House of Lords Journal Volume 62
17 May 1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 62: 17 May 1830', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 62: 1830, pp. 428-456. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16349 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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Contents

Die Lunæ, 17 Maii 1830.
Mullins et al. v. Townsend. James & Spencer v. Price & Gott. Com rs of Charitable Donations et al. v. Harris et al. Hollingrake's Patent Bill, Report from Select Com ee referred to Com ee on the Bill. Disabilities of the Jews, Petitions for Removal of: (Falmouth:) Jews of Canterbury: Freeholders, &c. of Canterbury. East Retford Election Bill, Petition against. Ellesmere & Chester Canal Bill. Rother Levels Drainage Bill. Criminal Laws, Petition from Teignmouth & Crediton for Alteration of. Taxes on the Necessaries of Life, Petition of British Association for promoting Co-operative Knowledge for Repeal of, &c. Mr. Owen's Plan, Petition of First London Co-operative Trading Association for Consideration of. Welsh Judicature, Petition from Carnarvon for Reformation of. Welsh Judicature, Petitions from Carmarthen against the Abolition of. Stamp Duties, (Ireland,) Petitions against Encrease of: (Inhabitants of Belfast:) Proprietors of Newspapers in Belfast: Letters Press Printers of Clonmel. Poor Laws, G. Gunning's Petition to establish, in Ireland. Limerick Road Bill, Witnesses to attend the Com ee. East India &c. Trade Petition of Iron Masters of Monmouth for opening. Tythe System, Petition from Kilmore, &c. for Abolition of. Poor Rates, Petition from Frome Selwood for Assessment of, by Hundreds. Slavery, Petitions from Frome Selwood & Pickering for Abolition of. Spirits & Stamps, (Ireland,) Petitions from Skryne & Carrickonsuir against additional Duty on. Richmond Lunatic Asylum (Dublin) Bill: Leases for Linen Manufacture (Ireland) Bill: Little Bolton Improvement Bill: New Sarum Poor Rates Bill: Messages to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to the 4 preceding Bills. Tweed Fisheries Bill: Message to H.C. with Amendments to it. Wareham, &c. Roads Bill: Message to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to it. St. Helen's & Runcorn Gap Railway Bill, The King's Consent signified: Bill read 3 a & passed: Derby Roads Bill: Stafford Improvement Bill: Charminster Inclosure Bill: Tiverton Roads Bill: Ashburton Roads Bill: Great Dover Street, &c. Improvement Bill: Kingston Bridge Bill: Tonbridge, & c. Roads Bill: Kingston upon-Hull Road Bill: Manchester Improvement Bill: Barnwell Tithes Bill: Messages to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to the 12 preceding Bills. Sir W. G. Cumming's Estate Bill: Rawlings's Estate Bill: Messages to H.C. with the 2 preceding Bills. Cromford Bridge Road Bill: Message to H. C. with an Amendment to it. 10th Report from Appeal Com ee. Sankey Brook Navigation Bill, The King's Consent signified: Bill reported Specially. Sir W. P. Campbell's Estate Bill. Hungerford Market Bill. Dunham Bridge Bill. Caithness Roads Bill. Glasgow Royalty Extension Bill. Louth, &c. Roads Bill. London Assurance Companies Bill. Walsall, &c. Roads Bill. Ker & Johnston v. Bell et al: Thomson to enter into a Recog ee on it. Harris v. Kemble et al. Petition of 3 Respondents to advance the Hearing, referred to Appeal Com ee. Duffy v. Orr et al. Petition of 2 Respondents for Time for their Cases, referred to Appeal Com ee. Birmingham Grammar School Bill. Heigham Bridge Bill. Queensferry Road Bill. Carlisle & Penrith Road Bill. Ideridgehay Roads Bill. Sheffield Waterworks Bill. Invernessshire Statute Labour Bill. Hamerton's Divorce Bill. Mildmay's Divorce Bill, 2d Reading deferred, & Witnesses to attend. East Retford Election Bill. Witnesses examined as to the State of Health of W. Cartwright: Order for Attendance of W. Cartwright discharged: 2d Reading postponed: Witnesses to attend: Witnesses discharged from Attendance. Hollingrake's Patent Bill Specially reported: Standing Order No. 173 to be considered on it. Adjourn.

Die Lunæ, 17 Maii 1830.

DOMINI tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Ds. Lyndhurst. Cancellarius.
Archiep. Cantuar.
Epus. Bath. et Well.
Epus. Lich. et Cov.
Epus. Bristol.
Epus. Carliol.
Epus. Roffen.
Epus. Cestrien.
Epus. Rapoten.
Ds. Clifton.
Ds. Teynham.
Ds. Clifford of Chudleigh.
Ds. Colville of Culross.
Ds. Belhaven & Stenton.
Ds. Boyle.
Ds. Hay.
Ds. King.
Ds. Monson.
Ds. Dynevor.
Ds. Gage.
Ds. Mendip.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. De Dunstanville & Bassett.
Ds. Rolle.
Ds. Bayning.
Ds. Northwick.
Ds. Carbery.
Ds. Redesdale.
Ds. Ellenborough.
Ds. Arden.
Ds. Sheffield.
Ds. Barham.
Ds. Hill.
Ds. Meldrum.
Ds. Glenlyon.
Ds. Bexley.
Ds. Penshurst.
Ds. Somerhill.
Ds. Wharncliffe.
Ds. Feversham.
Ds. Clanwilliam.
Ds. Durham.
Ds. Skelmersdale.
Ds. Wallace.
Comes Bathurst, Præses.
Comes Rosslyn, C. P. S.
Dux Norfolk, Marescallus.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Portland.
Dux Wellington.
March. Lansdowne.
March. Salisbury.
March. Camden.
March. Bristol.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Winchilsea & Nottingham.
Comes Chesterfield.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Rosebery.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Dartmouth.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes De Lawarr.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Malmesbury.
Comes Wicklow.
Comes Limerick.
Comes Manvers.
Comes Bradford.
Comes Glengall.
Comes Vane.
Vicecom. Arbuthnott.
Vicecom. Melville.
Vicecom. Lorton.
Vicecom. Gordon.
Vicecom. Granville.
Vicecom. Goderich.

PRAYERS.

Mullins et al. v. Townsend.

After hearing Counsel fully in the Cause wherein The Honorable Edward Mullins, and others, are Appellants, and John Townsend Esquire is Respondent:

It is Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Cause be put off sine Die.

James & Spencer v. Price & Gott.

Ordered, That the Hearing of the Cause wherein Thomas James and James Spencer are Appellants, and James Price and William Augustus Gott are Respondents, which stands appointed for this Day, be put off to Wednesday next.

Com rs of Charitable Donations et al. v. Harris et al.

Ordered, That the Hearing of the Cause wherein The Commissioners of Charitable Donations, and others, are Appellants, and Thomas Harris, and others, are Respondents, which stands appointed for this Day, be put off to Wednesday next.

Hollingrake's Patent Bill, Report from Select Com ee referred to Com ee on the Bill.

Ordered, That the Report from the Lords Committees appointed a Select Committee to enquire into the Expediency or Inexpediency of the Regulations contained in the Bill, intituled, "An Act for prolonging the Term of certain Letters Patent granted to James Hollingrake, for an improved Method of manufacturing Copper or other Metal Rollers, and of casting and forming Metallic Substances into various Forms with improved Closeness and Soundness of Texture," together with the Minutes of Evidence taken before the said Committee, be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed.

Disabilities of the Jews, Petitions for Removal of: (Falmouth:)

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town of Falmouth and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to remove the Civil Disabilities which for a long Period have been imposed on the Jews:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Jews of Canterbury:

Upon reading the Petition of His Majesty's Jewish Subjects resident in the City and County of the City of Canterbury, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to take the extreme Hardship and Humiliation of their Condition into their benign Consideration, and by removing from them all the Civil Disabilities under which they labour, grant them that Franchise and Protection which will entitle them to a full Participation in the Immunities and Privileges of the Constitution, the undoubted sacred and valuable Right of every Class and Denomination of His Majesty's Subjects:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Freeholders, &c. of Canterbury.

Upon reading the Petition of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of Canterbury and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will take into their benign Consideration the Petitions that have been presented by His Majesty's Subjects being Jews, and will afford them such Relief as to their Lordships shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

East Retford Election Bill, Petition against.

Upon reading the Petition of the Persons whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act to prevent Bribery and Corruption in the Election of Burgesses to serve in Parliament for the Borough of East Retford;" and praying their Lordships "not to pass the said Bill; but if their Lordships should be pleased to proceed further in the same, that they would insert a Clause therein restoring to every Inhabitant of the said Borough the Right of voting for his Representative in Parliament; and further that in giving such Vote he should have the Protection of the Ballot, a Measure which the Petitioners are fully persuaded would prove a Radical Cure for the Evil complained of:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ellesmere & Chester Canal Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Rowland Hill and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable the United Company of Proprietors of the Ellesmere and Chester Canal to make a Reservoir, and to establish Vessels for the Conveyance of Goods from Ellesmere Port across the River Mersey; and also to amend and enlarge the Powers of the Act relating to the said Canal;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Rother Levels Drainage Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Rowland Hill and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to amend an Act of the Seventh Year of His present Majesty, for more effectually draining and preserving certain Marsh Lands or Low Grounds in the Parishes of Sandhurst, Newenden, Rolvenden, Tenterden, Wittersham, Ebony, Woodchurch, Appeldore and Stone, in the County of Kent, and Ticehurst, Salehurst, Bodiam, Ewhurst, Northiam, Beckly, Peasmarsh, Iden and Playden, in the County of Sussex;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Two Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Criminal Laws, Petition from Teignmouth & Crediton for Alteration of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Teignmouth, in the County of Devon, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Crediton and its Neighbourhood, in the County of Devon, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; severally praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to substitute for Death some other Punishment that shall be more likely to prevent the Perpetration of the Crime of Forgery:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Taxes on the Necessaries of Life, Petition of British Association for promoting Co-operative Knowledge for Repeal of, &c.

Upon reading the Petition of the Labourers, Mechanics and Artizans, Members of the British Association for promoting Co-operative Knowledge, and others, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "First, That all Taxes imposed upon the Comforts and Necessaries of Life may be repealed; and that the Exigences of the State may be supplied by a comprehensive Tax on Property, increasing in Amount in the precise Ratio with the Accumulation of Property, which Measure appears simple in Application, equitable in Principle, and completely efficient in preventing a Recurrence of the Evil of too great an Equality in the Distribution of Wealth: Second, That the Law of Primogeniture, which unjustly leaves the junior Branches of a Family in a partial State of Destitution, be also repealed, inasmuch as it offers several Inducements for pensioning the younger Sons and Daughters of many Noble Peers, degrades the Nobility generally in the Estimation of the People at large, materially encreases the Public Burdens, and exhibits to the World the lamentable Spectacle of a Nobility, boasting of their high Honour, and revelling in all the Luxuries of Life, meanly casting the Burden of supporting and educating their Families upon an impoverished Population; while the Children of the industrious Mechanic and Artizan are fed, clothed and educated by their Parents out of a Weekly Stipend seldom as high as Thirty Shillings, and too frequently descending from that Sum as low as Ten: Third, That their Lordships will forthwith pass a Law to shorten the Duration of Parliaments, and to give to every Man (not incapacitated by Crime or Imbecility) the Right of voting for a Representative, because it appears to the Petitioners that the Producers of all Wealth are more justly entitled to be represented, and stand in greater Need of Political Protection, than those who possess the Wealth abstracted from their Toil; and for the more effectual Protection of the Voter in the independent Exercise of his Right, the Petitioners trust that their Lordships will make Provision for taking the Votes by Ballot:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Mr. Owen's Plan, Petition of First London Co-operative Trading Association for Consideration of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Labourers, Mechanics and Artizans, Members of the First London Co-operative Trading Association, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will forthwith take into their Consideration the Plan of Co-operation propounded by Mr.Owen, remove all Obstructions to its complete and immediate Establishment, and adopt such other Measures as, in their Wisdom, shall seem fitted for establishing the Prosperity and Happiness of the Nation at large:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Welsh Judicature, Petition from Carnarvon for Reformation of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the County of Carnarvon, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Local Judicature established in Wales may be reformed, but not abolished:"

"It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Welsh Judicature, Petitions from Carmarthen against the Abolition of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the County of Carmarthen, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

"Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the County of Carmarthen, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the County of Carmarthen, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; severally praying their Lordships "not to abolish the present System of the Welsh Judicature:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Stamp Duties, (Ireland,) Petitions against Encrease of: (Inhabitants of Belfast:)

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town of Belfast, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will reject the proposed Encrease of Stamp Duties in Ireland:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Proprietors of Newspapers in Belfast:

Upon reading the Petition of the Proprietors of Newspapers in the Town of Belfast, in Ireland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to refrain from laying any new Imposts on the Newspaper Press of Ireland, and to lighten the Burden of Taxation under which it already labours:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Letters Press Printers of Clonmel.

Upon reading the Petition of the Letter Press Printers of the Town of Clonmel, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "not to assimilate the Irish Newspaper Stamp Duties with those of England, which if carried into Effect must bring with it many Evils to the Community at large, and to the Petitioners the most calamitous Misfortune:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Poor Laws, G. Gunning's Petition to establish, in Ireland.

Upon reading the Petition of George Gunning of Frindsbury, Kent, a Lieutenant on the Half Pay of His Majesty's First Regiment of Dragoon Guards; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to pass a Law to establish a System of Poor Laws in Ireland which would tend to promote the Welfare of the labouring Classes of the People:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Limerick Road Bill, Witnesses to attend the Com ee.

Ordered, That Colonel Standish O'Grady, Thomas Montgomery Esquire and Thomas Philips Vokes Esquire do attend this House To-morrow, to be sworn, in order to their being examined as Witnesses before the Committee, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for improving and repairing the Road leading from Newcastle, in the County of Limerick, to the City of Limerick, and from thence to Charleville, in the County of Cork," stands committed.

East India &c. Trade Petition of Iron Masters of Monmouth for opening.

Upon reading the Petition of the Iron Masters and Holders of Mineral Property in the County of Monmouth, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of the Monopoly of The East India Company; and praying their Lordships "to accede to no Proposals for prolonging the Existence of any Restrictions on the natural and constitutional Right of their Fellow Subjects to trade with all Countries in Amity with this Nation, and to reside in any of the Colonies and Dependencies of the British Empire:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Tythe System, Petition from Kilmore, &c. for Abolition of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Landholders of the United Parishes of Kilmore, Kilturk, Tomhagard and Molraman; praying their Lordships "to adopt such Measures respecting the Church Establishment as may lead to the total and final Abolition of the present Tythe System:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Poor Rates, Petition from Frome Selwood for Assessment of, by Hundreds.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Parish of Frome Selwood, in Somersetshire, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will take into their serious Consideration theExpendiency of effecting a Change in the System of Poor Rate, and enacting that there shall be One common Assessment throughout each Hundred:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Slavery, Petitions from Frome Selwood & Pickering for Abolition of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town and Neighbourhood of Frome Selwood, in Somerset- shire, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships, with the other Branches of the Legislature, will enact such Laws, as to their Wisdom shall appear effective, to give Freedom to all Children of Slaves to be born after the passing of such Enact- ment, and to all Slaves who shall at that Period be under the Age of Ten Years:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Upon reading the Petition of the Minister and Members of the Congregation of Protestant Dissenters of the Independent Denomination at Pickering, in the County of York, and other Friends to the Abolition of Slavery, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "for the immediate Abolition of Slavery in every Part of the British Dominions:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Spirits & Stamps, (Ireland,) Petitions from Skryne & Carrickonsuir against additional Duty on.

Upon reading the Petition of the Landholders of the Parishes united to Skryne, in the County of Meath, Ireland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That no additional Tax be laid on Irish Corn Spirit beyond what was imposed in the Year 1825:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Upon reading the Petition of the Landowners, Merchants, Traders and Inhabitants generally of the Town and Neighbourhood of Carrickonsuir, Ireland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of the proposed Encrease of Duty on British Corn Spirits and on Stamps, and praying their Lordships "not to permit themselves to be guilty of a palpable Inconsistency of an unjustifiable Partiality, by encreasing the Taxes on this Country, which is poor and impoverished, whilst their Lordships are diminishing those of England, which is rich and prosperous:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Richmond Lunatic Asylum (Dublin) Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for appropriating the Richmond Lunatic Asylum in Dublin to the Purposes of a District Lunatic Asylum."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Leases for Linen Manufacture (Ireland) Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to confirm certain Leases of Lands for the Purposes of carrying on the Linen Manufacture of Ireland."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Little Bolton Improvement Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually cleansing, paving, lighting, watching, regulating and improving the Township of Little Bolton, in the County Palatine of Lancaster."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

New Sarum Poor Rates Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for better assessing and recovering the Rates for the Relief of the Poor within the City of New Sarum, and enlarging the Powers of an Act passed in the Tenth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, intituled, "An Act for consolidating the Rates to be made for the Relief of the Poor of the respective Parishes of Saint Thomas, Saint Edmund and Saint Martin, in the City of New Sarum."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to the 4 preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Harvey and Mr. Stratford;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Tweed Fisheries Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the more effectual Preservation and Increase of the Breed of Salmon, and for better regulating the Fisheries in the River Tweed, and the Rivers and Streams running into the same, and also within the Mouth or Entrance of the said River."

Then the following Amendments were made to the said Bill.

Pr. 13. L. 16. Leave out ("present legal")

L. 17. Leave out ("used")

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, with the Amendments, shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. with Amendments to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To return the said Bill, and acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the same, with some Amendments, to which their Lordships desire their Concurrence.

Wareham, &c. Roads Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving several Roads leading from the Market Cross in the Town of Wareham, and in Purbeck, in the County of Dorset."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

St. Helen's & Runcorn Gap Railway Bill, The King's Consent signified:

The Earl of Shaftesbury acquainted the House, "That His Majesty, having been informed of the Contents of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for making a Railway from the Cowley Hill Colliery, in the Parish of Prescot, to Runcorn Gap, in the same Parish, (with several Branches therefrom,) all in the County Palatine of Lancaster; and for constructing a Wet Dock at the Termination of the said Railway at Runcorn Gap aforesaid;" was pleased to consent (as far as His Majesty's Interest is concerned) that their Lordships may proceed therein as they shall think fit."

Bill read 3 a & passed:

The said Bill was read the Third Time.

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Derby Roads Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving certain Roads between the Towns of Derby, Mansfield and Nutthall, in the Counties of Derby and Nottingham."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Stafford Improvement Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for paving, lighting, watching, cleansing, regulating and improving the Streets, Lanes and other Public Passages and Places within the Borough of Stafford, in the County of Stafford."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Charminster Inclosure Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands within the Parish of Charminster, in the County of Dorset."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Tiverton Roads Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for improving several Roads and making certain new Roads in the Counties of Devon and Somerset, leading to and from the Town of Tiverton; and for amending an Act of His present Majesty, for repairing several Roads leading from and through the Town of Wiveliscombe."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Ashburton Roads Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving several Roads leading to and from or near to the Towns of Ashburton and Totness, in the County of Devon."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Great Dover Street, &c. Improvement Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for paving, lighting, cleansing and otherwise improving such Parts of Great Dover Street, Trinity Street, Trinity Square, and the Highways, Roads, Streets, Markets and other Public Passages and Places leading out thereof or abutting thereon or adjacent thereto, all within the Parishes of Saint Mary Newington and Saint George the Martyr Southwark, in the County of Surrey, as do not fall within the Powers and Provisions of any existing Acts of Parliament."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Kingston Bridge Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for amending and extending the Provisions of an Act passed in the Sixth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for the re-building of Kingston Bridge, and for improving and making suitable Approaches thereto."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Tonbridge, & c. Roads Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for amending and improving the Road from Tonbridge to Ightham, and other Roads communicating therewith, in the County of Kent."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Kingston upon-Hull Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for making and maintaining a new Turnpike Road from the Town of Kingston-upon-Hull, in the County of the said Town, to Hedon, in the County of York."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Manchester Improvement Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to amend several Acts for supplying the Town of Manchester with Gas, and for regulating and improving the same Town."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Barnwell Tithes Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to commute for Lands and a Corn Rent the ancient Compositions in lieu of Tithes and Glebe Lands payable to the Rector of the Parish of Barnwell Saint Andrew with Barnwell All Saints annexed, in the County of Northampton."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to the 12 preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Sir W. G. Cumming's Estate Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for selling the Entailed Lands and Estates of Gordonstown and others, in the County of Elgin and Forres, belonging to Sir William Gordon Gordon Cumming Baronet, or so much thereof as may be necessary, and to apply the Price arising therefrom in the Payment of the Debts affecting or that may be made to affect the said Lands and Estates."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the affirmative.

Rawlings's Estate Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for vesting the legal Estate in certain Estates late of Ann Budgen, formerly vested in Elizabeth Pedder deceased in Mortgage, in Edward Rawlings, the present Mortgagee and Trustee of the Equity of Redemption thereof."

Then an Amendment was made to the said Bill.

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H.C. with the 2 preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To carry down the said Bills, and desire their Concurrence thereto.

Cromford Bridge Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving the Road from Cromford Bridge to the Turnpike Road at or near Langley Mill, in the County of Derby."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill with the Amendment, shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with an Amendment to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To return the said Bill, and acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the same, with One Amendment, to which their Lordships desire their Concurrence.

10th Report from Appeal Com ee.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House; and to report to the House; and to whom were referred Petitions in the following Causes; Douglas and another against Brown and another; and Sir John Murray Baronet and others against Howell and others; "That the Committee had met, and considered the Appellants Petition in the Cause Douglas and another against Brown and another, praying their Lordships That this Appeal may be put up for Hearing on such early Day as the Business of the House will permit; and had heard the Agents thereon, and the Committee are of Opinion, That the Prayer of the said Petition for an early Day for Hearing cannot be complied with: And that the Committee had also considered the Petition of Edwin Samuel Hervey Howell and Catherine Emily his Wife, Two of the Respondents in the Cause Sir John Murray Baronet and others against Howell and others, praying their Lordships to dismiss the Appeal, with Costs; and had also considered the Appellants Petition in the same Cause, praying their Lordships that James Edward Maddox may be at liberty forthwith, or within Ten Days from the Time their Lordships shall make an Order on this Petition, to enter into the Recognizance on the Appeal on the behalf of the Petitioners; but the Agents desiring, on behalf of the respective Petitioners, that the said Petitions should now be withdrawn, the Committee are of Opinion, That the said Petitioners respectively should be allowed to withdraw their said Petitions, as desired."

Which Report, being read by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House; and Ordered accordingly.

Sankey Brook Navigation Bill, The King's Consent signified:

The Earl of Shaftesbury acquainted the House, "That His Majesty, having been informed of the Contents of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to consolidate and amend the Acts relating to the Sankey Brook Navigation, in the County of Lancaster, and to make a Navigable Canal from the said Navigation at Fidlers Ferry to communicate with the River Mersey at Widness Wharf, near Westbank, in the Township of Widness, in the same County," was pleased to consent (as far as His Majesty's Interest is concerned) that their Lordships may proceed therein as they shall think fit."

Bill reported Specially.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the last-mentioned Bill, That the Committee had met, and considered the said Bill, and, in the first place, proceeded to enquire how far the Standing Orders of the House relative to Navigation Bills had been complied with, and found that all the said Orders had been complied with, and in particular with respect to the Standing Order No. 213, that a Draft of the Bill was submitted to a Meeting of the Proprietors or Undertakers of the said Navigation at a Meeting held specially for that Purpose on the 22d of March last, which Meeting, it was proved to the Committee, was called by Advertizement inserted for Four consecutive Weeks, vizt. on the 19th and 26th of February and 5th and 12th of March last, in the Newspaper intituled The Liverpool Mercury; and on the 20th and 27th of February and 6th and 13th of March last, in the Newspaper intituled The Liverpool Saturday's Advertizer, the said Newspapers being published in the County of Lancaster, to which County the Matter of the Bill relates; and that it appears that such Meeting was held on a Period not earlier than Seven Days after the last Insertion of the said Advertizement, and that at the said Meeting a Draft of the Bill was submitted to the Proprietors or Undertakers then present, and was unanimously approved of by them; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to their Lordships, without any Amendment."

Sir W. P. Campbell's Estate Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable Sir William Purves Hume Campbell of Marchmont, Baronet, and the Heirs of Entail of the Lands and Barony of Greenlaw, in the County of Berwick, to grant Feus of Parts of the said Lands and Barony; and for other Purposes therein mentioned," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Hungerford Market Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act to incorporate certain Persons, to be called, "The Hungerford Market Company," for the Re-establishment of a Market for the Sale of Fish, Poultry and Meat, and other Articles of general Consumption and Use, and for other Purposes," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Dunham Bridge Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for building a Bridge over the River Trent, from Dunham, in the County of Nottingham, to the opposite Shore, in the County of Lincoln," was committed.

Caithness Roads Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for making, repairing, widening and keeping in Repair certain Roads and Bridges in the County of Caithness, and for better regulating and rendering more effectual the Statute Labour in the said County, and Conversion Money in lieu thereof," was committed.

Glasgow Royalty Extension Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for extending the Civil and Criminal Jurisdiction of the Magistrates and the Town or Burgh and Dean of Guild Courts of Glasgow over the Lands of Blythswood and adjacent Lands; and for amending the Acts relating to the Police of the said City," was committed.

Louth, &c. Roads Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving the Roads from Saltfleet to the Town of Horncastle, and other Roads therein mentioned, all in the County of Lincoln,"was committed.

London Assurance Companies Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable the London Assurance Companies and their Successors to purchase Annuities upon or for Lives, and also to lend Money or Stock upon Mortgage, for the Purpose of Investment," was committed.

Walsall, &c. Roads Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury also made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for improving and maintaining the Road leading from Walsall to Muckley Corner, near Lichfield, and other Roads, in the County of Stafford," was committed.

Ker & Johnston v. Bell et al:

Upon reading the Petition and Appeal of James Ker and Henry Johnston Esquires, Managers to and for behoof of the Leith Banking Company, Leith; complaining of an Interlocutor of the Lords of Session in Scotland, of the First Division, of 12th, and signed 14th May 1830; and praying, "That the same may be reversed, varied or altered, or that the Appellants may have such Relief in the Premises, as to this House, in their Lordships great Wisdom, shall seem meet; and that John Bell, Percey Hedley, Robert Scott, Alexander Hay Borthwick, Thomas Stavert, Richard Davidson and George Davidson, as Trustees of Walter Jardine deceased, may be required to answer the said Appeal:"

It is Ordered, That the said John Bell, and the several other Persons last named, may have a Copy of the said Appeal, and do put in their Answer or respective Answers thereunto, in Writing, on or before Monday the 14th Day of June next; and Service of this Order upon the said Respondents, or upon any of their known Counsel or Agents in the Court of Session in Scotland, shall be deemed good Service.

Thomson to enter into a Recog ee on it.

The House being moved, "That William Gibson Thomson of Old Palace Yard, Westminster, Gentleman, may be permitted to enter into a Recognizance for James Ker and Henry Johnston Esquires, on account of their Appeal depending in this House, they residing in Scotland:"

It is Ordered, That the said William Gibson Thomson may enter into a Recognizance for the said Appellants, as desired.

Harris v. Kemble et al. Petition of 3 Respondents to advance the Hearing, referred to Appeal Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of Charles Kemble, John Saltren Willett and John Forbes, Three of the Respondents in a Cause depending in this House, to which Henry Harris is Appellant; praying their Lordships, "That the said Appeal may be advanced for hearing forthwith, and that their Lordships will be pleased to appoint an early Day for that Purpose:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Duffy v. Orr et al. Petition of 2 Respondents for Time for their Cases, referred to Appeal Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of Robert Orr and John Duffy, Two of the Respondents in a Cause depending in this House, to which Cornelius Duffy is Appellant; praying their Lordships, "That they may be allowed a Month's further Time from the 26th Day of May instant to lodge their respective Cases with the Clerk of the Parliaments:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Birmingham Grammar School Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable The Governors of the Possessions, Revenues and Goods of the Free Grammar School of King Edward the Sixth in Birmingham, in the County of Warwick, to pull down the present Masters Houses and School House in New Street, in the Town of Birmingham, and to make and erect more suitable Accommodations on a new Site, in the Vicinity of the Town, and to procure such new Site; and to extend the Objects of the Charity by erecting and making on the old Site in New Street Accommodations suitable for a new School for teaching modern Languages, the Arts and Sciences; and to make certain Additions to the Estates of the said Charity by Purchase; and to raise Money for the Purposes aforesaid by applying certain Funds now belonging to the said Charity, and by Sale of Part of the Estates belonging thereto, and by Mortgage; and for other Purposes."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

L. Bp. Bath & Wells.
L. Bp. Lichfield & Coventry.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Bp. Rochester.
L. Bp. Chester.
L. Bp. Raphoe.
L. Clifton.
L. Teynham.
L. Clifford of Chudleigh.
L. Colville of Culross.
L. Belhaven & Stenton.
L. Boyle.
L. Hay.
L. King.
L. Monson.
L. Dynevor.
L. Gage.
L. Mendip.
L. Calthorpe.
L. De Dunstanville & Bassett.
L. Rolle.
L. Bayning.
L. Northwick.
L. Carbery.
L. Redesdale.
L. Ellenborough.
L. Arden.
L. Sheffield.
L. Barham.
L. Hill.
L. Meldrum.
L. Glenlyon.
L. Bexley.
L. Penshurst.
L. Somerhill.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Feversham.
L. Clanwilliam.
L. Durham.
L. Skelmersdale.
L. Wallace.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. President.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Norfolk.
D. Richmond.
D. Beaufort.
D. Portland.
D. Wellington.
M. Lansdowne.
M. Salisbury.
M. Camden.
M. Bristol.
E. Westmorland.
E. Winchilsea & Nottingham.
E. Chesterfield.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Rosebery.
E. Ferrers.
E. Dartmouth.
E. Tankerville.
E. Fitzwilliam.
E. De Lawarr.
E. Radnor.
E. Carnarvon.
E. Malmesbury.
E. Wicklow.
E. Limerick.
E. Manvers.
E. Bradford.
E. Glengall.
E. Vane.
V. Arbuthnott.
V. Melville.
V. Lorton.
V. Gordon.
V. Granville.
V. Goderich.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Friday the 28th of this instant May, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Heigham Bridge Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for building a Bridge over the River Wensum, in the Hamlet of Heigham and the Parish of Saint Clement, in the County of the City of Norwich."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Queensferry Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and keeping in Repair the Road from Cramond Bridge to the Town of Queensferry, the Road leading Westward therefrom through Dalmeny to Echline, and the Road from the West End of the said Town of Queensferry to the Town of Linlithgow, in the County of Linlithgow."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Carlisle & Penrith Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing the Road from Carlisle to Penrith, and from Penrith to Eamont Bridge, in the County of Cumberland."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Wednesday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Ideridgehay Roads Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for improving and maintaining the Turnpike Roads from the Worksworth Turnpike Road, in the Hamlet of Ideridgehay, to the Town of Duffield, and from the Market Place in Worksworth to the Turnpike Road leading from Derby to Brassington, and from the said Market Place to the Turnpike Road leading from Worksworth Moor to Matlock Bath, all in the County of Derby."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Sheffield Waterworks Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for better supplying with Water the Town and Parish of Sheffield, in the County of York."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Invernessshire Statute Labour Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for making and maintaining Roads, Bridges and Ferries, and for converting, regulating and making effectual the Statute Labour, in the County of Inverness."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Hamerton's Divorce Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of William Medows Hamerton Esquire with Isabella Frances his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and made some Amendments thereto, which he was ready to report, when the House will please to receive the same."

Ordered, That the said Report be received To-morrow.

Mildmay's Divorce Bill, 2d Reading deferred, & Witnesses to attend.

It was moved, "That the Order made on Friday last, "That the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Captain Edward St. John Mildmay with Marianne Catherine his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned," be read a Second Time on Monday the 31st of this instant May; and that the Lords be summoned; and that Counsel be then heard for and against the same," be now read."

The same was accordingly read by the Clerk.

Ordered, That the said Order be discharged.

Ordered, That the said Bill be read a Second Time on Wednesday the 2d of June next; and that the Lords be summoned; and that Counsel be then heard for and against the same.

Ordered, That John Clerk Esquire, Samuel Skinner, Henry Lyke and Maria Ann Tegg do attend this House on Wednesday the 2d of June next, in order to their being examined as Witnesses upon the Second Reading of the last-mentioned Bill.

East Retford Election Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the further Consideration and Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to prevent Bribery and Corruption in the Election of Burgesses to serve in Parliament for the Borough of East Retford;" and for the Lords to be summoned; and for permitting Counsel to examine Witnesses in support of the Bill; and for hearing Counsel on the Petition of the Burgesses of the Borough of East Retford, in the County of Nottingham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, praying their Lordships, "That the said Bill may not pass into a Law;"

Counsel were accordingly called in.

Then William Burton was called in, and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name William Burton?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"When were you admitted a Burgess?"

"I can hardly speak to that; about Five-and-twenty Years ago; but I do not know exactly."

"Whom did you vote for in the Election of 1812?

"Whom did you promise your Vote to when Mr. Marsh and Mr. Osbaldeston were elected?"

"Marsh and Osbaldeston; there was nobody else."

"Did you attend at the Angel Inn after that Election?"

"I did not."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"I did not."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to in the Year 1818, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were the Candidates?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"I believe there was some brought to my House."

"Had you any Packets left at your House?"

"I believe there was a Packet brought."

"What did that contain?"

"Well, I was not at Home myself; I cannot speak to what it did contain; my Wife received it."

"Was any Money produced to you?"

"I dare say Money was in it."

"Was any Money produced to you?"

"Well, I believe there might."

"How much?"

"I should think Twenty-one Pounds very likely."

"Was that the whole Sum?"

"The whole Sum."

"Only One?"

"Only One."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to in 1820, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were again elected?"

"The same Two."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"I believe there was the same."

"One Packet or Two?"

"One Packet."

"Containing what?"

"Containing the same, as nearly as I can say; but I was not at Home then."

"Do you know Mr. Fox?"

"Yes."

"Is he a Clerk in Mr. Foljambe's Bank?"

"Yes."

"Do you know his Handwriting?"

"I should not know it if I saw it."

"Do you know William Leadbeater?"

"Yes."

"Is he a Burgess of Retford?"

"He is."

"Have you had any Conversation with him on the Subject of the Election?"

"No; not lately I have not."

"Had you in the Course of the Day?"

"No."

"Was any Conversation held with William Leadbeater, in your Presence, in the Course of the last Four-andtwenty Hours?"

"I cannot speak to that; I do not know that there was any in respect to the Electioneering."

"Have you not been with Mr. Leadbeater within the last Twenty-four Hours?"

"Yes; within the last Twelve."

"Where?"

"At Snow Hill."

"Did you hear any Conversation addressed to William Leadbeater on the Subject of the Election Money?"

"No, I did not."

"Recollect yourself. Were you not at Mr. Heptinstall's Office with Leadbeater?"

"Yes; but I was not at Snow Hill then."

"Did you hear any Conversation pass at Mr. Heptinstall's Office respecting Election Money?"

"Respecting Election Money; I do not know; I do not understand you."

"Did you hear Leadbeater say any thing about the Receipt of Election Money?"

"I heard him speak to Mr. Heptinstall, but I cannot "speak to what he did say; I heard him talking to him."

"Did you hear the Angel Inn at Retford mentioned?"

"I did."

"What was said to William Leadbeater about the Angel Inn?"

"Oh! I cannot speak to what was stated."

"Do you mean to represent to their Lordships that, having heard this Conversation within the last Twelve Hours, you can give no Information about it?"

"It was no Concern of mine."

"Were you present?"

"Yes."

"How far did you stand from them?"

"About as far as I am from you."

"Did they speak in a loud Tone of Voice?"

"Yes."

"Did you hear all that passed?"

"I dare say I did."

"Then having heard what passed, will you tell me what it was?"

"I cannot tell what it was that passed."

"Do you mean to represent to their Lordships that, having overheard a Conversation in a loud Tone of Voice within the last Twelve Hours, you can repeat none of it to their Lordships?"

"I really cannot repeat it; it was no Concern of mine, therefore I cannot repeat it; if it had been a Concern of my own, I perhaps might have caused my Recollection to have thought of it."

"Was the Angel Inn mentioned?"

"It was."

"Was any Question put by Mr. Heptinstall to William Leadbeater concerning the Angel Inn?"

"Yes, I believe it was; but I cannot repeat the Words."

"State the Substance of it?"

"It is nothing to me, and I cannot state it; I had no Concern with it."

"What did you hear William Leadbeater say?"

"I do not know."

"How many Hours ago was this?"

"I cannot say; not many Hours ago."

"Was it To-day or Yesterday?"

"To-day; I recollect it very well."

"Was it in the Morning?"

"It was before Dinner."

"Was it since Twelve o'Clock To-day?"

"I believe it was not."

"The Witness was admonished to attend to the Question, and to give an Answer."

(Mr. Law.) "Having stated that the Conversation passed in a loud Tone of Voice this very Morning, do you mean to represent to their Lordships that you have no Recollection of what so passed?"

"I really have no Recollection; I do not know what passed; it was no Concern of mine; what had I to do with it?"

"What was the Subject of the Conversation between Mr. Heptinstall and William Leadbeater the Voter?"

"I do not know; I cannot say."

(By a Lord.) "Did you hear the Conversation?"

"Yes."

"Do you mean to say that, having heard the Conversation, you cannot tell what it was about?"

"I knew it was about the Angel; but I do not know what it was no more than if I had not been there; it was no Concern of mine."

(Mr. Law.) "Was any Question put to Leadbeater respecting the Persons for whom he promised to vote in 1818?"

"I believe there was."

"What Answer did Leadbeater give?"

"I cannot speak to that, so it is of no use my trying; for I really do not know; I do not recollect."

"What were you doing at the Time Mr. Heptinstall was speaking to Leadbeater, and Leadbeater was answering these Questions?"

"I was doing nothing."

(By a Lord.) "Were you listening to what passed?"

"I was not listening."

"Did you hear what passed?"

"I heard them talking; but I did not pay that Attention that I should if it had been any Business of my own."

(Mr. Law.) "Did you overhear all which passed?"

"I cannot say."

"Have you any Doubt that you overheard every Answer Leadbeater gave?"

"I cannot say that I have any Doubt of any such Thing."

"Did you accompany William Leadbeater to Mr. Heptinstall's Office?"

"I did."

"For what Purpose did you go there?"

"I went to Mr. Heptinstall's Office, to wish to be examined To-night, so that I might go Home in the Morning; as it is very inconvenient for me to remain here."

"You knew Leadbeater to be a Voter, did you not?"

"I did."

"Did you know that the Conversation Mr. Heptinstall addressed to him had Reference to the Election Money?"

"Yes; I believe it had."

"Do you mean to state to their Lordships that, knowing that to be the Case, and overhearing what passed, you have no Recollection what was said?"

"I cannot repeat the Words."

"You are not asked to repeat the precise Words; but the Substance?"

"It was respecting Electioneering Money, I believe."

"What Question did Mr. Heptinstall put to William Leadbeater respecting Election Money?"

"I cannot tell; I cannot repeat the Words."

"I do not ask you the Words: I ask you what Questions he put?"

"Then I do not understand you."

"Did he ask him whether he had received-"

Mr. Adam objected to the Question.

The Counsel were informed, "That it appeared sufficiently that the Witness was endeavouring to evade the Question to justify the putting of the Question in these Terms."

(Mr. Law.) "Did Mr. Heptinstall ask him whether he had received Money at the Angel Inn in 1814?"

"Yes, he did; that I can say."

"What Answer did Leadbeater give?"

"He said he believed he had some Packets; no, I beg your Pardon; in the Year 1814 that he was sent to the Angel Inn; is that the Question?"

"Do you mean to swear you do not recollect the Answer Leadbeater gave to that Question?"

"I have sworn, and I do not recollect that; I know he said something about Packets."

"Did he say whether he had or had not had Money in 1814?"

"I believe he did; he said he had had Packets."

"Have you any Doubt that he said he had received Money in 1814?"

"I do not think I have any Doubt of it; but I could not repeat the Substance of it."

"Do you recollect what Sum he said he had received?"

"I cannot say."

"Was a Sum of Twenty-one Pounds mentioned?"

"Twenty or Twenty-one was."

"Do you recollect whether Mr. Heptinstall asked him whether Mr. Hannam was there?"

"I think he said he did not know whether he was there or not."

"Was Leadbeater asked to whom he promised his Vote in 1818?"

"I think he said for Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Was he asked whether he received any Money after that Election?"

"Yes, he was."

"What Answer did he give?"

"He said there were some Packets taken to his House."

"Did he say what those Packets contained?"

"I do not exactly know whether it was asked what they contained."

"Did Leadbeater state that they contained Twenty Guineas each?"

"Twenty Guineas, or Twenty Pounds, or something of that kind."

"Was Leadbeater asked to whom he promised his Vote in 1820?"

"Yes, I dare say he was."

"Have you any Doubt of it?"

"No, I have no Doubt of it."

"To whom did he say he promised his Vote in 1820?"

"To Evans and Crompton."

"Was he asked whether he received any thing after that Election?"

"He was."

"What Answer did he give?"

"I think he said he received a Packet."

"Did he say what it contained?"

"I think it was the same as before."

"Was Leadbeater asked for what he considered he had received that Money?"

"Yes, he was."

"What Answer did he give to that?"

"He said he believed it was for some Electioneering Purposes."

"For whom did you vote at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

The Petition against the Bill was shewn to the Witness, and he was asked-

"Are you a Petitioner against this Bill?"

"I perhaps might sign that, I do not know."

"Do you mean to say you have a Doubt whether you have signed it?"

"I have not looked at it."

"Look at the Signature; is that your Name and Handwriting?"

"It is."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"How came you to go to Mr. Heptinstall's Office with Leadbeater?"

"I do not know; Mr. Heptinstall sent for me."

"Did you know that Mr. Heptinstall was the Solicitor for this Bill?"

"Yes."

"Did you know that Mr. Heptinstall was the Solicitor who prepared Briefs for the Counsel?"

"I had never seen him before; he sent his Clerk to the Swan Inn, saying he wanted to see me at the Office."

"Why did you go to him; do you go to every one who sends for you?"

"I think I ought to go to every one that sends to me; he is a Stranger."

"Did you know him before?"

"I had not seen him before."

"Where were you desired to go to?"

"To his Office; I forget the Number now."

"Where is the Office?"

"I could find it; but I do not know where it was."

"Did you not know he was a Lawyer?"

"Yes, I expected he was."

"Did you find Leadbeater at his Office?"

"Leadbeater and me went together."

"Were Leadbeater and you living at the same House?"

"Yes."

"Do you know what took Leadbeater there?"

"He went to accompany me there."

"Did he go to shew you the Way?"

"We went to take a Walk; we had been out before, when Mrs. Mills said I was sent for."

"When you went to Mr. Heptinstall's Office, whom did he begin the Conversation with, with you or Leadbeater?"

"With me."

"After he had had the Conversation with you, did he address himself to Leadbeater?"

"No, I think he did not."

"How did he come to talk to Leadbeater?"

"He asked me if Leadbeater was anywhere about, or something of that kind; I told him he was at the Door."

"Did he desire him to come in?"

"Yes, he did."

"Did he desire you to leave the Room?"

"No."

"Did he tell you why he wished to see him?"

"No."

"Did he tell you he wished to examine him?"

"Yes; I recollect he did."

"Did he say that he wished you to be there, to hear what passed?"

"I do not recollect that."

"Did he only say he wished to speak to Leadbeater?"

"I am sure he said that, but I do not recollect the other."

"When Leadbeater came in, what did Mr. Heptinstall say to him?"

"He asked him whether he had been at the Angel Inn."

"Did he tell him he was going to ask Questions whether he had been guilty of Bribery?"

"I never heard Bribery mentioned."

"As to whether he had received Money at the Angel Inn?"

"Yes, he did."

"Did he put him on his Guard, or give him any Caution?"

"I do not know whether there was any Guard or Caution about it, any more than that."

"I want to know what passed?"

"I do not know that there was any Guard about it."

"Did he say any thing to him before he began to put those Questions?"

"I do not know that he did."

"Did he say to Leadbeater that he was told he had been at the Angel Inn?"

"He asked him whether he was there; and he said that he was there; I am sure he said that he was there."

"Did Leadbeater make any Objections to answering those Questions?"

"He did not make any Objections to answering them."

"Did he make any Objections to answering any Questions?"

"He might hesitate a little, but he did answer."

"Were you desired to listen, and attend to what was going on?"

"I was not; I had nothing to do with it."

"Were you told you were to be called as a Witness To-day, to speak to what he had said in your Presence?"

"I was not."

"Were you told you were to be asked to it?"

"I understood that by what Mr. Heptinstall said, as I was coming out, that I should be asked to it."

"Did he say that before the Conversation passed?"

"No, after it was over."

"You say you have been a Freeman Five-and-twenty Years?"

"Five or Six-and-twenty Years."

"What was the first Election you recollect?"

"I remember Sir John Ingleby's."

"Did you vote?"

"I did."

"Whom did you vote for?"

"Sir John Ingleby."

"Did Sir John canvass you himself?"

"I believe he did; but it is so long since I cannot recollect."

"Do you recollect whether you promised Sir John himself?"

"I cannot say particularly."

"Did he promise you any thing for your Vote?"

"Oh no."

"Did he give you any thing for your Vote?"

"No."

"What was the next Election you recollect?"

"Sir William's."

"Whom did you vote for?"

"Sir William Ingleby."

"Did he promise you any thing before you voted?"

"No."

"Did he give you any Money afterwards?"

"No."

"What was the next Election you remember after Sir William Ingleby's; which came next?"

"Osbaldeston's."

"Did you see Mr. Osbaldeston?"

"Really I cannot speak to that, whether I did or not; I am not sure whether I did or not; I think I did not."

"Did you vote in 1826?"

"I did."

"Whom did you vote for?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Did they canvass you?"

"I believe they did."

"Did you promise your Votes to themselves?"

"I did."

"Did they make you any Offer, or give you any Promise about Money, or any thing else?"

"Oh no."

"Did you receive any thing?"

"No; I never expected to receive any thing."

"Were you at the Poll the First Day or the Second?"

"I was at the Poll the First Day."

"Was there any Rioting or Confusion that Day?"

"Yes, a great deal."

"Were the Soldiers called in?"

"Yes; not 'till after the Poll was over."

"Did you see the Bailiff receive a Blow with a Stone?"

"No; I saw him dismounted, but I did not see the Stone thrown."

"Is there an Inn in Retford called the Half Moon?"

"Yes, there is."

"Who kept it?"

"Samuel Caxon."

"Is that frequented by the Pink Party?"

"It has been frequented by both Parties, but of late by the Pink Party."

"Did you ever see Mr. Hannam there?"

"No."

"Or Mr. Sharp?"

"I cannot speak to that."

"Have you heard of a Club held there?"

"There is a sick Club held there."

"Has that any thing to do with this Enquiry?"

"Not at all."

"Do you know of any other Club held at the Half Moon?"

"I do not; yes; there is a free and easy Club."

"But that has nothing to do with this Enquiry?"

"No; but you asked me the Question."

"Are you a Freeman of any other Town?"

"No."

"Not of York?"

"No."

"You never voted for any other Place?"

"No."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"Sir John Ingleby did not succeed in his Election, did he?"

"I believe not."

"Did Sir William?"

"Yes."

"You say you were not promised any thing by Sir William Ingleby; did you receive any Packet after that Election?"

"No."

"Are you quite sure of that?"

"I am quite sure."

"Did you receive the Money without a Packet?"

"No."

"Do you mean to state that you received it only after 1818 and 1820?"

"Yes."

"Only upon Four Occasions?"

"Only upon Four Occasions."

Examined by the Lords.

"You are a Petitioner against the Bill?"

"Yes."

"Do you expect to pay for the Counsel that are heard against it?"

"I do not know; that was never put to me; if I am to pay, I must pay my Share amongst the rest."

"Do you expect it?"

"If there is any thing to pay; but it was never mentioned about paying."

"Who asked you to sign?"

"I cannot recollect who asked me to sign."

"Was it an Acquaintance of yours?"

"I do not know who brought it."

"Where was it brought to you?"

"I think it was brought to our House."

"Where is that?"

"At Retford."

"You cannot say who brought it?"

"I cannot at this Time."

"Did you read the Petition before you signed it?"

"Well, I do not think that; perhaps I might; I think I did not."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Uriah Jubb was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Freeman of Retford?"

"Fifteen or Sixteen Years."

"Do you recollect the Election at which Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were Candidates the first Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen your Vote?"

"Yes."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"Yes."

"What was it?"

"It was about Twenty or Twenty-one Pounds."

"Was it in Money or in Packets?"

"It was in a Letter."

"Did you receive One or more Letters?"

"Two."

"What did each contain?"

"Twenty-one Pounds each."

"Do you remember the second Election, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to those Gentlemen the second Time?"

"Yes."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"Twenty-one Pounds each."

"Were they in one Packet or several Packets?"

"Two."

"Do you remember the Election of 1826, when Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson were Candidates?"

"Yes."

"For whom did you vote on that Occasion?"

"Sir Robert and Mr. Wrightson."

"Do you reside in Nottingham at present?"

"At East Retford."

"Did you ever reside at Nottingham?"

"Yes."

"For how many Years?"

"Nine or Ten; I cannot say positively."

"How long have you left Nottingham?"

"Seven or Eight Years."

"Were you resident at Nottingham during the Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans, in 1818 and 1820?"

"Yes."

"Were you at any Time present when Money was paid to any other Freemen of Retford after those Elections?"

"I do not recollect."

"Do you remember to have seen any Packet after those "Two Elections delivered to any Freemen of Retford in your Presence?"

"No, I think not."

"Did you ever see any Packet opened by any Freeman?"

"No, I do not recollect one."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of Richard Hurst?"

"Yes."

"Is he a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Did he reside at Nottingham at the Time you resided there?"

"Yes."

"After those Elections?"

"Yes."

"Did you ever see him receive any Money?"

"I do not recollect."

"Any Packet?"

"I never saw him receive any Money; I have seen him receive Letters, but I do not know their Contents."

"Did you ever see him receive a Packet, opened in your Presence, containing Money?"

"I do not know; I do not recollect that I did."

"Will you swear you did not?"

"To the best of my Knowledge, I did not."

"Have you a Recollection of the Fact?"

"I have not the least."

"Did you ever hear, in Conversation, from Mr. Hurst, that he had received any Election Money?"

"I do not recollect just now that I did."

"Refresh your Memory?"

"I cannot recollect; it is so long ago."

"Did you ever hear from Richard Hurst, whether he had received any Election Money after either of those Elections? Now be careful."

"Well, I do not recollect that I did."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of Pawson?"

"No."

"Did you ever go with a Stranger to Richard Hurst's House?"

"I think I did."

"Did he deliver a Letter upon that Occasion?"

"Yes, he delivered a Letter."

"When was that?"

"I think it was after the first Election."

"The Election of 1818?"

"Yes."

"Did you accompany that Stranger to other Houses besides Mr. Richard Hurst's?"

"Yes."

"Were they Freemen of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Did you point them out to him?"

"Yes; I shewed him the Houses."

"Did he leave any Letters upon those Occasions?"

"Yes."

"Was he a Stranger to the Town of Nottingham?"

"I never saw him before, that I know of."

"Can you state, from your own Knowledge, what those Letters contained?"

"No; I never saw One of them opened, to my Recollection just now."

"Did that Stranger give you any One Letter?"

"Any One?"

"One Letter for yourself?"

"Yes."

"What did that Letter contain?"

"Twenty-one."

"Twenty-one Pounds?"

"Yes."

"Who were the Burgesses to whose Houses you went that Day with the Stranger?"

"One John White was one."

"Was Dowager Brummitt one?"

"No."

"Was William Rayner one?"

"Yes."

"Stephen Hurst?"

"No; there was not a Stephen Hurst."

"Any other Person of the Name of Hurst with a different Christian Name?"

"I think there was a Christian Name."

"William Harris?"

"No."

"John Kirkby?"

"Yes."

"William Kirkby?"

"Yes; I think it was William."

"Was it William and John?"

"No; only one of the Two."

"Was Edward Ogle one of those with whom you left a Packet?"

"Yes, I think he was."

"Daniel Bolton?"

"No."

"Any other Person besides those I have mentioned?"

"No, I cannot recollect any."

"Were all those Persons Freemen of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Is John Kirkby now confined from Infirmity of Mind?"

"One of the Kirkbys, but I do not know whether it is William or John."

"He is in the Nottingham Asylum?"

"Yes."

"Was he a Freeman of Retford?"

"I think he was."

"Who introduced the Stranger upon that Occasion to you?"

"He came by himself."

"At what Hour of the Day or Night?"

"It was late in the Evening."

"In consequence of what he said, you accompanied him to those Gentlemen's Houses?"

"Yes; he wished me to go with him."

"Were the Packets single Letters, or double, to your Belief?"

"Single, I think."

"Do you mean to say that they did not contain something?"

"I do not know; I did not see One opened."

"Did they look like the Letter you received?"

"Well, I cannot say, I am sure; I never had them in my Hands."

"Did not you deliver them?"

"No; I only went round with the Person who did deliver them."

"Had you any Conversation with any of those Freemen you have mentioned after the Delivery of those Packets?"

"I cannot say; I might or I might not."

"Recollect yourself?"

"It is a long while ago, and I cannot say positively; I might or I might not; it is a good many Years ago."

"Do you mean to swear you have no Recollection of any Conversation with any of those Men upon whom you called and left a Packet?"

"I cannot recollect that we had."

"At any Time afterwards?"

"At any Time afterwards, to my Recollection."

"To how many Persons did you deliver the Packets upon that Occasion?"

"There might be Four or Five; I cannot say."

"Did you deliver them yourself, or were you present when they were delivered?"

"I went with the Person; but I did not deliver them."

The Petition against the Bill was shewn to the Witness, and he was asked-

"Is that Signature your Handwriting?"

"It is."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"You say you did not deliver those Packets yourself?"

"No, I did not."

"You know nothing about them?"

"I never saw them opened."

"When were you first asked upon this Business you come to give Evidence upon; how long ago?"

"I do not understand that Question."

"How long is it since you were told you were to come and give Evidence at the Bar of this House?"

"A Week ago."

"Do you know the Name of the Gentleman who spoke to you on this Business?"

"Mr. Butt."

"What did Mr. Butt bring you?"

"He brought a Subpona to my House at East Retford."

"Then what did you do?"

"I came here immediately."

"Where did you come to?"

"To the Swan Inn."

"Where did you go to next?"

"I came down to the House on Tuesday next."

"To this House?"

"Yes."

"What did you do then?"

"I do not know; nothing in particular that I know of."

"Have you been asked Questions something similar to those you have been asked To-day?"

"No, I think not."

"Is this the first Time you have been questioned upon this Subject since the Time you delivered those Packets?"

"Yes."

"From the Time you delivered those Packets, up to the Time you have been examined here, you have had no Conversation with any body upon the Subject?"

"No, I do not recollect that I have."

"Do you personally know those Freemen, Mr. White, Mr. Kirkby, and Mr. Ogle?"

"Yes, perfectly well."

"Do you know they are Freemen of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"How?"

"By seeing them there at the Election."

"By seeing them poll?"

"We had not a Poll; but they were all in the Town Hall to poll, if called for."

"After the Delivery of those Packets, you had no Conversation with them?"

"No, I do not recollect any."

"Do you recollect the Time of the Year you gave those Packets?"

"In the Spring, I think."

"At what Time of Day?"

"In the Evening."

"In what Year?"

"The Year 1816 or 1817, I think; I am not certain."

"In the Spring of 1816 or 1817 it was you delivered those Packets?"

"Yes."

"You are sure of that?"

"I cannot be sure of the Year, but it was somewhere thereabout."

"Was that the only Expedition you went on to deliver Packets?"

"Yes, the only one."

"Upon none other?"

"Upon none other."

"Have you ever seen any of those Persons since?"

"Oh yes."

"Has it ever occurred to you to have any Conversation with them?"

"Not then, but since."

"How long have you been a Burgess?"

"Fifteen or Sixteen Years."

"How many Elections have you voted at?"

"Three."

"1818, 1820, and 1826?"

"Yes."

"Who canvassed you in 1818?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did they make any Promise to you, that they would give you those Packets after the Election?"

"Oh no; it was never mentioned."

"Had you any Idea at the Time that they would do it?"

"Oh no."

"Had you any Expectation of that after the Election of 1820?"

"No."

"Who canvassed you in 1826?"

"Mr. Wrightson and Sir Robert Dundas."

"Did they canvass you personally?"

"Yes."

"Did they make you any Promise?"

"No."

"Have you received any Money since?"

"No."

Re-examined by Mr. Price.

"Do you remember the first Election, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Was it after that Election you went round with the Stranger to carry the Packets?"

"Yes; after that Election."

"Can you, from your own Knowledge, state whether any Person went round after the Election of 1820 at Nottingham; the second Election?"

"No, I cannot."

"From whom did you receive your Money after the Election of 1820?"

"I was at Retford when the last of Mr. Evans's took place."

"Who gave it you?"

"I did not receive it myself."

"With whom was it left?"

"With my Wife. I was at Nottingham myself."

"Did you see any Packets containing any Money after 1820?"

"No, I did not."

"Did you receive any Money after the Election of 1820?"

"No, not myself; my Wife received One."

"Did you receive the Money after 1820?"

"No."

"From your Wife?"

"I might; but I did not receive the Letter with the Money in."

"Did you receive, after the Election of 1820, any Money from your Wife?"

"Yes, of course I did."

"How much?"

"I cannot recollect now; it was some Time before I returned to Retford."

"How much?"

"I cannot say positively."

"About how much? I will have an Answer."

"It will not be a correct one if I give it you."

"About how much? I will have an Answer."

"It might be Ten or Twelve; I cannot say positively."

"Was it Ten or Twelve, or more?"

"It was more than either; but I cannot say positively how much."

"What is your Wife's Christian Name?"

"Mary."

"Is she alive?"

"Yes."

"Is she at Retford now?"

"Yes."

(Mr. Stephenson.) "Did you ever receive any Money from your Wife, except upon this Occasion my Learned Friend has asked you, in all your Life?"

"Oh yes; my Wife has received Bills."

"It is not unusual for you to receive Money from her?"

"No."

"You never enquire probably when you receive Money from her?"

"No."

"When you come Home, she says, "Here is so much I have received;" and it goes into your general Affairs?"

"Yes."

"What are you?"

"A Shoemaker."

Examined by the Lords.

"Did you see Richard Hurst open the Packet which was put into his Hands?"

"No, I do not recollect that I did."

"Will you swear you did not?"

"It is so many Years ago, I cannot swear that I did, or that I did not."

"You are a Petitioner against this Bill?"

"Yes."

"Do you expect to pay the Expences of the Counsel at the Bar?"

"I do not know."

"Do you expect it; say yes or no?"

"No."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Edward Ogle was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Edward Ogle?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"Were you so before the Year 1802?"

"In 1801 I was a Burgess."

"Did you vote for the losing Candidate in 1802?"

"I did."

"In the Year 1807, for whom did you promise your Vote? Sir William Ingleby and General Crawford's Election."

"I promised it to General Crawford."

"Did you promise Sir William Ingleby?"

"Yes, and General Crawford."

"After that Election in 1807, did you receive any Money?"

"I did."

"How much?"

"Two Packets."

"What did each contain?"

"Twenty Pounds."

"Were they Pounds or Guineas?"

"They were Two Twenty Pounds and a Pound."

"Twenty-one Pounds in each?"

"Yes."

"In the Election of 1818, to whom did you promise your Vote; when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton stood?"

"For Evans and Crompton."

"After that Election, did you receive any Money?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"The same as I received before."

"Two Packets of Twenty Guineas each?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise in 1820; when Evans and Crompton stood again?"

"I promised them."

"After that Election, did you receive any Money?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"The same again."

"Twice Twenty-one?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect upon one of those Occasions a Man coming to enquire for you by Name?"

"I do not."

"Do you remember an Enquiry made whether you were Edward Ogle, a Freeman of Retford, after the Election of 1818?"

"Not to my Knowledge."

"Was it after the Election of 1820; do you remember an Enquiry made whether you were Edward Ogle, a Freeman of Retford, and a Man giving you a Letter?"

"The Man that brought the Letter enquired if I was Edward Ogle, and I told him I was."

"When you opened the Letter, you found the Twenty Guineas in it?"

"Yes, I did."

"At another Time, do you recollect, when you and your Wife were coming from Chapel one Sunday Evening, a Man coming up to you on that Occasion?"

"He came to my Door after the Chapel was over."

"Did he deliver any thing to you?"

"Yes, he did."

"Did he give you a Letter?"

"Yes."

"What did it contain?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to in 1826?"

"Whose Election was that?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson; the last Election; did you promise it to Sir Robert, or Mr. Wrightson, or Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"I promised it to Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"When you so promised your Vote, did you expect to receive the Money as usual?"

"I did not."

"Have you not said so?"

"No; to no one living Creature."

"Do you know Mr. Sharp?"

"I know him; he lives at Retford; he is a Neighbour."

"Have you had any Conversation with Mr. Sharp respecting your Expectations with regard to the last Election?"

"I have not."

"Are you quite certain of that?"

"I am quite clear of that; I never expected any thing; I never voted at the last Election."

"Is that your Reason for not expecting it; that you never voted?"

"No, not at all; I could not get to vote; the Election Day was on Friday or Saturday Morning; when I was going to vote there were the Soldiers come in."

"You were prevented voting?"

"The Books were closed."

"You say you have had no Conversation with Mr. Sharp?"

"No."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"You knew this Borough in 1802, did not you?"

"Yes; I was made a Burgess in 1801."

"How old were you then?"

"I was turned Twenty-one; I am in my Fiftieth Year now."

"Had you attended at the Elections before 1802; the Election of 1796?"

"No."

"In 1802 Mr. Jeffery and General Crawford stood, did not they?"

"I believe they did; but it is a long while back."

"You voted?"

"I voted for one Mr. Bowles."

"Crawford and Jeffery stood on The Duke of Newcastle's Interest, did not they?"

"Yes."

"Had The Duke of Newcastle an old standing Interest in Retford?"

"Yes; I believe his Interest has been in Retford many Years."

"Do you recollect the Town of Retford without hearing of The Duke of Newcastle's Interest in it?"

"I know his Interest was in it when I was a Boy."

"Was your Father a Freeman?"

"No, he was not."

"Were any of your Family Freemen?"

"No; my Father put me Apprentice to a Freeman."

"You never knew the Town without the Duke's Interest in it?"

"No."

"There were Colours, were not there, called The Duke of Newcastle's Colours?"

"There were several Colours; I cannot speak to them."

"Do you not recollect that the Pink Colours were The Duke of Newcastle's Colours?"

"Yes; the Pink Colours were the Duke's Colours, of course."

"You voted against the Duke's Interest in 1802?"

"Yes."

"In 1806, whom did you vote for?"

"Who were the Candidates?"

"Sir John Ingleby was one, Sir William's Father; you have told my Learned Friend you did vote in 1806?"

"I voted against Sir John Ingleby."

"You did vote for the Duke's Interest in 1806?"

"Yes."

"Who were the Candidates in 1806?"

"My Memory is so bad, I cannot remember their Names."

"Upon those Occasions, did you get any Promise about your Vote?"

"Never in my Life."

"Did you get any Money after that?"

"Never in my Life; nor never asked for such a thing."

"In 1807, whom did you vote for?"

"There were Two Elections in One Year, or almost in One Year."

"The No Popery Election, you know; do you remember that?"

"I forget who put up at that Election."

"I can help you to that; Sir William Ingleby was one?"

"I voted for Sir William Ingleby."

"Whom did you vote against?"

"I voted against the Duke's Interest, I should think, at that Election."

"You had voted for the Duke's Interest before?"

"Yes."

"You then voted against it?"

"Yes."

"In 1812, whom did you vote for?"

"That was Osbaldeston's."

"In Osbaldeston's Time, did you receive any Packet?"

"No."

"Nor any Money?"

"No; none whatever."

"The first Packet you received was after 1818, from the Man that came to Nottingham to you?"

"It was."

"And the other was from the Man that came to you as you were coming out of the Chapel?"

"Yes."

"You go to Chapel, do you?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Methodist, or what sort of Dissenter?"

"I was brought up a Member of the Church of England."

"Why did you go to Chapel?"

"I go to hear that which is good."

"Are you sure it was as you were coming out of Chapel that Money was paid you?"

"It was after I had got out of Chapel, and got into my House."

"Was that on a Sunday?"

"It was on a Sunday Evening. I had not got into my House Five Minutes; a Man asked me whether my Name was Ogle, a Freeman of Retford; in a Minute I went to the Door, but he was gone."

"Did you ever receive the Money in respect of Elections, except upon those Two Occasions?"

"No, never in my Life."

"Are you a Voter for any other Town?"

"No; I happened to live at Nottingham at that Time; I was there Fourteen Years."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"Do you mean to state to their Lordships, in answer to my Learned Friend's Question, that you have received Packets only Twice, or Two after each Election?"

"I have received it Three Times; the first was in Sir William Ingleby's Election."

"That was in 1807?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive after 1818 and after 1820?"

"Yes."

"How many Packets did you receive after 1818, when you had promised both Candidates?"

"I received from Sir William Ingleby's, that was the first Time; then Evans and Crompton's."

"How many Packets did you receive after the first Election in 1818; did you receive Two or One after that Election; did you receive Forty Guineas or Twenty after the Election of those Two Candidates?"

"Forty."

"After the Election in 1820 did you receive Forty again?"

"Yes"

"How much in 1807, after Sir William Ingleby's and General Crawford's Election; was it Forty or Twenty then?"

"I told you I had received from Sir William Ingleby's Election."

"Was it Forty or Twenty you received after that?"

"After that Election I received Forty."

"You received Forty after each of those Elections?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Valentine Baker was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

"(Mr. Price.) Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Freeman?"

"Twelve."

"Were you a Freeman at the Time of the Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans, the first Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"After that Election did you receive any thing?"

"No."

"Did you receive any Packet or any Money?"

"I received some Packets."

"How many?"

"Two."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"Twenty Guineas each or Twenty Guineas together?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"Do you recollect the second Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton, in the Year 1820?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to those Gentlemen the second Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"Did the Twenty Guineas each come together in One Packet, or were there Two Packets?"

"There were Two Packets."

"For whom did you vote at the last Election, when Sir Henry Wright Wilson, Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson were the Candidates, we are told?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"How soon after the Election of 1818 did you receive those Packets?"

"I cannot tell."

"How did they come to you?"

"I do not know, I am sure; they were brought and left at my Father's."

"Do you live in East Retford?"

"Yes."

"Were they directed to you?"

"Yes."

"Were you living in your own House at the Time?"

"No."

"In your Father's House?"

"Yes."

"Did he give them to you?"

"No."

"How came you to open them?"

"I found them in the House with my Name upon them."

"What did you imagine they were for?"

"I cannot tell what they were for."

"You found a Packet with Twenty-one Guineas in it; you opened it, and put the Money in your Pocket?"

"Yes."

"Did you know the Person the Money came from?"

"No."

"Nor for what Purpose it was sent?"

"No."

"How many Elections have you voted on?"

"Only One; there was no voting at the other Elections."

"When were you asked to go to Town about this Business?"

"Last Monday Week; no; this Day Week."

"Where did you come to, in Town?"

"To the Saracen's Head."

"Have you been talking to any of the Burgesses since you have been in Town?"

"No."

"Have you seen any Person on this Business since you have been in Town?"

"No."

"Have you had no Conversation with any one?"

"No."

"You never mentioned the Subject 'till this Moment?"

"No."

"To no one?"

"No."

"Do you know Mr. Sharp?"

"Yes."

"He lives in East Retford?"

"Yes."

"Do you know Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes."

"What kind of Man is he; a respectable Man?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"Did you know Mr. Hornby?"

"Yes."

"Have you ever had any Conversation with him, respecting Elections in East Retford?"

"No."

Re-examined by Mr. Price.

"When you received the first Packets, after the Election of 1818, were you surprised at the Receipt of those Letters?"

"Yes, rather."

"Did you ever, except upon those Four Occasions, receive any other Packets containing a similar Sum of Money?"

"No; I do not know as I did."

"Was there any Writing in the Inside of those Packets?"

"No."

"Did any Person owe you that Sum of Money?"

"No, I think not."

"Did you give Credit to any Person for those Sums?"

"No; not at that Time."

"You pocketed the Money?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Doubt it was what was called Election Money?"

"I could not tell what Money it was."

"Had you any Doubt?"

"I cannot answer what Money it is."

"Have you any Doubt that it was Election Money? I will have an Answer."

"I do not know what Money that was."

"Did you believe it was Election Money?"

"Mr. Adam objected to the Question."

"The Counsel were informed, "That it did not appear necessary to press the Question; that their Lordships would judge from the Facts which were stated by the Witness."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Joseph Rayner was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

"(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Joseph Rayner?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been so?"

"I think I was made a Burgess in either 1795 or 1796; I am not positive."

"Do you remember the Election of 1818?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to upon that Occasion?"

"To Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Well, I never received any Money of any Person."

"Did you receive any Packets?"

"Well, it was received at my House; I must speak the Truth, you know."

"Was there One Packet, or more than One?"

"I think there was Two."

"What did they contain?"

"Well, they contained Twenty Guineas each."

"Whom did you promise at the Election of 1820?"

"The same Gentlemen."

"Did you receive any Packets after that Election?"

"Yes."

"One or Two?"

"Two; Twenty Guineas each."

"Do you remember calling at any of the Freemen's Houses with a Stranger?"

"No."

"Do you know Pawson?"

"No."

"How did you receive those Packets in 1820?"

"I believe there was a Rap at the Door, and they were thrown into the House when the Door was opened."

"You did not go round with any Person to deliver Letters?"

"No, I did not."

"Did you, after any previous Election to 1818, receive Packets?"

"No."

"Recollect a little?"

"I did not."

"Did you receive any Money without its being put into Packets?"

"No."

"Did you vote for the losing Candidates before that?"

"I have been very unlucky."

"It is being out of Luck when you do not receive Money?"

"Money is better than none."

"From conversing with the Voters, did you learn whether they had been lucky or not?"

"No; I do not know any thing of other People."

"You considered yourself out of Luck when you did not receive Packets?"

"No; I cannot say any thing to that."

"You had been on the losing Side before that?"

"Yes, I had."

"The first Time you were on the winning Side, after that Election, did you receive the Packets?"

"I cannot speak to that."

"Was 1818 the first Time you had been on the right Side; the winning Side?"

"Yes, I believe it was so far, you know."

"In 1820 you were on the winning Side again?"

"Yes."

"You received nothing after the losing Sides, but you did after the winning Sides?"

"Yes."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"For whom did you vote in 1826?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Did Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson win?"

"Yes."

"Did Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson pay any Money?"

"No."

"Then there was One Occasion when you were on the winning Side that you got on Money?"

"Yes; there were Two."

"There were Two?"

"Yes."

"Since 1820, you have received no Money?"

"I have not."

"You were a Burgess in 1795?"

"I think it was in 1795 or 1796."

"Do you remember the Election in 1796?"

"Yes."

"Who stood then?"

"Mr. Petrie and Sir Walton Hamcotes and Mr. Blackburn."

"Did you vote for the Duke's Interest then?"

"No, I did not."

"For whom did you vote?"

"For Mr. Petrie and Sir Walton Hamcotes."

"Did not Mr. Petrie and Sir Walton Hamcotes succeed in 1796?"

"Yes, they did."

"Did you receive any Money then?"

"No, I did not."

"Then you were mistaken, when you said you were on the winning Side only on Two Occasions, and received no Money?"

"No, I was not mistaken; I said there was another."

"They succeeded, and you received no Money?"

"I did not."

"They stood against The Duke of Newcastle's Interest?"

"Yes."

"The Duke's is an old established Interest in Retford?"

"I was told so. That Interest has been opposed very strongly several Times since I have been a Burgess; for it was generally considered, before I was a Burgess, that The Duke of Newcastle had the ruling Power of the Town."

"Whether he succeeded or not, it was considered that he had an Interest in the Town?"

"Yes."

"In 1802, whom did you vote for? There were General Crawford and Mr. Jeffery."

"I cannot recollect; there were Crawford and Jeffery and Sir William Ingleby; but I cannot recollect whether they were Candidates."

"And Mr. Bowles and Mr. Bonham?"

"Yes; I recollect them."

"Whom did you vote for in that Election?"

"Bowles and Bonham."

"Did they canvass you?"

"Well, Mr. Bowles canvassed for his Son; and Mr. Bonham canvassed."

"In 1806, Sir John Ingleby stood?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you vote for then?"

"Sir John."

"Who else?"

"I forget who were the Candidates at the Election; I know I voted for Sir John as one."

"Did he oppose the Duke, or was he in the Duke's Interest?"

"He opposed the Duke."

"Was there any Money there?"

"No."

"In 1807, Sir William Ingleby stood?"

"Yes."

"For whom did you vote then?"

"Sir William."

"Did he oppose the Duke?"

"He did."

"Was there any Money then?"

"No."

"Did he succeed?"

"Yes."

"Then on those Occasions you were for the winning Candidate, but received no Money?"

"Just so."

"Are you a Freeman of any other Borough?"

"No."

"Have you lived in Retford all your Time?"

"No; I left Retford in 1793, and have lived in Nottingham."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"You voted for the losing Candidates in 1802; Bowles and Bonham?"

"Yes."

"And also in 1806, for Sir John Ingleby, when he lost his Election?"

"Yes."

"How soon after Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson were elected did the Proceedings come on in the House of Commons about that Election?"

"About this last Election? I am not able to say that."

"They were close upon it, were not they?"

"I cannot say."

"Were not you before the House?"

"No."

"The Election took place in June 1826; you were not before the Election Committee in the Spring of the following Year?"

"No; I was not in Town; I had nothing to do with it."

Examined by the Lords.

"Do you know John Kirkby?"

"Yes."

"Do you know him well?"

"Yes."

"Is he a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Did he ever admit to you that he had received any Money?"

"I do not know that he did; but if he had, I do not know what to say to you, for he is insane in the Asylum."

"John Hollis?"

"There is William Hollis."

"Is he a Freeman?"

"Yes."

"Did he admit that he had received any Packets?"

"No; he is a new Comer in the Town of Nottingham."

"Richard Hurst?"

"I scarcely know him."

"William Kirkby?"

"I know him very well."

"Did he ever admit to you that he had received any Packets?"

"No."

"Did Dowager Brummitt?"

"I am almost positive he never received a Farthing; I have heard him say he has not received any."

"Thomas Leake?"

"Thomas Leake I knew very little about."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then George Bingham was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Freeman?"

"I was a Freeman in 1812."

"Do you remember the Election in 1818, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates for the first Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen, or either of them, your Vote?"

"One of them, I did."

"Who was that?"

"Mr. Evans."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"I did not."

"No Money?"

"I did not."

"Any Packet?"

"I did not."

"Do you mean to swear you did not receive any thing after that Election of 1818?"

"I have sworn that I did not receive any thing after that Election."

"Do you mean to say upon that Occasion you did promise both the Candidates, or that you promised One?"

"I promised One."

"After the Election of 1818, did you receive no Money whatever?"

"No Money whatever."

"Nor any Packet?"

"There was a Packet left at my House."

"What did that Packet contain?"

"Either Twenty Pounds or Twenty-one Pounds."

"Do you remember the Election of 1820, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans stood a second Time?"

"I do."

"Before that Election, did you make any Promise of your Vote?"

"I did not promise any Person for that Election."

"No one?"

"No."

"Did you after that Election receive any Money or any Packet?"

"Yes, I did."

"How many?"

"One."

"What did it contain?"

"Twenty Pounds or Twenty-one Pounds."

"Do you remember the Election in 1826?"

"I do."

"For whom did you vote upon that Occasion?"

"Mr. Wrightson and Sir Robert Dundas."

"From whom did you receive those Two Packets you did receive?"

"I never did receive them; they were left."

"Who left them?"

"I do not know; I was not at Home; I do not live at Retford."

"Where do you live?"

"At Clayworth."

"How far is that from Retford?"

"About Six Miles."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"Did you vote at the last Election?"

"I did."

"For both the Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Who canvassed you, previously to this Election?"

"I do not think I was canvassed at all."

"Was any Promise of Money held out to you in consideration of your Vote?"

"None whatever."

"Was there in 1818?"

"None."

"Was there in 1820?"

"None."

"Was the Packet directed?"

"I do not know; I never saw the Direction."

"Did you open it?"

"I did not."

"Who did open it?"

"I do not know."

"Are you quite sure you got the Money?"

"Well, I got the Money."

"How it came into your House you do not know?"

"I do not know."

"You do not know who sent it you?"

"No."

"You found it there?"

"It was certainly there."

"Do you remember the Time of the Year?"

"No; I recollect nothing at all about it."

"Did you ever live in East Retford?"

"I was an Apprentice there."

"You left it some Time ago?"

"Yes, in 1812."

"Were you a Burgess in 1812?"

"I was, in some Part of it."

"Did you vote in the Election of 1812?"

"There was not any voting."

"Did you receive any Money after the Election of 1812?"

"No, none."

"Nor any Packet?"

"Yes; there was a Packet left at my House after 1812."

"Do you know by whom that was left?"

"No."

"Did you receive any Money after 1826?"

"No."

"No Packet?"

"No."

"Are you quite sure you received Money after the Election of 1812? Do you know who were the Candidates in 1812; Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh?"

"Yes, they were."

"Are you quite sure you received Money after that, or a Packet?"

"Well, there was a Packet left at my House."

"At what Time?"

"I do not know at what Time."

"I am speaking of 1812."

"Yes, I understand you."

"You think there was a Packet left at your House?"

"Yes."

"At what Time?"

"I do not know any thing about it."

"Are you sure about it that it was so?"

"I think it was so; there was a Packet left some Time."

"How long after that Election?"

"Perhaps Two or Three Years; I do not know when."

"So long after it as that?"

"Yes; I cannot speak to the Time."

"Three Years after 1812?"

"I do not know indeed how long it was after the Election."

"Did you say Two or Three Years?"

"Yes; I do not know the Time."

"Had you promised your Vote in 1812 for any one?"

"Yes; I promised Mr. Marsh."

"Do you think you received the Money from Mr. Marsh?"

"I do not know from whom."

"Did you promise Mr. Osbaldeston?"

"I believe I did."

"You promised them both?"

"Yes."

"Who canvassed you?"

"I do not know."

"Were you living at Retford then?"

"I was not."

"Did you come to Retford during the Election?"

"I was not living at Retford at that Time."

"You took no Part in the Election?"

"No."

"Did you go to Retford during the Election?"

"When Business called me there."

"Did you go there during the Election?"

"Yes, no doubt."

"But you did not poll?"

"No."

"You were not living in Retford at the Time?"

"No."

"Where were you living?"

"At Clayworth."

"You think, Two or Three Years afterwards a Packet came to your House?"

"Yes, I think it was that Time afterwards."

"What was in the Packet, do you recollect?"

"I cannot exactly say the Sum."

"Who opened it; did you open it yourself?"

"I did not."

"Who did?"

"I do not know who gave it to me; it was, I suppose, Twenty Pounds."

"Who opened the Packet?"

"I do not know who opened the Packet; I did not open it myself."

"Are you married?"

"I am."

"How do you know there was any Money in it?"

"It was not folded up at the Time; it was laid open."

(By a Lord.) "In your Presence?"

"It was not opened in my Presence; it was laid open when I received it."

(Mr. Stephenson.) "You took the Money out yourself?"

"Yes, I did."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Leake was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Thomas Leake?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Burgess?"

"About Six-and-thirty."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to in the Year 1818, when Mr.Evans and Mr.Crompton were the Candidates; did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"I promised them both."

"After that Election, did you receive any Money?"

"I never received a Halfpenny all the Days of my Life."

"Did you receive any Packets?"

"Why there was something came, but how it came I do not know."

"Did you find out afterwards that they contained Twenty Guineas each?"

"Why I never looked at them; my Mistress took them."

"Did she ever show them to you?"

"No."

"Who is your Mistress; what is Mrs.Leake's Christian Name?"

"Elizabeth."

"How many Packets were there?"

"I am sure I cannot tell."

"Is she alive?"

"No, she is dead; I wish she was alive."

"Did you find Mrs. Leake had a good deal more Money than usual about that Time?"

"Why she had more, and supported me rather better while it lasted."

"Did you find her flush of Cash after the Election of 1820 again?"

"What Election was that?"

"Did you find she had Money after the Election of 1820; the second Election of Mr.Evans and Mr.Crompton?"

"She received that herself."

"Did you find she had Money with which you had not supplied her after that Election?"

"She received it; I did not."

"Did you find that she had a good deal of Money more than you had paid her?"

"She did receive it, I believe."

"Had she Money for your Expences that you had not supplied her with?"

"Yes; she received it, I believe."

"Did you see the Packets on any Occasion?"

"No, not one."

(By a Lord.) "You did not receive the Packet yourself?"

"No, not all."

(Mr. Law.) "Did she support you again better after the Election of 1820, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were again elected?"

"I cannot say."

"Did you find she had Money you had not supplied her with?"

"At Two Elections, do you mean? There were but Two Elections."

"After the second, was it the same; had she Money again?"

"No, not at all."

"How often have you Reason to suppose a Supply of Money had come; after how many Elections?"

"I will tell you at once; I was ill, and I just voted about Once or Twice altogether."

"Those were the only Two Occasions you had promised?"

"Yes."

"Were you prevented by Illness from voting at any other Time?"

"Yes; both at Sir John and Sir William's, and many others."

"Were you prevented by Illness from voting at Sir John and Sir William Ingleby's Elections?"

"Yes."

"And Mr.Marsh's, and Mr. Osbaldeston's?"

"Yes; I could not vote."

"Are you intimate with any of the Voters?"

"I know the People."

"Where did you live in 1818?"

"I am sure I cannot tell."

"Were you living at Retford?"

"No."

"Were you living at Nottingham?"

"No."

"Have you lived at Nottingham at any Time since you have been a Burgess?"

"No."

"Have you lived near Nottingham?"

"Since I left Home."

"Have you any Retford Voters in that Neighbourhood?"

"There were Two or Three."

"Did you know Kirkby?"

"No, not to my Knowledge."

"Do you know Hurst?"

"Not to my Knowledge."

"Or Dowager Brummitt?"

"Yes, I have seen him."

"Have you had any Conversation with Brummitt about Money?"

"No, not at all."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"You have known Retford Six-and-thirty Years?"

"I should think it is nearly Fifty; but I have been a Burgess Six-and-thirty."

"How old are you?"

"If I live while the 14th of June I shall be Seven-andfifty."

"How long have you known Elections; do you remember the Election of 1790?"

"I am no Scholar; I cannot recollect them Things."

"Though you are no Scholar, you may recollect that Election of 1790?"

"If I heard mentioned who put up, I could perhaps tell you something about it."

"Sir Walton Hamcotes; do you remember that Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you vote on that?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you vote for?"

"Sir Walton Hamcotes."

"And Sir John Ingleby?"

"No; Squire Petre."

"Whose Interest did they stand on; The Duke of Newcastle's?"

"I am sure if I was to have the World I could not tell."

"You voted for Sir Walton Hamcotes and Mr. Petre?"

"Yes."

"In 1796, did you vote?"

"What Election was that?"

"That was Mr. Petre and Sir Walton Hamcotes too?"

"I voted for them."

"Did you vote for them Twice, or only Once?"

"Only Once; they never put up again, there were none but them who put up at that Election."

"There was no Opposition then?"

"Yes; Squire Blackburn put up."

"And Mr. Petre and Sir Walton Hamcotes came in?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you vote for?"

"Sir Walton Hamcotes and Squire Petre."

"In 1802, do you remember who were the Candidates; Crawford and Jeffery's Election?"

"I was ill at that Time."

"Let us come down to 1818, when you say you got some Money, as my Learned Friend says; did your Wife manage your Money Matters for you?"

"What Election was that? There was another Election after that; Sir William was one."

"But you say you were not there at Sir William's; did you vote at Sir William's?"

"No."

"Nor did you not vote at Osbaldeston's?"

"Not to my Knowledge."

"You did promise Crompton and Evans?"

"Yes."

"At that Time did your Wife, Mrs. Leake, manage your Money Matters for you?"

"She received what there was."

"Do not say what she received unless you saw it. Did she pay away Money for you, and manage your Money Matters; or did you manage them for yourself?"

"If she got hold of it she kept it; she would never let me have a Halfpenny of it."

"And she did not let you have a Halfpenny after the Election of 1818?"

"She would give me a Pint of Ale, but nothing else."

"She has given you a Pint of Ale To-day, has not she?"

"No; she is dead."

"Did she ever give you a Pint of Ale except after the Election of 1818?"

"I am sure I cannot tell."

"Do you mean to say you never had Ale except after the Election of 1818?"

"I had Ale all the Days of my Life."

"You would not be a good Nottinghamshire Man without it; but you never had any Money?"

"No, not to my Knowledge at all."

"Nor after the Election of 1820?"

"No, not One Halfpenny, to my Knowledge; but she received it herself."

"You did not see your Wife receive any Money?"

"No, not at all."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"Were you receiving Parish Relief at the Time of some of these Elections?"

"No."

"Were not you a Pauper on the Parish?"

"No, not at all."

"But too ill to vote?"

"You know if I had received Relief from the Parish I could not vote."

"You say you were too ill?"

"Yes, I was."

"Then you got nothing on those former Occasions?"

"No, then I got nothing; and so I get over that."

The Witness was directed to withdraw

Then William Crooks was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Freeman of Retford?"

"Fourteen, I think."

"Do you remember the Election of 1818, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates for the first Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote for those Gentlemen?"

"Yes, I did."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"Yes, after the Election, I did."

"What was it?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"Was it in Money or in a Packet?"

"I think there was a Packet."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1820?"

"Yes, I do."

"The second Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to those Gentlemen the second Time?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you, after that second Election, receive any Money?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"The same again."

"For whom did you vote at the last Election?"

"I did not vote then."

"Did you promise your Vote on that Occasion?"

"No, I did not."

"Those were the only Two Elections at which you promised your Vote?"

"Yes."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"How came you not to vote at the last Election?"

"I was in the Excise Department."

"You were disqualified?"

"Yes."

"Were you told, before the Two Elections, you should have any thing?"

"No; nothing at all was said to me upon the Subject of that."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Robert Appleby was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Robert Appleby?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Did you become so in the Year 1807?"

"No."

"Was it after that Time?"

"Yes."

"Were you a Voter before the Election of 1812?"

"No."

"That was Marsh and Osbaldeston's Election?"

"That was my first Election."

"You were a Voter at that Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"There were Two Packets sent to my House."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"In the Election of 1818, whom did you promise your Vote to then?"

"I beg your Pardon; there were no Packets sent to my House in 1812; I was sent for."

"Was that to the Angel Inn?"

"Yes."

"When you got to the Angel Inn, did you receive any Money?"

"Yes."

"Who paid it you?"

"There was Mr. Hannam there, and another Gentleman."

"How much did you receive?"

"Ten Guineas."

"To whom had you promised your Vote upon that Occasion?"

"To Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh."

"In 1818, to whom did you promise your Vote then?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton?"

"Yes."

"What did you receive?"

"Two Packets, I think."

"Containing what?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"Did you promise your Vote to those Gentlemen in 1820?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Packet or Money after that Election?"

"I was not at Home, but it was sent to my House."

"Did you find any Packet containing Money?"

"Yes; my Mistress did; it was sent to her."

"Was it produced to you?"

"Yes, I saw it."

"What did it consist of; what Money did she produce to you?"

"The Money I have described to you."

"Do you know Jonathan Fox?"

"Yes, I know him very well."

"Did he take an active Part in the Elections?"

"It was so said, but I interfered very little with the Elections myself."

"Did you see any Handwriting on the Packets your Wife produced to you?"

"No, I cannot say that I did."

"You do not remember it?"

"No, I do not."

"Have you had any Conversation with the Burgesses about this Election Money?"

"No, not in the least."

"Not with any of them?"

"No, not to recollect it."

"Have you never mentioned your own Receipt of Money to them?"

"No, I cannot say that I have, to my Knowledge."

"Nor they to you?"

"No."

"You have not talked with them, and compared Notes with any of the Burgesses?"

"I am sure I have not."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"Who opened the Packet in 1818?"

"I am sure it was so long back I cannot recollect."

"You are sure it was a Packet?"

"Yes, it was."

"How do you know, if you did not open it?"

"My Mistress opened it; I believe she said there was a Packet come for me."

"In what Form was it?"

"It is so long since, I cannot recollect rightly."

"You did not see the Packet opened?"

"No, I did not."

"Your Wife said there was some Money come for you?"

"Yes."

"It was Twenty Guineas?"

"Yes."

"It was in June 1820?"

"Yes."

"Were you present at the opening of that Packet?"

"No."

"You knew nothing but by Conversation with your Wife?"

"No."

"She is not a Burgess of East Retford, is she; she does not vote?"

"No."

"Who told you to go to the Angel Inn in 1814?"

"I was sent there; I cannot recollect by whom."

"You went up into the Room?"

"Yes."

"Who was present?"

"Mr. Hannam and another Gentleman; but I cannot speak to the other."

"Was any Observation made to you?"

"No, not to my Recollection."

"What passed when you went in?"

"I went up into the Room; I do not know whether they gave me the Notes as they told them off, or how."

"How much was there?"

"There was Ten Guineas."

"Had you no Conversation with any Burgesses?"

"Not to my Knowledge, I had not."

"As to their receiving Packages of this kind?"

"No; only it was rummaged up and down Town, that there were the Packets."

"Are you an Inhabitant of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been so?"

"All my Life-time."

"Do you know any thing of a Club formed for disfranchising the Borough?"

"I have heard of it."

"Do you know Mr. Sharp?"

"Yes."

"Is he a Member of it?"

"I have heard so."

"Do you know Mr. Newton?"

"Yes."

"Who is he?"

"He is with Mr. Hannam."

"Do you know any thing of Mr. Hannam?"

"I know he is an Attorney."

"Do you employ him?"

"No; I never employed him in my Life."

"Have you ever employed an Attorney?"

"Mr. Mee is our Attorney."

"Do you know Mr. Hornby?"

"Yes."

"Is he living in East Retford?"

"I believe not,"

"He has left it, has not he?"

"I believe he has."

"Who canvassed you for the last Election?"

"The first Time I was canvassed, I was canvassed by one Mr. Maddox."

"Did you vote at the last Election?"

"No."

"How happened that?"

"I do not know; because my Mind did not lead me to vote just at the Time."

"Whom should you have voted for, if you had voted?"

"I should have voted for Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"Upon Principle?"

"Yes, on Principle."

"You preferred his Principle to that of the other Candidates?"

"Yes, I did."

"You did not vote then at all?"

"No, I did not."

"You would have voted for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"Yes."

"Notwithstanding you had not a Packet?"

"Yes; I should have voted conscientiously."

"Without any Consideration?"

"Yes; I never had a Favour promised me, nor never asked one in my Life."

"You never gave a Vote in Consideration of those Packets?"

"No."

"You were very much surprised at the Receipt of the Packets?"

"No, I do not know that I was surprised; I was in no degree alarmed at it."

"Who canvassed you for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"He canvassed me himself."

"Was there a Gentleman of the Name of Brown with him?"

"Yes, I think there was."

"Did he canvass you?"

"Yes, I think he came along with him."

"Have you had any Conversation with any body respecting the Business before their Lordships; about the Evidence you have given To-day?"

"No, I am sure I have not."

"At any Period?"

"No."

"When were you directed to come up here?"

"I have been here a Fortnight Yesterday."

"Have you had any Conversation with any Person since you came to Town upon the Subject?"

"No."

"Had you any Conversation with any Person in Retford?"

"No, only that there was a Likelihood that we might be called up."

"With whom did you talk?"

"Only our Neighbours."

"Can you recollect the Names?"

"I cannot say, indeed."

"Have you signed any Petition?"

"No."

"Have you been asked?"

"No, I think not."

"What is your Trade?"

"I am a Shopkeeper and Cowkeeper in East Retford."

"Have you lived there long?"

"I have lived there all my Time."

"Have you ever taken any Interest in the Borough?"

"No; it has been no Matter of Concern with me."

"You do not care whether it is disfranchised or not?"

"I should rather it went on than not, though I have been a Loser."

"Notwithstanding those Packets?"

"I cannot say as to that."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"What did you mean by saying, "Though you have been a Loser?"

"Because I have gone off some little odd Times; only occasionally. At Sir Henry Wright Wilson's last Election, I believe, I was a Bit of Money out of Pocket with it."

"What did you mean by saying, "It was rummaged up and down Town about Packages;" what do you mean by that Answer?"

"Rumoured that there were; it was a general Thing with every body; it was the Talk."

"It was the general Talk?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Crooks was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Burgess?"

"I do not know, I am sure; I cannot recollect."

"How many Years?"

"I cannot tell to a Year or Two."

"About how many?"

"About Ten, I should think."

"Were you a Burgess before the second Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans, in 1820?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember that Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"Yes."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing; Money or Packets?"

"Yes; I received some Packets, after the Election."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"How many did you receive?"

"Two."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"How old are you?"

"Turned of Thirty."

"Where have you lived all your Life?"

"At several Places."

"How long have you lived at Retford?"

"I do not live at Retford."

"Where do you live?"

"At Torworth."

"Do you know any thing of Retford, except being Apprentice?"

"No, I know very little of it now; I left it while I was young."

"Were you born there?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember any other Election besides this?"

"Yes; One or Two."

"Did you vote at them?"

"No."

"Did you vote at the last Election?"

"Yes."

"For whom did you vote at the last Election?"

"Mr. Wrightson and Wilson."

"Did you receive any Promise for your Vote at the last Election?"

"No."

"Did you receive any Money for it?"

"No."

"Any Packet at all?"

"No."

"Whereabouts is the Place where you live?"

"It is Five Miles t'other Side of Retford."

"Is that in the Hundred?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Promise before the Election of 1820?"

"No."

"Do you know Mr. Hornby?"

"Yes."

"Did he make any Application to you?"

"Not then."

"About this Business?"

"No; I have never spoke to him."

"Have you never spoken to him upon any Subject?"

"No; I have never spoken to him lately. He subpænaed me to come up last Time."

"Did he examine you before he subponaed you?"

"He said something to me; I cannot recollect what he said."

"What did he say to you?"

"I cannot recollect; it is a long while ago; it is Three or Four Years."

"Were you before the Committee in the House of Commons?"

"Yes."

"Was there nothing said to you about swearing that "All right" was said?"

"No, I cannot recollect that."

"Did not Mr. Hornby upon that Occasion tell you-"

"No, he did not."

"You have not heard what I have to ask you. Did not he tell you to say, that Mr. Wrightson, when he canvassed you, said all was to be right?"

"No."

"Or any thing of that kind?"

"No."

"Was nothing said to you about what you were to say about the Canvass?"

"No."

"What was it he said to you?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"What were you to go and prove?"

"He told me I was to come up to be examined at the House of Commons."

"About what?"

"About the Elections. I told him that I did not know any thing about them; that it was no Occasion to take me up."

"Did he take you up, notwithstanding?"

"Yes; but I was never examined."

"After you told him that, did he take you up?"

"Yes."

"Was that all that passed between you before Mr. Hornby took you to London?"

"I do not know, I am sure; I do not keep such Things in my Head."

"Did you tell him nothing more than that you knew nothing about it, and then did he bring you up at Sir Henry's Expence?"

"That was all that passed at that Time, I think."

"You will swear you had no other Conversation with him than that?"

"I cannot recollect; I would not say so unless I knew."

Examined by the Lords.

"Have you any Brothers?"

"Yes."

"How many?"

"One."

"Is he a Burgess of East Retford?"

"No."

"Have you any Brother who is a Burgess?"

"No."

"Whom did you say you voted for at the last Election?"

"Mr. Wrightson and Sir Henry Wilson."

"How long before the Election did Sir Henry Wright Wilson canvass you?"

"He never canvassed me."

"He did not canvass you at all?"

"No."

"Did any body canvass you for him?"

"Yes."

"Who?"

"I forget the Name now."

"Answer the Question. Who canvassed you for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"I think Mr. Brown was the first."

"What did you mean by saying you did not know?"

"I forgot at the Time."

"Mr. Brown canvassed you for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"Yes."

"Did you give him your Vote on Principle, or was any Promise made to you?"

"There was no Promise made to me."

"You were against the Catholics, were you, then?"

"I do not know as I was."

"You did not think about it?"

"No."

"Did Mr. Brown say nothing to you upon the Catholic Question when he asked you for your Vote?"

"He was mentioning something about it."

"What did he say to you?"

"I cannot say, I am sure."

"Did he tell you you must vote for Sir Henry Wright Wilson if you wanted to keep the Protestant Establishment up?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"You recollect the Catholics being mentioned?"

"Yes; he was mentioning the Catholics."

"Did you vote for Sir Henry Wright Wilson upon that Ground?"

"No; I did not think upon it; about the Catholics."

"Did Mr. Wrightson canvass you?"

"He did not come to my House."

"Did Mr. Wrightson ask you for your Vote?"

"Yes."

"Did he ask you for it himself?"

"Yes, I think he did."

"Did he make you any Promise?"

"No."

"Did any Agent make you any Promise for him?"

"No."

"Do you live within the Hundred of Bassetlaw?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Freeholder of the Hundred?"

"Yes."

"Is there a Place called the Dukery any where near Retford?"

"I do not know that there is."

"You never heard of it?"

"No."

"Who are the chief Proprietors in the Hundred of Bassetlaw?"

"I cannot say, I am sure."

"Has The Duke of Newcastle any Property there?"

"He has some Property thereabout."

"How far is Clumber off?"

"I should think it is about Ten Miles."

"Is that in the Hundred of Bassetlaw?"

"I do not know."

"Has The Duke of Norfolk any Property in the Hundred of Bassetlaw?"

"I do not know."

"Has Lord Manvers any Property in the Hundred of Bassetlaw?"

"I dare say he has."

"Has The Duke of Portland any Property in the Hundred of Bassetlaw?"

"I do not know."

"Has any body ever told you, that if you came up and gave Evidence for this Bill you would then have a Vote for the Hundred of Bassetlaw?"

"No; nobody has told me."

"Was the Subject never mentioned to you?"

"No."

"Do you know Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes."

"Did he never talk to you upon the Subject?"

"No."

"Nor his Clerk?"

"No."

"Nor any body belonging to the Birmingham Club?"

"No."

"Are you a Member of the Club?"

"No."

"Did they ask you to belong to it?"

"No."

"Do you know where it meets?"

"I do not know exactly; I do not live in the Town."

"Have not you a pretty good Guess where it meets?"

"Somewhere in Newgate."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Clark was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Thomas Clark?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1818?"

"Yes."

"When Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were elected?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to at that Election?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton, I promised."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"No; I received a Paper after."

"What was in the Parcel?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"Did you receive One or Two Parcels?"

"I received Two."

"What did the Two contain?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to in the Election of 1820?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"I received Two Parcels."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"Are those the only Two Elections at which you voted?"

"I voted for Mr. Osbaldeston before that."

"Did you receive any Money after that?"

"Yes; I received a Parcel at Mr. Hannam's."

"From Mr. Hannam?"

"From a Friend that was with Mr. Hannam in the same Room."

"Did you vote in 1826?"

"Yes."

"For whom did you vote?"

"I voted for Mr. Dundas and Wrightson."

"Did you receive any Money after that?"

"No."

"Had you a Promise?"

"No."

"Had you any previous Promise in the Election of 1818?"

"No."

"Had you any previous Promise in the Election of 1820?"

"No."

"Did you receive the Parcels yourself?"

"Yes."

"Did you open them?"

"Yes."

"Where were they left?"

"I cannot say; it was a long while ago."

"Were they left at your House?"

"Yes."

"By whom?"

"I cannot say; it was a Stranger to me."

"Do you know when?"

"No, I cannot say."

"What are you?"

"A Cordwainer."

"How long have you been in London?"

"A Fortnight last Saturday."

"Have you had any Conversation with any body about your Evidence?"

"No."

"When were you desired to come to Town?"

"Friday or Saturday."

"The last Friday or Saturday?"

"The Friday or Saturday before the last; no; a Fortnight last Saturday."

"Had you any Conversation with any Person about the Evidence you have to give?"

"No."

"This is the first Time you have had your Memory refreshed since the Election of 1818?"

"Yes."

"And since the Election of 1820?"

"Yes."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"How much did you receive in Hannam's Presence?"

"It was in a Parcel; Twenty Guineas."

"Where did you receive it, do you know; was it at the Angel Inn at Retford?"

"I received it in a Room at the Angel Inn."

Examined by the Lords.

"How long have you been in London?"

"A Fortnight last Saturday."

"Where have you been living?"

"At Mrs. Couch's in Marsham Street."

"Are there any Burgesses of East Retford living there beside you?"

"Yes; there are several there."

"Does any Attorney ever pay them a Visit in the Morning?"

"No; not since I have been there."

"Have you had any Conversation with any of the Burgesses who are living in that House, about the Evidence you are to give?"

"No; there has been nothing said since I have been there."

"You never talk to one another as to what you are come upon?"

"I have heard a little, but nothing to signify."

"Do you talk one among another about the Evidence you are to give with regard to the Borough?"

"No; I never heard that mentioned."

"Do you feel quite sure that the Evidence you will give will enable you to send Members again?"

"No; I never heard any thing about that."

"What do you talk about?"

"Nothing particular."

"Who pays for your Living in London?"

"I cannot tell; I expect somebody must pay for it; I am not able to pay it."

"Who pays for your Living every Day?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"Are you all fed together?"

"Yes."

"Who mixes up the Feed?"

"Mrs. Couch; she is the Cook, I believe."

"You all dine together?"

"Yes."

"Did you never ask for the Bill?"

"No; she has never asked me."

"Do you live better than you do at East Retford?"

"I do not know whether we are living much better or much worse; but I do not live at Retford."

"Have you better Living here than at Home?"

"No; I cannot say that I have."

"How many of you are there?"

"I do not know how many."

"Are there Ten of you?"

"I think there are somewhere about Eight."

"You all dine together?"

"We all dine at One Table."

"Who is in the Chair?"

"Sometimes one, and sometimes the other; we are not particular about that."

"Do you take it by Turns? Who was in the Chair Yesterday?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"You forget?"

"Yes; it has slipped my Memory."

"What Time did you dine To-day?"

"I do not know what Time; there is no Clock, and we do not know."

"You forget who was in the Chair Yesterday, and at what Time you dined To-day?"

"Yes."

"And yet you can recollect all about their giving you this Money?"

"I can recollect that I had a Parcel in the Room with Mr. Hannam."

"But you cannot recollect the Time you dined Today?"

"I cannot, exactly."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Banks was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Burgess?"

"I cannot rightly tell you; but Seven or Eight-andtwenty."

"Do you remember the Election of 1818, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates for the first Time?"

"Yes; I remember something about it."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"Yes, I did."

"After that Election, did you receive any Money or Packets?"

"I received Packets."

"How many?"

"Two, I think."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each, to the best of my Recollection; I have a very poor Recollection, but I think that was the Sum."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1820, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates the Second Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen the second Time?"

"Yes; there was nobody to oppose them."

"After that Election, did you receive any more Packets?"

"I cannot say exactly, but I think I did; but my Memory is very bad; I do not know whether I did or did not."

"You recollect the Packets you received in 1818?"

"Yes, I do."

"Do you remember receiving Two Packets after the Election of 1818?"

"Yes; I think I remember something about them."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each, I believe."

"Do you remember receiving Two other Packets after the Election of 1820?"

"I cannot remember; I might, or I might not; my Memory is very bad."

"What Age are you?"

"I am turned of Fifty."

"Do you believe you received Two Packets after the Election of 1820?"

"Well, I cannot recollect."

"Do you believe it?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Do you believe you received Two Packets after the Election of 1820?"

"I cannot recollect whether I did or did not; my Memory is very bad."

"I do not ask you whether you did, but whether you believe it; have you any Doubt you received Two Packets after the Election of 1820?"

"Well, I cannot say, indeed."

"Have you any Doubt you received Two Packets after the Election of 1820?"

"I cannot add to that; I might, or I might not; but my Recollection is not good."

The Witness was admonished to attend to the Questions, and answer them.

"(Mr. Price.) "Did you receive any Packet after any Election before 1818; do you remember receiving any Packet after the Election of 1812, when Mr. Marsh and Mr. Osbaldeston were Candidates?"

"No; I did not receive any after that Time."

"Then your Memory is so good as to enable you to say you did not receive any Packet after the Election of 1812?"

"Perhaps I might, or I might not; but I remember Osbaldeston's Election."

"After that Election, did you receive any Packet?"

"I did not receive any thing then."

"You are certain of that?"

"I am certain."

"Now, before the Election in 1812, the Election of 1807, did you receive any, when Sir William Ingleby was the Candidate?"

"No, I did not."

"As you recollect perfectly well after the Election of 1807 and 1812, tell me again, whether you have any Doubt as to the Reception of Packets after the Election of 1820?"

"I think, to the best of my Recollection, I did receive Packets after the Election of 1820, but I did not think of it at that Time."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each, to the best of my Knowledge."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"Did you receive any thing in 1807?"

"What Election was that; Sir William Ingleby's?"

"Yes, it was."

"I did not vote for Sir William."

"For whom did you vote?"

"There was one Crawford, I do not know whether Charles or Robert, and another."

"Was that Jeffery?"

"Yes, I believe it was."

"That was the winning Candidate, I believe; you voted for the winning Candidates in 1807, did you not?"

"I voted against Sir William Ingleby."

"And for General Crawford?"

"I voted for General Crawford."

"In 1812, you voted for Osbaldeston and Marsh; you promised them?"

"Yes; I promised them; but I never received any thing."

"In 1818, are you quite sure you received any Packets from Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"Yes, that is right."

"I speak of the first Time?"

"Yes."

"When did you receive them?"

"Oh, I do not know when I received them; but I did receive them."

"How soon after the Election?"

"I do not know; it was a while after the Election."

"Did you receive them in your own Hands?"

"No."

"Who did receive them, do you know?"

"They were flung into the House."

"In 1826, whom did you vote for?"

"I do not know what Election that was."

"The very last of all?"

"Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"How came you to vote for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"Oh, I do not know."

"Had you promised your Vote to any body else?"

"Why, yes; there was a Promise made by my Wife for Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"Did you differ, or not, about the Catholic Question, or any thing of that kind; did you differ in your Politics?"

"Yes; we differed in our Parties."

"You thought the Catholics ought not to come on?"

"Yes; that was the Difference."

"So you would not vote for those Persons whose Principles you disapproved, and you voted for Sir Henry Wright Wilson on Principle?"

"Yes, I did; on the Principles he declared."

"Had you any Promise from him?"

"No; never in the least."

"Or any Performance?"

"No; I never asked any thing."

"Did you have any thing without a Promise?"

"No, nothing at all."

"Nothing flung into your House at all?"

"Oh no; nothing at all."

"On no Occasion had you ever a Promise before that?"

"No, not before; for no Gentleman had ever come to the Town."

"Had you any Reason, at the Time you voted, to expect the Packets, from any thing that was said to you?"

"No; nothing was ever said by any Gentleman."

Re-examined by Mr. Price.

"In the Year 1807, you say, you voted against Sir William Ingleby?"

"Yes."

"For whom did you vote at that Election?"

"For Crawford and somebody else; I do not recollect the Name."

"Sir William Ingleby was the winning Candidate?"

"He was one of the winning Candidates, and Crawford was the other, I think."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Drake was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name John Drake?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"When were you first a Burgess?"

"About Three or Four-and-thirty Years ago."

"In 1812, where were you living?"

"At Retford."

"In the Town?"

"Yes."

"Did you remove between that and 1814?"

"Yes."

"Where to?"

"To a Place called Lowndes."

"How far is that from Retford?"

"About Three Miles."

"In the Year 1806, for whom did you vote?"

"I do not recollect."

"Which was the first Election you voted at?"

"Sir Walton Hamcotes and Mr. Higham."

"The first Election you did not vote?"

"No; I was in that."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"No."

"In what Year was that?"

"I do not recollect the Year."

"Are you sure those Gentlemen got their Election?"

"Yes."

"Mr. Higham?"

"Mr. Petre and Sir Walton Hamcotes."

"In 1818, to whom did you promise your Vote, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton stood; did you promise them your Vote?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"No."

"Recollect yourself; did you receive no Packets after that Election?"

"Yes, I did; I ask your Pardon; I did not understand the Question."

"How many Packets?"

"Two."

"What did they contain?"

"About Twenty Guineas each, I believe."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to in 1820, when those Gentlemen stood again?"

"Mr. Wrightson and Dundas."

"When Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton stood again, did you promise your Vote again?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you receive any thing after the Election of 1820, when Evans and Crompton were elected?"

"I received for both of those Elections."

"The same Sum?"

"Yes, I believe the same Sum."

"Two Packets of Twenty Guineas each?"

"I believe to the same Amount."

"Which was the first Election after which you received any Money?"

"Those Two."

"Do you mean to state to their Lordships, that before 1818 you had not received Packets?"

"Yes."

"Nor Money?"

"No."

"Where have you been living?"

"At Retford, all the principal Part of my Life."

"Have you voted for the winning or the losing Candidates?"

"Sometimes the winning and sometimes the losing Candidates."

"But you have not received any thing?"

"I have not received any thing."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of Francis Drake?"

"Yes."

"Is he a Relation of yours?"

"He was my Son."

"Is he a Freeman of Retford?"

"He was; he is dead now."

"Did he receive any Money after the Elections, to your Knowledge?"

"He received Two Packets after the Elections of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did they contain the same as yours?"

"I suppose they did; I did not open them; I saw the Letters, but did not open them."

"You opened your own, and found Twenty Guineas in each?"

"I believe that was the Amount."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"Have you been a Burgess ever since the Year 1794?"

"I have been a Burgess about Thirty-four Years."

"You have voted at a good many Elections?"

"Yes."

"The Two Elections of 1818 and 1820 were the only Two after which you received any Money?"

"Yes."

"Who gave you the Packets?"

"I cannot say; it was unknown to me."

"Was there any thing written upon them?"

"Nothing; with only my Name on the Back."

"Did you open the Packet?"

"I dare say I might; I am not sure; but I believe I did, myself."

"Did you open the Packet for your Son?"

"No, I did not."

"At neither Time?"

"No."

"Then you do not know that there was any Money?"

"No; he was residing at a Distance of Eighteen or Nineteen Miles."

"Have you voted at every Election which has taken place since you have been a Burgess?"

"Yes."

"Had you a Promise from Mr. Crompton or Mr. Evans in 1818?"

"No."

"Had you a Promise from Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans in 1820?"

"No; I never had a Promise of any Money in my Life."

"And this was the first Time you ever received any Packet in your Life?"

"Yes."

"Did you vote in 1826?"

"I did."

"For whom did you vote?"

"For Mr. Wrightson and Dundas."

"Have you received any Packets since then?"

"No."

"Had you any previous Promise?"

"No."

"Do you recollect at how many Elections you have voted?"

"No; not at this Moment, I cannot."

"Five or Six?"

"It may be Five or Six, or more; I cannot recollect at the Moment."

"Have you voted from the Year 1796?"

"I voted for Sir Walton Hamcotes and Mr.Petre at the first Election."

"Do you recollect the next Election after that?"

"I do not remember the Name, but I have voted at all the Elections ever since."

"Did you vote in 1806?"

"I voted for all the Elections ever since."

"Did you vote in 1806?"

"Yes; that Year was an Election, I believe."

"You received no Money then?"

"No."

"In 1807?"

"No."

"In 1812, did you vote?"

"Yes; there was an Election, I believe."

"You received no Money after that?"

"No."

"Were you asked to go to the Angel Inn in 1814?"

"No."

"Nobody at all asked you to go there?"

"No."

"Do you know Mr. Hannam?"

"I know him by Sight."

"You received no Packet of Money from him, or any strange Gentleman, in his Presence?"

"No, not on that Election."

"You voted for Mr. Marsh and Mr. Osbaldeston upon that Election?"

"Yes, I did; but I received nothing."

"There are certain Elections at which you have voted and received nothing?"

"Yes."

"And the last?"

"At the last I received nothing."

"You were surprised, in 1818 or 1820, at receiving any Packets?"

"Yes."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"You stated that you were not living in Retford in 1814?"

"I lived near Retford; about Three Miles distant."

"Whom did you vote for in 1802, when you got nothing; when Robert Crawford Esquire and John Jeffery Esquire were the Candidates who succeeded?"

"I voted for Robert Crawford Esquire and John Jeffery Esquire."

"Do you mean to say you received no Packet after that Election?"

"Yes."

"Nor any one for you?"

"No; nor any one for me."

"Whom did you vote for in 1806?"

"Who were the Candidates?"

"Robert Crawford and Thomas Higham Esquire."

"I voted for them."

"Do you mean to represent to their Lordships that you have never received any Money, except Four Parcels of Twenty Guineas each after the Elections of 1818 and 1820?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive the Packets your Son had at your House?"

"They came to me, and I sent them to him, and never opened them."

"Were they directed on the Outside?"

"They were directed in his Name."

"Was it in the same Handwriting as the Direction to your own?"

"I cannot say."

"The same Size?"

"Yes."

"And you sent it off to your Son?"

"Yes."

"Had you never a Conversation afterwards with your Son about it?"

"Yes; I asked whether he had received it, and he said he had."

"Did he say what it contained?"

"Yes."

"How much did he say it contained?"

"Twenty Guineas."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Buxton was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Freeman?"

"Sixteen Years."

"Do you remember the first Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans in 1818?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"I was working at Hull at the Time."

"Did you promise them your Vote?"

"A Friend sent me a Letter to Hull."

"Did you promise your Vote to them?"

"Yes, I did."

"After the Election of 1818, did you receive any Packet?"

"Yes."

"What did it contain?"

"It was Twenty Guineas in that."

"How many Packets did you receive?"

"There was Two."

"Did they contain Twenty Guineas each?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans for the Election of 1820; the second Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you after that Election receive any Money?"

"Yes."

"What was it?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"One Packet or Two?"

"There was Two."

"Did they each contain Twenty Guineas?"

"Yes."

"Can you state from your own Knowledge who sent those Packets?"

"No."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of Jonathan Fox, a Clerk of Mr. Foljambe?"

"Yes."

"Did he ever pay you any Money?"

"No."

"Have you any Relations who are Burgesses?"

"My Father."

"What is his Name?"

"Samuel."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"How many Times have you received Packets?"

"Four Times."

"That is, Four Packets?"

"Yes."

"You say a Gentleman wrote a Letter to you?"

"A Friend; but I do not know who it was."

"What did you mean by a Friend writing to you about the Election; did he ask you for a Vote?"

"My Father sent me the Letter -but he could not write it himself-when I was working at Hull."

"Have you got that Letter?"

"No."

"What has become of it?"

"Perhaps it has got burnt."

"What were the Contents of that Letter?"

"I was to come over to the Election."

"For what?"

"To vote for Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"What did you do upon that; did you write an Answer?"

"No; I came over immediately."

"Was there any Election?"

"What I understand by Election; there was not no Opposition."

"If there was no Opposition, was there any polling?"

"They mean by polling, the holding up of their Hands."

"That is what you call polling?"

"Yes."

"Does every body who holds up his Hands poll at Retford?"

"I cannot say."

"Were you ever at the Quarter Sessions; did you ever see any Persons poll there?"

"No, I cannot say."

"Had you any other Promise except this Letter of your Father's?"

"No."

"Did not you see Mr. Crompton or Mr. Evans?"

"Not 'till the Election Day."

"What did they say to you?"

"I shaked Hands with them."

"Did they say any thing more to you?"

"No, I cannot remember."

"That was the only Promise you had?"

"Yes."

"The second Election, had you any thing more than shaking Hands again, or did the first go for both?"

"No; I saw the one, and then I saw the other."

"What passed between you?"

"I am sure I cannot say."

"Did any thing pass about Money?"

"No; I never had such a Word put to me in my Life; I gave Mr. Crompton a Vote, and Mr. Evans."

"That is to say, you promised?"

"Yes."

"Did they say any thing more to you than shake Hands with you?"

"No, not to my Knowledge."

"After that you received those Packets?"

"Yes."

"Was that all passed, your receiving those Packets and shaking Hands?"

"Yes; I cannot speak to any thing more."

"For whom did you vote at the last Election?"

"I did not vote at all."

"For whom should you have voted?"

"I should have voted for Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"Why should you have voted for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"Because he is a Man of my Principles."

"What were those Principles that induced you to vote for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"I cannot tell you that; but he seemed to suit me."

"How did he suit you-if you will tell me; what did he say that pleased you?"

"He said in this Way-that he was for Birthright and Servitude."

"Was that what caught you?"

"Yes, I believe it was."

"Was any thing said about the Catholic Question?"

"No; I know nothing about the Catholic Question."

"You did not care about the Catholic Question?"

"I do not know any thing about that."

"But what made you interested in his Success was Birthright and Servitude?"

"Yes."

"Those are your Principles-Birthright and Servitude?"

"Yes."

"Did you get any Money by Birthright and Servitude?"

"Not by him, I did not."

"Did he promise you any?"

"No."

"Nor has he given you any?"

"No."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

Witnesses examined as to the State of Health of W. Cartwright:

Then Benjamin Robinson M. D., attending by Order of the House, was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as to the State of Health of William Cartwright, as follows:

"Are you a Physician practising at East Retford?"

"I am."

"Do you know a Person of the Name of William Cartwright there?"

"I do."

"Are you aware that he was summoned as a Witness to attend at the Bar of this House?"

"I am."

"Did you examine him for the Purpose of ascertaining whether he could attend without Danger to his Health?"

"I was asked by a Gentleman to attend him, and I did."

"What was the Result of your Examination?"

"The Man exhibited no Symptoms at the Examination which I made that led me to think he was incapable of going up to London without Danger."

"He exhibited no Symptoms that led you to believe he was incapable of going up to London without Danger?"

"There were Symptoms of an Apoplectic Tendency, but not of sufficient Importance, in my Idea, at that Time, to lead me to suppose his going up to London would be attended with Danger."

"Did you afterwards examine him a second Time?"

"I did not."

"Did you communicate to him the Result of your Opinion upon that Examination?"

"I told him, I thought he might go up; that it would not be perhaps injurious to him; rather the contrary. He seemed in a nervous Way; and his Wife seemed under great Apprehensions that he would suffer. I said, "Oh, it will do him good."

"When was it you thus examined him?"

"I really cannot charge my Mind with the exact Date; about Eight or Ten Days ago, to the best of my Recollection."

"How long was it before you signed the Certificate?"

"A Day intervened; the Day following but one."

"You examined him one Day; a Day intervened; the Day after that you signed a Certificate; had you seen him again in the meantime?"

"No, I had not. Mr. Gylby, a Practitioner there, wished me to examine this Man, and to sign a Certificate for him. I said, "I will see him, and then we will talk about it." After visiting the Patient, I called at Mr. Gylby's House, and he was from Home. I saw his Son, and I told him to tell his Father that I could not feel myself justified in signing a Certificate; which Message, I believe, he delivered to him. On my Return after seeing Cartwright I went Home; and the following Day but one I was going in to Town, and I saw Mr. Gylby again, and then Mr. Gylby gave me a History of his Illness, that induced me to change my Opinion, and to think there might be a Risk attending his going up to London; and from Mr. Gylby's Statement I was led to sign the Opinion I have committed to Paper."

"According to the Result of your own Enquiry and Examination, you thought he might safely come?"

"Yes."

"But there was a Representation made to you by Mr. Gylby, in consequence of which you were induced to sign a Certificate?"

"Yes; as I understood the Case from Mr. Gylby, I was induced to sign the Certificate."

"On reconsidering the Case, are you not of Opinion that he may safely come here, and be examined at the Bar of this House, provided he is allowed sufficient Time?"

"I think, with a Medical Attendant, that he might; but from the Symptoms he has exhibited, and from the Statement upon which I found my Judgment, Mr. Gulby's Statement that there is a Tendency to Apoplexy, that from any Excitement it might be liable to cause to recur, that the being brought to this Bar, a Journey to Town, with a Medical Friend with him immediately afterwards, it might probably be a Matter of Safety; but I do not take upon myself to say he could take a Journey to London in his present State of Health, and be examined at the Bar of this House, without a Risk of those Apoplectic Symptoms recurring."

"Were you applied to by Mr. William Mee, a Surgeon in the Town of Retford, to give his Certificate?"

"Mr. William Mee met me coming into Town, and he said, "Why will not you sign Cartwright's Certificate? His poor Wife is in a dreadful Way; extremely anxious about him. The Man is exceedingly ill, and why should you not sign the Poor Fellow's Certificate?" That is, to the best of my Recollection, the Conversation that passed."

"Did Mr. William Mee shew you a Note from Mr. Bigsly, the Partner of the Town Clerk, also requesting you to sign it?"

"No, I think not; I think, to the best of my Recollection, I saw on Mr. Gylby's Table a Note addressed to Mr. Gylby, saying that he supposed Doctor Robinson could have no Objection to signing the Man's Certificate; but the Note was not addressed to me, nor shewn to me by Mr. William Mee."

"Had you attended Cartwright before, medically?"

"No, I had not."

"Was Mr. Gylby his regular Medical Attendant?"

"Mr. Gylby stated to me that he had attended him for a considerable Time; that he had repeated Attacks of Apoplexy."

"Are you a Tenant of Mr. Mee's?"

"I am."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

"Then Worthington Thomas Gylby, attending by Order of the House, was called in; and having been sworn, was also examined as to the State of Health of William Cartwright, as follows:"

"You are a Surgeon practising at East Retford?"

"I am."

"Do you know William Cartwright?"

"Yes."

"Has he been a Patient of yours?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been in the habit of attending him?"

"About Two Years."

"What is the Complaint under which he has laboured?"

"In the first Instance he laboured under an Ulcer of the Leg; that continued a considerable Time; but within the last Twelve Months he has been an Apoplectic Subject; he has laboured under Apoplexy."

"Has he during that Period, in your Judgment, been in Danger?"

"Undoubtedly so."

"Do you remember Dr. Robinson having visited him?"

"I do."

"Did you visit him up to the Period of Dr. Robinson visiting him?"

"At Intervals, I have found it necessary, up to the Time that I requested Dr. Robinson to see him; constantly, at Intervals."

"At the Time when Dr. Robinson visited him, in your Judgment and Opinion, and you are giving your Opinion on Oath, could he then come to the Bar of this House without Danger to his Life?"

"My Opinion is, that the Excitement of the Examination might certainly have produced very prejudicial Effects."

"You say it might; would it probably; was there a Probability of it?"

"There was a Probability that it might bring on a Fit of Apoplexy that might have caused his Death."

"Did you communicate with Dr. Robinson after he had visited this Person?"

"Yes."

"Did you state to Dr. Robinson your Opinion with respect to his Case, and give him the History of his Case, so far as you had observed him?"

"I did."

"Did you hear from Dr. Robinson what his Opinion was with respect to the Case?"

"I did."

"Did you express any Opinion to Dr. Robinson at the Time, whether he could safely come to London?"

"I did."

"What was the Opinion you so expressed?"

"I stated to Dr. Robinson that I was of Opinion that the Excitement of Examination, the Patient labouring under this Infirmity, I was apprehensive might bring on a Return of Apoplexy."

"Was that your fair honest Opinion at the Time, without reference to Political Considerations?"

"That was my Opinion, I declare upon my Oath."

"Is it your Opinion now?"

"It is; his Memory is very defective; and he is obliged sometimes, when the Attacks are coming upon him, to take hold of something immediately, or he would otherwise fall; he is affected with Dizziness, which affects his Head."

"Are you aware that Cartwright attended the last Assizes at Nottingham, and was there examined as a

"Witness, in March last?"

"Yes."

"Did he suffer in consequence?"

"He was decidedly worse after having attended the Assizes."

"Do you know Mr. Flower?"

"I do."

"Is he a Surgeon at Retford?"

"He practices as a Surgeon."

"Had you ever my Conversation with him respecting Cartwright?"

"I had."

"Did he ever state to you his Opinion as to the Danger of Cartwright's coming up?"

"He did."

"What Opinion did he give to you?"

"In consequence of my requesting his Attendance with me to see him, wanting to get Mr. Flower to give me his Certificate, having understood that a Certificate signed by Two Medical Men would be more worthy of Attention, he saw him with me; examined him at my Request; and he expressed his Approbation of a Certificate being given to him, and thought it was highly necessary, and mentioned Ten o'Clock on the following Morning for our meeting for the Purpose of its being drawn up. Previously to the Hour appointed, Mr. Flower came to my House, and stated that he had altered his Mind, and would not sign any Certificate; he did not wish to talk about any Reasons; but he did not wish to sign any Certificate. Then I applied to Dr. Robinson."

"In the first Instance, Mr. Flower agreed with you in giving a Certificate as to the Danger of Cartwright's coming up?"

"Yes, he did; and Mr. Flower likewise mentioned to several Persons in the Town, besides myself, the Necessity there appeared to be of giving a Certificate to Mr. Cartwright."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Order for Attendance of W. Cartwright discharged:

Then it was moved, "That the Order for the Attendance of William Cartwright be discharged."

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

2d Reading postponed:

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off 'till To-morrow; and that the Lords be summoned.

Witnesses to attend:

Ordered, That William Worsley, William Tomlinson, Reuben White, William Clayton, George Whittam, Edward Markham, William Freeman, Isaac Dean, Thomas Burton, John Walker, Richard Hindley of Newark, John Denman, James Dernie, Joseph Bailey, William Hemsworth, John Shaw, William Palmer, Robert Pashley, Joseph Marshall, Robert Rushley, William Hollis, William Wright, Thomas Batty, Richard Mawer, Elizabeth Scott, John White, William Leach, William Pierpoint, Thomas Cutler, John Hutchinson, Charles Crooks, Stephen Hurst, John Fenney, Mary Jubb, George Crooks, William Kirkby, Thomas Evans, William Trueman, William Cocking, Richard Hurst, William Furley, Thomas Hempsall, Robert Johnson, Richard Hodgskinson, John Burton, Thomas Willey, Robert Catcliff, James Clark, Thomas Hudson, James Bailey, John Clark, James Bailey and John Burton senior do attend this House forthwith, in order to their being examined as Witnesses upon the Second Reading of the last-mentioned Bill.

Witnesses discharged from Attendance.

Ordered, That Thomas Parnham, Francis Hodson, William Burton, William Leadbeater, Uriah Jubb, Edward Ogle, Valentine Baker, Joseph Raynor, George Marshall, George Bingham, Thomas Leake, William Crooks, Robert Appleby, John Crooks, Thomas Clarke, John Banks, John Drake, Thomas Buxton, Dr. Robinson and Worthington Thomas Gylby be discharged from further Attendance on this House upon the Second Reading of the lastmentioned Bill.

Hollingrake's Patent Bill Specially reported:

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for prolonging the Term of certain Letters Patent granted to James Hollingrake, for an improved Method of manufacturing Copper or other Metal Rollers, and of casting and forming Metallic Substances into various Forms with improved Closeness and Soundness of Texture;" "That the Committee had met, and considered the said Bill, and, in the first place, proceeded to enquire how far the Standing Orders of the House relative to Bills for the Extension of Patents had been complied with, and found that the said Orders had been complied with except in the following Particulars; 1st. That instead of the Notice of the Bill having been given in The London Gazette in the Months of August or September, as prescribed by the Standing Order, such Notice was given on the 2d and 6th of October and 25th of November last; and 2dly, That the Term of the Letters Patent will not expire within Two Years from the Commencement of the present Session of Parliament; but it was stated to the Committee by the Solicitor for the Bill, that the said Notice was duly transmitted to The London Gazette Office for Insertion in the Month of September, but that the Editor, imagining that the Period for Insertion of intended Applications to Parliament had been extended by The House of Lords to the Months of October and November, omitted to insert the Notice until the Time above mentioned; and it appeared to the Committee, with respect to the Term of the said Letters Patent, that such Term will expire in August 1832, being only a short Period beyond the Time prescribed by the Standing Order; and that the Invention for which such Patent was granted had been proved to be of the greatest National Importance; and further, that the Inventor has not only not received any adequate Remuneration for his Invention, but that he has not yet been repaid the Capital actually expended in bringing his Invention to Perfection; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to their Lordships, with some Amendments."

Which Report, being read by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

Then the Amendments made by the Committee to the said Bill were read by the Clerk, as follow; (vizt.)

"Pr. 7. L. 23 & 24. After ("notwithstanding") insert Clause (A.)

"Clause (A.) Provided always, and be it further enacted, That the said James Hollingrake, his Executors, Administrators or Assigns, shall supply or cause to be supplied for His Majesty's Service all such Articles of the said Inventions as he or they shall be required to supply, in such Manner, at such Times, and at and for such reasonable Prices and Sums as shall be settled and fixed for that Purpose by the Principal Officers and Commissioners of His Majesty's Navy for the Time being; and that in case of any Neglect or Failure on the Part of the said James Hollingrake, his Executors, Administrators or Assigns so to do, it shall be lawful for the said Principal Officers and Commissioners at any Time thereafter to make use of the said Inventions for the Advantage of His Majesty's Service, without making any Compensation for the same, or being liable to account for any Infringement of the Rights by this Act vested in the said James Hollingrake."

"L. 32. After ("Bankrupts") insert ("or of the said Samuel Davenport and Robert Fayle, or either of them")

And the said Amendments, being read a Second Time, were agreed to by the House.

Standing Order No. 173 to be considered on it.

Ordered, That the Standing Order No. 173, respecting Bills for the Extension of the Term of Letters Patent, be taken into Consideration To-morrow, in order to its being dispensed with on the last-mentioned Bill; and that the Lords be summoned.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Martis, decimum octavum diem instantis Maii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.