House of Lords Journal Volume 62
14 May 1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 62: 14 May 1830', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 62: 1830, pp. 397-427. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16348 Date accessed: 21 August 2014.


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Contents

Die Veneris, 14 Maii 1830.
Lindsay v. Jaffray & Mercer. Sir J. Montgomery et al. v. M. of Queensberry, & Selkrig. Bruce v. Bruce. Stewart v. Fullarton et al. Munro & Rose v. Drummond et al. Mullins et al. v. Townsend. Morgan v. Evans et al. et e con: Petitions of all Parties for further Time for their Cases, referred to Appeal Com ee. James & Spencer v. Price & Gott. Com rs of Charitable Donations et al. v. Harris et al. Climbing Boys in sweeping Chimnies, Petition from Chichester against Employment of. Hop Duty, Petition from Mayfield for Repeal of. Anatomy, Petition of Worcestershire Medical & Surgical Society respecting. Tiverton Roads Bill, Petition against. Distress of the Country, Petition from Randwick respecting, & for Reduction of Taxation. Poor Laws, Petition from Roscommon against Introduction of, into Ireland. East India, &c. Trade, Petitions from Walsall & Leicester for opening, referred to East India Comee. Beer Trade, Petition from Ilkeston against proposed Changes in the Licensing System. Greenwich Hospital, Petition of Merchant Seamen of Scarborough against contributing to. Distress of Ship Owners, Petition from Scarborough for Relief. D'Oyly's Divorce Bill. Kidwelly, &c. Inclosure Bill. Waterford Roads Bill. Little Addington Inclosure Bill. D'Oyly's Divorce Bill, Commons Amendment agreed to. Limerick Road Bill, Petition against, referred to the Com ee: All Lords added to the Com ee: Com ee to appoint a Chairman. Papers delivered from Ireland: Annual Report on Education: 18th Report of Com rs of Public Accounts: Compensation to J. Brenan. East India Co's Annual Revenue Accounts delivered, & referred to East India Com ee. Staines Bridge Account delivered. Foreign Grain, Petition from Belfast for Leave to grind. Criminal Laws, Petitions for Alteration of: (Limerick:) (Limerick:) Athlone: Sligo: Cork: Falmouth. Tithe Laws, Petition from Devon for Alteration of. Spirits, (Ireland,) Petition from Athlone against additional Duty on. Stamps, (Ireland,) Petition from Athlone against additional Duty on. Coals, Petition from St. Paul's, Dublin, for Repeal of Duty on Import of, into Ireland. Sunday Markets & Sunday Labour in the West Indies, Petition from Ipswich for Abolition of. Hamerton's Divorce Bill. Navy Pay Bill: Ross Improvement Bill: Stamford Road Bill: Great Strickland, &c. Inclosure Bill: Birmingham & Edgehill Road Bill: Messages to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to the 5 preceding Bills. Dundee & Newtyle Railway Bill: Message to H.C. with an Amendment to it. Mildmay Leave for a Divorce Bill: Bill presented: Order for 2d Reading: Petitioner to attend. Richmond Lunatic Asylum (Dublin) Bill. Leases for Linen Manufacture (Ireland) Bill. Doe v. Vardill, in Error, Judges to attend. Bp. Lincoln et al. v. Rennell, in Error, Judges to attend. Giles v. Grover & Pollard, in Error, Judges to attend. Mellish v. Richardson, in Error, Judges to attend. Cadell v. Palmer et al. Judges to attend. Bulkley v. Wilford, Respondent's Petition for Time for her Case, referred to Appeal Com ee. Sir W. P. Campbell's Estate Bill, Report of Judges in Ireland read, & referred to the Com ee. Welsh Iron & Mining Co's Estate Bill, Petition against, referred to the Com ee: All Lords added to the Com ee: Perring to attend the Com ee: Hungerford Market Bill. Dunham Bridge Bill. Hollingrake's Patent Bill. Bath Hospital Bill. Caithness Roads & Statute Labour Bill. Cowfold Roads Bill. Glasgow Royalty Extension Bill. Louth, &c. Roads Bill. London Assurance Companies Bill. Walsall, &c. Roads Bill. D. of Buccleuch's Estate Bill. Monks Risborough Inclosure Bill. Manchester Improvement Bill. Sir W. G. Cumming's Estate Bill. Rawlings's Estate Bill. Barnwell Tithes Bill. Cromford Bridge Road Bill. Little Bolton Improvement Bill. New Sarum Poor Rates Bill. Tweed Fisheries Bill. Wareham Roads Bill. St. Helens & Runcorn Gap Railway Bill. Derby Roads Bill. Stafford Improvement Bill. Charminster Inclosure Bill. Tiverton Roads Bill Specially reported. Ashburton Roads Bill. Great Dover Street, &c. Improvement Bill. Kingston Bridge Bill. Tonbridge Roads Bill. Kingston-upon-Hull & Hedon Road Bill. Ld. Cremorne's Estate Bill, Ellis's Petition to take his Consent in Ireland. East Retford Election Bill: Witnesses examined as to the State of Health of W. Cartwright: Witnesses to attend: 2d Reading postponed: Witnesses discharged from further Attendance. E. of Mexborough's Claim, Com ee to meet. Adjourn.

Die Veneris, 14 Maii 1830.

DOMINI tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar.
Ds. Lyndhurst, Cancellarius.
Epus. Lich. et Cov.
Epus. Rapoten.
Vicecom. Duncan.
Vicecom. Melville.
Vicecom. Lorton.
Vicecom. Granville.
Ds. Teynham.
Ds. Boyle.
Ds. King.
Ds. Monson.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Sundridge & Hamilton.
Ds, Lyttelton.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. De Dunstanville & Bassett.
Ds. Rolle.
Ds. Bayning.
Ds. Bolton.
Ds. Fitz Gibbon.
Ds. Carbery.
Ds. Dufferin & Claneboye.
Ds. Dunalley.
Ds. Ellenborough.
Ds. Arden.
Ds. Barham.
Ds. Mont Eagle.
Ds. Hill.
Ds. Churchill.
Ds. Glenlyon.
Ds. Delamere.
Ds. Bexley.
Ds. Penshurst.
Ds. Somerhill.
Ds. Farnborough.
Ds. Feversham.
Ds. Durham.
Ds. Wallace.
Comes Bathurst, Præses.
Comes Rosslyn, C. P. S.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Rutland.
Dux Newcastle.
Dux Wellington.
March. Lansdowne.
March. Salisbury.
March. Bute.
March. Camden.
March. Anglesey.
March. Cleveland.
Comes Winchilsea & Nottingham.
Comes Chesterfield.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Rosebery.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Hardwicke.
Comes De Lawarr.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Hillsborough.
Comes Norwich.
Comes Mansfield.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Wicklow.
Comes Caledon.
Comes Minto.
Comes Verulam.
Comes Brownlow.
Comes Morley.
Comes Bradford.
Comes Glengall.
Comes Eldon.
Comes Falmouth.
Comes Vane.

PRAYERS.

Lindsay v. Jaffray & Mercer.

The Answer of William Jaffray junior and William Mercer to the Petition and Appeal of William Lindsay was this Day brought in.

Sir J. Montgomery et al. v. M. of Queensberry, & Selkrig.

After hearing Counsel fully in the Cause wherein Sir James Montgomery Baronet, and others, are Appellants, and Charles Marquess of Queensberry and Charles Selkrig are Respondents:

It is Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Cause be put off to Monday the 24th of this instant March.

Bruce v. Bruce.

Ordered, That the Cause wherein James Carstairs Bruce Esquire is Appellant, and Thomas Bruce Esquire is Respondent, be taken into further Consideration on Monday the 24th of this instant May; and that a Copy of the Deed of Entail, referred to in the said Appeal, be laid before the House.

Stewart v. Fullarton et al.

Ordered, That the Cause wherein Frederick Campbell Stewart Esquire is Appellant, and Stewart Murray Fullarton Esquire, and others, are Respondents, be taken into further Consideration on Monday the 24th of this instant May; and that a Copy of the Deed of Entail of the Ascog Estate, referred to in the said Appeal, be laid before the House.

Munro & Rose v. Drummond et al.

Ordered, That the Cause wherein Mrs. Catharine Munro and Hugh Rose her Husband are Appellants, and Andrew Berkeley Drummond Esquire, and others, are Respondents, be taken into further Consideration on Monday the 24th of this instant May.

Mullins et al. v. Townsend.

After hearing Counsel, in Part, in the Cause wherein The Honorable Edward Mullins, and others, are Appellants, and John Townsend Esquire is Respondent:

It is Ordered, That the further Hearing of the said Cause be put off to Monday next.

Morgan v. Evans et al. et e con: Petitions of all Parties for further Time for their Cases, referred to Appeal Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of Francis Morgan, Appellant in a Cause depending in this House, wherein Herbert Evans, and others, are Respondents, et e contra; praying their Lordships, "That further Time may be allowed him until the first Day of the next Session of Parliament, or such other Day as to their Lordships, in their great Wisdom, shall seem proper, for laying the Print of his Case in both the said Appeals upon the Table of their Lordships House:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Upon reading the Petition of John Jenkins and Philip Hurd, Two of the Respondents in the last-mentioned Cause; praying their Lordships, "That further Time until the first Day of the next Session of Parliament, or such other Time as to their Lordships, in their great Wisdom, shall seem proper, may be allowed the Petitioners for laying the Print of their Cases in the abovementioned Appeals upon the Table of their Lordships House:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Upon reading the Petition of Herbert Evans, One of the Respondents in the Original and Appellant in the Cross Appeal last-mentioned; praying their Lordships, That further Time until the first Day of the next Session of Parliament, or such other Time as to their Lordships, in their great Wisdom, shall seem proper, may be allowed the Petitioner for laying the Print of his Case in the above-mentioned Appeals upon the Table of their Lordships House:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

James & Spencer v. Price & Gott.

Ordered, That the Cause wherein Thomas James and James Spencer are Appellants, and James Price and William Augustus Gott are Respondents, be heard by Counsel at the Bar on Monday next.

Com rs of Charitable Donations et al. v. Harris et al.

Ordered, That the Cause wherein The Commissioners of Charitable Donations, and others, are Appellants, and Thomas Harris, and others, are Respondents, be heard by Counsel at the Bar on Monday next.

Climbing Boys in sweeping Chimnies, Petition from Chichester against Employment of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Chichester and its Vicinity, associated for the Purpose of introducing Machinery in the sweeping of Chimnies, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That a Penalty may be attached to the placing or receiving of Children as Apprentices to Chimney Sweepers as shall amount to a perfect Prohibition of the Practice, unless such Children shall severally have attained the Age of Fourteen Years:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Hop Duty, Petition from Mayfield for Repeal of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Hop Planters of the Parish of Mayfield, in the County of Sussex, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to repeal the New or War Duty on Hops:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Anatomy, Petition of Worcestershire Medical & Surgical Society respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Worcestershire Medical and Surgical Society; complaining of the great Hardships which the Petitioners, in common with all other Members and Students of the different Branches of the Professions of Medicine and Surgery, are labouring under, from the present State of the Law, which, by impeding a most important Branch of Medical Education, the Practice of Dissection, throws almost insurmountable Difficulties in the Way of acquiring a Knowledge of Anatomy; and praying their Lordships, "That in any Bill passed for the Regulation of the Study of Anatomy Provision may be made for the Transfer of Bodies to any Part of the United Kingdom, as otherwise Difficulties will still oppose themselves to the Study of this important Art in Edinburgh, Glasgow and other Places; and that, in order to do away with the Stigma that now attaches to Dissection, the dead Bodies of Murderers be no longer given up to the Anatomist, as a Part of the Punishment for their Crimes, since the Petitioners verily believe this Practice has tended to encrease the popular Odium against Dissection:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Tiverton Roads Bill, Petition against.

Upon reading the Petition of the Owners and Occupiers of the Lands in the Parish of Oakford, in the County of Devon, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act for improving several Roads, and making certain new Roads, in the Counties of Devon and Somerset, leading to and from the Town of Tiverton; and for amending an Act of His present Majesty for repairing several Roads leading from and through the Town of Wiveliscombe;" and praying their Lordships "to expunge from the said Bill the intended new Line of Road from the Turnpike Road near Rackenford, through the said Parish of Oakford, into the Wiveliscombe Turnpike Road, in the Parish of Knowstone, all in the County of Devon; and that the Petitioners may have Leave, by themselves and their Agents, to be heard against the said Bill, so far as concerns the said intended new Line of Road, before the Committee of their Lordships:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Distress of the Country, Petition from Randwick respecting, & for Reduction of Taxation.

Upon reading the Petition of the Freeholders and Inhabitant Householders in the Parish of Randwick, in the County of Gloucester, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will take their Case into their most serious Consideration, and by a Reduction of Taxation, and by equalizing Parochial Burdens, (either by a general Rate through the Kingdom, or upon some large Divisions thereof,) or by such other Means as to the Wisdom of their Lordships shall seem meet, to alleviate their present distressed and ruinous Condition:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Poor Laws, Petition from Roscommon against Introduction of, into Ireland.

Upon reading the Petition of the Landowners and Landlords of the County of Roscommon, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will not sanction the Introduction of Poor Laws into this Part of the United Kingdom:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

East India, &c. Trade, Petitions from Walsall & Leicester for opening, referred to East India Comee.

Upon reading the Petition of The Mayor, Commonalty, Merchants, Manufacturers and other Inhabitants of the Borough and Foreign of Walsall, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That at the Expiration of the Charter now held by The East India Company all British Subjects may have the Privileges of a Free Trade with those Parts, and Liberty to settle in the British Eastern Possessions, under such Regulations as their Lordships may, in Concurrence with the other Branches of the Legislature, direct, in reference to the general Interests of the Empire, and not in deference to any existing Monopoly:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Select Committee appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town of Leicester and its Neighbourhood, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, That no Time may be lost in putting an end to The East India Company's Monopoly of Trade at the earliest Period allowed by Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the lastmentioned Committee.

Beer Trade, Petition from Ilkeston against proposed Changes in the Licensing System.

Upon reading the Petition of the several Owners and Occupiers of Licensed Victualling Houses residing in or near the Parish of Ilkeston, in the County of Derby, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will not sanction the proposed Changes in the Licensing System, a Measure so pregnant with Mischief to the Petitioners, and, in the Opinion of the Magistrates of the Kingdom generally, as the Petitioners believe, so prejudicial to Public Morals:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Greenwich Hospital, Petition of Merchant Seamen of Scarborough against contributing to.

Upon reading the Petition of the Trustees, in the Name and on behalf of the Merchant Seamen of the Port of Scarborough and its Dependencies, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to relieve them from the Contribution of Sixpence per Month to Greenwich Hospital; and also to alter or amend the Merchants Seamen's Act, so as to apply the same to their own Fund, from which they would receive the full Advantage of their Industry:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Distress of Ship Owners, Petition from Scarborough for Relief.

Upon reading the Petition of the Ship Owners of the Port of Scarborough, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to appoint a Committee to take into Consideration the increasing Sufferings of the Ship Owner, and the ultimate Danger resulting to the Country at large, and adopt such decisive Measures as may afford speedy and effectual Relief to a numerous and now declining Class of His Majesty's Subjects:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

D'Oyly's Divorce Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Thomas Baring and others;

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of John Hadley D'Oyly Esquire with Charlotte his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again, and for other Purposes;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to the same, with One Amendment, to which they desire their Lordships Concurrence.

Kidwelly, &c. Inclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr.Rice Trevor and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands within the several Parishes of Kidwelly, Saint Mary in Kidwelly, Saint Ishmael and Pembrey, in the County of Carmarthen;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Waterford Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr.Corbett and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving several Roads leading from the Bounds of the County of Cork to the City of Waterford;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Little Addington Inclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Corbett and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parish of Little Addington, in the County of Northampton;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Three Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

D'Oyly's Divorce Bill, Commons Amendment agreed to.

The House proceeded to take into Consideration the Amendment made by the Commons to the Bill, intituled, An Act to dissolve the Marriage of John Hadley D'Oyly Esquire with Charlotte his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes."

And the said Amendment, being read Three Times by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

And, A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Giffin Wilson and Mr. Eden, to acquaint them therewith.

Limerick Road Bill, Petition against, referred to the Com ee:

Upon reading the Petition of Peirce Mahony of Merrion Square, in the City of Dublin; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act for improving and repairing the Road leading from Newcastle, in the County of Limerick, to the City of Limerick, and from thence to Charleville, in the County of Cork;" and praying their Lordships "to permit the Petitioner to be heard before the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed against several of the Clauses and Provisions of said Bill, by himself, his Counsel or Agents:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed, and that the Petitioner be at liberty to be heard against the same by himself, his Counsel or Agents, as desired; and that Counsel be heard for the Bill at the same Time if they think fit.

All Lords added to the Com ee:

Ordered, That all the Lords who have been or shall be present this Session, and are not named of the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed, be added thereto.

Com ee to appoint a Chairman.

Ordered, That the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed do appoint their own Chairman.

Papers delivered from Ireland:

The House being informed, "That Mr. Johnson, from the Office of the Chief Secretary for Ireland, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to the Directions of several Acts of Parliament,

Annual Report on Education:

"Annual Report from the Commissioners of Education in Ireland to His Excellency The Lord Lieutenant, for the Year ending the 25th March 1830:"

18th Report of Com rs of Public Accounts:

Also, "The Eighteenth Report of the Commissioners for auditing Public Accounts in Ireland:"

Compensation to J. Brenan.

And also, "A Copy of the Certificate filed by The Right Honorable The Lord Chancellor in the Office of the Auditor General in Ireland, in the Matter of the Petition and Claim of John Brenan Esquire, one of the Six Clerks of the Court of Chancery in Ireland, for Compensation for One Year ended the 2d November 1829; together with a Copy of The Lord Lieutenant's Warrant thereon."

And then he withdrew.

And the Titles thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Papers do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said first-mentioned Report be printed.

East India Co's Annual Revenue Accounts delivered, & referred to East India Com ee.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Preston, from the Court of Directors of The East India Company, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to the Directions of an Act of Parliament,

"1. An Account of the Annual Revenues and Charges of Bengal, under the respective Heads thereof, for Three Years, according to the latest Advices; with an Estimate of the same for the succeeding Year:"

Also, "2. A Comparison of the Estimated and Actual Revenues and Charges of Bengal for the Year 1827/28:"

Also, "3. An Account of the Revenues and Charges of Fort St. George, under the respective Heads thereof, for Three Years, according to the latest Advices; with an Estimate of the same for the succeeding Year:"

Also, "4. A Comparison of the Estimated and Actual Revenues and Charges of Fort St. George for the Year 1827/28:"

Also, "5. An Account of the Revenues and Charges of Bombay, under the respective Heads thereof, for Three Years, according to the latest Advices; with an Estimate of the same for the succeeding Year:"

Also, "6. A Comparison of the Estimated and Actual Revenues and Charges of Bombay for the Year 1827/28:"

Also, "7. An Account of the Revenues and Charges of Prince of Wales Island, Singapore, Malacca and St. Helena, for Three Years, according to the latest Advices; with an Estimate of the same for the succeeding Year:"

Also, "8. General Abstract View of the actual Revenues and Charges of India for Three Years, according to the latest Advices; with an Estimate of the same for the succeeding Year, shewing the Net Revenue, the Amount paid for Interest on Debts, and the remaining Surplus Revenue or Surplus Charge:"

Also, "9. Abstract Statement of the Receipts and Disbursements of the Bengal Government, from 1st May 1827 to 30th April 1828:"

Also, "10. Abstract Statement of the Receipts and Disbursements of the Madras Government, from 1st May 1827 to 30th April 1828."

Also, "11. Abstract Statement of the Receipts and Disbursements of the Bombay Government, from 1st May 1827 to 30th April 1828:"

Also, "12. Abstract Statement of the Receipts and Disbursements of Prince of Wales Island, Singapore and Malacca, for 1827/28:"

Also, "13. An Account of the Balance of Quick Stock, exhibiting a State of the Company's Affairs in respect of their Assets and Debts, as they stood at the several Presidencies of Fort William, Fort St. George, Bombay and Prince of Wales Island at the Conclusion of the Year 1827/28:"

Also, "14. Amount of Bond and other Debts owing by The East India Company at their several Presidencies in the East Indies on the 30th April 1828, the Rates of Interest which such Debts respectively carry, and the Annual Amount of such Interest:"

Also, "15. Abstract Estimate of the probable Receipts and Disbursements of the Bengal Government, from the 1st May 1828 to 30th April 1829:"

Also, "16. Abstract Estimate of the probable Receipts and Disbursements of the Madras Government, from the 1st May 1828 to 30th April 1829:"

Also, "17. Abstract Estimate of the probable Receipts and Disbursements of the Bombay Government, from the 1st May 1828 to 30th April 1829:"

Also, "18. Abstract Estimate of the probable Receipts and Disbursements of Prince of Wales Island, Singapore and Malacca, for 1828/29:"

Also, "19. An Account of the Annual Charges defrayed by The East India Company for the Management of their Trade and Commerce in Bengal, Madras, Bombay Bencoolen and Prince of Wales Island, also an Account of the Factory Charges at Canton, for Three Years, according to the latest Advices, with an Estimate of the same for the succeeding Year:"

Also, "20. An Account of the Amount received at the several Presidencies of Fort William, Fort St. George, Bombay and Prince of Wales Island, for Sales of Import Goods, for Three Years, according to the latest Advices; with an Estimate for the same for the succeeding Year:"

And also, "21. An Account of the Prime Cost of all Cargoes purchased by The East India Company in India and shipped for Europe, for Three Years, according to the latest Advices."

And then he withdrew.

And the Titles thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Accounts do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Accounts be referred to the Select Committee appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China.

Staines Bridge Account delivered.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Randolph Horne, from the Commissioners of Staines Bridge, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to the Directions of an Act of Parliament,

"An Account of the Receipts and Disbursements of the Tolls and other Monies collected and raised by virtue of the Act for building a Bridge over the River Thames at Staines, in the County of Middlesex, from the 26th of March 1829 to the 25th of March 1830."

And then he withdrew.

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Account do lie on the Table.

Foreign Grain, Petition from Belfast for Leave to grind.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town of Belfast, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to permit Foreign Grain to be admitted into the Country to be ground, on Bond being given that an equivalent Quantity of Flour shall be returned into bonded Warehouses:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Criminal Laws, Petitions for Alteration of: (Limerick:)

Upon reading the Petition of the Local Directors and Manager of the Provincial Bank of Ireland at Limerick, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

(Limerick:) Athlone:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Local Directors and Manager of the Provincial Bank of Ireland at Athlone, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Sligo:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Local Directors and Manager of the Provincial Bank of Ireland at Sligo, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Cork:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Local Directors and Manager of the Provincial Bank of Ireland at Cork, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; severally praying, "That their Lordships will not withhold from them that Protection to their Property which they would derive from a more lenient Law than the Infliction of Death for Forgery:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Falmouth.

Upon reading the Petition of The Mayor and Corporation of the Town of Falmouth, in the County of Cornwall, and others, Inhabitants of the said Town and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to decide on the Abolition of Capital Punishment for all Descriptions of Forgery:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Tithe Laws, Petition from Devon for Alteration of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the County of Devon, being all either Owners of Land or Payers or Receivers of Tithes, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will, at as early a Period in this Session of Parliament as the Business of the Nation will allow, take into their most serious Consideration the present State of the Tithe Laws and the Effects now resulting from them; also the Changes which have occurred since they were framed; and that, after a strict and mature Investigation of the Question in all its relative Bearings, they will be pleased to adopt such Measures and make such Arrangements as shall appear to their Lordships to be consistent with Justice to the Payers and Receivers of Tithes, and most beneficial to the general Interests of Religion, and those of the Community at large:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Spirits, (Ireland,) Petition from Athlone against additional Duty on.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town of Athlone and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will legislate for Ireland in a parental Spirit, uphold her only Hope, her Agriculture, by continuing the present Protection to Home-made Spirits:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Stamps, (Ireland,) Petition from Athlone against additional Duty on.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town of Athlone and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "not to encrease the present Rate of Stamp Duties, being already sufficiently oppressive to the Interests of Ireland:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Coals, Petition from St. Paul's, Dublin, for Repeal of Duty on Import of, into Ireland.

Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Manufacturers, Traders, Householders and other Inhabitants of the Parish of Saint Paul, in the City of Dublin, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, That all Duties, whether Local or General, on the Importation of Coals into Ireland may be forthwith repealed:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Sunday Markets & Sunday Labour in the West Indies, Petition from Ipswich for Abolition of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Protestant Dissenters of the Baptist Persuasion meeting for Religious Worship at Stoke Green Chapel Ipswich, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Sabbath may be effectually secured to the Slaves as a Day of Rest and entire Relaxation from Labour, and be open to be devoted to Religious Instruction and Worship: That Sunday Markets and Sunday Labour may be prohibited; and that sufficient Time be allowed on other Days for the Cultivation of Provisions, and marketting: That the Slave Population may be allowed to attend for the Purpose of receiving Religious Instruction at all Times, without Let or Hindrance, when the Labours of the Day are ended; and that no Infringement upon Religious Liberty may be allowed:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Hamerton's Divorce Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of William Medows Hamerton Esquire with Isabella Frances his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Monday next.

Navy Pay Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to amend and consolidate the Laws relating to the Pay of the Royal Navy."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Ross Improvement Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for paving, cleansing, draining, lighting, watching, regulating and improving the Town of Ross, and for disposing of certain Common and Waste Lands and Rights of Common within the Parish of Ross, in the County of Hereford."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Stamford Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving the Road leading from the Town of Stamford to the Division Stone in South Witham, in the County of Lincoln."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Great Strickland, &c. Inclosure Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Townships of Great Strickland and Thrimby, in the Parish of Morland, in the County of Westmorland."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Birmingham & Edgehill Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for repairing the Road from Birmingham, through Warwick and Warmington, in the County of Warwick, to the utmost Limits of the said County on Edgehill."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to the 5 preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Giffin Wilson and Mr. Eden;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Dundee & Newtyle Railway Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled "An Act to amend an Act for making a Railway from Dundee to Newtyle."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, with the Amendment, shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. with an Amendment to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To return the said Bill, and acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the same, with One Amendment, to which their Lordships desire their Concurrence.

Mildmay Leave for a Divorce Bill:

A Petition of Edward St. John Mildmay, a Captain in His Majesty's 10th Regiment of Foot; praying their Lordships, "That Leave may be given to bring in a Bill to dissolve his Marriage with Marianne Catherine his Wife, and to enable him to marry again," being offered to be presented to the House;

The House was informed, "That Mr. George Harding was attending."

He was Ordered to be called in:

And being called in accordingly, and sworn at the Bar, delivered a Copy of the Proceedings for a Divorce a Mensâ et Thoro, and the Definitive Sentence of Divorce in the Arches Court of Canterbury, intituled, "Mildmay against Mildmay," which he said he had examined with the Originals, and that the same were true Copies:

And then he withdrew.

Ordered, That the said Proceedings and Sentence do lie on the Table.

Then the said Petition was presented and read.

Ordered, That Leave be given to bring in a Bill according to the Prayer of the said Petition.

Bill presented:

Accordingly, The Earl of Shaftesbury presented to the House a Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Captain Edward St. John Mildmay with Marianne Catherine his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned."

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Order for 2d Reading:

Ordered, That the said Bill be read a Second Time on Monday the 31st of this instant May, and that Notice thereof be affixed on the Doors of this House, and the Lords summoned; and that the said Captain Edward St. John Mildmay may be heard by his Counsel, at the said Second Reading, to make out the Truth of the Allegations of the Bill; and that the said Marianne Catherine may have a Copy of the Bill, and that Notice be given her of the said Second Reading; and that she be at liberty to be heard by her Counsel what she may have to offer against the said Bill, at the same Time.

Petitioner to attend.

Ordered, That Captain Edward St. John Mildmay do attend this House on Monday the 31st of this instant May, in order to his being examined upon the Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Captain Edward St. John Mildmay with Marianne Catherine his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned," if the House shall think fit, whether there has or has not been any Collusion, directly or indirectly, on his Part, relative to any Act of Adultery that may have been committed by his Wife; or whether there be any Collusion, directly or indirectly, between him and his Wife, or any other Person or Persons, touching the said Bill of Divorce, or touching any Proceedings or Sentence of Divorce had in the Ecclesiastical Court at his Suit, or touching any Action at Law which may have been brought by him against any Person for Criminal Conversation with his the said Captain Edward St. John Mildmay's Wife; and also, whether, at the Time of the Adultery of which he complains, his Wife was, by Deed, or otherwise by his Consent, living separate and apart from him, and released by him, as far as in him lies, from her conjugal Duty, or whether she was, at the Time of such Adultery, cohabiting with him, and under the Protection and Authority of him as her Husband.

Richmond Lunatic Asylum (Dublin) Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for appropriating the Richmond Lunatic Asylum in Dublin to the Purposes of a District Lunatic Asylum."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Leases for Linen Manufacture (Ireland) Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to confirm certain Leases of Lands for the Purposes of carrying on the Linen Manufacture of Ireland."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Doe v. Vardill, in Error, Judges to attend.

Ordered, That the Errors assigned upon the Writ of Error wherein John Doe, on the Demise of John Birtwhistle, is Plaintiff, and Agnes Vardill is Defendant, be argued by Counsel at the Bar on Wednesday the 26th of this instant May; and that the Judges do then attend.

Bp. Lincoln et al. v. Rennell, in Error, Judges to attend.

Ordered, That the Errors assigned upon the Writ of Error wherein George Lord Bishop of Lincoln, and others, are Plaintiffs, and Frances Henrietta Rennell Widow is Defendant, be argued by Counsel at the Bar on Wednesday the 26th of this instant May; and that the Judges do then attend.

Giles v. Grover & Pollard, in Error, Judges to attend.

Ordered, That the Errors assigned upon the Writ of Error wherein Daniel Giles Esquire is Plaintiff, and Harry Grover and James Pollard are Defendants, be argued by Counsel at the Bar on Friday the 4th of June next; and that the Judges do then attend.

Mellish v. Richardson, in Error, Judges to attend.

Ordered, That the Errors assigned upon the Writ of Error wherein William Mellish is Plaintiff, and George Richardson is Defendant, be argued by Counsel at the Bar on Friday the 4th of June next; and that the Judges do then attend.

Cadell v. Palmer et al. Judges to attend.

Ordered, That the Cause wherein Thomas Cadell Esquire is Appellant, and Arthur Palmer, and others, are Respondents, be heard by Counsel at the Bar on Monday the 7th of June next; and that the Judges do then attend.

Bulkley v. Wilford, Respondent's Petition for Time for her Case, referred to Appeal Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of Anna Wilford, Respondent in a Cause depending in this House, to which George Wilford Bulkley is Appellant; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to grant an Order allowing the Petitioner the same Time to lay her Case upon the Table of their Lordships House as their Lordships shall be pleased to grant to the Appellant:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Sir W. P. Campbell's Estate Bill, Report of Judges in Ireland read, & referred to the Com ee.

The Report of the Judges in Ireland, to whom a printed Copy of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable Sir William Purves Hume Campbell of Marchmont, Baronet, and the Heirs of Entail of the Lands and Barony of Greenlaw, in the County of Berwick, to grant Feus of Parts of the said Lands and Barony; and for other Purposes therein mentioned," was referred, to take the Consents of Mrs. Eliza Hannah Wauchope Widow and Major William H. Rainey, Two of the Guardians of Andrew Wauchope, was read.

Ordered, That the said Report be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed.

Welsh Iron & Mining Co's Estate Bill, Petition against, referred to the Com ee:

Upon reading the Petition of Thomas Henry Parker of Camden Place, Camden Town, in the County of Middlesex, Esquire; William Davies of North Audley Street, in the said County of Middlesex, Coal Merchant; and William Dobree of Craven Lodge, Fulham, in the County of Surrey, Esquire; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act for dissolving a certain Partnership Company known by the Name of "The Welsh Iron and Coal Mining Company," and for enabling the Directors and Trustees thereof to dispose of the Estate and Effects of the Concern, and divide the Surplus, after Payment of Debts and Expences, amongst the Shareholders of the Capital Stock therein; and for other Purposes;" and praying their Lordships, "That the same may not pass into a Law; and that the Petitioners may be heard by their Counsel, Solicitors or Agents against such Parts of the said Bill as affect their Rights and Interests:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed, and that the Petitioners be at liberty to be heard by their Counsel, Solicitors or Agents against the same, as desired; and that Counsel be heard for the Bill, at the same Time, if they think fit.

All Lords added to the Com ee:

Ordered, That all the Lords who have been or shall be present this Session, and are not named of the Committee to whom the last-mentioned Bill stands committed, be added thereto.

Perring to attend the Com ee:

Ordered, That Philip Perring do attend this House on Monday next, to be sworn, in order to his being examined as a Witness before the Committee to whom the lastmentioned Bill stands committed.

Hungerford Market Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to incorporate certain Persons to be called "The Hungerford Market Company," for the Re-establishment of a Market for the Sale of Fish, Poultry and Meat, and other Articles of general Consumption and Use; and for other Purposes."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

V. Duncan.
V. Melville.
V. Lorton.
V. Granville.
L. Bp. Lichfield & Coventry.
L. Bp. Raphoe.
L. Teynham.
L. Boyle.
L. King.
L. Monson.
L. Holland.
L. Sundridge & Hamilton.
L. Lyttelton.
L. Calthorpe.
L. De Dunstanville & Bassett.
L. Rolle.
L. Bayning.
L. Bolton.
L. Fitz Gibbon.
L. Carbery.
L. Dufferin & Claneboye.
L. Dunalley.
L. Ellenborough.
L. Arden.
L. Barham.
L. Mont Eagle.
L. Hill.
L. Churchill.
L. Glenlyon.
L. Delamere.
L. Bexley.
L. Penshurst.
L. Somerhill.
L. Farnborough.
L. Feversham.
L. Durham.
L. Wallace.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. President.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Richmond.
D. Rutland.
D. Newcastle.
D. Wellington.
M. Lansdowne.
M. Salisbury.
M. Bute.
M. Camden.
M. Anglesey.
M. Cleveland.
E. Winchilsea & Nottingham.
E. Chesterfield.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Rosebery.
E. Ferrers.
E. Stanhope.
E. Hardwicke.
E. De Lawarr.
E. Radnor.
E. Hillsborough.
E. Norwich.
E. Mansfield.
E. Carnarvon.
E. Wicklow.
E. Caledon.
E. Minto.
E. Verulam.
E. Brownlow.
E. Morley.
E. Bradford.
E. Glengall.
E. Eldon.
E. Falmouth.
E. Vane.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Monday next, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Dunham Bridge Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for building a Bridge over the River Trent, from Dunham, in the County of Nottingham, to the opposite Shore in the County of Lincoln."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Hollingrake's Patent Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for prolonging the Term of certain Letters Patent granted to John Hollingrake, for an improved Method of manufacturing Copper or other Metal Rollers, and of casting and forming Metallic Substances into various Forms with improved Closeness and Soundness of Texture."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Bath Hospital Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for altering and amending an Act passed in the Twelfth Year of the Reign of His Majesty King George the Second, for establishing and well-governing an Hospital or Infirmary in the City of Bath, and for constructing Baths therein, and supplying the same with Water from the Hot Baths in the said City."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Wednesday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Caithness Roads & Statute Labour Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for making, repairing, widening and keeping in Repair certain Roads and Bridges in the County of Caithness, and for better regulating and rendering more effectual the Statute Labour in the said County, and Conversion Money in lieu thereof."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Monday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Cowfold Roads Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing the Roads from Hand Cross, through Cowfold, to Corner House, and from thence to the Turnpike Road from Horsham to Steyning, and from Corner House aforesaid to the Maypole, in the Town of Henfield, and certain Branches therefrom, all in the County of Sussex."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Glasgow Royalty Extension Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for extending the Civil and Criminal Jurisdiction of the Magistrates and the Town or Burgh and Dean of Guild Courts of Glasgow over the Lands of Blythswood and adjacent Lands; and for amending the Acts relating to the Police of the said City."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Louth, &c. Roads Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for, more effectually repairing and improving the Roads from Saltfleet to the Town of Horncastle, and other Roads therein mentioned, all in the County of Lincoln."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

London Assurance Companies Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable the London Assurance Companies and their Successors to purchase Annuities upon or for Lives, and also to lend Money or Stock upon Mortgage, for the Purpose of Investment."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Walsall, &c. Roads Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for improving and maintaining the Road leading from Walsall to Muckley Corner, near Lichfield, and other Roads, in the County of Stafford."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

D. of Buccleuch's Estate Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for exchanging the Estates in the County of Northampton of which The Most Noble Walter Francis Douglas Montagu Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry is Tenant in Tail under the Will of The Most Noble John late Duke of Montagu, deceased, for some of his Settled Estates in the Counties of Lancaster and York of which he is Tenant for Life under the Will of The Most Noble Elizabeth late Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry, deceased."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Tuesday the 25th of this instant May, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Monks Risborough Inclosure Bill.

Ordered, That the Sitting of the Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parish of Monks Risborough, in the County of Buckingham," which stands appointed for Monday next, be put off to Wednesday next.

Manchester Improvement Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act to amend several Acts for supplying the Town of Manchester with Gas, and for regulating and improving the same Town," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Sir W. G. Cumming's Estate Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for selling the Entailed Estates of Gordonstown, and others, in the Counties of Elgin and Banff, belonging to Sir William Gordon Gordon Cumming Baronet, or so much thereof as may be necessary, and to apply the Price arising therefrom in the Payment of the Debts affecting or that may be made to affect the said Lands and Estates," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made some Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Rawlings's Estate Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for vesting the legal Estate in certain Estates late of Mrs. Ann Budgen, formerly vested in Elizabeth Pedder deceased in Mortgage, in Edward Rawlings, the present Mortgagee and Trustee of the Equity of Redemption thereof," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made One Amendment thereto."

Which Amendment, being read Twice by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendment, be ingrossed.

Barnwell Tithes Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act to commute for Lands and a Corn Rent the ancient Compositions in lieu of Tithes and Glebe Lands payable to the Rector of the Parish of Barnwell Saint Andrew with Barnwell All Saints annexed, in the County of Northampton," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Cromford Bridge Road Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving the Road from Cromford Bridge to the Turnpike Road at or near Langley Mill, in the County of Derby," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made One Amendment thereto." Which Amendment was read by the Clerk as follows; (viz t.)

"Pr. 2. L. 32. Leave out ("Day of June") and insert ("Monday")"

And the said Amendment, being read a Second Time, was agreed to by the House.

Little Bolton Improvement Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually cleansing, paving, lighting, watching, regulating and improving the Township of Little Bolton, in the County Palatine of Lancaster," was committed; That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

New Sarum Poor Rates Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for better assessing and recovering the Rates for the Relief of the Poor within the City of New Sarum, and enlarging the Powers of an Act passed in the Tenth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, intituled, "An Act for consolidating the Rates to be made for the Relief of the Poor of the respective Parishes of Saint Thomas, Saint Edmund and Saint Martin, in the City of New Sarum," was committed.

Tweed Fisheries Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual Preservation and Increase of the Breed of Salmon, and for better regulating the Fisheries in the River Tweed, and the Rivers and Streams running into the same, and also within the Mouth or Entrance of the said River," was committed.

Wareham Roads Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving several Roads leading from the Market Cross, in the Town of Wareham, and in Purbeck, in the County of Dorset," was committed.

St. Helens & Runcorn Gap Railway Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for making a Railway from the Cowley Hill Colliery, in the Parish of Prescot, to Runcorn Gap, in the same Parish, (with several Branches therefrom,) all in the County Palatine of Lancaster; and for constructing a Wet Dock at the Termination of the said Railway at Runcorn Gap aforesaid," was committed.

Derby Roads Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving certain Roads between the Towns of Derby, Mansfield and Nutthall, in the Counties of Derby and Nottingham," was committed.

Stafford Improvement Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for paving, lighting, watching, cleansing, regulating and improving the Streets, Lanes and other Public Passages and Places within the Borough of Stafford, in the County of Stafford," was committed.

Charminster Inclosure Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands within the Parish of Charminster, in the County of Dorset," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Tiverton Roads Bill Specially reported.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Bill, intituled, An Act for improving several Roads and making certain new Roads in the Counties of Devon and Somerset, leading to and from the Town of Tiverton; and for amending an Act of His present Majesty, for repairing several Roads leading from and through the Town of Wiveliscombe;" "That the Committee had met, and considered the said Bill, and, in the first place, proceeded to enquire how far the Standing Orders of the House relative to Road Bills had been complied with, and found that all the said Orders had been complied with, except in the following Particular; viz t. that Notice of the Bill, containing Mention of a proposed Amendment of the Wiveliscombe Road Act, referred to in the Bill, had only been inserted Twice in the County Newspapers (Woolmer's Exeter and Plymouth Gazette of the 21st and 28th of November, the Devonport Telegraph and Plymouth Chronicle of the 21st and 28th of November, and Keen's Bath Journal of the 23d and 30th of November 1829,) within the Period prescribed by the Standing Orders, viz t. August, September, October or November, as it was stated to the Committee by the Solicitor for the Bill that he did not know that it was necessary to mention such proposed Amendment, as the Trustees for the said Act were assenting to the Measure, and that when he was informed of such Necessity by the his Parliamentary Agent, it was too late to give the Third Notice in the Month of November; but that it was proved to the Committee that a Third Insertion of such Notice was given in the Beginning of December, (viz t. on the 5th of December 1829 in the said Two firstmentioned Newspapers, and on the 7th of December in the last-mentioned Newspaper,) and that, upon the Notices so published of such Amendment, Leave was given by the House of Commons to the Parties to proceed with their Bill; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to their Lordships, without any Amendment."

Which Report being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Report do lie on the Table.

Ashburton Roads Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving several Roads to and from or near to the Towns of Ashburton and Totness, in the County of Devon," was committed; That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Great Dover Street, &c. Improvement Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for paving, lighting, cleansing and otherwise improving such Parts of Great Dover Street, Trinity Street, Trinity Square, and the Highways, Roads, Streets, Markets and other Public Passages and Places leading out thereof or abutting thereon or adjacent thereto, all within the Parishes of Saint Mary Newington and Saint George the Martyr Southwark, in the County of Surrey, as do not fall within the Powers and Provisions of any existing Acts of Parliament," was committed.

Kingston Bridge Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending the Provisions of an Act passed in the Sixth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for the rebuilding of Kingston Bridge, and for improving and making suitable Approaches thereto," was committed.

Tonbridge Roads Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending and improving the Road from Tonbridge to Ightham, and other Roads communicating therewith, in the County of Kent," was committed.

Kingston-upon-Hull & Hedon Road Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury also made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, An Act for making and maintaining a new Turnpike Road from the Town of Kingston-upon-Hull, in the County, of the said Town, to Hedon, in the County of York," was committed.

Ld. Cremorne's Estate Bill, Ellis's Petition to take his Consent in Ireland.

Upon reading the Petition of Thomas Ellis of the City of Dublin, Esquire, the Guardian appointed by the High Court of Chancery in Ireland of the Fortunes of The Right Honorable Richard Lord Cremorne, an Infant, on behalf of the said Infant; praying their Lordships, "That the Petitioner's Consent to the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable the Guardian of The Right Honorable Richard Lord Cremorne, an Infant, to carry into Effect a Contract entered into for the Purchase of Rockcorry Castle and adjoining Lands in the County of Monaghan, in Ireland," may be signified before Mr. Justice Torrens and Mr. Justice Vandeleur, or Two other of the Judges in Ireland; and for that Purpose a Copy of his Petition for such Bill, and Report of the English Judges thereon, and a printed Copy of the said Bill, may be referred to such Two Judges in Ireland:"

It is Ordered, That a printed Copy of the said Bill, attested by the Clerk of the Parliaments, be, and the same is hereby referred to Mr. Justice Torrens, in Ireland, and Mr. Justice Vandeleur, in Ireland, who are forthwith to summon the said Thomas Ellis, and to take his Consent to the said Bill, as the Guardian of the said Richard Lord Cremorne; and thereafter to report to the House, under their Hands, whether the said Thomas Ellis has appeared before them the said Mr. Justice Torrens and Mr. Justice Vandeleur, and consented to the same as such Guardian; and that the said Mr. Justice Torrens and Mr. Justice Vandeleur do sign the said printed Copy of the said Bill.

East Retford Election Bill:

The Order of the Day being read for the further Consideration and Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, An Act to prevent Bribery and Corruption in the Election of Burgesses to serve in Parliament for the Borough of East Retford;" and for the Lords to be summoned; and for permitting Counsel to examine Witnesses in support of the Bill; and for hearing Counsel on the Petition of the Burgesses of the Borough of East Retford, in the County of Nottingham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, praying their Lordships, "That the said Bill may not pass into a Law;"

Counsel were accordingly called in.

Then Thomas Slaney was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Thomas Slaney?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of East Retford?"

"I believe so; yes, I am."

"When were you admitted a Burgess?"

"About Thirty Years ago."

"To whom did you promise your Vote in the Election of 1812?"

"To Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"No, I did not receive any Money; yes, I received One Pound."

"Of whom did you receive that?"

"Of Mr. Hannam."

"Where?"

"At the Angel Inn."

"Was that in October 1814, or thereabout?"

"Somewhere thereabout; I cannot speak exactly to the Day."

"Was the Sum of One Pound all you received?"

"It was all I received myself."

"Did any one receive any Money on your Account?"

"I saw an Account of Mr. Hannam's, that he said he had received some for me before that."

"Had Mr. Hannam previously advanced you any Sum of Money?"

"No; I never got any Money of Mr. Hannam, except that Sum."

"Did any body else receive any Money on your Account of Mr. Hannam?"

"No, not that I know of; not from Mr. Hannam."

"Did Mr. Hannam lend you any Money, for which you gave a Note?"

"No; I never gave any Note to Mr. Hannam."

"Do you mean to state to their Lordships, that you received only One Pound by way of Loan, or otherwise?"

"Mr. Hannam said he had laid down Twenty Pounds for me; but he never gave the Money to me."

"Did any other Person receive it for your Use?"

"I do not know exactly whether they did or not. I dare say they might; but they never told me that they had."

"To whom did you promise your Vote in the Election of 1818?"

"To Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election."

"There were some Packages and Letters put into the House."

"What did those Packages contain?"

"I did not open them; my Wife opened them."

"When they were opened, what did they contain?"

"I dare say Twenty-one Pounds, to the best of my Knowledge."

"Whom did you promise in the Election of 1820?"

"Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans."

"Did you receive any Packages after that Election?"

"Yes."

"What did they contain?"

"The same Amount."

"Twenty-one Pounds each?"

"Yes."

"What was the first Election after which you received any Money; you say you have been a Burgess about Thirty Years?"

"I never received any at any Time but at that Time, and I never made any Bargain for my Vote at any Time to any one."

"Do you mean to state that you have received Election Money only upon the Five several Occasions you have mentioned?"

"Five I have not said."

"One from Mr. Hannam, Two Packages in 1818, and Two in 1820?"

"I do not say that those were on Elections."

"Do you mean to state to their Lordships that the Sum of One Pound after the Election of 1812, and the Sums of Twenty Guineas each after the Election of 1818, and the Sums of Twenty Guineas each after the Election of 1820, are the only Sums you have received in respect of any Elections?"

Mr. Adam objected to the Question, as assuming that which the Witness had not stated.

"I declare I made no Bargain for Money. I do not know that those were for Election Purposes. I have received that Money in 1818 and 1820."

(Mr. Law.) "Will you state to their Lordships any possible Reason for which you could have received it except in respect of Elections?"

"I have no Reasons whatever; for I never made any Bargains for my Vote, nor asked any Gentleman for a Farthing."

"Can you state any Reason to their Lordships for the Receipt of that Money?"

"I do not know any Reason for it. I do not know how it came into the House; when I was in Bed at Night, the Door was opened, and it was thrown in."

"Upon what Account, upon your Oath, do you believe it was so received by you?"

"I cannot give no Account of that."

"Do you mean to state to their Lordships that you have no Belief upon the Subject?"

"It might, or it might not; I cannot exactly say how it came or by whom, for I do not know."

"State to their Lordships your Belief upon the Subject; do you believe or not that it had respect to the Election?"

"I really cannot say; perhaps it might."

"Upon your Oath, have you any Doubt about that?"

"It might be the Case."

"Have you the slightest Doubt about it?"

"It might be the Case, I really cannot say,"

"Have you the slightest Doubt of it?"

"I cannot speak to that, I am sure."

(By a Lord.) "You can say whether you have any Doubt?"

"It might be for that Purpose"

"Can you say whether you have any Doubt or not?"

"I have not a Doubt but that it might be the Case."

(Mr. Law.) "Have you any Doubt that it was the Case?"

"Well I cannot say."

"Have you any Doubt that it was the Case?"

"It might be the Case."

"Have you any Doubt that it was?"

"I do not know, I cannot speak to that exactly."

"You have been Thirty Years a Burgess?"

"Yes, and I speak the Truth to the best of my Knowledge."

"Having been Thirty Years a Burgess, have you any Doubt it was?"

"It might be for that Purpose."

"Have you any Doubt it was?"

"Nobody ever told me it was for that Purpose."

"Have you any Doubt that it was?"

"I do not know."

"You will not go 'till you answer the Question?"

"It might be the Case; I dare say it was."

"Have you any Doubt it was?"

"I cannot say."

"Have you any Doubt whatever that it was in respect to the Election?"

"I dare say it was for that Purpose; I have no Doubt that it might be."

"Have you any Doubt that it was?"

"I do not know how to answer that Question."

"You know whether you have a Doubt or not; nobody else has probably?"

"Then I have no Doubt that it was."

"Are you acquainted with many of the Freemen?"

"Yes; I know some of them."

"Will you name One or Two that you are intimate with?"

"I know a many."

"Mention One of the many that you have conversed with upon the Subject of Elections?"

"I do not know that I have conversed with any on the Subject of Elections."

"Have you had any Conversation with Freemen?"

"Concerning receiving Money do you mean?"

"Have you had any Conversation with the Freemen in respect of Elections?"

"Yes, I have had a many Times a Conversation with respect to electioneering."

"Have you ever heard from them, whether they were fortunate enough to receive Packages?"

"No, I never did."

"Not from one of your numerous Acquaintance?"

"No."

"Did you ever hear them speak on the Subject of Mr. Marsh?"

"Yes; I can speak myself, you know."

"Have you ever heard the Freemen speak upon the Subject of Mr. Marsh?"

"Yes; I have heard that several Times, of course."

"Have you not heard Complaints from the Freemen in respect of Mr. Marsh?"

"No, I never did."

"Do you mean to say you have never heard that Gentleman complained of by the Freemen?"

"No; he was elected honourably."

"Did you receive any Packet after his Election?"

"No."

"Did you ever hear his not having sent Packages the Subject of Complaint from the Freemen?"

"No; he was chosen freely. I never heard any Complaint."

"Do you mean to state that you never heard the Freemen complain of Mr. Marsh not having sent Packets?"

"No; when we promised our Votes we never made any Bargain for Money, and therefore there could be no Complaint."

"Was the Fact so that there was a Complaint?"

"I do not know that there was any Complaint."

"Will you look at that?" (The Petition against the Bill being shewn to the Witness.) "Do you find your Name signed there?"

"Yes, it is there."

"That is your Name and Handwriting, "Thomas Slaney?"

"I do not know that that is my Handwriting, but I gave Sanction to its being signed."

"It was signed by your Authority, but not in your Handwriting?"

"Yes."

"Do you know Mr. Fox?"

"Yes, very well."

"Have you seen him at the Time of Elections?"

"Yes; I have seen him at the Time of Election many Times."

"Have you seen him when the Candidates were canvassing?"

"No, never."

"Do you know his Handwriting?"

"No, I cannot say that I do."

"You, perhaps, do not know Handwriting when you see it?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"Do you happen to know the Handwriting on the Packages in which the Twenty Guineas were inclosed which you received?"

"I did not see any Handwriting; I never opened them."

"Whom did you vote for in the Year 1826?"

"For Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"Did you see Sir Robert Dundas in the Canvass of 1826?"

"Yes."

"Did you see Mr. Wrightson?"

"Yes."

"Did they canvass you for your Vote themselves?"

"Yes."

"You promised them themselves?"

"Yes."

"Was any thing said about Money upon that Occasion?"

"No, nothing whatever."

"Nor any thing said about Things being all right?"

"No."

"Or Joss?"

"No."

"Did you ever hear the Word "Joss?"

"Yes, many Times; when Two or Three go to get a Gill of Ale, One says I will stand Joss for you, that is the Meaning of it, to the best of my Knowledge."

"Did you ever hear it used in reference to any thing but Ale?"

"No, never, or Liquor of any kind."

"One pays, and all have a Share of what is bought?"

"Yes."

"Did you ever hear the Word "Tip?"

"No, I do not know that I have."

"Or "all right?"

"No."

"When did you sign that Petition?"

"I did not sign it myself."

"When did you authorize it to be signed?"

"I cannot speak to the Day exactly; but a little Time before the meeting of the Lords."

"What do you call a little Time before the meeting of the Lords?"

"When I was summoned."

"How long before you were summoned?"

"I cannot exactly say."

"When were you summoned?"

"On the 28th of April."

"Do you know the Turk's Head?"

"Yes."

"Do you know whether there is a Birmingham Club held there?"

"I believe there is."

"What is the Landlord's Name?"

"It is a Landlady; Mrs. Ann Clark."

"Do you ever go to the Turk's Head yourself?"

"Very seldom; but I go sometimes, because I am in a sick Club that meets there."

"Do you know who are the Members of the Birmingham Club?"

"No, I cannot speak to that."

"What Business are you in?"

"I am a Cordwainer."

"Were you at the Election in 1826?"

"Yes."

"At the Poll?"

"Yes."

"Did you see any Stones thrown at the Returning Officer?"

"No; I was not there at the Time."

"Was the Town quiet, or was there any Disturbance?"

"It was quiet Part of the Time, while the polling was over."

"Do you remember the Military being sent for?"

"Yes."

"On what Day was that; was it the Day of the polling?"

"Yes, the Day of the polling."

"Are you a Freeman of any other Town?"

"No."

"In 1812 did you promise Mr. Marsh as well as Mr. Osbaldeston?"

"Yes."

Examined by the Lords.

"Did any body desire you to sign that Petition?"

"No."

"Are you to pay any Part of the Expences of prosecuting that Petition?"

"No, not that I know of."

"Have you paid any?"

"No."

"You do not expect to pay any?"

"No."

"Have you appointed any Agent or Counsel to prosecute that Petition?"

"No."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Broxholme Slaney was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Freeman of Retford?"

"Nine-and-thirty Years."

"Do you remember the Election of 1812, when Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh were Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Did you upon that Occasion promise your Vote to those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"After that Election did you receive any Money?"

"I do not know that I did for that Purpose; I received some at one Time; but whether for that Purpose I cannot say."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election of 1812?"

"Nobody never told me it was for that Purpose; I did receive some."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"I did."

"Where was it?"

"At the Angel Inn."

"Was Mr. Hannam present?"

"Yes."

"Was any other Person present?"

"There was another old Gentleman, but I did not know him."

"How much did you receive?"

"I am sure I do not know whether it was Twenty Pounds or Twenty Guineas."

"Who gave it you?"

"It was either the old Gentleman or Mr. Hannam; which it was I do not know."

"Do you remember the Election of 1818, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates for the first Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Yes."

"How did you receive it?"

"It came in a Packet; may be it might be Half a Year or a Year after, I cannot say."

"Was it in One Packet or Two?"

"One."

"How much did you receive?"

"Twenty."

"Recollect yourself?"

"I got Two Packets, but not both One Night, I think."

"You received Two Packets at Two different Times?"

"Yes."

"What did they contain severally?"

"Twenty Guineas each, I think."

"Do you know who brought them to you?"

"No, I do not, indeed; they called me up in the Night, and gave them to me at the Door."

"In the Year 1821, do you recollect the Second Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to them again?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Yes, Two Packets containing Twenty each."

"Are you well acquainted with the Freemen of the Town of East Retford, having lived there so long?"

"I know a great many of them."

"Have you ever had any Conversation with them, respecting whether they were as fortunate as you?"

"Oh no; I always looked to myself; I never minded any body else."

"That is not an Answer to the Question?"

"I never conversed with any body but myself."

"Have you Two Sons?"

"No, I have only One."

"Is he a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long has he been a Freeman?"

"I am sure I do not know; about Seven-and-twenty Years, I should think. No; he has not been so long as that, he is only Twenty-seven Years old. I cannot say in what Year he was admitted."

"Did he ever vote at any Election?"

"Yes, I think he did."

"To your own Knowledge did he ever promise at any Election?"

"I do not know that he did."

"Was he a Freeman in the Year 1820, before the Second Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"I am sure I cannot say if he was a Freeman at the First Election."

"The Second Election of 1820, I ask you to?"

"Yes, he was."

"What is his Name?"

"George."

"Do you know whether he has not received Money since the Election of 1820, upon your Oath?"

"I am sure I do not know that he did."

"Had you any Conversation with him respecting it?"

"No."

"You have never heard him say any thing upon that Subject?"

"I heard him say that he got it at one Election, but which I do not know."

"What did he say he had got?"

"He did not tell me; he said he had got a Packet."

"Is he alive now?"

"Yes."

"His Name is George Slaney?"

"Yes."

"Do you mean to say that he was a Freeman in the Year 1818, the first Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"I cannot say whether he was or was not."

"But in 1820 you do remember his being a Freeman?"

"Yes."

"Was it since that Time you heard that Statement from him?"

"Yes."

"Look at that." (The Petition against the Bill being shewn to the Witness.) "Is that Signature your Name and Handwriting?"

"Yes, it is."

"Who brought that Paper to you?"

"I am sure I do not know."

"When was it brought to you?"

"I do not know; but I remember signing it in the Street."

"Who presented it to you in the Street?"

"John Richardson."

"Who is he?"

"He is a Freeman of Retford."

"Any Connection of Mr. Mee?"

"Not that I know of."

"Who is Mr. John Richardson; in what Line of Life is he?"

"He is a Shoemaker at Retford."

"Whom did you vote for in the Year 1826; Sir Henry Wright Wilson, Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson were the Candidates?"

"Wrightson and Dundas I voted for."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"How old is your Son George?"

"I am sure I cannot say how old he is."

"Is he your eldest Son?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been married?"

"He is about Thirty-six Years old."

"He would be about Twenty-six in the Year 1820; is not that so?"

"Yes."

"You said he was Twenty-seven just now?"

"Well, I meant to say Thirty-seven."

"When did he tell you that he had got a Packet?"

"It was in Crompton and Evans's last Election."

"When?"

"I do not know; it was their last Election."

"When did he tell you that he had got a Packet?"

"The Morning I got mine."

"When was that?"

"I am sure I do not know the Month."

"Do you know the Year?"

"It was after the Election."

"In what Year was that?"

"I am sure I do not know."

"If you had received it Yesterday that would be after the Election?"

"It might be Half a Year after the Election, or it might be less."

"You say you voted for Wrightson and Dundas?"

"Yes."

"Were you canvassed by them?"

"Yes."

"Did any thing pass on the Canvass about Twenty Guineas, or "it is all right," or any thing of that Kind?"

"No."

"Have you received any thing since that?"

"No."

"The last Election was in 1826; Four Years ago?"

"Yes."

"You did not receive any thing then?"

"No, nothing."

"Was there much rioting at the last Election?"

"Yes."

"Do you know whether the Senior Bailiff was struck over the Head with a Stone?"

"I cannot remember that."

"Did you see him with his Head tied up?"

"No, I did not."

"You do not know whether any other Person was equally fortunate?"

"Mr. Wrightson and Sir Robert Dundas were very illused."

"What was done to them?"

"The People that were in the Town ill-used them."

"In what Way did they ill-use them?"

"They stoned him, and tore his Coat; but I do not know who it was."

"Which of them was stoned, and which had his Coat torn?"

"I believe both of them."

"What was it for?"

"Because they did not like them; Wilson's Set did not like them, and they ill-used them."

"What was the Reason that Wilson's Set did not like them?"

"I do not know."

"Was there any Cry?"

"I never heard any Cry; indeed, I never see'd them come out of the Hall, but I heard it mentioned that they did ill-use them in their Way."

"Was there much rioting at the last Election?"

"I never see'd any."

"Do you know of any Club that is called the Birmingham Club?"

"There was a Blue Club they used to cry every Week."

"Where did they meet?"

"They used to cry it in the Town."

(Mr. Price.) "How do you know that?"

"They used to cry where they were to meet, at such a House."

(By a Lord.) "Do you know it of your own Knowledge?"

"I have heard it cried so; the Bellman has gone round the Town to cry that they were to meet at such a Place."

(Mr. Alderson.) "Have you heard the Bellman summon the Club to meet?"

"I have heard him cry the Blue Club to meet at such a Public House, such a Night."

"At what Public House?"

"They used to meet One Week at One House, and One at another."

"Do you know William Clark of the Turk's Head?"

"Yes."

"Do you know of any Club that meets at the Turk's Head?"

"No; I know the Turk's Head very well, but I do not know of any Club meeting there."

"You say you have been a Freeman Thirty-nine Years; how many Elections have you voted at altogether?"

"There was Mr. Petre's."

"Go backwards."

"Wrightson and Dundas, then Crompton and Evans Twice."

"Who was the One before that?"

"Osbaldeston and Marsh."

"Did you vote at that?"

"Yes; -the Two Inglebys, and Bowles and Petre."

"How many Packets altogether have you ever received at those Three Elections?"

"I never received any while Osbaldeston's."

"After Three Elections did you receive those Packets?"

"Yes."

"Have there been Five Elections, including the One in which no Packets have been received by you?"

"Yes."

"Including the last?"

"I got none at the last."

"Had you any Promise even on the Three you did receive?"

"No."

"Or any thing said to you, before you voted, respecting them?"

"No."

"At what Period after the Election of Mr. Osbaldeston was it you did receive that?"

"I should think not less than a Year afterwards."

"In the other Case, several Months after?"

"Yes."

"And you never had any Promise or Undertaking beforehand?"

"Never in my Life; I never had a Promise made to me before the Election in my Life."

Re-examined by Mr. Price.

"How many Elections did you vote at previously to Mr. Osbaldeston's Election; there was an Election in 1807, was there not; Sir William Ingleby's?"

"Yes."

"Did you vote at that Election?"

"Yes."

"Was there an Election in 1806; Sir John Ingleby's?"

"Yes; I voted then."

"Was there an Election in 1802, when Mr. Bowles was a Candidate?"

"Yes; I voted for him."

"Was Mr. Bowles successful?"

"No; he lost his Election."

"For whom did you vote?"

"For him."

"In the Year 1806, for whom did you vote, when Sir John Ingleby was a Candidate?"

"I voted for John Ingleby and Crawford; I think there was Crawford."

"Did you receive any thing after the Election of Mr. Crawford, and the Contest of Sir John Ingleby?"

"No."

"The Election of 1807, Sir William Ingleby's?"

"No, I voted for him and Crawford again."

"You received nothing then?"

"No."

"You stated to my Learned Friend that you had not received a Packet; did you receive any Money?"

"No."

"You received nothing after the Election?"

"No."

"Nor from any Person on their Account?"

"To my Knowledge, I never did."

"Did you receive any Money from any Person after those Three Elections, upon your Oath?"

"The first Money that I got was at Osbaldeston's, then Crompton's and Evans's; that was all which I got."

"Do you mean to say, positively, that you received no Money after those Elections, or that you do not recollect it?"

"Yes, I had none."

(By a Lord.) "Was Mr. Crawford successful in his Election?"

"He came in with Ingleby."

"Was that Petition you signed a Petition to be heard by Counsel against this Bill?"

"Yes."

"Are you to pay any Portion of the Expence of these Counsel?"

"No; I never heard any more than, "Will you sign this; and I did. I never heard what it was for, only it was a Petition to be heard by Counsel."

"You instructed no Person to employ Counsel?"

"Oh dear no."

"You do not understand that you are to pay any Part of the Expences?"

"No."

"Did you understand that the Petition was from the Freemen of Retford, praying that the Borough might not be disfranchised?"

"Yes."

"And you signed it with that View?"

"Yes; that it might not be disfranchised."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Benjamin Scott was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Benjamin Scott?"

"It is."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"I believe I am."

"Have you a Doubt of it; have you voted?"

"Yes."

"Did you vote at the last Election?"

"Yes."

"Were you admitted in 1810?"

"Yes, I believe I was."

"Do you recollect the Election, in 1812, of Mr. Marsh and Mr. Osbaldeston?"

"Very well I do."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Why, I believe I received something; but I forget now what it was."

"Was it as much as Twenty Guineas, or less?"

"Less, I believe."

"Pounds or Guineas?"

"I do not know; I cannot speak to that."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to at that Election?"

"To Mr. Marsh."

"Did you promise Mr. Osbaldeston?"

"I told him if the Candidate from the Newcastle Party did not come, I should serve him; but if he came I could not."

"What did you mean by the Newcastle Party; what was the Gentleman's Name, the Candidate for the Newcastle Party?"

"I cannot say; he was to have been the Third Man, but I cannot say what his Name was to be."

"That if the Candidate from the Newcastle Party, the Third Man, did not come you would vote for Mr. Osbaldeston?"

"Yes."

"He did not come?"

"Not that I know of."

"Did you promise your Vote after that to Mr. Osbaldeston?"

"The Election was quite at hand, and I did not come over 'till the Election came. I did not attend at the Hall, as there was no voting at the Hall."

"Did you go to the Angel about Two Years afterwards, and call on Mr. Hannam and a strange Gentleman there?"

"Yes."

"Was it on that Occasion you got a Sum of Money, the Amount of which you do not recollect?"

"I do not know; it might be; I cannot tell what was done; something allowed for my Expences of living away from Retford; and it was for that."

"How many Miles did you live from Retford, as you expected something for your Expences?"

"Between Five and Six Miles."

"Living so far as Five or Six Miles, how much was it you had for your Travelling Expences to Retford?"

"I cannot speak to the Sum."

"Was it much less than Twenty Guineas for the Five Miles?"

"It was under Twenty Guineas."

"Was it something above Nineteen?"

"I cannot speak to the Sum, it is so long since."

"Will you undertake to say it was not Nineteen?"

"I cannot speak to the Sum."

"But whatever it was you thought it was Travelling Expences for the Five Miles?"

"I did not know what it was for; I was quite a young Burgess at the Time."

"What Expences did you consider they were; were they for Travelling or otherwise?"

"I did not know. I was a young Burgess, just attained my Freedom. I had been a long while from Retford, not being apprenticed in it, that I did not know nothing about it."

"When you stated to their Lordships that you believed it was for your Expences, what did you mean?"

"I expected there would be something allowed me for the Loss of my Time; I was there Four or Five Days of the Election, and afterwards."

"Did you consider it was for the Loss of your Time?"

"I could not consider it any otherwise."

"Did you consider it was for the Loss of your Time?"

"I could not consider it otherwise."

"What were your Earnings a Day at the Time?"

"I had a Guinea a Week, and my House Rent-free, under Mr. Jackson of Markham Moor."

"And you lost Four or Five Days?"

"I employed a Man to officiate for my Work; I had him to pay."

"What do you think you got for your Expences, having employed a Man to officiate for you?"

"Perhaps I might be a Pound or Two into Pocket by it, but I do not know."

"How many Pounds did you put into your Pocket altogether?"

"I cannot speak any more to that."

"Will you undertake to say you did not receive Twenty Guineas?"

"I will."

"Will you undertake to say you did not receive Nineteen?"

"I will."

"Did you receive Fifteen?"

"I cannot speak to the Sum."

"Can you undertake to say you did not receive Ten?"

"I received some Money."

"How much did you receive?"

"I was denied on first entering the Room; I was told there was nothing for me."

"Were you more fortunate afterwards?"

"I believe I was; I received some Money, as I considered for my Expences."

"Have you any Doubt it was Ten Guineas?"

"I have no Doubt to say what it was."

"Do you believe it was Ten Guineas?"

"It might be more, or it might be less."

"We are aware of that; what do you believe it was?"

"It is of no Use my speaking it now-I cannot."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to at the Election of 1818?"

"Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans, I believe."

"Are you clear who the Persons were to whom you promised?"

"Yes; I believe they were the Two Candidates."

"After that Election did you receive any Money- any Packets?"

"Yes."

"How many Packets after the Election of 1818?"

"Two, I think."

"What did those Packets contain?"

"I think they contained Twenty Pounds."

"Pounds or Guineas-Twenty-one Pounds or Twenty Pounds?"

"Well, they might be Twenty-one Pounds."

"Have you any Doubt that they did contain Twentyone Pounds?"

"I have no Doubt they might."

"Whom did you promise at the Election in 1820?"

"The same Candidates."

"Did you receive any Packets after that Election?"

"Yes, I believe I did."

"Have you any Doubt that you did?"

"I think not."

"Have you any Doubt?"

"I have no Doubt at all."

"What did they contain, those Packets?"

"They contained, I believe, the same as those before."

"Twenty Guineas each?"

"Yes."

"Be good enough to look at that, (the Petition against the Bill being shewn to the Witness,) and state whether that is in your Handwriting?"

"Yes."

"Do you bear any Expences of this Petition against the Bill?"

"Not to my Knowledge; I do not know that I do."

"Do you employ Counsel?"

"I was asked, by the Burgesses of the Town, to employ Counsel to speak at the Bar; but I cannot say whether I am to be at any Expence at present; perhaps I may."

"Who was the managing Man for your Party, for the Freeman? Do you know Alderman Parker?"

"Yes."

"Is he an active Partizan for the Petition?"

"I believe not."

"Who is the managing Person on your Behalf?"

"I do not know; I think we are almost without an active Man."

"Do you remember, when you received One of your Packets after the Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton, whether you saw Westby Leadbeater?"

"No, I do not remember seeing him."

"Did you sign any Paper when you received One of the Packets?"

"Not to my Knowledge at all."

"Did you know Westby Leadbeater?"

"I knew him very well."

"Was he the Town Crier?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember his calling upon you at the Time the Packet was delivered?"

"He never called upon me at all."

"You did not see him?"

"No."

"Did you sign any Paper in Acknowledgment of having received any Packet?"

"No; I believe I never signed any Paper of the Kind; I never had such a thing put to me to my Knowledge."

"Do you know Thomas Bailey the Saddler?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"For Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Did you receive any Promise before you gave your Vote?"

"None at all."

"Are you sure you did not?"

"I am certain of it."

"Have you never said so?"

"Thomas Bailey perhaps was a Man that would begin to annoy and plague People, and I might say in some little Way of Nonsense, or something of that Kind; but I never had any Promise from any Person."

"Did you in a Way of Nonsense tell Thomas Bailey you had a Promise?"

"Not that I recollect any such a thing; he has told me of it, but I do not know any thing of such a thing."

"You cannot say that you did not tell Thomas Bailey you had a Promise?"

"I cannot say; indeed there have been so many People baiting us, but there never was such a thing; I never received a Farthing from any Person, neither did I expect it."

"Did not you say you had been guaranteed against the last Election?"

"I never said it to my Knowledge to any Person living."

"Not to Thomas Bailey?"

"No, not to Thomas Bailey, nor no other Person."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"A good many People have been speaking to you about promising, have they?"

"A great many."

"Did the People endeavour to make you say you had Promise?"

"No Doubt of it, and on Purpose that they might come up here to get the Expences of their coming."

"Can you tell me some of the Names of the Persons who have endeavoured to induce you to say that you had been promised?"

"I can tell you the Name of one who told me the Thursday before I came from Retford, that they would give me Thirty Guineas if I would give up my Chance; I believe he was an Enemy to our Concern."

"What was his Name?"

"His Name was Fisher."

"Is he a Freeman?"

"No."

"What is Fisher?"

"He is a Grocer."

"Do you know whether he belongs to the Birmingham Club?"

"I have no Doubt of it."

"Do you know it?"

"I did not know the Fact, for I never saw them meet before."

"Did he take a Share in any Elections though he is not a Freeman?"

"It appears as if he was taking a Share in this."

"Did he take any Share in the Election of 1826?"

"I cannot say that he took any Share in it."

"Did you see him wear any Colours?"

"No; I do not know that he did."

"Has he busied himself about this Enquiry since it began?"

"Very much; I have had several Conversations with him, and it has been chiefly upon this Subject."

"Can you tell me the Name of any One Person who has been baiting you upon this Subject?"

"I do not know: I have had several little Baits and Nonsense in those Persons saying they might beat us, and should beat us; but I did not know how they could."

"Have you got any acting Man on your Side?"

"No."

"Have not you got Mr. Hannam, or some one like him, on your Side; or Mr. Newton?"

"I wish we had."

"Have you any body like Mr. Newton on your Side?"

"No; I should be very sorry."

"Or Mr. Sharp?"

"No."

"Or Mr. Fisher?"

"No, I do not want none of them."

"Or Mr. Buttevant; do you know him?"

"Yes."

"What is he?"

"He is a Draper."

"Does he take a Share in this Proceeding?"

"I have been told so."

"Do you know whether any of those People get Witnesses together, and send them up?"

"I have no Doubt of it, by what I have heard."

"When did you sign that Petition which has been shewn to you?"

"I am sure I do not know."

"How long before you were sent for here?"

"I do not know; it bears Date at the Time."

"How do you know that you saw it on the Day it bears Date?"

"That I do not know."

"Where do you live now?"

"In East Retford."

"How long have you lived there?"

"I have lived there about Twelve Years, I think."

"Were you living there at the Election of 1818; had you come into the Town at that Time?"

"I believe not; I think I was at Markham Moor at the Time Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans canvassed me first."

"Were you a Waiter at Markham Moor?"

"I was a Blacksmith and Farrier."

"Did you keep a Shop of your own?"

"I was a Journeyman."

"On the Occasion of 1814, you state that you received only One or Two Pounds beyond that you would have made if you had remained at Home?"

"No, I am sure I did not; it was not much more."

"How long were you kept away from Home?"

"Perhaps a Week; perhaps a little more."

"Who was the Person that was expected to come into the Town for the Newcastle Party, the Third Candidate?"

"I think there was one named Dochin. I think there was, but I am not certain."

"If he had come you would have voted for him?"

"Undoubtedly."

"Why should you have voted for the Man in the Newcastle Party?"

"Because Master Jackson, my Employer, had a large Farm under The Duke of Newcastle, and the House I lived in belonged to his Noble Grace."

"Your Master rented under him, and you would have voted for the Man belonging to the Newcastle Party?"

"Yes."

"Was the Gentleman's Name that was expected Dawkins?"

"I think that was the Name."

"Did you ever see him in Retford before?"

"Not to my Knowledge."

"Has he ever come since to Retford?"

"Not to my Knowledge."

"Had you any Reason for voting for Mr. Dawkins, except that you rented under The Duke of Newcastle?"

"I thought I should be very ungrateful if I did not vote for the Friend of my Master."

"You would have done that without Consideration?"

"Yes."

"Did your Master make you a Promise that if you voted for Mr. Dawkins it should be better for you?"

"My Master knew nothing about it till the Election was over."

"You would have voted on your individual Impulse?"

"Yes."

"By the Newcastle Party, you mean the Party supporting the Interest of The Duke of Newcastle?"

"Yes."

"Is that an old Party?"

"I have no Doubt of it."

"Have you know of it ever since you knew the Town?"

"Yes."

"Have Members been returned upon that Interest?"

"They call them The Duke of Newcastle's Men."

"Tell me the Names of them; was General Crawford one of them?"

"I have no Doubt of it, though it was before my Time."

"Was Sir William Ingleby one?"

"I was not of Age at that Election."

"What was the first Election you remember since you were a Freeman?"

"Osbaldeston's."

"Osbaldeston's and Marsh's?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember Mr. Ewing being elected, or Ewan?"

"I remember the Election."

"Were you old enough to know on whose Interest he stood?"

"He was on the Newcastle Interest, as was supposed."

"Was not it notorious in the Town that he stood on the Newcastle Interest?"

"I am sure I cannot tell."

"Did not every Person say so?"

"It was said that they thought one ought to be the Go of the Day."

"Was not it as notorious as any Fact in the World, that Mr. Ewan stood in the Interest of The Duke of Newcastle?"

"It might not appear to be the Wish of the Town that he should; but it was the Case."

"He was returned?"

"Yes."

"Who was returned along with him?"

"I think General Crawford."

"Did General Crawford stand upon the Interest of The Duke of Newcastle?"

"Undoubtedly."

"Do you remember a Gentleman of the Name of Jeffery?"

"I remember the Name, but I cannot speak to knowing the Man."

"Do you remember whether Mr. Jeffery came in on the Interest of The Duke of Newcastle?"

"I have no Doubt of it."

"Did you know Sir John Eamer when he was returned for the Borough?"

"I think Sir John Eamer was not returned."

"Whose Interest did he stand on; the Newcastle Interest?"

"I do not know; he came to that Party, but I believe he ran away with the Battle on his Back."

"As long as he did fight he fought under the Duke's Colours?"

"He joined that Party."

"What were the Duke's Colours?"

"Pink."

"Were they the same Colours that Sir Henry Wright Wilson had in 1826?"

"Sir Henry Wright Wilson at his first coming had Blue, after that he took to the Pink."

"Before the Election was over he became Pink too?"

"Yes."

"The Duke of Newcastle has had a long standing powerful Interest in the Borough, has not he?"

"Yes."

"And returned many Members to Parliament?"

"I have no Doubt of it."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"Have you any Knowledge of your own, of the Duke having returned a single Member?"

"Only by what was represented to me; The Duke of Newcastle's Party."

"When was Sir John Eamer a Candidate?"

"He was a Candidate at the Time of Bowles's Election, I think."

"Were you a Burgess at the Time?"

"No."

"How old were you then?"

"I was, perhaps, about Twelve Years of Age."

"That was what you heard when you were Twelve Years of Age, which you have told my Learned Friend?"

"Yes."

"Did you state to my Learned Friend that you lost a Week of your Time in the Time of 1812?"

"I believe I did."

"Did you lose Fifteen Minutes; was there any polling?"

"No, it was unexpected, for he did not come."

"Did you lose a Week in expecting the Third Candidate?"

"Not the Election Day; a Day or Two afterwards, I lost my Time."

(By a Lord.) "Were you present at the Election of 1826?"

"Yes, I was."

"Were you in the Town at that Period?"

"Yes."

"Were you in the Town previous to that?"

"I lived in the Town then."

"Do you remember Sir Henry Wright Wilson coming there first?"

"Yes, very well."

"Did he stand on what was called the No Popery Cry?"

"That was what he stood on."

"Did you hear him make any Speeches from the Broad Stone?"

"I went to hear him once."

"Did you hear him?"

"Part of it."

"Had that Part you did hear any Relation to the Catholic Question?"

"It was all on the Catholic Question I did hear."

"Was he for it or against it?"

"Against it."

"Did he tell the Burgesses that any Danger would arise to the Constitution?"

"That a very great Danger would arise to it."

"Did he name the Names of any Persons in either House of Parliament that were against it?"

"I did not hear it."

"Was there any Clergyman who spoke about the Catholics there?"

"I did not hear him."

"Were the Military brought in?"

"Yes."

"What Time was that?"

"I think about Half past Four o'Clock, or it might be a little sooner."

"On the last Election?"

"Yes."

"Did any rioting take place?"

"A great deal."

"Had any Officers of the Corporation been insulted?"

"Yes, I believe they had."

"Was the Bailiff stoned?"

"Yes."

"Was the Town Clerk spit upon?"

"I did not see that; but I have no Doubt of it."

"For how many Months before the Election was this sort of voting going on?"

"Oh, a long while."

"Was there a good deal of Drunkenness going on?"

"Yes, I believe there was some Drink stirring."

"On the No Popery Party?"

"Yes."

"Did the other Candidates parade the Town?"

"No, very rarely; Once or Twice they might shew off, but very little was done."

"They had a Hop there Once, had they not?"

"Yes."

"Were the Voters in that Interest insulted as they went to that Hop?"

"Yes."

"It was very bad before that?"

"Yes, very bad."

"Were the Ladies insulted?"

"Yes."

"What did they do to the Ladies?"

"They made them glad to get out of the Way as quick as they could from the blackguard Mob after them."

"Can you speak to any particular Fact?"

"I cannot speak to any Facts generally; I lost a good Coat, and got my Eyes blacked in getting out of the Way of them."

"Did any thing of that kind happen to the Ladies; had they their Coats taken off?"

"I cannot speak of that, but I have no Doubt some of them got their Clothes torn."

"Had they any of them their Eyes blacked?"

"That I cannot speak to."

"Did those Eye Blackers compose the Majority of the Freemen?"

"I should almost doubt whether there was any Freemen at all in the Mob; but it was merely hired Bullies, or Fellows hardened on by Drink to do it."

"They were not Freemen of Retford?"

"Very few; the Freemen fell back out of the Street; they had not a Party strong enough for them."

"How many of them were Voters of Retford?"

"I suppose this Party did not consist of One Third the Number we had."

"After having stoned the Bailiff, did they go and light a Fire before his Door?"

"They made One in the Market Place."

"Does he live in the Market Place?"

"He lives in the Market Place."

"Was the Fire near his House?"

"Not the One I saw."

"Did any body ever come to you to ask you to come and give Evidence against the Borough?"

"I might have had that Question put to me."

"Who put it to you?"

"I believe Sharp."

"Who is he?"

"He is a Person living in the Town; he is no Inhabitant; he is a Lodger in it."

"What is his Christian Name?"

"I do not know."

"Had you ever seen him before?"

"Oh yes, I have seen him."

"Was he a Burgess?"

"No."

"How long has he lived there?"

"Several Years; Three or Four."

"Does he follow any Trade there?"

"A Timber Merchant."

"What did he say?"

"He said it would be a good thing for me, if I would go and give Evidence against the Borough."

"Did you ask him what that good thing would be."

"He said it would be a good thing for me; that I should get esteemed by the Townspeople, and get well paid for my Trouble."

"Did he tell you who was to pay you?"

"No, he did not."

"What did you say?"

"I said I could not do it; I did not know any thing that would criminate them."

"He did not tell you from whom the Money was to come?"

"No."

"Did he say any thing about Birmingham?"

"He showed me a Watch, and said, "This comes from Birmingham for my Services."

"What sort of Watch was it?"

"A Gold Watch."

"Did he tell you who had sent it him?"

"No; he did not name the Name."

"Does he belong to the Birmingham Club?"

"I have no Doubt of it."

"How long has the Blue Club been established in Retford?"

"Oh, it was established, I should think, perhaps a Year and a Half before Election of 1826."

"Was that the same Club that goes by the Name of the Birmingham Club?"

"No; the Blue Club was all kinds of People in the Town and Country round. Several of my Customers came and said, if I would not turn from my Word, from Sir Robert Dundas and Wrightson, to vote for Henry Wilson, it was the last Job I should do for them. I told them then it might be so; there were several Friends whom I lost before the Election on that Account, who have not returned, except One."

"They endeavoured to induce you to break your Promise to Dundas and Wrightson?"

"Yes."

"In consequence of your not doing so, you lost their Custom?"

"Yes; in consequence of that I lost my Custom."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of Richard Hannam?"

"Yes."

"What is he?"

"An Attorney."

"Is he in great Business in Retford?"

"I cannot speak to his Business; I believe he is Clerk to the Magistrates; but I have so little Business with the Attornies, that I do not understand whether they have a fair Business or not."

"Had you any Business with him?"

"No, not any thing in particular."

"Did Hannam ever come to you about this Election?"

"No, I believe not."

"Did any of his Clerks ever come to you?"

"I have met with One of his Clerks, who spoke to me about it; but not to come to any particular Proposals."

"Was that Newton?"

"Yes; I have talked a little with Newton; but he made no Proposal of Electioneering Matters."

"Did Newton tell you any thing about the Disfranchisement of the Borough?"

"Well, I cannot speak to it; I had some Talk about it; but I took so little Notice of it, not expecting to have any thing to do with it, that I cannot say."

"Did you understand from him that he was engaged in getting Evidence to disfranchise the Borough?"

"I cannot speak to that."

"You stated that you got Two Black Eyes, and a Coat torn?"

"Yes, I did."

"And the Bailiff got his Head broken?"

"I did not see his Head broke; but he got stoned."

"And the Town Clerk got spit upon?"

"I heard that, but I did not see it."

"Who else got Black Eyes?"

"There is another Witness here in the Hall now that got his Coat torn at the same Time that I got mine, and I believe a Black Eye too."

"What was his Name?"

"Bailey."

"What Bailey?"

"Bailey as keeps the Mermaid Public House."

"Do you know Mr. Fox?"

"Yes."

"Who is he?"

"He is Clerk to Mr. Foljambe."

"Was he at that Ball you have spoken of?"

"I do not know."

"Was he at the Hop where you got your Black Eyes?"

"It was in the Street I got my Black Eye, not at the Hop."

"Was Mr. Fox at the Hop?"

"I do not recollect seeing him."

"Was the Town Clerk there?"

"I do not know, I am sure; I cannot speak to that; I merely went in and out to look; but it is not what I was accustomed to myself; I do not know much about it."

"Was Mr. Fox stoned?"

"I believe he has been stoned several Times."

"What for?"

"Because he was supposed to be a Friend to the Purple Party."

"Which was the Purple Party?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson's Friends."

"You belong to the Purple Party?"

"Yes."

"Were you very active for the Purple Party?"

"I was very active sometimes; but then I had only my own Power."

"Was Mr. Fox very active?"

"He appeared to be very active."

"He went about canvassing, did he?"

"I do not know whether he canvassed or not."

"Do you remember his making a Speech from the Broad Stone?"

"No, I do not remember his making a Speech from there; I think he dare not get on there to make one."

"He made himself very obnoxious to the Voters?"

"To the No Popery Party."

"They were very much afraid of him?"

"No; he was very much afraid of them."

"The Town Clerk got spit upon?"

"I heard it said so."

"Why did the Town Clerk get spit upon?"

"Because he was considered a Friend to the Purple Interest."

"Was he a Friend to the Purple Interest?"

"I do not believe he was more a Friend than an Enemy; I believe he was very fair on both Sides; but they would make him be of one Side."

"Which Side would they make him be of?"

"He was forced to take care of himself."

"Which was the Way of his taking care of himself?"

"To keep out of their Way; there was no other Way."

"Did Alderman Parker get any Black Eyes?"

"I believe he has in his Time."

"He was a very active Man?"

"Yes."

"Which Side was he?"

"The Purple Side."

"They were all against the Purple Party?"

"It was all against them; if you would go over to their Party, they would carry you round the Town."

"Did William Cartwright get Black Eyes?"

"I think he was insulted one Evening."

"Was he very active?"

"He was as active as the rest of us; we were all desirous of bringing our Men in."

"Was not be more active than some of the rest?"

"He was very active, I believe; but he was a very quiet Man; he was a Man that stirred very little about."

"Do you know Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes."

"Had you not some Conversation with him?"

"Very little."

"Are you quite sure you never talked to him about the Disfranchisement of the Borough?"

"I do not know that I have spoken to Mr. Hannam about the Disfranchisement of the Borough."

"Are you quite sure you never talked to Mr. Hannam about the Disfranchisement of the Borough?"

"Mr. Hannam and me have had very little Conversation together."

"Have you talked to Sharp upon it?"

"Sharp and me have had several Conversations upon the Subject."

"Has he any Connection with Mr. Hannam?"

"I do not know; but I make no Doubt that he has Connections along with Mr. Hannam's Clerk."

"Do you know that?"

"I have frequently seen them together."

"Have you Reason to believe, from what he said about the Gold Watch, and so forth, that it came from Mr. Hannam?"

"I do not know whom it came from; but he said, Look you there; this comes from Birmingham."

"Have you seen him and Mr. Hannam's Clerk very often together?"

"I have."

"The Witness was directed to withdraw.

"Then John Holt was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Freeman of Retford?"

"More than Thirty?"

"Do you recollect the Election of 1812, when Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh were Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise either of those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"After that Election, did you receive any Money or Packets?"

"Yes."

"What did you receive?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"From whom?"

"I was sent for to the Angel Inn by some Gentleman, (I do not know who he was,) and he gave me a Packet with Twenty Guineas, and said, "Mrs. Osbaldeston" (those were the Words he said to me,) "sent that as a Present."

"Was Mr. Hannam at the Time present in the Angel Inn?"

"I believe he was."

"Did you know the Person who presented you with that Packet?"

"I did not."

"Do you remember the Election of 1818, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates for the first Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Yes."

"What?"

"A Packet was chucked into my House, about Eleven o'Clock; my Master opened the Door, and chucked it in; I was not at Home."

"Did you receive One or Two Packets after that Election?"

"Two, I think."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty each."

"Do you mean Twenty Pounds or Twenty Guineas?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"Do you remember the Second Election of 1820, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates again?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to them again?"

"Yes."

"After that Election, did you receive any Money?"

"Yes; the same."

"Two Packets, containing what, each?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"Have you a Son a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"What is his Name?"

"Henry Holt."

"What is his Age?"

"Thirty-three."

"When did he take up his Freedom?"

"Before the Election."

"Before what Election?"

"Before those Elections."

"Did he, to your Knowledge, promise Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton on the first Election?"

"I believe he did."

"Did you hear from him that he did?"

"Yes; the same as I did, I believe."

"After that first Election of 1818, do you, from your own Knowledge, know whether he received any Money?"

"He did."

"How much?"

"The same as I did. He lived with me at my House. It was brought to my House, and flung in at the Door, the same as the other."

"Was that a Sum equal to what you received?"

"Just the same."

"After the Election in 1820, did he receive any other Money?"

"Exactly the same as I did; it was both alike."

"For whom did you vote in the Year 1826, when Sir Henry Wilson and Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson were Candidates?"

"I voted for Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"What is your Age?"

"Fifty-five."

"How long have you been admitted a Freeman?"

"Thirty-four Years."

"Were you admitted in 1796 or 1794?"

"1796, I think."

"What was the first Election you remember since you were admitted?"

"I am sure I do not know exactly now."

"When was the first Election that you remember after you were admitted a Freeman?"

"I do not know whether it was Marsh and Osbaldeston."

"It was in the Year 1812, was not it?"

"I am sure I cannot tell; it was Sir John Ingleby, I think."

"Do you remember Sir John Ingleby's Election?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember the Election of 1796; did you take up your Freedom for that Election; do you remember Sir John Eamer being a Candidate?"

"Yes; I remember something of it."

"Do you remember Mr. Jeffery and General Crawford?"

"Yes; I remember it, now you mention it."

"Did you vote at that Election, or were you a Freeman at the Time of the Election?"

"Yes, I believe I was."

"Do you remember Sir John Ingleby's first Election?"

"I was Apprentice when Sir John Ingleby first came to Retford."

"Sir John stood in 1806, we have heard?"

"I thought it was Sir William."

"Sir William stood in 1807?"

"I believe I was a Freeman at that Time; certainly I must have been."

"Do you remember Sir John's Election?"

"Yes."

"And General Crawford and Mr. Jeffery?"

"Yes."

"There might have been an Election within the Ten Years?"

"Yes; I cannot speak to that, I am sure."

"You recollect Eight Elections then, do you?"

"I am sure I cannot remember how many there were."

"What Number of Packets have you received ever in the Course of your Life?"

"I have received from those last Two Elections before the last; none others."

"The Two Elections before the last, and no others?"

"Yes."

"At the Eight Elections you have received no more?"

"Yes."

"You have not received upon the last?"

"No, not upon the last."

"You spoke about Mr. Osbaldeston?"

"Yes; I can take upon myself to swear that I never heard Mr. Osbaldeston's Name mentioned when I was sent for to the Angel."

"Had you ever, in the Course of those Elections, any Promise made to you?"

"No, never."

"Or any thing said to you at the Time you were canvassed?"

"Never."

"Or before you voted?"

"No, never."

"Or at the Time you voted?"

"Never."

"Had you any at the last Election?"

"Never."

"And you have received nothing?"

"Never."

"On whose Interest did General Crawford and Mr. Jeffery stand?"

"The Duke of Newcastle's, I believe."

"Whose Interest did Sir John Ingleby stand upon?"

"His own, I believe."

"Was there an Opposition to The Duke of Newcastle's Interest at that Time?"

"I am sure I forget."

"Did you take any Interest in Sir John Ingleby's Election?"

"No; I never took no Interest in none of them."

"Did you vote?"

"I voted for Sir John Ingleby."

"Whom did you vote for in Sir William Ingleby's Election?"

"Sir William Ingleby."

"He was the Son of Sir John Ingleby?"

"Yes."

"Who was the opposing Candidate at the Time?"

"I am sure I do not know now; it is a long Time back."

"Do you know whether General Crawford was the opposing Candidate?"

"I think he was once; there was General Robert Crawford."

"Did he come in?"

"I cannot tell."

"Do you know whether General Charles Crawford's Election was set aside, and General Robert Crawford, came in afterwards; do you remember that there was a Dispute about General Charles Crawford's sitting, and that General Robert Crawford came in afterwards."

"Yes, I think it was so; but I had nothing to do with them."

"Your Son lives with you?"

"He did at that Time."

"When did he cease to live with you?"

"He has been away from me, I think, these Nine or Ten Years."

"Was he with you in 1820?"

"I believe he was; but I cannot speak to that."

"You say somebody threw some Packets into your House?"

"Yes; there came a Knock at the Door; the Door was locked; and my Mistress opened the Door, and somebody flung something in; and there was not a Word on the Back, nor nothing but the Money wrapped up in it."

"Was there any Direction upon them?"

"To John Holt; that was all."

"Only on those Three Occasions; and One of them was when Mr. Hannam was there?"

"Yes."

"Who was Mr. Hannam?"

"He is an Attorney at Retford."

"Is he in much Business there?"

"I am sure I do not understand him; I do not think he is."

"What do you mean by not understanding him?"

"I do not know much of him."

"Does he live there?"

"Yes."

"Do not you know a respectable Attorney at Retford?"

"Yes, I know some of them."

"Is not he a respectable Attorney at Retford?"

"He is an Attorney at Retford."

"You do not adopt the Epithet, I observe?"

"I do not know any thing about him."

"Has Mr. Hannam taken any Part in getting up this Business?"

"Yes, I believe he has."

"Which Side?"

"Against the Borough, I believe."

"Do you know that he has a Clerk of the Name of Newton, or had a Clerk of that Name?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Newton take a Part about it?"

"Yes."

"Do you know the Birmingham Club?"

"I have heard them say there is such a thing; but I do not know nothing about it."

"Do you know Mr. Carter and Mr. Fisher?"

"Yes; they are Neighbours of mine; I live between them."

"Do you know whether they take an active Part in this Business?"

"I have heard it said that they do."

"Have you heard them say that they do?"

"No."

"Did you ever see Mr. Sharp's Watch?"

"I have seen his Watch Chain; he may have a Watch, or he may not."

"You do not know where he got it?"

"No, I do not."

"Were you present at the last Election?"

"Yes."

"Was it a quiet Election, or was there a good deal of Tumult?"

"I dared not go in the Street; I have been threatened with my Life many Times, and dared; to be sure they threatened that they would take my Business from me, if I would not vote their Way."

"You have been dared or tarred?"

"Yes; they threatened that they would take away my Business."

"Who threatened that they would take away your Business?"

"The People in the Opposition to the Party I was concerned in."

"Which Party was that?"

"It was for Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson; it was Sir Henry Wright Wilson's Party."

"They threatened to take away your Business?"

"Yes."

"What is your Business?"

"A Shoemaker by Trade: they threatened to take the Business from me, and did do, several of them."

"There was a great deal of rioting, and you were afraid to go out?"

"Yes; I never saw any thing like it."

"Did you see the Bailiff knocked on the Head?"

"No; I took care not to go out."

"Did you ever hear the Expression "all is right" used in Retford?"

"No, I never did; I have heard it here many Times since I came here."

Re-examined by Mr. Price.

"My Learned Friend has asked you with respect to the Election of General Crawford and Mr. Jeffery; do you remember that Election?"

"I remember there was such an Election."

"Did you take any Part in it?"

"No."

"Were you at all interested in it?"

"Not the least; I voted at that Election."

"How came you to say that it was The Duke of Newcastle's Party; what Authority have you for saying that?"

"I understood it was."

"From public Rumour and Report?"

"Yes."

"Was that the whole?"

"Yes; the Duke never told me so."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then George Worsley was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name George Worsley?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"When did you become so?"

"About One-and-twenty Years ago."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1812, Mr. Osbaldeston's and Mr. Marsh's?"

"Yes."

"To whom did you promise your Vote upon that Occasion?"

"To Mr. Osbaldeston."

"Did you go to the Angel Inn after that Election?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you see Mr. Hannam there?"

"Yes."

"Did you see any other Person?"

"Yes; there was another Gentleman."

"Did you receive any Money there?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"Eighteen Pounds."

"Had you received any before?"

"Three."

"From whom did you receive the Three before?"

"Mr. Carter?"

"Who was Mr. Carter?"

"He was at Mr. Hannam's."

"Was he a Clerk of Mr. Hannam's?"

"Yes."

"You received Eighteen Pounds in Mr. Hannam's Presence at the Angel?"

"Yes."

"Who paid you; the Stranger or Mr. Hannam?"

"The Stranger."

"Do you remember the Election of 1818 Mr. Evans's and Mr. Crompton's?"

"Yes."

"To whom did you promise your Vote?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Packets after the Election?"

"Yes."

"What did they contain?"

"One-and-twenty Pounds."

"Did you receive One Packet or Two?"

"Two."

"Do you remember the Election of 1820?"

"Yes."

"To whom did you promise your Vote then?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Packets after that Election?"

"Yes."

"What did they contain?"

"The same as the others."

"Look at that." (The Petition against the Bill being shewn to the Witness.) "Is that your Name and Handwriting?"

"Yes, it is."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"What are you?"

"A Cordwainer."

"When were you made free?"

"About One-and-twenty Years since; I do not know the Year."

"Was 1812 the first Election you were at after you took up your Freedom?"

"Mr. Osbaldeston's."

"Do you remember the Election in 1807?"

"Not before Osbaldeston's."

"Do you remember it, though you were not a Freeman?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember who were the Candidates in 1807?"

"Sir William Ingleby."

"Who besides Sir William Ingleby?"

"Mr. Marsh-no, it was not Mr. Marsh."

"Who was against Sir William Ingleby?"

"I cannot tell; I do not recollect; I was not a Burgess then."

"Did you vote in 1826?"

"I am sure I do not know one Way or the other how it was."

"Did you vote at Dundas and Wrightson's Election?"

"Yes."

"For whom did you vote?"

"For Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Did they canvass you themselves, or any other Person?"

"They canvassed me themselves."

"Did you promise them?"

"Yes."

"Before you promised, was any thing said about Money, or any thing of the kind?"

"Nothing at all."

"Did you ever receive any thing since the Election of 1826?"

"No, not any thing,"

"When did you sign that Petition?"

"I cannot tell, indeed; it is not a vast long while since."

"How long was it before you were sent for here?"

"I am sure I did not take particular Notice how long before I was sent for here."

"When were you sent for here?"

"The First of May."

"Who asked you to sign the Petition?"

"John Richardson."

"Who is John Richardson?"

"He is a Burgess."

"What had he to do with you; how came he to ask you to sign the Petition?"

"I do not know, I am sure; he came to our House and asked me."

"Do you know whether he voted at the Election; and if so, for whom?"

"I do not know that he voted at all."

Examined by the Lords.

"Do you pay for the Counsel that are employed upon this Petition?"

"No, I paid nothing."

"Do you expect to pay?"

"No; they said nothing at all about any Pay."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Matthew Wass was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Freeman?"

"Better than Twenty Years."

"Do you remember the Election of 1818, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to Mr. Crompton?"

"Yes."

"After that Election did you receive any Money or Packets?"

"Well, I did."

"How many?"

"One, I think."

"One or Two?"

"Well, I cannot be sure which."

"What did the Packet contain?"

"It contained Twenty-one Pounds."

"Recollect yourself whether there was One or Two Packets?"

"One."

"Will you swear there were not Two?"

"Well, I cannot be sure."

"Will you swear there were not Two?"

"No."

"Were there Two Packets?"

"Well, I am not sure whether I have received One or Two in my Lifetime."

"I am speaking after the Election of 1818; confine yourself to that?"

"Mr. Evans?"

"And Crompton; did you receive more than One Packet after that Election?"

"No; I do not know that I did."

"Will you swear you did not?"

"No, I cannot swear in particular."

"But you swear that you received One?"

"Yes."

"In the Election of 1820, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates the Second Time, did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"What did you receive after that Election?"

"One."

"More than One?"

"No."

"Will you swear that?"

"I do not know that I did."

"Will you swear that you did not receive more than One?"

"No, I cannot be sure of that."

"How was that One brought?"

"It was brought to my House."

"In what was it?"

"In a Paper."

"What did it contain?"

"Twenty-one Pounds."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"How many Elections do you recollect in your Life?"

"I can recollect several; there have been a great many Bye Elections."

"Who was the first Member of Parliament you voted for?"

"Well, I cannot say exactly."

"How long is it since you were admitted a Freeman?"

"Better than Twenty Years."

"Do you remember Sir John Ingleby's Election?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember General Crawford's Election?"

"I cannot say."

"Mr. Jeffery's?"

"No, I cannot say."

"But you remember Sir John Ingleby's?"

"Yes."

"And Sir William Ingleby's?"

"I remember Sir John very well."

"Sir William was after Sir John?"

"I should not doubt it was so."

"Did you vote at Sir John's Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any thing at all?"

"No, not a Halfpenny."

"Did you receive any thing after Mr. Osbaldeston's?"

"Nothing at all."

"Whom did you vote for?"

"I voted for Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh; not a Halfpenny. Mr. -I forget his Name.-Mr. Hannam was concerned in it; it was a Bye Election."

"You received nothing?"

"Not a Halfpenny Piece."

"Not from Mr. Hannam?"

"No; he said there was something to come to the Freemen; but I never received any thing."

"Then if there was any thing for you, Mr. Hannam pocketed it, I suppose?"

"I cannot say any thing to it; but I never got a Halfpenny; not a Halfpenny Piece."

"How many Packets altogether did you ever receive?"

"Only One to the best of my Memory; to the best of my Knowledge that was all."

"Do you know of People receiving any more than Two Packets?"

"Really I do not."

"When were those Two received?"

"After Mr. Evans's Elections."

"When you state that you have not received more than Two, you mean Two altogether; One at One Election and One at another?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any thing for the last Election?"

"Nothing at all; not a Halfpenny."

"During all the Time you have voted, did you ever receive a Promise that you should have any thing for voting?"

"Never in my Lifetime."

"Were you ever told it would be better for you if you voted?"

"No; as I am here a living Sinner, no Gentleman never promised me no such thing."

"Did he say that he might give you any thing if you voted that Way?"

"No, nobody ever promised me any thing of the kind."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Richardson was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name John Richardson?"

"Yes."

"Are you called John Richardson junior?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"When were you admitted?"

"About Fourteen Years ago."

"Was it in 1816?"

"It was about Fourteen Years ago."

"To whom did you promise your Vote at the Election in 1818?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"No, not from them."

"Did you receive any Packets?"

"I received Two Packets; they were thrown into my House."

"What did they contain?"

"They contained Twenty Guineas each."

"To whom did you promise your Votes in the Election of 1820?"

"The same Men."

"Did you receive any Packets after that Election?"

"The same again."

"Twice Twenty-one?"

"Yes."

"Is that Name yours, John Richardson junior," signed to that Petition?" (The Petition against the Bill being shewn to the Witness.)

"Yes, that is my Writing."

"Is your Father John Richardson senior?"

"Yes."

"Is he a Voter?"

"Yes."

"Do you know whether he received Packets after the same Elections?"

"I do not."

"You do not know that from him?"

"No."

"Did you live in the same House with him?"

"No."

"Have you never heard him say so?"

"No."

(By a Lord.) "Do you know what is meant at Retford by having large Pockets?"

"I never heard of such a thing."

"You are a Petitioner against the Bill?"

"Yes."

"Do you expect to pay for the Counsel?"

"No, of course not; I do not know at all who is to pay."

"Your Father is a Burgess?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then William Cookson was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Freeman?"

"To the best of my Knowledge, about Seven-and-thirty Years."

"Do you remember the Election of Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh, in the Year 1812?"

"I do."

"After that Election did you receive any Money?"

"There was some Money sent, but I did not know from whom it came."

"I ask you, have you received any Money?"

"Yes."

"Where was it paid?"

"At the Angel Inn at East Retford."

"Was Mr. Hannam present?"

"I believe he was."

"Was any other Person present besides Mr. Hannam?"

"A Stranger to me."

"Who paid you the Money?"

"It was laid upon the Table, and I was ordered to take it up."

"What was the Amount?"

"I believe Twenty Guineas."

"Whom had you promised at that Election?"

"I had promised Mr. Marsh and Mr. Osbaldeston for that Election, but never had any Promise of any Money."

"In the Year 1818, do you recollect the first Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"I did."

"After that Election, did you receive any Money?"

"Some Packets was brought to my House, but I do not know by whom."

"How many Packets?"

"I think Two."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each, I think."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1820, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates the Second Time?"

"I do not recollect the Year of our Lord; I recollect the Names."

"Do you recollect the Second Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton?"

"Certainly; they were Twice."

"Did you promise them?"

"I believe I did."

"Did you receive any thing after the Election?"

"Yes."

"What?"

"There were some Packets sent to my House after that, which contained Twenty Guineas each."

"How many Packets?"

"There was One at each Time."

"Do you mean to say there were Two or One after the Election of 1820?"

"I cannot recollect."

"After the Election of 1818, you tell me you received Two Packets of Twenty Guineas each?"

"To the best of my Knowledge."

"After the Election of 1820, how many Packets did you receive?"

"My Recollection is imperfect; I think One."

"Look at that Paper." (The Petition against the Bill being shewn to the Witness.) "Is that Name in your Handwriting?"

"I believe it is."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"How old are you?"

"Nearly Fifty-nine."

"How many Elections do you remember; do you remember the Election of 1790?"

"I do not."

"Were you living in Retford in 1790?"

"I believe I was; but I cannot recollect that Election in particular."

"That is Forty Years ago; you were Nineteen Years old, were not you?"

"I believe I was about that Age."

"Do not you recollect the General Election of 1790?"

"I do not, certainly."

"You do not know who were the Candidates?"

"No, I do not."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1796?"

"I cannot recollect correctly."

"You were a Freeman by that Time?"

"If I was, my Recollection is very incorrect."

"Did you vote at the first Election that happened after you became a Freeman?"

"I believe not."

"How did that happen; was there any Canvass?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Do you recollect Sir John Ingleby's Election?"

"I do not recollect the Name."

"Did you vote in 1802?"

"I cannot call my Recollection to him."

"Do you recollect General Crawford's and Mr. Jeffery's Election?"

"I remember their Names."

"Did you vote for General Charles Crawford?"

"I believe so."

"Whose Interest did they stand on; did not they stand on The Duke of Newcastle's Interest?"

"Indeed I do not know that perfectly."

"Do you know at all?"

"I do not."

"You voted for them?"

"I think not."

"Did you vote against them?"

"I do not know who stood against them."

"You voted at the Election?"

"I think I did."

"Recollect yourself; did you vote for General Crawford and Mr. Jeffery, or did you vote against them?"

"To the best of my Recollection, I voted One Vote for General Charles Crawford."

"To whom did you give the other?"

"I cannot recollect."

"You recollect there was a Petition before the House of Commons in 1802?"

"I cannot recollect that."

"Who asked you to vote for General Charles Crawford?"

"That has passed my Knowledge; I cannot recollect it."

"Do you know whether General Charles Crawford was married to The Duchess of Newcastle?"

"I believe he was."

"Have you any Doubt about it; did not Her Grace come to the Election?"

"I do not know that she did."

"Brush up your Recollection; do not you recollect The Duchess of Newcastle coming to the Election?"

"I do not."

"Nor before the Election?"

"Nor before the Election."

"Nor after the Election?"

"To my Knowledge, I never saw her."

"Who canvassed you to vote for General Charles Crawford?"

"I cannot recollect."

"What was the Name of The Duke of Newcastle's Steward at the Time?"

"I do not know nothing at all about it."

"Do you rent under the Duke?"

"No, I do not."

"You do not know what the Name of His Grace's Steward was at that Time?"

"No."

"Did you know Mr. Mason, the Attorney at Retford?"

"Yes, I believe I did."

"Have you any Doubt that you knew him?"

"The Reason I give you that Answer was, there were so many Masons, I cannot recollect."

"Were there so many Masons Attornies in Retford; do you mean to say there were so many Masons Attornies in Retford that you cannot tell the Man I meant?"

"I cannot recollect whom you meant."

"Mr. Nathaniel Mason, the Town Clerk; was not he The Duke of Newcastle's Agent at the Time you voted for General Charles Crawford?"

"I never knew that he had any thing to do with any thing of the kind."

"Was not he the Town Clerk of the Borough?"

"Yes, he was."

"Did not he canvass you for the Borough?"

"I do not know that he did."

"Can you say he did not?"

"No; I cannot say either way."

"Have you any Recollection whether you voted for General Charles Crawford?"

"I have not in particular."

"Did you vote for the other Candidate?"

"I cannot say."

"Did you give the General a Plumper?"

"That I cannot say."

"Had The Duke of Newcastle an Interest in Retford at that Time?"

"Indeed I cannot tell."

"Were there any Colours known by the Name of The Duke of Newcastle's Colours?"

"I cannot tell indeed; not in particular."

"Do you recollect the Pink Colours in the Year 1802?"

"No."

"Was not there a very violent Contest in 1802, followed by a Petition to the House of Commons?"

"I cannot recollect."

"I beg you will recollect; was not it a very violent Contest in the Borough of Retford, followed by a Petition to the House of Commons?"

"I am quite entirely lost in my Recollection concerning of it."

"Do you recollect whether there were any Pink Colours in the Town known by the Name of The Duke of Newcastle's Colours?"

"I cannot recollect in particular."

"Do you mean to say there was not an Interest in the Town known by the Name of His Grace The Duke of Newcastle's Colours?"

"I do not know for a Certainty."

"Was it a Rumour in the Town of Retford that there was such a Thing as The Duke of Newcastle's Interest?"

"It might be rumoured as such."

"Did you ever happen to hear the Rumour just by Accident?"

"Not in particular."

"You may have heard the Rumour?"

"I may have heard it."

"Is there the Newcastle Arms, an Inn in the Town?"

"I believe there is."

"Do you know whether His Grace employs a great many Tradesmen?"

"I do not know that he does."

"What Line of Business are you in?"

"A Shoemaker."

"How far is Clumber from Retford?"

"I do not particularly recollect."

"Did you vote for Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson, in 1826?"

"I believe I did."

"You are not quite certain?"

"I am certain; it is so late that Recollection has not left me."

"In 1806, do you recollect Sir John Ingleby's Election?"

"I am under a Mistake; I ax your Pardon; I thought you meant the last Election of all."

"I did just ask you about the last Election; you have no Recollection whom you voted for at the last Election?"

"Yes; it was Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"In 1806, Sir John Ingleby stood, did not he?"

"I cannot recollect the Year, but I recollect his standing for Retford."

"In 1802, when you voted for General Crawford, did you receive any Money after the Election; that is a very plain Question?"

"I believe there was something sent to my House, but from whom it came I cannot say."

"Recollect whether, in 1802, any Money was sent to your House at the Time that General Charles Crawford and Mr. Jeffery stood. Will you swear there was not Money sent to your House?"

"There was never any Money sent to my House for any considerable Time after the Election took place."

"I am not asking whether it was shortly after or longer, but after the Election of 1802; did you receive any Money after General Crawford's Election?"

"I believe I did."

"When?"

"That I cannot recollect."

"Where?"

"That I cannot recollect."

"Will you swear that you did? Take Time, and recollect yourself, and do not say the Thing off hand."

"I am not positive."

"Will you undertake to say you received any Money after General Crawford's Election?"

"I cannot positively say."

"Do you believe you did?"

"Not to be certain."

"In 1806, that was Sir John Ingleby's Election, whom did you vote for there?"

"I cannot remember."

"Who stood against Sir John Ingleby?"

"I cannot remember."

"Did you vote for any body?"

"I cannot recollect who stood at the Time."

"Do you remember for whom you voted in 1806?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Did you receive any Money after the Election in 1806?"

"I cannot say indeed; my Recollection is so incorrect."

"Do you recollect the Election in 1807?"

"I do not indeed."

"Do you remember Sir William Ingleby's Election?"

"Sir William Ingleby's? I remember -Sir William Ingleby - something about it at Retford."

"Do you remember whether it took place?"

"I believe it did."

"Have you any Doubt whether it took place or not; do you recollect whether it took place or not?"

"I believe it did."

"Have you any Doubt that it did; have you the least Doubt it did?"

"No."

"Do not you remember going to the Poll, and voting at that Election?"

"Sir William Ingleby's?"

"Yes, Sir William Ingleby's; do not you remember going to the Poll, and giving your Vote?"

"My Recollection is incorrect; I believe I did."

"Did you receive any Money after Sir William Ingleby's Election in 1807, before Osbaldeston's Election; after Sir William Ingleby's Election?"

"I believe there was a Packet sent to my House which contained Forty."

"Do you mean to say you have any Recollection whatever of Money being sent to your House after Sir William Ingleby's Election?"

"I do not know."

"Do not you know what was the first Money you ever received; was it at the Angel Inn in 1814?"

"I cannot recollect whether that was the first Time or not."

"How many Times altogether did you receive Money after Elections?"

"I do not know; I do not know indeed."

(By a Lord.) "You are a Petitioner against this Bill; did you sign that Petition?"

"Yes."

"Do you expect to pay for the Counsel who have just cross-examined you?"

"I am an utter Stranger to any thing of the kind, though I put my Name to it."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Baker was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Thomas Baker?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1818, Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton's Election?"

"Yes, I can recollect it."

"Did you receive any Packets or Money after that Election?"

"I received a Letter."

"What did it contain?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"Did you receive One or Two Letters after the Election?"

"Two."

"What did the other contain?"

"Twenty."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to in 1820, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were again elected?"

"To Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Yes."

"What?"

"Forty; the same."

"The same as before?"

"Yes."

"In Two Packets?"

"Yes."

"Will you look at that Name, Thomas Baker, subscribed to that, (the Petition against the Bill being shewn to the Witness,) and state whether that is your Name and Handwriting?"

"Yes, it is."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then William Brown was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been admitted a Freeman of Retford?"

"I voted the first Time in 1818."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to upon that Occasion?"

"I promised my Vote to Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Am I bound to answer that Question?"

(By a Lord.) "Have you any Reason to state to the House why you should not answer that Question?"

"No, I cannot say as I have."

The Witness was informed, he was bound to answer the Question.

(Mr. Price.) "Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Yes; I was down at Brighton; I had Fifteen Pounds sent me."

"Was that all?"

"No."

"Who sent you down the Money?"

"I was at Brighton, and in great Distress, in danger of losing my Arm, and Mr. Crompton recommended me to a Doctor of his, and he recommended me to the Salt Water; I wrote to Mr. Crompton, and told him of my Distress, and he sent me Ten Pounds."

"You said you received Fifteen Pounds?"

"Yes; the other Five Pounds was from Mr. Evans."

"Did you receive any thing besides those Fifteen Pounds upon that first Election?"

"Yes; I received Eleven Pounds more from Mr. Crompton after I returned to London."

"Any thing more?"

"Not at that present Time."

"At any Time afterwards?"

"Yes, some Time afterwards I did."

"What did you receive afterwards?"

"Not on that Account; I received a Parcel that came privately with Sixteen Pounds in it."

"Was all this before the Election of 1820?"

"It was a long Time after the Election."

"Was it before the Second Election of 1820 that you received all those Sums; between the Election of 1818 and the Election of 1820?"

"I received the same Amount the Second Election that I did the First."

"What did you receive in all after the First Election?"

"I received Forty Guineas the first Election; and I believe I received the same Amount after the second Election."

"For whom did you vote at the last Election of 1826, when Sir Henry Wilson and Sir Robert Dundas were Candidates?"

"I voted for Sir Henry Wright Wilson at the last Election."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"You say you voted for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"Yes; I promised my Vote, but I was not polled."

"Did you receive any thing for that?"

"No."

"How came you to promise your Vote to Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"The Reason I promised him was because he was a strong Advocate against the Catholic Question."

"You promised to vote for him on Principle?"

"Yes."

"On the former Occasion you were in great Distress when Mr. Crompton sent you the Ten Pounds?"

"I was certainly in very great Distress."

(Mr. Price.) "Is that your Handwriting?" (The Petition against the Bill being shewn to the Witness.)

"That is my Name."

"Is that your Handwriting; did you write that with your Left Hand?"

"No; that is not my Writing."

"Did you authorize any body to write it?"

"I did; the Petition; oh yes, I authorized Mr. John Taylor to sign my Name to a Petition."

(Mr. Alderson.) "What was the Petition about?"

"I am not certain."

"It might be in favor of the Catholics for aught you know?"

"John Taylor told me it was something about having Counsel at the Bar."

"To be heard against the present Bill?"

"I suppose it was."

"I was asking whether you were in great Distress at the Time Mr. Crompton sent you the Money?"

"I was."

"How came you to be in such great Distress?"

"I was very short of Money when I went down to Brighton; and not being able to work; I had my Arm tied up in a Sling at the Time, and had no other Means."

"Was that at the Time you lost your Arm?"

"It was before I lost my Arm. When I got down there, I was in hopes of being able to work a little; but I found I was not able to work."

"When was it that you received this Money from Mr. Crompton?"

"I received Ten Pounds from Mr.Crompton."

"Had you any Promise before the Election, that when you were in Distress Mr. Crompton would send you any Money?"

"No, I had no Promise."

"Did you apply for it as Charity?"

"When I saw Mr. Crompton, he asked me the Particulars, and my Name. I told him I had had an Injury in the King's Service; that I was very much afraid that I should lose my Arm; and he recommended me to his Doctor."

"How much was paid to his Doctor; that he paid for you after the Election?"

"I never knew that, because the Doctor only advised me to go down to the Salt Water; I took his Advice, and I found myself in Distress when I was there."

"You suppose Mr. Crompton paid the Doctor for you?"

"That might be, but I never enquired."

"Did you apply also for Money to Mr. Evans in like Manner, when you got the Five Pounds?"

"I sent him Word."

"Did you send him Word that you were in Distress for Money, and had a bad Arm?"

"Yes."

"And he sent you that Money?"

"Yes."

"You do not recollect any Election before that of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"I never voted at any Election before that."

"Had you any Promise from Mr. Crompton or Mr. Evans, that if you voted for them they would give you Money?"

"No; never."

"Neither directly nor indirectly?"

"I am certain I never had any Promise made."

"When the Catholic Question came up, you promised your Vote for Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson?"

"No; I voted for Sir Henry Wright Wilson merely on Principle."

(By a Lord.) "Did John Taylor tell you that you would have to pay Counsel who were to be heard at this Bar, when you signed the Petition?"

"No; he did not tell me that."

"Do you expect to have to pay for them?"

"No. I do not understand exactly the Question."

"Do you expect to have to pay for the Counsel appearing at the Bar?"

"Why I do not know about that; I cannot say."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Stephen Lawrence was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"In what Year did you become a Burgess?"

"In 1807."

"Do you recollect the Election in 1812?"

"Yes."

"To whom did you promise your Vote upon that Occasion?"

"To Mr. Marsh and Mr. Osbaldeston."

"Do you recollect going to the Angel Inn at Retford after that Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you see Mr. Hannam there, and a Stranger?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Money?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"Eighteen Pounds."

"Had you received any Money before that?"

"Yes; Three Pounds."

"From whom?"

"From Mr. Carter."

"Was Mr. Carter the Clerk of Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1818?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise upon that Election?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Yes."

"What did you receive?"

"Two Parcels."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty-four Guineas each."

"Who did you promise in the Election of 1820?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Yes."

"What?"

"Two Parcels."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

The Petition against the Bill was shewn to the Witness.

"Is that your Name?"

"Yes."

"Do you know Westby Leadbeater?"

"Yes."

"Did you ever receive any Money from him?"

"I cannot say I did."

"Was he Town Crier?"

"Yes."

"And a Burgess?"

"Yes."

"Did he ever produce any Paper to you to sign?"

"No; I believe he never did."

"Did he ever deliver to you any of those Packets you mention?"

"No; he never delivered none to me. He brought it to our House, I dare say; but I was not in at the Time."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"Was 1818 the first Election at which you voted?"

"It was not; I voted for Sir William Ingleby."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Yes; about Six Months after."

"Was it in consequence of any previous Promise?"

"Not at all: I never had any kind of Promise in my Life, not even a Shilling, or any thing of the sort."

"Are you a Resident of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"Do you know any thing of Westby Leadbeater?"

"I knew him all my Lifetime."

"He never brought you a Paper to sign?"

"No; I cannot say that ever he did in his Life."

"Did you vote at the last Election?"

"Yes."

"For whom?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"No."

"Who canvassed you?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

(By a Lord.) "Who asked you to sign that Petition?"

"John Richardson brought it to me."

"Do you expect to pay for the Counsel who have been heard at the Bar?"

"I expect nothing at all."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Baker was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Freeman?"

"Nearly Fifty Years."

"Do you remember the Election of 1812, when Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh were Candidates?"

"I do not recollect any thing about it."

"Where were you resident in the Year 1812?"

"In Retford."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1818, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates?"

"No, I do not recollect that; my Memory is getting very bad."

"Do you recollect Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans being Candidates at all there?"

"Yes."

"How many Years ago?"

"I cannot say."

"About how many?"

"I do not know; it may be Ten, or it may be more."

"Did you ever promise those Gentlemen your Vote?"

"Yes."

"After the Election, did you ever receive any Money?"

"Yes; I received a Packet."

"How much did that Packet contain?"

"I cannot exactly say."

"Tell us as near as you can?"

"Forty Guineas, I think."

"Was that contained in One or Two Packets?"

"It was contained in Two Packets."

"Do you recollect the second Time that Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise them your Vote again?"

"I think I did."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"There was some Man brought me somewhat; I was called up in the Night, and give it."

"What was it that he gave you?"

"I do not know."

"How much?"

"There might be Twenty Guineas in it."

"Did you receive, upon that Occasion, or at any Time afterwards, more than One Packet?"

"No."

"Do you mean to state then, that after the first Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans you only received One Packet?"

"I think not."

"Will you swear you did not receive Two?"

"Very likely I might."

"Have you any Doubt you received Two?"

"No, I have no Doubt about it."

"Do you recollect receiving One Packet or Two?"

"I have no Doubt but that I did receive Two."

"Did those Two Packets the last Time contain as much as you received before?"

"Yes, I think they did."

The Petition against the Bill was shewn to the Witness.

"Is that your Handwriting?"

"Yes, that is my Handwriting."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"How old are you?"

"In my Ninetieth Year."

"Are you the oldest Burgess of Retford?"

"No, I am not the oldest."

"Is there an older Burgess than one of Ninety?"

"No; I am in my Seventieth Year."

"How many Elections do you recollect?"

"I do not know; for when the Election is over I never think any more about it."

"You have known Retford all your Life, perhaps?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember General Grawford's Election?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Do you recollect his being Member for the Borough?"

"There was one Crawford a Member."

"How long ago?"

"I do not know."

"Do you remember Mr. Jeffery being Member?"

"I cannot recollect any thing about it; I think I have heard of that Name."

"Do you remember Sir John Eamer coming down?"

"Yes, I think there was a Name of that sort."

"Do you remember any Interest called the Newcastle Interest there, in old Time?"

"No, I do not recollect any thing about it."

"Have you ever heard of such a thing as that all the Time you have been at Retford?"

"No, not all the Time I have been there."

"You never heard any thing at all of the sort?"

"No."

"Have you ever had any Promise of Money at any Election?"

"No, never in my Life."

"How many Times have you ever received any Money in the whole Seventy Years?"

"I cannot tell you."

"Have you received it more than the Two or Three Times you have mentioned to that Gentleman?"

"I think not."

"In all the Elections you have known for the last Forty-eight or Forty-five Years, you have never received Money but those Three Times?"

"I think not."

(By a Lord.) "Have you a Brother of the Name of "Valentine Baker?"

"Yes."

"Is he alive?"

"Yes."

"Where does he live?"

"He is here at London."

"Did you ever hear from him whether he had received any Packet after the Election in 1820?"

"I cannot say whether he said any thing to me about that or not."

"Have you any Doubt that he said any thing to you about it?"

"I do not know that he might have; but if he did I forget about it. I did not keep it in my Head."

"Does he live in the same House with you?"

"No; we live asunder the one from the other."

"Have you got a Son who is a Burgess?"

"Yes."

"What is his Name?"

"His Name is Valentine Baker; and I have another Son, and that is John Baker."

"Both Burgesses?"

"Yes."

"Did they ever admit to you that they received any Packets after the Election?"

"No."

"After no Election?"

"I cannot say that they did."

"Do you expect to have to pay the Counsel who are heard at this Bar against the Bill?"

"I do not know any thing about it."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Robert Whatmough was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"When were you admitted?"

"About Twenty-three Years ago."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1812; Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh's Election?"

"Yes."

"Who did you promise upon that Occasion?"

"Mr. Osbaldeston."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Yes."

"Where?"

"At the Angel Inn."

"Of whom did you receive it?"

"I do not know."

"How much was it?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"Did you see Mr. Hannam there at the Time?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1818?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise upon that Occasion?"

"Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"I received Two Packets."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1820?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise then?"

"Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans."

"Did you receive any Packets after that Election?"

"Two of Twenty Guineas each."

"Were you at Home when they were delivered?"

"No."

"Who delivered the Packets?"

"I do not know."

"Do you know Westby Leadbeater?"

"Yes."

"Did he deliver to you any Packets?"

"No."

"Are you sure of that?"

"Yes."

The Petition against the Bill was shewn to the Witness.

"Do you believe that to be your own Signature?"

"Yes."

"Who did you vote for at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"Was 1812 the first Election at which you voted?"

"No."

"What was the first Election?"

"Sir John Ingleby's."

"When was that?"

"About Twenty-three Years ago."

"Who canvassed you for that Election?"

"Sir John Ingleby."

"Did he promise you any Money?"

"No."

"Did he give you any Money after that Election?"

"No."

"1812, then, was the first Election after which you received any Money?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Money after the Election of 1826?"

"None."

"Who canvassed you?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Did they talk to you about any Money?"

"No."

"Do you know any thing about "all right?"

"I heard it at Mr. Hornby's."

"When was that?"

"It was Two Years ago that first I heard Mr. Hornby talk about "all right."

"In what Way did he talk about it?"

"He said he had mentioned it to several of the Burgesses."

"In what Way?"

"When they came up upon this Petition."

"Do you mean to say he talked about it for the Purpose of their mentioning it when they came to give Evidence?"

"Yes."

"That was the first Time you ever heard it?"

"Yes."

"Did you attach any Meaning to it?"

"No."

"Have you heard the Word "Joss?"

"No."

"Or the Word "Tip?"

"No."

"Have you heard any thing of a Club in the Town of East Retford?"

"I have heard of it."

"Do you know the Turk's Head?"

"Yes; I live near it."

"Do you know whether the Club frequents that?"

"I do not."

"Was 1807 the first Election at which you voted?"

"Yes."

"Who canvassed you for Mr. Osbaldeston's Election?"

"Mr. Osbaldeston, and Mr. John Kirke deceased."

"Did they make you any Promise of any Money?"

"No."

"Who paid you the Money in 1814?"

"I do not know; it was a Stranger."

"Do you know any thing of Mr. Hornby?"

"Yes, I know him."

"Is he a respectable Man?"

"No, not very."

"Do you know Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes."

"Is he a respectable Attorney of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"More so than Mr. Hornby?"

"Yes."

"Were you a Tenant of Mr. Hornby's?"

"No."

"What brought you to his House?"

"I was there under an Execution."

"Were you present at the last Election at East Retford?"

"Yes."

"Was it much disturbed?"

"Yes."

"Did they call in the Military?"

"Yes."

"You have received no Money since that?"

"No, not a Farthing."

"I think you say you received no Money after Sir John Ingleby's Election?"

"No."

(By a Lord.) "You say the Town was disturbed at the first Election; who disturbed it?"

"The Town's people in general."

"Had they any particular Cries when they were going about the Town?"

"I cannot recollect any particular Words."

"Did they cry "No Popery?"

"Yes; they made a deal of Use of those Words."

"And it was the People that cried "No Popery" that made the Riot?"

"Yes."

"And the Military were called in to quell those Riots?"

"Yes."

"Did any body ever come to you about giving Evidence against the Bill?"

"No."

"How came you to come up here?"

"I was subponaed up here."

"You had no Conversation with any body upon the Subject?"

"Never; with no One."

"Not since you came up here?"

"No, never."

"You say you live near the Turk's Head; did you ever see any Freemen going into that House?"

"I have seen them going backwards and forwards."

"Is there a Club held there?"

"There is a Sick Society held there."

"Does the Blue Club hold its Sittings there?"

"I have heard of it, but I never knew it as a Fact."

"Did you ever see any of the Burgesses going into the Inn?"

"No, I cannot say that I did."

"Do you know Mr. Newton?"

"Yes."

"Who is he?"

"Mr. Hannam's Clerk."

"Had you ever any Conversation with him about the Disfranchisement of the Borough?"

"No."

"You said that Colonel Kirke canvassed you?"

"Along with Mr. Osbaldeston."

"Who canvassed you in the Election of 1826?"

"Colonel Kirke and Sir Robert Dundas."

"Was Mr. Foljambe with him?"

"Yes."

"And Mr. Fox?"

"No."

"You said you were in Mr. Hornby's House on an Execution; are you a Sheriff's Officer?"

"Yes."

"Then you were in the Execution of your Duty as a Sheriff's Officer?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Sinegar was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Freeman?"

"About Thirty Years."

"Do you remember the Election of 1818, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"After the Election of 1818, did you receive any Money?"

"No."

"Did you receive any Packet?"

"No."

"Was any Packet left at your House?"

"No."

"Do you mean to state to their Lordships that you received no Money, nor any thing, after the first Election of 1818?"

"No; I never received no Money at that Election."

"Did you receive it after the Election?"

"Yes; I received One Packet after the Election."

"What did that Packet contain?"

"Twenty Pounds."

"Was it Pounds or Guineas?"

"Pounds."

"Who gave it to you?"

"I do not know; but somebody left it at my House."

"Where did you live at that Time?"

"At Westham, near Rotheram."

"Do you mean to say, that you only received One Packet after the Election of 1818?"

"One Packet."

"Nothing else?"

"Nothing else."

"Do you recollect the second Election of 1820, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates the second Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to them?"

"Yes."

"After the Election of 1820, what did you receive?"

"Nothing."

"Did you receive any Packet?"

"No."

"Did you know a Person of the Name of Mr. Shore?"

"No."

"Did you never receive any Money in any way after the Election of 1820?"

"No."

"Was no Packet left at your House?"

"No."

"Did you know a Gentleman of the Name of Thornton at Retford?"

"Yes; Mr. John Thornton."

"Have you ever received any Money from him?"

"No."

"Do you mean to swear, that after the Election of 1820 you never received any Money at all?"

"I received none."

"Nor any Benefit whatever?"

"No."

"Then if I understand you rightly, you only received One Packet after the Election in 1818?"

"One Packet."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"I voted for Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of Robert Hudson, who lives at Sheffield?"

"Yes."

"Is he a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"What Line of Life is he in?"

"He is a Druggist."

"Had you ever any Conversation with him respecting Election Money?"

"No, never a Word."

"With respect to any Money received after Elections?"

"No."

"Have you had any Conversation with any Freeman of Retford respecting Election Money?"

"No, none; and who left me that Packet, I do not know, for they flung it into the House."

"I ask you again if you had any Conversation with any Freeman of Retford respecting the Receipt of Election Money?"

"No."

"Or of any Packet?"

"No."

"Did you ever talk to any Freeman about the Circumstance of your receiving this Packet in 1818?"

"I never talked to any Freeman, for I live Twenty Miles from Retford."

"Did you ever talk to any Freeman respecting the Receipt of the Packet of Money you received in 1818?"

"No."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of John Fenney, a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Where does he live?"

"I do not know; I have not seen him these Two Years."

"Did he live at Sheffield?"

"Yes."

"Had you ever any Conversation with him respecting the Receipt of Election Money?"

"No, I never had."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of Thomas Brown of Sheffield?"

"Yes."

"Is he a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Have you had any Conversation with him about Elections?"

"No."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"You have been Thirty Years a Burgess?"

"Yes."

"How many Elections have you voted at?"

"I have voted at Four, I think."

"Can you recollect them?"

"No, I cannot recollect them all."

"Did you vote in 1812?"

"I am no Scholar; I do not know how long that is since."

"At Mr. Osbaldeston's and Mr. Marsh's Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Money after that?"

"No."

"Did you vote in 1807, at Sir John Ingleby's Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Money after that?"

"No."

"Did you vote in 1826, at Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson's Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Money after that?"

"No."

"My Learned Friend has asked you a great deal about Conversation with different Burgesses of the Borough about Election Money; you answered you had had no Conversation with them about Election Money?"

"No, I never had."

"You are not a Resident of East Retford?"

"No."

"In 1818 a Packet was put into your House containing Twenty Pounds; how it came there you do not know?"

"No."

"Nor by whom it was sent?"

"No."

"Nor for what Reason?"

"No, nor what for."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Butler was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"When were you admitted?"

"I was a Burgess above Fifty Years ago."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1812?"

"No; I cannot remember any such thing."

"Do you recollect Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh?"

"Yes, I do."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen your Vote?"

"Yes."

"After the Election were you at the Angel Inn?"

"Yes, I was."

"Did you see Mr. Hannam there?"

"Yes."

"And a strange Gentleman?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you receive any Money?"

"From the strange Gentleman I did."

"How much?"

"I have almost forgotten, it is so long since."

"How much more or less was it than Twenty Guineas?"

"I cannot say particularly."

"Was it more or less than Twenty Guineas?"

"I think it was somewhere about that."

"Do you recollect the Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton in 1818?"

"No; when the Election is over, I think no more about it."

"Do you remember their being Members for the Borough?"

"Yes."

"Before they were elected did you promise them your Vote?"

"I have forgotten; it is a long while since, and my Memory gets bad. I am Seventy-five Years of Age, and I think no more about the Election when it is over."

"Do you recollect receiving any Packets after that Election?"

"I remember something of a Letter in my House at Night-time, but who it came from I do not know."

"But you remember a Letter coming at Night?"

"Yes, I do."

"Do you recollect what was in it?"

"I have forgotten."

"How much more or less than Twenty Guineas was it?"

"I cannot say particularly; perhaps my Wife got it, and kept it unknown to me; but a Letter I did receive."

"Upon your Oath, did you not receive a Packet containing Money?"

"I did."

"How much Money did it contain?"

"It was Forty Guineas."

"After the Election of 1820, did you receive One Packet or Two?"

"I cannot remember from one Election to another."

"How many Packets did you receive?"

"Two, I think."

"What did they amount to?"

"Just the same as the other."

"Forty Guineas?"

"I believe it was."

"Have you a Son a Burgess?"

"Yes."

"Did you ever hear what he received?"

"No."

"Did you ever receive any Packet for your Son, the Burgess?"

"I do not know."

"Brush up your Recollection?"

"I dare say I did once."

"Have you any Doubt of it?"

"I do not know."

"Have you any Doubt that you did?"

"I believe I did."

"What did it contain?"

"Forty Guineas."

"Did you hand it over to your Son?"

"I cannot say that; perhaps I might keep it myself."

"Do you mean to state that as your Answer upon your Oath?"

"Those are my Words; and I believe I did keep it myself."

"Did you maintain your Son?"

"I did."

"He lived with you?"

"Yes; he has Fits."

"Did you take care of the Forty Guineas for him?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you sign the Petition against this Bill?"

"I cannot write."

"Did you employ any body else to write for you?"

"Yes; and you will find my Name or my Mark."

"Who did you desire to write for you?"

"I forget; I do not know who it was."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"How old is your Son?"

"About Forty, to the best of my Knowledge."

"Is your Son a Burgess?"

"Yes."

"I think you stated you had been Fifty Years a Burgess of Retford?"

"Better."

"How many Elections have you voted at?"

"I cannot tell you that."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1806?"

"No."

"Do you recollect who stood then?"

"No."

"Do you recollect General Crawford?"

"I recollect General Crawford, and Charles Crawford, both."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"I never asked for any thing, and they never promised me any."

(By a Lord.) "Did you get any Money after that Election?"

"When I promised a Gentleman, I never asked for any Money, and he never promised me none."

(Mr. Stephenson.) "Do you recollect Sir William Ingleby's Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you vote for him?"

"Yes."

"Did he give you any Money?"

"No; I never asked him for Money, and he never promised me none."

"Did you vote at the last Election in 1826?"

"There was no voting at the last Election."

"When Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson stood did you vote?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you vote for?"

"For Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Have you got any Money for it?"

"No."

"Who canvassed you?"

"The Two Gentlemen themselves."

"Have you received any Money since the last Election?"

"No."

"Are you a Resident of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Were you present at the last Election in the Town?"

"Yes."

"Was it quiet?"

"No."

"What was the Matter?"

"Breaking the Windows; and a deal of Mischief they did."

"Who did it?"

"I cannot tell who did it; it was done by some bad People."

"Do you know Mr. Hornby?"

"Yes."

"What do you know of him?"

"I think he is a very busy kind of Gentleman."

"He has busied himself about East Retford, has not he?"

"Yes; he used to run out to give the Men a Belly-full of Drink."

"Has he ever talked to you about the Borough?"

"He has a deal of Talk; he interferes with Things he has no Business with."

"Had he any Conversation with you about disfranchising the Borough?"

"No, never with me."

"Do-you know Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes."

"Is he an Attorney?"

"Yes."

"Is he a respectable kind of a Man?"

"I do not think he is too much; he is a busy kind of a Man."

"He is another busy Man that has meddled about the Borough?"

"I think he is."

"There are a good many of those Persons in East Retford?"

"Yes."

"Do you know Mr. Sharp?"

"Yes; I know him."

"What do you know of him?"

"He is another busy kind of Man."

"Mr. Fisher?"

"Yes."

"Is he another busy kind of Man?"

"I cannot say that he is; I have heard that he is; but he is a good Tradesman, and a good sort of a Man."

"Fisher is the best of the Set?"

"Yes."

"Do you know of these Persons ever meeting together?"

"I have heard say that they do meet together."

"Where?"

"At the Turk's Head; but then I never saw it myself."

"Did you ever see Mr. Sharp's Watch?"

"No, I never heard talk of it before I came here; I have heard talk of some Gold Watch, but I know nothing about that."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"You have stated to my Learned Friend, that you never asked General Crawford for any Money, and he never promised you?"

"He never did."

"Did you get some Money after his Election?"

"He never promised me nothing, and I never asked him."

"Did you get some Money after his Election?"

"There was a Man, as I told you before, a Stranger, that I knew nothing about, that came at Night-time and threw a Letter into the House; and I should think it after General Crawford's Election, or Charles Crawford's Election."

"Was that Twenty Guineas?"

"Yes."

"You did not ask, nor did Sir William Ingleby promise you; but did you get some Money after his Election?"

"I forget."

"Did you receive some Money after Sir William Ingleby's Election?"

"I think there was a Letter left at the House."

"Was there Twenty or Forty Guineas inside of it?"

"I forget."

"Recollect yourself?"

"I never think of it when the Election is over."

"Did it contain Twenty or Forty Guineas?"

"I cannot recollect whether it was Twenty or Forty now."

"Was it either the one or the other?"

"It was one of the two."

"What is your Son's Christian Name?"

"John."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

William Cartwright not having attended pursuant to the Order of the House of Monday the 26th of April last;

Witnesses examined as to the State of Health of W. Cartwright:

John Butt was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

"Did you serve the Order of the House upon William Cartwright to attend here as a Witness?"

"I was sent down for my Father to serve these Orders, and I did serve Mrs.Cartwright upon the 28th of April, who then stated that Mr. Cartwright was labouring under a Paralytic Attack. I afterwards saw Mr. Cartwright, who produced a Copy of the Order of his Medical Attendant, Mr.Gylby, who stated that it would be highly improper for him to leave Home."

"Did he appear to you to be ill?"

"He did; he seemed to have a Paralytic Affection in his Face, and the whole of one Side; and I also understood that he could not assist himself in dressing. I have the Certificate."

"Do you know the Name of the Medical Attendant of Mr.Cartwright?"

"Mr.Gylby is Mr.Cartwright's Medical Attendant."

"Is he a Surgeon?"

"He is; and I understand he is a Gentleman of great Credit there with regard to his Skill."

"Have you, from your own Observation, reason to believe that any Deceit was practised?"

"I should think certainly not. I should mention to your Lordships that Mr.Cartwright came down with Mr.Gylby to the Inn where I was staying, and he seemed very much affected in his Side, and I think there was an Affection in his Face."

"Could he walk?"

"I think he could; I have heard that he was seen the Day after in the Market Place."

"How far was your Inn from his Residence?"

"I should think not above Twenty-five Yards."

"The Witness was directed to withdraw."

"Then Samuel Francis Flower was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

"What are you by Profession?"

"A Surgeon."

"Are you acquainted with William Cartwright of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"When did you see him last?"

"I have seen him almost every Day of late."

"When did you see him last; how many Days ago?"

"About Two Days ago."

"In what State was he at that Time, in respect to his Health?"

"I had not any Conversation with him at that Time; I saw him in the Street."

"Could you judge from his Appearance whether it was likely to be attended with any Danger, his coming here to London?"

"I should think there would be no Danger in his coming here."

"Was he walking in the Street?"

"Yes."

"Did he appear to be Paralytic?"

"I could not perceive any Paralysis about him."

"What aged Man is he?"

"He is apparently rather better than Forty."

"You perceived no Sympton of Paralysis in the Manner of his walking?"

"Not any."

"Did you perceive any Affection in his Countenance that led you to believe he was labouring under Paralysis?"

"I did not perceive any."

"Do you know Mr. Gylby?"

"I do."

"What is he?"

"A Surgeon."

"Does he attend Mr.Cartwright?"

"Not to my Knowledge; he does not attend Mr. Cartwright now."

"Is he a Surgeon in good Practice in Retford?"

"Yes."

"Is Mr.Cartwright attended by any Medical Man there?"

"Not to my Knowledge."

"Since Mr.Cartwright has been served with a Summons to attend this House, have you not been called in for the Purpose of certifying as to his Health?"

"I have."

"What was your Opinion when you did see him?"

"My Opinion was, that he was able to come to London."

"Without any Risk?"

"Without any Risk."

"When you examined him in the Manner you describe, and with that view, did you perceive that he had had any Attack of Paralysis?"

"Mr.Gylby attended Mr.Cartwright about Six Months ago; he told me at that Time that he had some Affection of his Head; since that Time I think he has not attended him."

"At the Time when you examined him for the Purpose of ascertaining whether he could safely come to London, did you discover any thing that led you to suppose he would run any Risk in coming here?"

"No Risk that I could discover."

"The Witness was directed to withdraw."

Witnesses to attend:

Ordered, That Worthington Thomas Gylby Surgeon and Benjamin Robertson M.D. do attend this House forthwith, in order to their being examined as to the State of Health of the said William Cartwright.

2d Reading postponed:

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off to Monday next; and that the Lords be summoned.

Witnesses discharged from further Attendance.

Ordered, That Thomas Slaney, Broxholme Slaney, John Hoult, George Worsley, John Richardson, Thomas Baker, Benjamin Scott, William Cookson, William Brown, Matthew Wass, Stephen Lawrence, John Baker, Robert Whatmough, Thomas Butler and John Sinegar be discharged from further Attendance on this House upon the Second Reading of the last-mentioned Bill.

E. of Mexborough's Claim, Com ee to meet.

Ordered, That the Committee for Privileges to whom the Petition of John Earl of Mexborough, praying, "That his Right to vote at the Election of Peers of Ireland to sit in the Parliament of the United Kingdom may be admitted by their Lordships," stands referred, do meet to consider of the said Claim on Wednesday next.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Lunæ, decimum septimum diem instantis Maii, hormâ decimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.