called in.

Mr. Harrison stated, "That he understood that Mrs. Matthews was in attendance; that she was examined in the Ecclesiastical Court as a Witness adverse to the Petitioner; that she stands therefore in a Situation in which it would be his Duty to cross-examine her, being called by the House, if she gave Evidence against the Petitioner, and to contradict her Evidence, if necessary; that the Servants were adverse Witnesses in the Ecclesiastical Court, but in consequence of the Examinations not being known to the Petitioner previous to Publication, there had been no Means of cross-examining Mrs. Matthews upon the Circumstances stated by those Witnesses. That he had another Witness attending, who could prove Adultery to have been committed in France."

The Counsel was informed, "That he might examine Mrs. Matthews not as his Witness, but having reference to that she had sworn in the Ecclesiastical Court."

Then Mrs. Mary Matthews was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Were you acquainted with Major and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes."

"Did you live at Cheltenham in the Years 1826 and 1827?"

"Yes."

"Was Mrs. Hamerton in the habit of frequently coming to your House?"

"Yes."

"Was Mr. Bushe also in the habit of frequently coming to your House in the Years 1826 and 1827?"

"Mr. Bushe was an occasional Visitor."

"Was Mr. Bushe only an occasional Visitor, or a frequent Visitor?"

"An occasional Visitor."

"Did Mr. Bushe meet Mrs. Hamerton at your House?"

"In the Visits Mr. Bushe has paid me, he has at Times been there when she was there, and they have seen each other in my House as Visitors only."

"You are aware that Major Hamerton disapproved of the Acquaintance between Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"No."

"Were you never apprised in any way by Mrs. Hamerton or Mr. Hamerton himself that he disapproved of those Visits?"

"No."

"Did Major Hamerton never come to your House when Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton were there at the Time?"

"I am not aware of any particular Time."

"Do you remember Major Hamerton calling upon one Occasion in which Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton were in the House, and being let in?"

"Yes, I do."

"Did Major Hamerton then see Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton at your House?"

"Yes; they were both at my House as Visitors; and Major Hamerton came to take his Wife. Mrs. Hamerton and Mr. Bushe called to pay me a Morning Visit, and Major Hamerton came to take Mrs. Hamerton out to pay some Morning Visits, and took Mrs. Hamerton away."

"Do you mean to say that Major Hamerton never expressed to you any Disapprobation of the Acquaintance between Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"No; I have no Recollection of any thing of that kind being expressed."

"Do you remember, on another Occasion, Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton being at your House, and Major Hamerton coming towards the House, and Mr. Bushe retiring up Stairs?"

"No, I am not aware of any thing of that kind ever having happened in my House."

"Do you mean to state solemnly, that no such Transaction ever took place in your House?"

"I do not understand you."

"The Question is, whether on one Occasion when Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton were sitting together in your Parlour, on seeing Major Hamerton approach the House, Mr. Bushe did not retire, and remain out of the Room during the Time of Major Hamerton having been there?"

"I am not aware of any such Transaction having occurred at my House."

"Do you venture to say that no such Thing took place?"

"I do venture to state, certainly, that I have no Knowledge of such a Transaction taking place."

"You do not venture to state that no such Transaction took place?"

"Yes, I do, that I have no Recollection of such a Transaction having taken place."

"You may have no Recollection of it, and yet it may have taken place?"

"Yes, certainly; I am not aware of such a Transaction having taken place."

"Do you remember upon any Occasion on which Mrs. Hamerton was dining with you, Mr. Bushe calling upon you shortly after you had sat down to Dinner?"

"I remember it perfectly well, in consequence of an Act of Disobedience of my Servant; there was a general Order given not to be at Home; and Mrs.Hamerton came in when I was sitting down to a sort of Luncheon, a solitary Pigeon; having made an Engagement to go with her after Dinner to meet her Mother, who was then expected that Day in Town, I had given an Order not to be at Home; but to Mrs. Hamerton and Major Hamerton I was always at Home; consequently Mrs. Hamerton was let in, and was in the Parlour with me, and Mr. Bushe did call, and my Servant ushered him up into the Drawing-room. I was not in that sort of Dress that I wished to receive a Visitor, and I was rather annoyed. Mrs. Hamerton, as a mere Act of Politeness and Civility, said, I will go up into the Room and wait 'till you go and put on your Pelisse and your Hat, as we were to be ready to go and take a Drive. I was out a very few Minutes to put on my Pelisse and my Hat. I just gave an Order to the Servant before I went up, and was very shortly after in the Room Mrs. Hamerton and Mr. Bushe were those few Minutes in the Room, which annoyed me; but I then had no Notion of any Intelligence between Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton. I did not suppose any thing wrong, nor could any thing have passed, for the Latch of the Door was out of Repair, and the Door would not shut. It was a very accidental Occurrence, and which might have occurred in any Family. Mrs. Hamerton was so intimate with me, that as mere Matter of Politeness she said, I will go up and tell Mr. Bushe you will wait upon him; that is all the Recollection I have of that Circumstance, and perhaps I might not have recollected it so well if I had not been engaged to meet her Mother that Day."

"Was Mrs. Hamerton in the habit of coming to your House, and riding out in one of the Cheltenham Carriages in the Course of the Morning?"

"Mrs. Hamerton was a very dear and particular Friend; she was in the habit of coming to me at all Hours and all Times; and I occasionally drove out with Mrs. Hamerton in a little open Carriage."

"Do you recollect the Name of the Man whose Carriage was generally employed?"

"No; because we did not employ One only; you cannot get those Vehicles at your Command at Cheltenham; you are obliged to take them as they are disengaged. I never knew the Name of any Man who drove me out."

"Did you know a Man of the Name of Fletcher?"

"I really do not know; driving out in those common Hacks, I did not generally ask the Name of the Driver who drove us out; it is very possible it might be."

"Did Mr. Bushe continually meet Mrs. Hamerton in the Course of your Drives?"

"No, certainly not."

"Do you mean to state distinctly, that when you rode out in that Way with Mrs. Hamerton, in one of those Carriages - the Carriage of Fletcher, Mr. Bushe was not constantly in the habit of meeting you in the Course of your Ride round?"

"I mean to say, no, positively. We rode round Cheltenham; those who know the Place know they can never go far without meeting every body; it is a small Circle of Drives; they will meet the same Persons Five-and-twenty Times a Day; and Mr. Bushe may have seen us in that Way, but not otherwise."

"The Question did not allude to seeing in that Way, but whether he did not join you and get into Conversation with Mrs. Hamerton. Not whether you saw him casually, but whether he did not upon those Occasions constantly join you and enter into Conversation with Mrs. Hamerton?"

"I can state this, that we were in the habit of taking a Drive occasionally, and as I was an Invalid, not a good Walker, we very frequently stopped at Thompson's Wells to hear the Music. It was more the Fashion to do that than to walk on the Promenade; and I used to sit in preference, with other genteel Carriages; there were Twenty or Thirty in an Evening; and during that Time Mr. Bushe may have come up to my Carriage as he did to others, and I dare say he did; such a trifling Circumstance as that could hardly be kept in Recollection, and I have no doubt he may have done so."

"The Question is, whether that did not constantly occur upon every one of those Occasions. Did not Mr. Bushe join you for the Purpose of entering into Conversation with Mrs. Hamerton?"

"I declare solemnly, no, most solemnly."

"Do you remember on one Occasion Mr. Bushe joining you at the Sherborne Spa; upon one of those Occasions when you were riding out in the Carriage belonging to this Man Fletcher?"

"No, I do not; I have no Recollection exactly of that or any other particular Occasion."

"The Occasion alluded to is, when Mr. Bushe met Mrs. Hamerton, and afterwards went to a Place called Pitville."

"I have no Recollection of Mr. Bushe meeting Mrs. Hamerton and me at Sherborne Spa at the Time that we went to Pitville."

"Do you remember on any Occasion going to Pitville with Mrs. Hamerton?"

"I do."

"Do you remember Mr. Bushe meeting you at Pitville?"

"Mr. Bushe, with other Gentlemen, came up to the Carriage; but I must only answer, I suppose."

"Did Mrs. Hamerton, on his coming up to the Carriage, get out of the Carriage and walk away with Mr. Bushe?"

"Mr. Bushe came to the Carriage, and asked me whether I would get out to see this new Building; it was then in the rough; a very small Walk round which led to this Building, and was considered a very fine Thing, the Prospect being beautiful; he asked me whether I had ever seen it; I was taking a Drive and mounting up the Hill; "Ladies, have you ever seen this; will you get out and look at it?" I said, "No, Sir, I have no Wish, for I am not well."

"Did Mrs. Hamerton get out and walk away with Mr. Bushe?"

"Mrs. Hamerton said, "I should like to see it;" and did get out of the Carriage and made one little Circle round that Building, about a Quarter the Size of this Room; it was not Pitville then; and in my Sight as well as that of others."

(By a Lord.) "How long was she absent from the Carriage?"

"About Five Minutes."

"Was she out of your Sight?"

"Never. Pitville at that Time was a small Place in the rough; Mrs. Hamerton made one Turn round it, and went into this Door and came out at that; it occupied about Five Minutes, and she was never out of my Sight except that Five Minutes that they passed from that Door to this, and immediately came down to my Carriage. It was a very simple Occurrence, and I certainly did not attach any Consequence to it. Mrs. Hamerton was never out of my Sight; there were Workpeople in the House, and there were several People all around."

(By Counsel.) "At what Hour in the Evening were you there?"

"It might have been between Six and Seven; it was the general Hour for driving about; at least, my general Hour."

"Are you sure it was not later than that?"

"I am sure it was not later."

"Pitville was not then finished?"

"It was not finished. I asked the Lady what she saw, whether it was pretty; she said, "Nothing particular; there is no Floor laid."

"Am I to understand that Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton were not in that House?"

"You are to understand that Mrs. Hamerton made one single Round that very small Spot, about a Quarter of the Size of this Room, and went into that Door to look at the Building, and she passed through the other, and came down to my Carriage instantaneously."

"Will you venture to state that no more Time was occupied than by the Parties walking round that Building in the Way you describe?"

"I can venture to state that most solemnly."

"Can you, from your Recollection, venture to state that there were any Workmen remaining at Work at the Time you were at Pitville?"

"I do not know whether the Workmen were remaining at Work; I know there were Objects round, and several Persons standing on a Wall by a new-made Bridge; the only Question I asked was, the natural Question, "What is there to be seen;" she said, Very little, for there is no Floor laid."

"Did you ever write to Mr. Bushe?"

"I may have written a Note to Mr. Bushe."

"Did you ever enclose a Letter of Mrs. Hamerton to Mr. Bushe?"

"Never; that I can take Ten thousand Oaths upon."

"Have you any Recollection of giving a Letter to your Servant Charlotte Hargraves directed to Mr. Bushe?"

"No, I never did on any Occasion. Mr. Bushe was a very casual Acquaintance; I became acquainted with Mr. Bushe from the Intimacy he had at Mr. Hamerton's House; he was Major Hamerton's Friend. I was very strict in my Intimacy with Mrs. Hamerton, who was brought up in my House. I became acquainted with Mr. Bushe at Mr. Hamerton's House; Mr. Bushe's. Visits were not always to me, sometimes he called upon my Son; that brought on the Acquaintance; and certainly I could not suppose that a Person I was meeting at Major Hamerton's, and meeting in every Society there of the first Class, and who appeared there as a Gentleman; I could not suppose that a Person I dined with Two or Three Times a Week almost, was an improper Person; and the Acquaintance altogether was merely accidental."

(By a Lord.) "You negative every Opportunity of committing Adultery in your House at Cheltenham?"

"It never could have occurred."

"Did you ever leave them alone in your House?"

"Only on the Occasion I have spoken to, for a very few Minutes."

"In what Room in the House?"

"I have stated that I was at Dinner; at least I was at a Luncheon; I had a solitary Pigeon; Mrs. Hamerton came in; it was not an Invitation Dinner. I trust a Lady put in such a Situation from a mere Act of Humanity will receive your Lordships Consideration."

"How long were they together in that Room?"

"Only just Time for me to go up Stairs and put on my Pelisse and my Hat to go and meet her Mother; it was entirely against my Orders that he should be admitted, as I was sitting in an Undress, and was not then sitting to receive Visitors; and in that respect I felt annoyed."

Mr. Harrison stated, "That he had endeavoured to perform his Duty to the House, and his Duty to his Client, in putting the Questions which occurred to him, and did not wish to put any other Questions."

"Mrs. Matthews. -Major Hamerton brought his Wife to my House, and not as stated in Major Hamerton's Libel; for he brought her in a Chair, and left her at my House, without any Explanation whatever, such as might have been expected; putting me into a Situation that I could not turn a Lady out of Doors who came without Money in her Pocket, and said, "If I die, let me die in the House, and not out of the House." That Act of Compassion has brought me into the painful Situation in which I stand."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Marie Clotilda Suetens was called in:

John Loger was sworn as Interpreter, as follows:

"You shall well and truly interpret, according to the best of your Skill and Understanding, between this House and the Witnesses who shall be examined at the Bar of this House, and a true Report make of the Matter and Matters which each and every such Witness shall give in Evidence, So help you GOD."

The Witness was then sworn, the Oath being interpreted by John Loger; and examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Are you a Dressmaker living at Paris?"

"Yes."

"Did you work for Mrs. Hamerton in the Rue Neuve, St. Augustine?"

"Yes."

"How long did you work for Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Two Months."

"In what Year was that?"

"Two Years ago."

"Was any Gentleman in the habit of visiting Mrs. Hamerton during that Time?"

"Yes, every Day,"

"What was the Gentleman's Name?"

"Mr. Bushe."

"Did you receive any Orders from Mrs. Hamerton, as to not admitting any other Person except Mr. Bushe?"

"Yes, once."

"Did you ever see Mrs. Hamerton in her Bed-room when Mr. Bushe called?"

"Yes, very often."

"Was there a little Room, in which there was a Couch, adjoining the Bed-room?"

"Yes; behind the Lady's Room."

"Have you ever seen Mr. Bushe go into the Room described the Bed-room, or the little Room?"

"I never saw him but in the Bed-room of the Lady."

"Have you ever seen Mr. Bushe go into the Room described the Bed-room, or the little Room?"

"No, I never saw the Gentleman in the little Room."

"Have you ever seen Mrs. Hamerton change the Key from being outside the Door, and take it inside the Door?"

"I saw that the Key had been taken away, but I could not say by whom it had been taken away."

"Did that happen when Mr. Bushe called on Mrs. Hamerton, and went into her Room on calling?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember on any Occasion the Door being left open when Mr. Bushe was in Mrs. Hamerton's Bedroom?"

"It was always shut."

"Do you remember upon any Occasion the Room Door being open, and seeing Mr. Bushe in Mrs. Hamerton's Bed-room?"

"Yes."

"With Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes."

"Was Mrs. Hamerton in Bed at the Time?"

"No; she was in a Morning Dress."

"Was Mr. Bushe dressed, or was he dressing himself?"

"He was dressing."

"Was Mr. Bushe, then, dressing in Mrs. Hamerton's Bed-room when Mrs. Hamerton was there?"

"Yes."

"How long was Mr. Bushe in the Bed-room with Mrs. Hamerton; what length of Time?"

"Not any particular Time."

"Upon the Occasion alluded to, when you saw him dressing in the Room, how long had he been in the Room?"

"About Two Hours."

"Did the Window of Mrs. Hamerton's Bed-room look into the Garden?"

"Yes."

"Did you ever, in passing that Window, see Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton in Bed together?"

"Yes."

"Did you go with a Person of the Name of Parslow to Rue Godot?"

"Yes."

"Did you see there the Gentleman that you have described as calling himself Bushe, and Mrs. Hamerton, at that House?"

"I saw them go out of the House."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then James Parslow was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Did you know Major and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes, quite well."

"Did you also know Mr. Bushe?"

"Quite well."

"Did you go with the Witness that is standing behind you, and with a Man of the Name of Delawny, and his Wife, to a House in Paris, in the Rue Godôt?"

"Yes; and likewise the Workwomen and the Portress saw both Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton together in the Street, going towards the Boulevards."

"Were the Gentleman and Lady you saw at that House, Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes. They first of all pointed them out to me."

"The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Mr. Harrison stated, "That he did not wish to adduce further Evidence."

The Counsel was directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off sine Die.

Mullins et al. v. Townsend.

Ordered, That the Order made Yesterday, "That the Cause wherein The Honorable Edward Mullins, and others, are Appellants, and John Townsend Esquire is Respondent, be heard by Counsel at the Bar on Friday next," be discharged, and that the said Cause be heard by Counsel at the Bar To-morrow.

Navy Pay Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to amend and consolidate the Laws relating to the Pay of the Royal Navy;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Richmond Lunatic Asylum (Dublin) Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for appropriating the Richmond Lunatic Asylum in Dublin to the Purposes of a District Lunatic Asylum;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Standon Inclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Nicolson Calvert and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parish of Standon, in the County of Hertford;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Stafford Improvement Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Benson and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for paving, lighting, watching, cleansing, regulating and improving the Streets, Lanes and other public Passages and Places within the Borough of Stafford, in the County of Stafford;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Kingston-upon-Hull & Hedon Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Portman and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for making and maintaining a new Turnpike Road from the Town of Kingston-upon-Hull, in the County of the said Town, to Hedon, in the County of York;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Charminster Inclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Portman and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands within the Parish of Charminster, in the County of Dorset;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Wareham Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Portman and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving several Roads leading from the Market Cross in the Town of Wareham, and in Purbeck, in the County of Dorset;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Portman Market Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Portman and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for establishing a Market in the Parish of Saint Mary-le-bone, in the County of Middlesex;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Sankey Brook Navigation Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Lord Stanley and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to consolidate and amend the Acts relating to the Sankey Brook Navigation, in the County of Lancaster, and to make a Navigable Canal from the said Navigation at Fidler's Ferry to communicate with the River Mersey at Widness Wharf, near Westbank, in the Township of Widness in the said County;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Little Bolton Improvement Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Lord Stanley and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually cleansing, paving, lighting, watching, regulating and improving the Township of Little Bolton, in the County Palatine of Lancaster;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Hollingrake's Patent Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Lord Stanley and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for prolonging the Term of certain Letters Patent granted to James Hollingrake, for an improved Method of manufacturing Copper or other Metal Rollers, and of casting and forming Metallic Substances into various Forms with improved Closeness and Soundness of Texture;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

St. Helens & Runcorn Gap Railway Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Lord Stanley and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for making a Railway from the Cowley Hill Colliery, in the Parish of Prescot, to Runcorn Gap in the same Parish, (with several Branches therefrom,) all in the County Palatine of Lancaster; and for constructing a Wet Dock at the Termination of the said Railway at Runcorn Gap aforesaid;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Peebles Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hay and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and keeping in Repair the Turnpike Roads in the County of Peebles, for making and maintaining certain new Roads, and for rendering Turnpike certain Parish Roads in the said County;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Cromford Bridge Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Mundy and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving the Road from Cromford Bridge to the Turnpike Road at or near Langley Mill, in the County of Derby;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Derby Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Mundy and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving certain Roads between the Towns of Derby, Mansfield and Nutthall, in the Counties of Derby and Nottingham;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Manchester Improvement Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Lord Stanley and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to amend several Acts for supplying the Town of Manchester with Gas; and for regulating and improving the same Town;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Tweed Fisheries Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Thomas Fremantle and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual Preservation and Increase of the Breed of Salmon, and for better regulating the Fisheries in the River Tweed, and the Rivers and Streams running into the same, and also within the Mouth or Entrance of the said River;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Monks Risborough Inclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Thomas Fremantle and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parish of Monks Risborough, in the County of Buckingham;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Dunham Bridge Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Admiral Sotheron and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for building a Bridge over the River Trent from Dunham, in the County of Nottingham, to the opposite Shore in the County of Lincoln;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Ashburton Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Bastard and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving several Roads leading to and from or near to the Towns of Ashburton and Totness, in the County of Devon;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Tiverton Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Bastard and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for improving several Roads and making certain new Roads, in the Counties of Devon and Somerset, leading to and from the Town of Tiverton; and for amending an Act of His present Majesty for repairing several Roads leading from and through the Town of Wiveliscombe;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

New Sarum Poor Rates Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Windham and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for better assessing and recovering the Rates for the Relief of the Poor within the City of New Sarum, and enlarging the Powers of an Act passed in the Tenth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, intituled, "An Act for consolidating the Rates to be made for the Relief of the Poor of the respective Parishes of Saint Thomas, Saint Edmund and Saint Martin, in the City of New Sarum;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Port Crommelin Harbour Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Thomas Fremantle and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for establishing and maintaining the Harbour of Port Crommelin in the Bay of Cushenden, in the County of Antrim;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Great Dover Street, &c. Improvement Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Thomas Fremantle and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for paving, lighting, cleansing and otherwise improving such Parts of Great Dover Street, Trinity Street, Trinity Square, and the Highways, Roads, Streets, Markets and other Public Passages and Places leading out thereof or abutting thereon or adjacent thereto, all within the Parishes of Saint Mary Newington and Saint George the Martyr, Southwark, in the County of Surrey, as do not fall within the Powers and Provisions of any existing Acts of Parliament;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Twenty-four Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Bogs Draining (Ireland) Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Thomas Fremantle and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for the draining and allotting the Bogs of Ireland;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Ordered, That the said Bill be printed.

Hollingrake's Patent Bill referred to a Select Comee:

Ordered, That the Bill, intituled, "An Act for prolonging the Term of certain Letters Patent granted to James Hollingrake, for an improved Method of manufacturing Copper or other Metal Rollers, and of casting and forming Metallic Substances into various Forms with improved Closeness and Soundness of Texture," be referred to a Select Committee to enquire into the Expediency or Inexpediency of the Regulations therein contained, pursuant to the Standing Order No. 198; and to report to the House.

The Lords following were named of the said Committee:
L. Dacre.
L. Sheffield.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Durham.
L. Skelmersdale.
E. Stanhope.
E. Radnor.
E. Harewood.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Comee to appoint a Chairman.

Ordered, That the said Committee do appoint their own Chairman.

Foreign Trade with China, Account of, delivered, & referred to

The House being informed, "That Mr. Preston, from the Court of Directors of The East India Company, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to an Order of the 25th of February last,

East India Com ee.

A Return of the Foreign Trade with China, distinguishing the different Nations, and the Trade carried on by The East India Company from that carried on by Private India Ships under the British Flag; also the Tonnage employed by each Nation, and the principal Articles of Export and Import, as far as the same can be ascertained for the last Fifteen Years."

And then he withdrew.

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Paper do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Paper be printed.

Ordered, That the said Paper be referred to the Select Committee appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China.

East India, &c. Trade, Petitions from Prescot & Belfast for opening, referred to East India Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Prescot and its Vicinity, in the County Palatine of Lancaster, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Monopolies now enjoyed by The East India Company may not be granted to them again, but that the Trade to the Countries East of the Cape of Good Hope may be equally free to all the Subjects of Great Britain:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the lastmentioned Committee.

Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Bankers, Manufacturers and Traders of Belfast, and others interested in the Trade to the East, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will in due Time give the requisite Notice to The Honorable The East India Company, that their exclusive Privileges of trading to China and the Restriction on the Trade to India will terminate on 11th April 1834:"

Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the lastmentioned Committee.

Corn Spirits, Petitions against additional Duty on:

Upon reading the Petition of the Members of the Clackmannanshire Union Agricultural Society, and others connected therewith, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Clackmannanshire Union Agricultural Society: Shilbourne: Shilmalier:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Landed Proprietors and Land Holders of the Barony of Shilburne, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Landed Proprietors and Land Holders of the Barony of Shilmalier, County of Wexford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Gorey:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Landed Proprietors and Land Holders of the Barony of Gorey, County of Wexford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Bantry:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Landed Proprietors and Land Holders of the Barony of Bantry, County of Wexford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Forth:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Landed Proprietors and Land Holders of the Barony of Forth, County of Wexford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Bargy:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Landed Proprietors and Land Holders of the Barony of Bargy, County of Wexford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Scarawalsh:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Landed Proprietors and Land Holders of the Barony of Scarawalsh, County of Wexford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Ballaghkeen:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Landed Proprietors and Land Holders of the Barony of Ballaghkeen, and County of Wexford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; severally praying, "That their Lordships may be induced to forego the Intention of imposing the additional Duty on Corn Spirits, or if, in their Wisdom, it should be deemed advisable to lay on this Duty, the Petitioners humbly hope their Interests may be protected by placing a corresponding Duty on Rum:"

"It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Tullamore.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Tullamore, in the King's County, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "not to sacrifice their Interests and those of this Country at large, by giving to the West Indian Slave Trader a Preference to the Irish Farmer, by encreasing the Duty on Homemade Spirits without imposing an equivalent Duty on Rum:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Criminal Laws, Petitions from Great Yarmouth & Great Bardfield for Alteration of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Mayor, Magistrates, Merchants, Bankers, Traders and others, Inhabitants of Great Yarmouth, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to attach to the Crime of Forgery for the future some Punishment short of Death, such as solitary Confinement and Hard Labour for Life, with a Confiscation of all Property for the Maintenance of the Delinquent, which Enactment, at the same Time that it would be severe enough to deter Offenders by the Force of Example, would be so accordant with Public Feeling, as to secure, as far as possible, its certain Infliction:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Great Bardfield and its Neighbourhood, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Penalty of Death for Forgery may be commuted, and to adopt such Measures as may in their Wisdom appear best calculated to effect these important Ends:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Newspapers, (Ireland,) Petition of Newspaper Proprietors against further Duty on.

Upon reading the Petition of the Newspaper Proprietors of Ireland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will not by any Legislative Enactment encrease the Burdens already pressing on the Newspaper Proprietors of Ireland:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Hops, Accounts respecting, Ordered.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, "A Return of the Amount of the Hop Duty, old and new Duty included, from the Year 1800 to 1829, inclusive:"

Also, "An Account of the Expences of Collection in each Year, and Number of Persons employed chiefly in the Collection of the said Duties:"

Also, "An Account of the Quantity of Hops imported in each of the said Years, and the Duty paid thereon:"

"Also, "An Account of the Quantity of Acres in Cultivation of Hops in each Year aforesaid:"

Also, "An Account shewing how often in each Year the Payment of the said Duties has been deferred, and to what Periods, and upon what Securities:"

And also, "An Account of the Amount of any Arrears of Duty now owing, stating the Year."

Northern Road Commissioners, Petition of Trustees of Hitchin Road & Inhabitants of Bedford against Appointment of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Trustees of the Turnpike Road leading from Hitchin to Bedford, and the Roads branching therefrom, through Henlow, to Girtford Bridge and to Arlesey, in the Counties of Hertford and Bedford; praying their Lordships "not to consent to the Appointment of the Board of Commissioners recommended in the Report of a Select Committee appointed to enquire into the State of the Road between London and Edinburgh, recommending the Appointment of a Board of Commissioners constituted in a similar Manner, and invested with the same or similar Powers, to those of the Commissioners for the Improvement of the Road between London and Holyhead:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants, Owners and Occupiers of Lands and Tenements within the Town of Bedford, in the County of Bedford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Commission recommended by a Report of the Select Committee appointed by the House of Commons to enquire into the State of the Roads between London and Edinburgh may not receive the Sanction of their Lordships, and that the Petitioners may be heard by themselves, their Counsel, Agents and Witnesses, against the Appointment of the same:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Tithe Laws, Petition from Gissing for Alteration of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Owners and Occupiers of Land in the Parish of Gissing, in the County of Norfolk, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to take into Consideration the Laws respecting Tithes, and to devise some Means by which the Clergy may be more justly and equally paid, and the Petitioners relieved from the Burdens which cramp their Industry, repress their Exertions and ruin their Hopes:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Poor Laws, Petition from Ireland for Extension of, to Ireland.

Upon reading the Petition of the Working and Laborious Classes of the Irish Community, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to take into their Consideration the Justice and the Wisdom of an immediate Extension of the Principle of the English Poor Laws to Ireland:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Sir G. Chetwynd's Estate Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for vesting certain Parts of the Real Estates devised by the Will of John Williams Esquire, deceased, in the County of Stafford, in Trustees, in Trust to carry into Execution a Contract entered into for Sale thereof, and to apply the Money arising from such Sale in Manner therein mentioned."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Farrer and Sir Giffin Wilson;

To carry down the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence thereto.

Peebles Statute Labour Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for further regulating the Statute Labour, and repairing the Highways and Bridges, in the County of Peebles."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Blacktoft, &c. Inclosure Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Townships of Blacktoft, Gilberdike and Faxfleet, in the Parish or Parochial Chapelry of Blacktoft, and in the Parishes of Eastrington and South Cave, in the East Riding of the County of York."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Whitesheet Hill Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for repairing the Turnpike Road from the Top of Whitesheet Hill to the Wilton Turnpike Road at or near Barford, in the County of Wilts."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to the 3 preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Leeds & Selby Railway Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for making a Railway from the Town of Leeds to the River Ouse, within the Parish of Selby, in the West Riding of the County of York."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, with the Amendments, shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with Amendments to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To return the said Bill, and acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the same, with some Amendments, to which their Lordships desire their Concurrence.

East India Comee, further Report of Evidence.

The Lord President reported further Minutes of Evidence taken before the Select Committee appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China, up to the 29th Day of April last inclusive.

The said Evidence was read by the Clerk.

Pensions granted, & Salaries abolished, Accounts respecting, Ordered forthwith.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House forthwith, "An Account of all Pensions granted under the 57th Geo. 3, Cap. 65:"

And also, "An Account of the Amount of all Salaries abolished under Acts passed in the same Year, for regulating Public Offices;" Ordered to be laid before the House on Friday the 26th of February last.

Shakerley's Divorce Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Charles Peter Shakerley Esquire, of the Parish of Egham, in the County of Surrey, with Laure Angelique Rosalbe Shakerley his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and made some Amendments thereto, which he was ready to report, when the House will please to receive the same."

Ordered, That the said Report be received To-morrow.

Parochial Registers (Scotland) Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to be put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the better Regulation of Parochial Registers in Scotland; and for the general recording of such Registrations in the Office of the Lord Clerk Register in Edinburgh;" and for the Lords to be summoned;

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Thursday next; and that the Lords be summoned.

Rawlings's Estate Bill, Monck to attend the Com ee.

Ordered, That Elizabeth Monck do attend this House on Thursday next, to be sworn, in order to her being examined as a Witness before the Committee to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for vesting the legal Estate in certain Estates late of Mrs. Ann Budgen, formerly vested in Elizabeth Pedder deceased in Mortgage, in Edward Rawlings, the present Mortgagee and Trustee of the Equity of Redemption thereof," stands committed.

Franklen's Estate Bill, Witnesses to attend the Com ee.

Ordered, That Richard White, Henry Berkin and Thomas Evans do attend this House on Monday the 24th of this instant May, to be sworn, in order to their being examined as Witnesses before the Committee to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for carrying into Effect a Contract entered into for the Sale of certain Freehold and Leasehold Estates in the Parishes of Merthyr Maur, Saint Brides Major and Coitee, in the County of Glamorgan, the Estate of Richard Franklen Esquire, to The Right Honorable Sir John Nicholl Knight, and for applying the Money thence arising in the Purchase of other Estates to be settled to the same Uses as the Estates sold," stands committed.

9th Report from Appeal Com ee.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House; and to report to the House; and to whom were referred certain Petitions in the following Causes; Duff against Fraser; Fraser against Fraser; Douglas and others against Brown and another; The Glamorganshire Canal Navigation Company against Blakemore; Robley and others against Brooke; Maccabe against Hussey and others; M'Taggart against Jeffrey; and Dillon against Sir William Parker Baronet; "That the Committee had met, and considered the Respondents Petitions in the Causes Duff against: Fraser, Fraser against Fraser, and Douglas and others against Brown and another, severally praying their Lordships for Leave to lodge their Cases; and also the Defendant's Petition in the Writ of Error, The Glamorganshire Canal Navigation Company against Blakemore, praying their Lordships for Leave to lodge his Cases and Appendixes; and had heard the Agents thereon, and the Committee are of Opinion, That the Prayers of the said Petitions may be complied with: That the Committee had also considered the Respondent's Petition in the Cause Robley and others against Brooke, praying their Lordships for Six Weeks further Time for laying the Prints of his Case upon the Table of the House, such Time to be computed from the Expiration of the Time allowed by the Orders of the House; and had heard the Agents thereon, and the Committee are of Opinion, That the Prayer of the said Petition may be complied with: That the Committee had also considered the Petition of Catherine Hussey Widow, one of the Respondents in the Cause Maccabe against Hussey and others, praying their Lordships for Six Weeks further Time to lay her Case on the Table of the House; and had heard the Respondent's Agent thereon, and the Committee are of Opinion, That the Petitioner may be allowed Six Weeks further Time to deliver in her printed Case: That the Committee had also considered the Petition of James Kerr, Accountant in Glasgow, praying their Lordships that he may have Leave to appear as Respondent to the Appeal M'Taggart against Jeffrey, and lodge a printed Case in his own Name; and had heard, the Appellant's Agent thereon, and the Committee are of Opinion, That the said James Kerr may appear as a Respondent to the said Appeal, and should be ordered to put in his Answer thereunto in Writing within Four Weeks, and also that he should be allowed to lodge a printed Case in his own Name: And that the Committee had also considered the Petition of Sir Hyde Parker Baronet, only Brother and Heir at Law of Sir William Parker Baronet, deceased, late Respondent in the Cause Dillon against Sir William Parker Baronet, praying their Lordships that the said Appeal may stand revived in the Name of the Petitioner, (the now Tenant in Tail of the Estates in question in the Appeal,) as Respondent in the Place and Stead of his Brother the late Respondent, and that the Petitioner may have the same Benefit of the Appeal as his said Brother would or might have had if still living; and had heard the Agents thereon, and the Committee are of Opinion, That the said Appeal may stand revived in the Name of the said Petitioner as Respondent thereto, as desired, and that he should have the same Benefit of the Appeal as his said deceased Brother Sir William Parker would or might have had if still living."

Which Report, being read by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House; and Ordered accordingly.

Bulkley v.Wilford, Appellant's Petition for further Time for his Case, referred to Appeal Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of George Wilford Bulkley, Appellant in a Cause depending in this House, to which Anna Wilford is Respondent; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to grant an Order allowing the Petitioner Two Months further Time to lay his Case upon the Table of their Lordships House:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Russell v. D. of Bedford et al: Same v. same: Appellant's Petition to advance the Causes, referred to Appeal Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of Mrs. Euphemia Russell or Innes, Appellant in Two Causes depending in this House, to which John Duke of Bedford, and others, are Respondents; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to order that one of these Appeals, which stands last in the List, may be brought forward, so as to stand immediately after the first of them in the Paper:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Richardson to enter into a Recogee on Burns & Griers' Appeal.

The House being moved, "That John Richardson of Fludyer Street, Westminster, Gentleman, may be permitted to enter into a Recognizance for John Burns and Robert Grier, on account of their Appeal depending in this House, they being in Scotland:"

It is Ordered, That the said John Richardson may enter into a Recognizance for the said Appellants, as desired.

Sir M. P.Stewart v. Porterfield.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing the Cause wherein Sir Michael Porterfield Shaw Stewart Baronet is Appellant, and James Corbet Porterfield Esquire is Respondent, ex-parte, the Respondent not having put in his Answer to the said Appeal, though peremptorily Ordered so to do:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Cause ex-parte, by Counsel at the Bar, on the first vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed, unless the Respondent puts in his Answer thereto in the mean time.

The Provost of Dingwall et al. v. Mackenzie & Munro.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing the Cause wherein The Provost of Dingwall, and others, are Appellants, and The Honorable Mrs. Mary Hay Mackenzie and Hugh Munro Esquire are Respondents, ex-parte, the Respondents not having put in their Answer to the said Appeal, though peremptorily Ordered so to do:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Cause ex-parte, by Counsel at the Bar, on the first vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed, unless the Respondents put in their Answer thereto in the mean time.

Bp. London's Estate Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for enabling The Bishop of London to grant Building Leases of certain Estates belonging to the said See," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Ordered, That the said Bill be ingrossed.

Ashbourne & Sudbury Roads Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for repairing, altering and improving the Roads from Ashbourne to Sudbury, and from Sudbury to Yoxall Bridge, and from Hatton Moor to Tutbury, and from Uttoxeter to or near the Village of Draycott-in-the-Clay, and from Hadley Plain on the late Forest or Chase of Needwood, to Callingwood Plain, on the same late Forest or Chase," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Foston Bridge Road Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for repairing the Road from Foston Bridge to the Division Stone on Witham Common, in the County of Lincoln," was committed.

Mansfield & Chesterfield Road Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving the Road from Temple Normanton to Bunting field Nook, in the County of Derby, and the Road from Tupton Nether Green to Stubbing Edge Lane and Knot Cross, in the said County," was committed.

Limerick Hospital Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury also made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the Management and Direction of the Hospital founded by Joseph Barrington and his Sons in the City of Limerick," was committed.

Motions relative to the Poor Laws &

The Order of the Day being read for the Lords to be summoned;

their Administration, moved & withdrawn.

It was moved to resolve, "1st, That the present Administration of the Poor Laws is a complete Deviation from the Principles of the Act of the 43d of Elizabeth, entitled, "An Act for the Relief of the Poor," and that the Tendency of such Construction of the Poor Laws is to produce a general Demoralization of the Labouring Classes, who are thereby taught to depend upon Parish Relief in all their Wants and Necessities, instead of their own Industry and prudent Conduct:

"2d. That it is the Duty of Parliament and of His Majesty's Ministers to consider what Remedies can be applied to these Evils, and what Legislative Measures can be adopted to arrest their Progress:

"3d. That adequate Wages and remunerative Employment for the Labouring Classes are the most solid Basis for Society to rest upon, thereby securing the Property of the Wealthy and the Independence of the poorer Classes:

"4th. That therefore the Act of the 43d of Elizabeth, the 13th and 14th of King Charles the 2d, and all Acts passed since the Year 1690, for the Relief of the Poor, the explaining and amending the said Acts, the directing of Settlements, &c. for the Labouring Poor, the Maintenance of Bastard Children, &c. should be repealed:

"5th. That in lieu thereof, all Laws relating to the Support and Maintenance of the Poor should be consolidated into One Act, founded on the Basis of giving Support and Relief alone to the Lame, Impotent, Old, Blind, and those who, from Sickness and Infirmities, are poor and quite unable to work, and to the Relief of Orphans or abandoned Children:

"6th. That all Laws relating to the Settlement of the Poor shall be consolidated in One Act, and that the Basis of such Law should be a County Settlement and not a Parish one, as at present:

"7th. That all Property of every Description in the said County ought to be equally assessed to the Rate for the Relief of the Poor, and that its Expence shall be borne jointly by the Landlord and Tenant; and that such Property should be fairly assessed at its full Annual Value:

"8th. That an Inspector of the Poor Laws should be appointed in each County, by the Magistrates in Sessions, and Deputy Inspectors for each Subdivision of the said County, to whom all the Duties now performed by Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poor should be then delegated:

"9th. That at any Appeals or Discussions under these Laws no Persons, but the Parties concerned shall be heard, either before Magistrates or at the Quarter Sessions; and all Disputes between Counties shall be settled by Arbitration:

"10th. That it would much increase the Means of finding Employment for the surplus Population in each County if the Government would undertake the Management of the Roads, Bridges and Causeways of the United Kingdom, under a Board of Commissioners for that Object, and save the heavy and useless Expenditure now incurred for their Direction and Support, and which entails an unjust and oppressive Taxation upon the Farming Interest, and impedes the Facilities of travelling, to the great Detriment of the Nation:

"11th. That, in order to meet the Exigences of the Times, and to provide adequate Remedies for those of the Labouring Population who would now suffer from a Change of these Laws, it is expedient to establish a compulsive Friendly Society in each Parish, in which the Assessment shall never exceed One Shilling in the Pound of the Property rated to the County Rate in the said Parish; and every One of the Labourers of the said Parish, who shall be willing to contribute Sixpence per Week to the said Fund in Summer, shall participate, for himself and his Family, in the Distribution thereof, when in Need, either from temporary Sickness, Want of Work, Excess of Children, &c.: That a Committee of the said Parish shall manage the said Fund, and give what Relief they think fit, and that there shall be no Appeal from their Decree, or any Interference with them on account of the Management of the said Fund, from Magistrates or others:

"12th. That it is expedient that all Assessments on Parishes for local Objects should cease, and that all Rates for those Objects should be County Rates in future, such as the Church Rate, Highway Rate, Constable Rate, &c. and equalized in each County:

"13th. That the Metropolis, and certain Towns, Cities, &c. having Corporate Rights, might be exempted from County Jurisdiction in these Matters; and, where of Necessity they must be rated to particular Objects, that they might compound for a regular Annual Payment of such Rates:

"14th. That the Prevention of Crimes, especially petty Thefts, is much more beneficial to the Community than Schemes for their Punishment; and that the Establishment of a Rural Guard in each County to patrol its various Subdivisions would tend much to the Diminution of Crime, and the great Expence attending its Prosecution, &c.:

"15th. That a King's Attorney or Assistant Barrister should be nominated by each County to conduct, gratis, all Prosecutions for Crimes, &c.:

"16th. That, in order that these Suggestions may be properly considered, and a Review of their Utility and Advantages obtained, it is expedient to nominate a Parliamentary Commission from experienced Members of both Houses of Parliament to consider the Premises, and report thereon."

Which being objected to;

The said Motions were (by Leave of the House) withdrawn.

Comee on Wayte's Petition for a Bill to annual the Marriage of Elizabeth Hickson.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to be put into a Committee upon the Petition of Mary Ann Wayte and George Wayte Gentleman, her Husband; praying their Lordships, "That Leave may be given to bring in a Bill to annual and declare void an alleged Marriage between Thomas Buxton and Elizabeth Hickson;" and also upon the Petition of the said Thomas Buxton, praying, "That this House will reject the Application to dissolve the Marriage of the Petitioner with Miss Hickson;" and for the Lords to be summoned;

The House was accordingly adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the said Petitions.

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had considered the said Petitions, and had come to a Resolution thereupon, which he was ready to report when the House will please to receive the same."

Ordered, That the said Report be received To-morrow.

East Retford Election Bill:

The Order of the Day being read for the further Consideration and Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to prevent Bribery and Corruption in the Election of Burgesses to serve in Parliament for the Borough of East Retford;" and for the Lords to be summoned; and for permitting Counsel to examine Witnesses in support of the Bill; and for hearing Counsel on the Petition of the Burgesses of the Borough of East Retford, in the County of Nottingham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, praying their Lordships, "That the said Bill may not pass into a Law;"

Counsel were accordingly called in.

Then William Wake was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name William Wake?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"When were you admitted a Burgess?"

"In 1818."

"In what Month?"

"In March."

"Did you promise your Vote for the Election of 1818?"

"Yes, I did."

"To whom?"

"To Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"After that Election, did you receive any Money?"

"Am I bound to answer that Question?"

Mr. Adam submitted, "That the Witness was not compelled to answer that Question."

The Counsel and Witness were informed, "That a Bill was passed in order that the Witness might be compelled to answer the Question; that in a Court of Justice a Witness was not bound to answer any Question tending to degrade himself, but that it was necessary for the Investigation of the Case before the House, and that he was bound to answer the Question."

(Mr. Law.) "After the Election of 1818, did you receive any Money?"

"No."

"Did you find any Money left at your House; and recollect you are upon your Oath?"

"I did."

"What did you find at your House?"

"I found a Letter in the Morning."

"What did it contain?"

"It contained Bills."

"To what Amount?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"Did you find One such Letter, or Two?"

"One."

"Did you afterwards find another?"

"Yes, I believe I did."

"At what Time in the Year 1818 did you find those Packets containing that Money?"

"I cannot recollect; but some Months after the Election."

"When Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans came again, did you promise your Vote to them as before?"

"Yes, I did."

"After that Second Election in 1820, did you find any Money at your House?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"The same Quantity as before."

"Do you mean by the same Quantity, Two Packets, each containing Twenty Guineas?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Where were you residing at the last Election; previous to the Time of the Election?"

"At Elksley."

"Where did you live in 1818?"

"At Mansfield; no, I was not at Mansfield; at Warsop."

"Did you know William Clayton?"

"Yes."

"Did he live at Warsop?"

"No."

"Have you had any Conversation with William Clayton?"

"No, none at all."

"In 1818, had you any Conversation with him respecting the Election Money?"

"No."

"Nor since?"

"No, I have not."

"Do you know any other Burgess who lived at Warsop?"

"There was not any other Burgess lived at Warsop. William Clayton lived at Warsop."

"Who produced to you the Letters you saw at your House?"

"Indeed I cannot tell."

"Who was living in the House beside yourself?"

"I found them in the Morning when I got up; I was mostly the first Person in the Morning to get up to work."

"Did you open the Letter first?"

"Yes."

"Was it addressed to you?"

"There was just the Direction."

"Did you know the Handwriting?"

"No."

"Did you know John Thornton?"

"Yes."

"Had you ever any Conversation with him upon the Subject of those Packets?"

"No."

"Did you know what that Money was when you received it?"

"No."

"Had you any Doubt what it was?"

"I knew what it was when I opened the Letter."

"When you opened the Letter, what did you know it was?"

"I knew it was Money."

"What for?"

"I did not know what it was for."

"Do you mean to swear that you have any Doubt why that Money was sent you?"

"Yes; because I do not know from any Cause whatever; nor from any Gentleman, nor from any Agent whatever, that I had any Correspondence with, that ever mentioned such a Case to me."

"Do you mean to state to this House, that you do not know what the Four several Packets, each containing a Sum of Twenty Guineas, were left at your House for?"

"No, I do not know what it was for."

"Have you any Doubt what it was for?"

"No, I have no Doubt."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"How long have you lived in Retford?"

"I left Retford in 1812."

"How old were you then?"

"I was Two-and-twenty."

"Was the Election of 1818 the first Election you remember?"

"Yes, it was."

"Who canvassed you upon that Occasion in 1818?"

"Mr. Evans canvassed me, and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you Promise Mr. Evans?"

"I promised them both."

"Did Mr. Evans say any thing to you about any Money, in case you should vote for him?"

"No; he never mentioned a Word about it."

"Or Mr. Crompton?"

"No, nor Mr. Crompton."

"Did you live in Retford in 1820?"

"No, I have never lived in Retford since 1818."

"Have you ever voted in Retford since 1820?"

"I voted in 1826."

"You voted for Dundas and Wrightson?"

"Yes, I did."

"Who canvassed you upon that Occasion?"

"Sir Robert Dundas canvassed me himself, and Mr. Wrightson canvassed me."

"Did you promise him?"

"I promised them both."

"Did either Mr. Wrightson or Sir Robert Dundas promise you Money?"

"No, they never did."

"When you lived in Retford, did you ever hear the Expression, "It is all right?"

"No; never since I left Retford I never did, nor never before."

"Or "Joss?"

"No, not that Word."

"Or "Tick," or "Tip," or any of those Things?"

"No, none of those Words I never heard."

"Thornton is dead, is not he?"

"He is, I understand."

"Do you live in Retford now?"

"No, at Warsop."

"Do you know any thing of a Club at Retford about this Proceeding for disfranchising the Borough?"

"I have heard speak of a Club."

"Do you know any thing of it yourself?"

"No, I do not; because I was rather detested against, in regard to what I heard about the Proceedings."

"Was any Proposition made to you to belong to it?"

"No, there was from nobody."

"Do you happen to know where it meets?"

"I heard say -"

"Mr. Law objected to the Answer.

(Mr. Adam.) "You do not know of your own Knowledge where it meets?"

"At the Turk's Head, I believe."

"What Reason had you for answering, at the Turk's Head?"

"Nothing but what I heard the People say."

"What sort of a House is the Turk's Head; is it a respectable House-large?"

"Yes, very; I have been in it several Times."

"Which Party does it belong to?"

"What they call the Blue Club."

"Do you know Mr. Newton?"

"No, I do not."

"Do you know Mr. Hannam?"

"I do."

"How long have you known him?"

"I have known him ever since I went Apprentice in 1812, nearly the first Time I knew him."

"Have you seen any thing of him lately?"

"Yes, I have seen him not long ago."

"How long ago?"

"Since I came up to London."

"Did you see him before you came to London?"

"No."

"Had you any Conversation with him in London?"

"No, never."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"Who accompanied Sir Robert Dundas on his Canvass?"

"Well, I cannot recollect just now."

"Do you know Mr. Foljambe?"

"Yes, very well."

"Did you see him on the Canvass?"

"No."

"Do you know Mr. Fox?"

"Yes."

"Did you see him on the Canvass?"

"No."

"Did you see Mr. George Thornton?"

"No."

"Or Mr. Kirke?"

"I cannot recollect that I did."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then William Elvidge was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Freeman?"

"About One-and-twenty."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1812, when Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh were Candidates?"

"I recollect the Election of Mr. Osbaldeston."

"Did you promise your Vote to those Gentlemen?"

"I do not recollect that in particular."

"Did you go to the Angel Inn at any Time after that Election?"

"Yes."

"I mean about Two Years after?"

"I cannot recollect at what Time."

"Did you go to the Angel Inn where you met a Person of the Name of Hannam?"

"I saw a strange Person there."

"Did you go to the Angel Inn, and see Mr. Hannamthere?"

"Yes, I believe I saw him there." Was Mr. Hannam the strange Person?"

"No."

"Did you mean to say that Mr. Hannam was there with a strange Person?"

"Yes."

"Upon that Occasion did you receive any Money?"

"I received a Packet."

"What was contained in that Packet?"

"I cannot exactly say how much; there was Money."

"How much was there?"

"I cannot speak to the Amount of the Money; somewhere about Twenty, I think."

"Were they Pounds or Guineas?"

"I think they were Guineas."

"From whom did you receive that Packet?"

"From the strange Person."

"Was Mr. Hannam present when you received it?"

"I think he was."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1818, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates?"

"I do not recollect the Time; I recollect the Election."

"Do you recollect the first Election when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates?"

"Yes, I recollect the Election very well."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen your Vote?"

"Yes."

"At any Time after the Election, did you receive any Money?"

"I decline answering that Question."

"The Witness was informed, "That he must answer the Question;" and the Question was again put.

"I received a Parcel, but I cannot recollect where from."

"What did that Parcel contain?"

"It contained Money."

"How much?"

"About Twenty Guineas."

"Did you receive One Parcel, or Two?"

"One."

"From whom did you receive it?"

"I do not know."

"Where was it left?"

"At my House, I believe."

"Do you mean to state that you received but One Parcel after the Election of 1818, the first Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"I believe I received Two Parcels."

"What did that second Parcel contain?"

"The same Quantity."

"In the Year 1820, the second Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton, did you promise your Vote to those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"After the Election of 1820 did you receive any Money?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"The same Quantity."

"If I understand you rightly, by the same Quantity, you mean Two Packets containing Twenty Guineas each?"

"Yes; but where it was from I cannot say, for I had no Promise of any thing of the sort."

"Has any Person told you to object to the Question

"I have put to you respecting your Receipt of Money?"

"No, nothing of the kind."

"Has any Person told you to object to that Question?"

"No."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of Alderman John Parker?"

"Yes, very well."

"Is he a Freeman of East Retford?"

"I believe he is."

"Have you any Doubt he is?"

"No."

"Is not he One of the Aldermen?"

"Yes."

"Have you had any Conversation with him upon the Subject?"

"No."

"Were you a Magistrate of the Borough of East Retford last Year?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Petitioner against the Bill for the Disfranchisement of East Retford?"

"No."

"Have you not signed the Petition?"

"Mr. Alderson submitted, "That the Petition must be shewn to the Witness, if he was asked that Question."

"The Petition was shewn to the Witness, and he was asked-

(Mr. Price.) "Is that your Handwriting?"

"Yes, that is my Handwriting; but I did not understand what you meant."

"I asked you whether you were a Petitioner against the Bill for disfranchising East Retford?"

"Yes; I did not understand the Question at first."

"You now admit you are a Petitioner against the Bill?"

"Yes."

(By a Lord.) "You signed that Petition?"

"Yes."

(Mr. Price.) "Did you vote in the Year 1826?"

"Yes."

"For whom?"

"For Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"How long have you known the Borough of Retford?"

"About Eight-and-twenty Years."

"Being a Petitioner, do you consider yourself as one of the Parties accused?"

"Yes."

"One of the Defendants upon the present Occasion?"

"Yes."

"Who summoned one of the Defendants as a Witness to give Evidence against himself?"

"I do not understand the Question."

"Who summoned you to attend here; who was the Person?"

"Mr. Butt, I believe."

"When was that?"

"On the 28th of last Month, I believe."

"Was it after you had signed that Paper?"

"Yes."

"How soon after you had signed that Paper were you summoned to give Evidence against yourself?"

"I cannot say how long it was after."

"How many Elections do you remember?"

"Three, I think."

"Are you a Freeman of any other Borough?"

"I am a Burgess for the County."

"Are you a Freeman of any other Borough?"

"No."

"Not of Hull, for instance?"

"No."

"Or of Pomfret?"

"No."

"Or of York?"

"No."

"Have you at any Time had any Promise whatever?"

"Never."

"From whom did you receive those Packets of which you spoke?"

"I cannot tell; I have no Knowledge of nothing of the sort."

"Did you see the Person who left them?"

"I did not know him."

"Was he a Stranger to you?"

"Yes."

"Did any thing pass between you and him when the Papers were left?"

"No."

"Nor had you any Promise beforehand?"

"Never."

"Nor any Conversation respecting it, directly or indirectly?"

"No, never."

"Did you vote at the last Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you make any Promise at the last Election?"

"No."

"Have you had any Money since the last Election?"

"No."

"Nor any Packet?"

"No."

"Nor any Promise?"

"No."

"Nor any Undertaking of any sort?"

"No, no Undertaking of no kind."

"Who canvassed you upon the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Were they together?"

"No; separate."

"Was any thing said except asking you for your Vote?"

"Nothing more; and I gave it them."

"Do you know whether there is any Club in the Town for disfranchising the Borough?"

"I believe there is a Thing of that kind."

"Where is it held?"

"At the Turk's Head."

"Who are the Members of that Club?"

"I understand Mr. Fisher is one."

"Who is Mr. Fisher?"

"A Grocer."

"Do you know Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes."

"Is he one of the Members?"

"I do not know that."

"Do you know Mr. Newton, his Clerk?"

"Yes."

"Do you know whether he is one of the Members?"

"I do not know."

"Have you ever seen him at the Turk's Head?"

"No."

"Do you know a Man of the Name of Sharp?"

"Yes."

"Do you know whether he is one of the Members?"

"No more than Report; the Report is very strong that he is one."

"What is he?"

"He keeps a Timber Yard."

"Where does he live?"

"Near to the Coal Yard."

"In the Borough, or out of the Borough?"

"In the Borough."

"Is he a Freeman?"

"No."

"Is he a Freeholder of Bassetlaw?"

"I understand he has bought a Close of Land about a Month ago."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Christopher Whatmough was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Christopher Whatmough?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"Were you so in the Year 1818?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote upon that Occasion?"

"I did."

"To whom?"

"To Mr. Crompton."

"Did you promise Mr. Evans?"

"Yes."

"After the Election of 1818, did you receive any Money?"

"I did."

"How much?"

"I cannot exactly say; it was a Packet."

"Did you receive One or Two Packets?"

"I received Two."

"What did the Packets contain; the Money you received after the Election in 1818?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"Whom did you promise in 1820?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"After the Election of 1820, did you receive any Money?"

"Yes, I believe I received Packets again."

"Have you any Doubt of it?"

"No, I have not."

"What did the Packets contain?"

"The same Amount, I believe."

"Twenty Guineas each?"

"Yes."

"Do you reside in London?"

"I do."

"Do you know a Mr. Ward; or did you in 1818?"

"I cannot say that I do."

"How did the Packets come to your House?"

"I cannot tell, I am sure; somebody brought them; I do not know who."

"Somebody, you do not know who, brought them?"

"Yes."

"Were you canvassed at the last Election in 1826?"

"I was."

"By whom?"

"I was canvassed first by Mr. Wrightson."

"Were you canvassed afterwards by Sir Robert Dundas?"

"Not by him himself."

"By whom?"

"By a Gentleman who canvassed for him; I forget the Gentleman's Name."

"Did you know Mr. Foljambe?"

"Yes; but it was not him."

"Did you know Mr. Fox?"

"It was not Mr. Fox."

"Who was it?"

"I did not know the Gentleman; I do not know who he was."

"Where were you canvassed; in London or at Retford?"

"In London."

"Do you mean to state to their Lordships that you do not know who it was that canvassed you for Sir Robert Dundas?"

"I do."

"How soon after the Election in 1826 were the Proceedings taken in the Committee of the House of Commons?"

"I am sure I cannot exactly say; I believe it was in the April following."

"How close after the Election in 1818 did you receive your Packets?"

"I cannot say."

"Do you know William Brown, a London Voter?"

"Yes, I know him."

"Have you had any Conversation with him?"

"Not at all."

"Upon the Subject of any Election?"

"Not at all."

"Do you know John Denman?"

"Yes."

"Is John Denman one of the London Voters?"

"He is."

"Has he ever mentioned to you any thing respecting the Election Money?"

"Never."

"Do you know George Cocking?"

"Yes, I do."

"Have you had any Conversation with him about those Packets of Election Money?"

"Never; I never had any Conversation with no one."

"Did you keep it entirely a Secret to yourself?"

"I never mentioned it to any one."

"You never mentioned your good Fortune to any Human Being, of the Packets being left after the Elections?"

"No, not to any body."

"Not even to your Wife, perhaps?"

"I suppose I did mention it to my Wife."

"To no one else?"

"No."

"You pocketed the Money, and said nothing about it?"

"Yes."

"Is that your Name to this Petition, Christopher Whatmough?" (The Petition being shewn to the Witness.)

"Yes, I believe it is."

"For whom did you vote in 1826?"

"Mr. Wrightson and Sir Robert Dundas."

"Then the Petition came on, and not the Packets?"

"I do not know how the Petition came on."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"Where do you live?"

"In Wilson's Court, Silver Street, Wood Street, Cheapside."

"Did you live in London in 1818?"

"I did."

"Was it in London you were canvassed then?"

"Yes."

"Recollect when it was you received the Packet after 1818?"

"I cannot exactly."

"In what Time of the Year was the Election in 1818?"

"In June."

"Was it in the Summer you received it, or the Winter Time?"

"In the Winter Time."

"Did you find it at your House, or where did you get it?"

"It was in the House as I lived in; not where I live now."

"Did you find it there, or did a Person give it you?"

"A Person gave it to me."

"Was it sealed?"

"I think it was; I am not sure."

"In 1820, you say, you received Money too?"

"Yes."

"How long after that Election?"

"I cannot exactly say how long it was."

"Was it Two or Three Months?"

"I am sure I cannot say how long it was."

"How did you get it?"

"A Person brought it whom I did not know."

"Was it the same Person, or a different Person?"

"It was not the same Person that came the first Time."

"Do you know Mr. Wrightson?"

"I do; I have seen him."

"Did he canvass you in London or at Retford?"

"In London."

"At that Time, did Mr. Wrightson promise you any Thing?"

"Never."

"Did the Gentleman who canvassed you for Mr. Dundas promise you any thing?"

"No."

"How long have you been a Voter for Retford?"

"Twelve Years."

"How do you know that Brown is a Freeman of Retford?"

"He was a Freeman born, I believe."

"Did you ever see him do any Act as a Freeman?"

"No."

"How do you know that John Denman is a Freeman?"

"He got it by Servitude."

"Did you ever see him vote, or do any Act that a Freeman can do, and that another Man cannot?"

"No."

"How do you know that Cocking is a Freeman?"

"By voting."

"Did you ever see him vote?"

"No."

"Then how do you know he was a Freeman?"

"By serving an Apprenticeship."

"Did you know him when he was an Apprentice?"

"Yes."

"To whom was he Apprentice?"

"To his Brother."

"Do you know whether his Brother was a Freeman?"

"I believe he was."

"Did you ever see his Brother do any Act as a Freeman?"

"No, I never did."

"When did you sign this Petition which has been shewn to you?"

"I cannot tell how long ago it was."

"Was it a Month or Two Months ago?"

"I think it was a Month or Six Weeks since I signed it."

"When were you summoned to come here?"

"A Fortnight To-morrow; on the 26th of April, I think."

"Have you been living in London ever since the last Election?"

"Yes."

"You did not receive any Money after the last Election?"

"No, I did not."

"Are you a Voter for any other Place besides Retford?"

"No."

"Have you been at Retford in the Course of last Year?"

"I have not."

"You know nothing of any Club that is there?"

"Not at all."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Taylor was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Freeman?"

"Ever since 1812."

"Do you recollect the Election when Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh were Candidates?"

"I do."

"Did you promise your Vote to either of those Gentlemen upon that Occasion?"

"To both of them."

"After that Election, at any Time, did you receive any Money?"

"No."

"Were you resident at Retford at that Time?"

"In London."

"Do you mean to say that after the Election you never received any Packet?"

"I did not receive any Packet after that Election."

(By a Lord.) "Was any Packet sent to your House?"

"I declare there was not."

"Was any Packet, to your Knowledge, delivered to any Member of your Family?"

"Not any."

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Relation of a Family of the Name of Slaney?"

"I am."

"Did you ever receive any Money through their Hands?"

"I did not."

"Do you remember the Election of 1818, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates?"

"I do."

"Where were you resident at that Time?"

"In London."

"Did you after that Election receive any Money?"

"My Lords, Allow me to throw myself upon your Mercy-upon your Clemency. Am I bound to answer that Question, yes or no?"

The Witness was informed, "That he was bound to answer the Question."

"I did receive a Packet."

"What did that Packet contain?"

"Twenty-one Pounds."

"Did you receive One or Two Packets after the Election of 1818?"

"Two Packets."

"What did the second Packet contain?"

"Twenty-one Pounds."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1820?"

"I do."

"Whom did you promise?"

"To Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans."

"Did you after that Election receive any thing?"

"I did."

"How much?"

"Twenty-one Pounds."

"Had you Two Packets, or One?"

"I had Two Packets."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty-one Pounds each."

"Do you remember the Election in 1826?"

"I do."

"Did you promise your Vote to any Gentlemen upon that Occasion?"

"Dundas and Wrightson."

"Is that your Handwriting?" (The Signature to a Petition being shewn to the Witness.)

"That is my Handwriting."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of William Brown, resident in London?"

"I do."

"A Retford Freeman?"

"Yes."

"Can you, from your own Knowledge, say whether he was so fortunate as yourself; did he ever receive any Packets, to your Knowledge?"

"I know nothing of William Brown as receiving any Packets."

"Did you hear from him that he had received any Packets?"

"I never did."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of John Denman?"

"I know John Denman."

"Did you ever hear any thing from him respecting his receiving any Packets?"

"I never did."

"Have you had any Conversation with any of the London Freemen upon this Subject?"

"Upon what Subject?"

"Upon the Subject of receiving Money after Elections?"

"I beg your Pardon. It is an understood Practice. I have heard of the Practice generally; I cannot speak to any Individuals. That is all I know."

"Did you ever hear that from any of the Freemen?"

"I cannot name any particular individual Freemen that I have heard speak of it."

"Was it from several Freemen you heard it?"

"I have heard of the Practice, but I cannot name any Individual."

(By a Lord.) "You heard of the Practice from Freemen of the Borough?"

"I have heard of the Practice, but I know of no Individual receiving the Money."

"Attend to the Question. The Question is this, Have you heard of the Practice from Freemen of the Borough?"

"I have."

(Mr. Price.) "Can you name any Freeman from whom you have heard it?"

"No, I cannot."

"Was it from one or from several you heard it?"

"Really I cannot say."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"If you cannot name the Persons, can you say you heard it from Freemen?"

"I cannot speak to Individuals; I do not recollect any Persons; I cannot name any Persons."

"Will you undertake to swear that the Persons you heard name it were Freemen?"

"No, I will not."

"You have heard it talked of a good deal lately?"

"I cannot tell."

"From People who were not Freemen as well as those who were?"

"The Proceedings in this House have made it notorious; I could not avoid hearing of it."

"You say you are one of the Petitioners against this Bill before their Lordships House?"

"Yes."

"Were you summoned to give Evidence after you had signed your Petition?"

"I was summoned on the 26th of April."

"Was that after you had made yourself a nominal Defendant, by signing the Petition?"

"I was summoned to this House afterwards."

"Who came to summon you?"

"I was summoned in the House; I was fetched out of the House."

"In what House?"

"I was behind the Bar."

"Were you attending as one of the Petitioners?"

"I was merely attending by Curiosity, and was picked out as a Person summoned; I had not been served, but there was a Summons in existence."

"Were you known as a Petitioner to the opposite Side at that Time?"

"I am not aware that I was known as a particular Petitioner."

"Do you know whether they summoned any of our Agents at that Time?"

"I cannot say that."

"As you are one of the Petitioners, do you bear any Part of the Expences of the Defence?"

"I do not."

"When was it you signed the Petition, do you remember?"

"I really cannot say; I know it was at least a Month ago."

"When you were served, did you tell them you were a Petitioner, and object to be examined against yourself?"

"No, I did not."

"Did you ever object 'till you came to this House?"

"I had a very strong Feeling against an Examination."

"Did you object to the other Side, and tell them you thought it was hard to summon one of the other Side to give Evidence against himself?"

"No."

"Are you a Freeman of any other Borough?"

"I am a Freeman of London."

Re-examined by Mr. Price.

"You have been asked whether you paid the Expences of the Defence; do you know from your own Knowledge who does pay them?"

"Upon my Word I do not."

"Where did you see this Petition first?"

"At my House."

"Who brought it to you?"

"I think it came under Cover from Retford; it did come under Cover from Retford."

"Did a Letter accompany it?"

"No, it did not, to the best of my Recollection."

"You signed the Petition in your House?"

"I did."

"To whom did you send it back?"

"I sent it to Richards, Clarke and Nares, to the best of my Recollection."

Examined by the Lords.

"Did you say you were a Freeman of the City of London?"

"Yes."

"Did you ever vote at any contested Election there?"

"I am not a Liveryman."

"You have no Vote?"

"No; I am only a Freeman; a privileged Freeman, by Purchase."

"Do you know any thing of a Club formed at Retford for the Disfranchisement of the Borough?"

"I have heard of it."

"Did you ever hear it called the Birmingham Club?"

"Yes; I believe it is as notorious as the Question before your Lordships. What I mean to say is, that it is known all over the World that this Question is agitated."

"That this Bill is entertained by this House?"

"That the Question is entertained in this House at the Instigation of a Club formed at Retford."

"Who was the principal Manager of this Club?"

"Living in London, I do not know who the principal Manager was, but I know the active Partisans. There is a Person of the Name of Sharpe, Mr. Hudson and Mr. Parnham; I have heard that they are very active Partisans for the Disfranchisement of the Borough; in fact, that they would make any Sacrifice; and that One of them wears a very handsome Gold Watch made a Present of from Birmingham. Whether that is the Fact, I do not know."

"Have you heard that Persons have come from Birmingham?"

"Yes; to enlist them to disfranchise the Borough of East Retford."

"Did you ever hear of Money being sent there to carry on these Proceedings?"

"Not directly; I cannot state that; what I state now is by Report."

"You have heard of that?"

"Yes; and I have very little Doubt about it."

"You have no manner of Doubt whatever?"

"Not at all."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of Newton?"

"Oh yes."

"What is he?"

"He is a very active Partisan for our Disfranchisement."

"What is he?"

"I really do not know; I think he is in the Law."

"He never had any thing to do with the Law but administering it, had he?"

"I do not know; I have been Twenty-three Years from Retford."

"But Report will do upon this Bill; every thing that you have heard?"

"I have only heard that he is very active for the Disfranchisement of the Borough."

"Is he a Clerk to Mr. Hannam the Attorney?"

"I have understood that he has some Connection with Mr. Hannam. Mr. Hannam has charged me with Twenty-one Pounds I never received. The House I hope is aware of that Fact. He has put Twenty-one Pounds opposite to my Name."

"In which Transaction did this take place?"

"In 1812; that is to say, the Money was paid in 1814, and he has debited me with it, and the Excuse he makes is, that I was not scored under; but he very modestly puts Twenty-one Pounds opposite my Name which I never received. A casual Reader would suppose I had received the Twenty-one Pounds."

"Is that in the List given in by Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes."

"To this House?"

"To the Commons."

"Have you seen that List?"

"I have seen the List given into the Commons; there is Twenty-one Pounds opposite to my Name."

"That was in 1812?"

"In 1814 the Money was distributed."

"The Election being in 1812?"

"Yes."

"You mean to say, in point of fact, that Twenty-one Pounds was not paid to you?"

"Yes. It is admitted, I believe, that it was never paid; it stands opposite to my Name."

"Did you ask Mr. Hannam for it?"

"Never. I asked Mr. Hannam why he placed it opposite to my Name; and he said that I might have had it if I called for it. I said, "It is a very strange sort of Proceeding to place my Name opposite;" and I believe I said, "You might as well have placed Twenty-one Pounds opposite to The Duke of Wellington's Name, and said that he might have had it if he came for it."

"Did not you state just now, that Mr. Hannam stated that he had paid you Twenty-one Pounds?"

"No."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then George Cocking was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name George Cocking?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"When were you admitted; in what Year?"

"Twelve or Fourteen Years since; I cannot say what Year."

"How long before the Election of 1818 were you admitted?"

"A Year or Two."

"Did you promise your Vote in the Year 1818?"

"Yes."

"To whom?"

"To Messieurs Evans and Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election; any Packet, or any Money?"

"I received a Package afterwards."

"One or Two Packages?"

"I think it was One; I am not certain."

"Think again; was it One or Two, after the Election in 1818?"

"I cannot positively say."

"What did the Package contain?"

"It contained Twenty Guineas."

"Now you have recollected what it contained, were there One or Two Packages, after the Election of 1818?"

"I cannot positively say whether there were One or Two."

"What do you believe; whether you had One or Two?"

"I cannot positively say whether I received more than One Package or not."

"Whom did you promise for the Election of 1820?"

"Evans and Crompton."

"Did you receive any Packages after that Election?"

"Yes; I received Two."

"What did they each contain?"

"They each contained Twenty Guineas."

"Did you promise your Vote in 1826?"

"Yes."

"To whom?"

"I promised one to Sir Robert Dundas."

"To whom did you promise the other?"

"To Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"Do you know Mr. Hornby?"

"Yes."

"Did you see him at the Time you were canvassed for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"I was not canvassed for Sir Henry Wright Wilson; when I saw him first I did not know that Sir Henry Wright Wilson was going to come."

"When Sir Henry Wright Wilson canvassed you for your Vote, where was it; in London or Retford?"

"In London."

"Did you see Mr. Hornby with him?"

"No, I did not."

"Did you afterwards see Mr. Hornby with him?"

"I saw Mr. Hornby with him afterwards at the Grecian Coffee House in the Temple; I think when he gave his Canvass Dinner."

"Did you receive any Money from Mr. Hornby?"

"Not at that Time, I did not."

"Did you afterwards receive any Money from Mr. Hornby?"

"No, I did not."

"Had you before that Time received any Money from him?"

"Yes."

"Between the seeing Sir Henry Wright Wilson and the Canvass Dinner at the Grecian Coffee House, you received some Money from Mr. Hornby?"

"Yes. When Mr. Hornby first came, he brought a Letter from some of my Friends that I expected to receive some from; and I said I am in very great Trouble; and I said I wanted a Friend; and I gave him a Note for it."

"What did he give you before you gave him the Note?"

"Nothing at all."

"No Money?"

"No, nothing at all before I gave him the Note."

"When you gave him the Note, what Money did he give you?"

"He gave me Five Pounds."

"Have you ever paid him again?"

"No; it has never laid in my Power; but he has offered the Note for Payment."

"How long before the Election of 1826 was this Money paid you by Mr. Hornby?"

"I cannot say."

"For whom did you afterwards vote?"

"I voted for Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"Did you vote for Sir Robert Dundas also?"

"No."

"For any body else?"

"No."

"Did you receive any thing from the Friends of Sir Robert Dundas?"

"No; I never spoke to the Friends of Sir Robert Dundas nor Sir Henry Wright Wilson in my Life."

"Is that your Name and Handwriting- "George Cocking?" (The Signature to a Petition being shewn to the Witness.)

"No, it is not."

"Is there any Freeman of Retford of the Name of George Cocking besides yourself?"

"No other as I know of."

"Did you authorize your Name to be written, if it is not your Writing -"George Cocking?"

"No, I do not know that I did."

"Was the Petition presented to you; was this Parchment presented to you for Signature?"

"I do not know that it was."

"Recollect you are upon your Oath."

"I do not know that it was."

"Do you mean to state before their Lordships, that you do not know whether this Petition was presented to you for Signature, or not?"

"I cannot say that it was."

"Will you swear that is not your Handwriting?"

"I will."

"Will you swear you did not authorize any one to put your Name to this Petition?"

"I signed no Petition but one that was to be heard by Counsel at the Bar."

"Look at that, and tell me whether that is not the Petition that you speak of. Is not that your Handwriting?" (The Signature being shewn to the Witness.)

"It is."

"Will you state to their Lordships why you took Five Minutes to say it was your Handwriting, after having denied it?"

"I knew I had signed no Petition but one, and I could not say what Petition that was."

"Why did you take Five Minutes to state that to be your Handwriting when it was shewn to you, and you denied it; why did not you admit it at once, when it was shewn to you? Do you mean to give any Answer?"

"I do not know what Answer to give."

(By a Lord.) "Did they ever shew you the Heading of the Petition; they only shewed you the Signature?"

"Only the Signature. They told me it was to be heard by Counsel at the Bar."

"The Counsel only shewed you the Name just now?"

"Yes."

"You were not bound to know, from what he asked you, what the Petition was for?"

"No."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"What are you?"

"I am one of the Police Force at this present Time."

"What were you in the Year 1826?"

"A Cowkeeper."

"Where did you live?"

"I lived in the Cornwall Road, Lambeth."

"Do you mean that you had Cows of your own, and sold Milk?"

"Yes."

"How long had you been in that Line of Business?"

"I think Three or Four Years; somewhere thereabouts."

"Was it there that Sir Henry Wilson canvassed you?"

"Yes."

"How long before the Election of 1826 was it that Sir Henry Wilson canvassed you?"

"I cannot positively say."

"I do not ask you within a Week or a Month?"

"I should think about Six Months; Five or Six Months."

"Do you mean Five or Six Weeks or Months?"

"From Four to Six Months, I should think."

"Was he alone when he came to you?"

"No. I did not see him at the present Time; but I was informed by my Mistress, that Mr. Yatman and Sir Henry Wright Wilson had called upon me, and John Taylor had come with them to shew them my Place."

"Did you at any Time see Sir Henry Wright Wilson himself?"

"I never saw him himself but at the Canvass Dinner."

"Was that the Dinner at the Grecian Coffee House, you have referred to?"

"Yes."

"How long before the Election was that?"

"I cannot exactly say."

"How long was it after Sir Henry Wright Wilson and Mr. Yatman had called upon you, accompanied by Taylor?"

"No; I think it was by Hudson, not by Taylor."

"How long was it after that Visit?"

"I should think somewhere about Four Months, as near as I can speak."

"What was Mr. Hornby; did you know him before?"

"No, I did not."

"Had Mr. Hornby any thing to do with Sir Henry Wilson?"

"Not at that present Time; I do not know that he had."

"You saw him at the Grecian Coffee House?"

"No; I saw him in Smithfield."

"Was he coming to see you by Appointment?"

"I was informed that he had come, and brought a Letter for me."

"A Letter from Retford?"

"Yes."

"Mr. Hornby was a Retford Man?"

"Yes."

"He was an Attorney there?"

"He was at that Time."

"Did your Family live at Retford?"

"A great many Years."

"Was Mr. Hornby a Retford Man?"

"No; not until he came to live there."

"How long have you left Retford?"

"Eight or Nine Years."

"Do you know when Mr. Hornby went there?"

"I cannot say."

"Was the Letter from any of your Family?"

"Yes."

"Was it upon that Occasion you asked him to lend you the Money?"

"It was. They disappointed me."

"Who disappointed you?"

"I think it was Appleby. I said I was in great Trouble, and did not know what to do. He made a Reply, "If you be fast for a Friend, I will lend you a Trifle."

"That was when he brought you a Letter from Retford?"

"Yes."

"You gave him a Note, we understand?"

"Yes."

"Where did you get the Stamp?"

"He was at the Mitre Coffee House; I met him in Smithfield, and he said, "Come to me over Night, and I will lend you the Money."

"Where did you go to?"

"I went to meet him, I think, at the Mitre Coffee House."

"Then he did lend you the Money, and you gave him the Note in return?"

"I gave him the Note, and he gave me the Money."

"What has become of that Note?"

"He has it at this present Time."

"He has applied to you for Payment?"

"No. He offered it to Robert Hudson, for to pay Mr. Pettinger's Bill, in Smithfield."

"Who is Robert Hudson?"

"A Freeman."

"Who is Mr. Pettinger?"

"He is a Publican that lives in Smithfield."

"Do I understand you correctly, that Mr. Hornby offered your Bill to somebody else, to pay that Man's Bill to Pettinger?"

"Yes."

"So as to pass it away?"

"Yes."

"Do you know whether it was indorsed?"

"I think, to the best of my Recollection, it was. He was sitting down to Dinner at the Time, and I think that was the Reason he did not indorse it."

"Did he send for a Stamp?"

"Yes."

"Was it a Loan from Mr. Hornby to you, to assist you in your Distress?"

"Yes."

"Has Mr. Hornby ever spoken to you upon the Subject?"

"No; I have not seen him since, except at the Election when I was down."

"How long was that after the Note was given?"

"I should think about Eight Months."

"You promised to vote for Sir Robert Dundas?"

"Yes."

"You did not do so?"

"No."

"Why did not you vote for Sir Robert Dundas?"

"Because it was reported in Town that Sir Robert Dundas would not accept one Vote unless he accepted the other from Mr. Wrightson too."

"Why did you vote for Sir Henry Wilson?"

"I do not know."

"Was there any thing said about the Political Opinions of Sir Robert Dundas?"

"Yes; but I was not able to discourse with him."

"Did you ever hear from Mr. Hornby any thing about the Word "Joss"?"

"No, never a Word."

"Have you seen Mr. Hornby only once or twice?"

"Once, I think."

"Once when you got the Loan in Smithfield; once at the Grecian Coffee House; and once at the Election?"

"I saw him at Smithfield when he brought me the Letter, and the Night after at the Grecian Coffee House, and a long Time after with Sir Henry Wilson."

"You never heard him make use of any of those Expressions?"

"No, I never did."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then James Bailey was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Burgess of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Burgess?"

"I cannot exactly say."

"About how many Years?"

"I cannot say to the Year exactly."

"Was it about the Year 1808 you became a Burgess?"

"Perhaps it may have been; it was somewhere about that Time."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1818, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates for the first Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"After that Election, did you receive any Money?"

"I cannot say exactly as to receiving any Money."

"Did you receive any Packets?"

"Yes, I believe I did."

"How many?"

"At the Two Elections, I suppose?"

"After the Election of 1818, how many Packets did you receive?"

"I never made any Contract with any Gentleman whatever concerning the Election."

"How many Packets did you receive after the Election of 1818?"

"For both the Elections?"

"How many, after the Election of 1818, did you receive; One or Two?"

"Two."

"What did those Two Packets contain?"

"I did not open them exactly myself."

"What did those Packets contain?"

"I expect they contained Twenty Pounds each."

"Was it Twenty Pounds, or Guineas?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"In the Year 1820, did you promise your Vote to Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans again?"

"Yes."

"What did you receive after the Election of 1820?"

"The same."

"Are you at present a Magistrate of the Town of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Is that your Handwriting?" (The Signature to a Petition on the Table of the House being shewn to the Witness.)

"Yes."

"Have you read that Petition?"

"I looked at it."

"Is that your Name and Handwriting?"

"It is."

"In the Year 1826, did you promise your Vote to any Gentleman?"

"Yes."

"To whom?"

"I cannot exactly say who the Candidates were in that Year."

"The Three Candidates were Sir Robert Dundas, Mr. Wrightson and Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"I promised my Votes to Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"Are you a Freeman of any other Borough?"

"No."

"Have you any Freehold in the Hundred of Bassetlaw?"

"Yes."

"When was it you signed that Petition which has been shewn to you?"

"I cannot exactly say how long ago it was."

"Was it a Week ago, or a Month ago?"

"I cannot say exactly to the Day; it was better than a Week."

"How long have you been in Town?"

"A Fortnight."

"Was it signed before you came to Town?"

"Yes."

"Was it signed a Week before you came to Town?"

"No, I think not."

"When did you receive your Summons; was it after you signed the Petition, or before?"

"After I signed the Petition; no; I believe before."

"Were you one of the Returning Officers at the last Election?"

"No."

"Who is the Returning Officer; the Senior or the Junior Bailiff?"

"Both."

"You are now one of the Bailiffs?"

"Yes."

"At the last Election, you voted for Mr. Wrightson and Sir Robert Dundas?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Promise from them?"

"No."

"Did you receive any thing from either of them?"

"No."

"Do you know any thing of the Birmingham Club?"

"I cannot say that I do; I have heard of the Blue Club raised in Retford against the Freemen of Retford."

"Where is it held?"

"It is held at different Public Houses in Retford."

"Was that the same as the Birmingham Club?"

"I never heard it called the Birmingham Club; it is generally called the Blue Club, in Retford."

"Do you know whether Mr. Hannam is a Member of this Club?"

"There is no doubt he is."

"Do you know whether Mr. Newton is a Member of it?"

"He is, as far as I can learn."

(By a Lord.) "Do you know that Mr. Hannam is a Member of it?"

"I cannot exactly say."

"Have you ever heard, by the Rumour of the Place, that he is?"

"Yes."

(Mr. Alderson..) "They hold it at different Public Houses?"

"Yes."

"How many People voted for Sir Henry Wilson at the last Election?"

"I should think somewhere about Forty or Fifty, or so."

"Was there much Bustle at the last Election?"

"Yes."

"Any Cry of "No Popery?"

"Yes."

"Who cried "No Popery"?

"The Blue Club, chiefly."

"Was that the Club which you said was about to disfranchise the Borough?"

"Yes."

"So they cried "No Popery?"

"Yes."

"Was that one of the Means they took to disfranchise the Borough?"

"Yes; there is no doubt that it is. They tried all the Means they possibly could."

"All Means; good, bad, and indifferent?"

"Yes."

"On any former Election, had you had any Promise at all, when you say you received those Packets?"

"No, I had no Promise at all."

"Do you know whether it is the Custom in other Boroughs to make Presents of that sort?"

Mr. Law objected to the Question.

Examined by the Lords.

"You were at the contested Election between Mr. Wrightson, Sir Robert Dundas, and Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"Yes, I was."

"There was a great deal of Rioting, was there not?"

"Yes, there was."

"Were you ever at the Market Cross during that Election? Is not there a Market Cross or a Market Stone?"

"The Broad Stone."

"Did Sir Henry Wright Wilson make a Speech from the Broad Stone?"

"Yes."

"Did he talk very much about the Pope?"

"Yes."

"Did he say it would be very dangerous?"

"Yes."

"That the Pope-what did he say that the Pope would do?"

"I cannot exactly say what he said the Pope would do; but he said a great deal about the Consequences of the Pope and the Gridiron Work; and he talked about burning in Smithfield, and talking in that kind of way."

"The Burden of his Song was the Gridiron Work and burning at Smithfield?"

"Yes."

"Did he say nothing about any Englishman connected with Popery?"

"I cannot exactly say the Words; I was not there all the Time."

"Did you hear nothing about any staunch Defenders of the Protestant Constitution?"

"I cannot say."

"Either Peer or Commoner; here or elsewhere?"

"I cannot say; I was not there all the Time."

"You did not hear any body mentioned as a Champion against the Pope, did you?"

"No, I cannot say that I did."

"Did you ever hear of a Parson named Parson Brooks?"

"Yes."

"Did you ever read a Pamphlet written by Parson Brooks?"

"I cannot say that I ever did."

"You have heard of it, perhaps?"

"Yes, I have."

"Did not the Parson tell the Burgesses, that if they voted for Dundas and Wrightson they would introduce Popery into the Kingdom?"

"Something of that kind."

"Did not he say they were Friends to Catholic Emancipation?"

"I believe he said that."

"Did not he say they would be all damned?"

"I cannot say as he did."

"Did not he recommend to them to break their Promises to Wrightson and Dundas?"

"Something of that kind, I believe."

The Examination was objected to.

The Counsel and Witness were directed to withdraw.

The Counsel and Witness were again called in; and the Witness was asked, "Did he not say it would be doing God a Service?"

"Something of that kind."

The Counsel and Witness were directed to withdraw.

It was moved to resolve, "That the following Question be put, "Do you know this of your own Knowledge?"

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

It was moved, "That the further Consideration of the said Bill be adjourned to Thursday next."

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Negative.

The Counsel and Witness were again called in; and the Question was put as follows:

"Do you know this of your own Knowledge?"

"Yes."

"You know that Parson Brooks said so?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off to Thursday next; and that the Lords be summoned.

Witnesses discharged from further Attendance on it.

Ordered, That William Wake, William Elvidge, Christopher Whatmough, John Taylor and George Cocking be discharged from further Attendance on this House upon the Second Reading of the last-mentioned Bill.

Werneth, &c. Roads Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for improving and maintaining the Road from Werneth to Littleborough, and other Roads communicating therewith, in the County of Lancaster."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

L. Bp. London.
L. Bp. Lichfield & Coventry.
L. Bp. Lincoln.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Bp. Rochester.
L. Bp. Oxford.
L. De Clifford.
L. Willoughby de Broke.
L. Petre.
L. Clifton.
L. Teynham.
L. Colville of Culross.
L. Napier.
L. Boyle.
L. King.
L. Monson.
L. Montfort.
L. Grantham.
L. Holland.
L. Montagu.
L. Braybrooke.
L. Gage.
L. Auckland.
L. Dawnay.
L. Calthorpe.
L. Rolle.
L. Bayning.
L. Ribblesdale.
L. Fitz Gibbon.
L. Carbery.
L. Dufferin & Claneboye.
L. Dunalley.
L. Ellenborough.
L. Arden.
L. Sheffield.
L. Barham.
L. Mont Eagle.
L. Manners.
L. Hill.
L. Meldrum.
L. Melbourne.
L. Prudhoe.
L. Ormonde.
L. Glenlyon.
L. Ravensworth.
L. Bexley.
L. Penshurst.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Feversham.
L. Tenterden.
L. Clanwilliam.
L. Durham.
L. Skelmersdale.
D. Cumberland.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. President.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Norfolk.
D. Leeds.
D. Wellington.
M. Lansdowne.
M. Salisbury.
M. Bute.
M. Anglesey.
E. Derby.
E. Denbigh.
E. Westmorland.
E. Winchilsea & Nottingham.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Albemarle.
E. Rosebery.
E. Ferrers.
E. Hardwicke.
E. De Lawarr.
E. Radnor.
E. Mansfield.
E. Carnarvon.
E. Malmesbury.
E. Caledon.
E. Limerick.
E. Charleville.
E. Harewood.
E. Minto.
E. Verulam.
E. Brownlow.
E. Morley.
E. Beauchamp.
E. Howe.
E. Stradbroke.
E. Vane.
E. Amherst.
V. Arbuthnott.
V. Maynard.
V. Duncan.
V. St. Vincent.
V. Melville.
V. Lorton.
V. Gordon.
V. Goderich.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet To-morrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Mercurii, duodecimum diem instantis Maii, horâ decimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Footnotes

* This Evidence is inserted in the Appendix to this Volume, Appendix No. 1, commencing No. 295 in the Margin.