House of Lords Journal Volume 62
24 May 1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 62: 24 May 1830', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 62: 1830, pp. 499-523. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16353 Date accessed: 31 October 2014.


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Contents

Die Lunæ, 24 Maii 1830.
Burns & Grier v. Stewart. Marriage Law, Petition of Freethinkers of Dewsbury for Alteration of. Assizes for West Riding of Yorkshire, Petition from Heckmondwike for Removal of, to Wakefield. Ellesmere & Chester Canal Bill: Peebles Roads Bill: Queensferry Road Bill: Messages to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to the 3 preceding Bills. Monks Risborough Inclosure Bill: Message to H.C. with an Amendment to it. Hildyard's Estate Bill: Poore's Estate Bill: Messages to H.C. with the 2 preceding Bills. East India Co. Account respecting, Ordered. Polloc & Govan Railway Bill. Bruce v. Bruce. Taxes, Ireland, Petition of Corporation of Smiths, Dublin, against encreasing. Limerick Road Bill: Message to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to it. Eyre's Petition claiming the Earldom of Newburgh. Humbert's Naturalization Bill, Certificate read: Humbert takes the Oaths: Bill read 2 a & committed. The King's Message respecting His Sign Manual: Address thereupon. Lords summoned. Dundee Harbour Bill. Glasgow & Garnkirk Railway Bill. Highgate Grammar School Bill. Carlisle Road Bill: Message to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to it. Australian Co's Bill. New Cross Roads Bill, read 2 a & committed: Petition against it, referred to the Com ee: All Lords added to the Com ee: Com ee to appoint a Chairman. Beer Trade, Petition from Stratton respecting. Hop Duty, Petition from Seddlescomb for Repeal of. Hollingrake's Patent Bill, Standing Order No. 173 dispensed with, & Bill passed: Message to H.C. with Amendments to it. Marquess of Hastings's Estate Bill Specially reported: Standing Orders relative to Private Bills to be considered on it. Warriner's Estate Bill. Criminal Laws, Petition from Glastonbury for Alteration of. Home-grown Tobacco, Petition from Waterford against proposed Duty on. Disabilities of the Jews, Petition from Great Yarmouth for Removal of. Slavery, Petition from Southampton for Abolition of. Stamp Duty, (Ireland,) Petitions from Kilkenny against Encrease of. Kingsbury Episcopi Inclosure Bill. Dundalk Roads Bill. Ld. Cremorne's Estate Bill, Report of Judges in Ireland read, & referred to the Com ee on the Bill. Greece, Papers respecting, delivered. Ld. Rokeby's Claim, Com ee to meet. Sheffield Waterworks Bill Specially reported. Hickson's Marriage Annulling Bill. Rickmersworth Road Bill. East Retford Election Bill: by Mr.Alderson. Witnesses discharged from further Attendance on it. Crommelin Harbour Bill. Ld. Cremorne's Estate Bill. Register of Chancery Bill presented. Masters in Chancery Bill presented. Adjourn.

Die Lunæ, 24 Maii 1830.

DOMINI tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Dux CUMBERLAND.
Archiep. Cantuar.
Ds. Lyndhurst,
Cancellarius.
Archiep. Ebor.
Epus. Londinen.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. Bath. et Well.
Epus. Lich. et Cov.
Epus. Glocestr.
Epus. Bristol.
Epus. Carliol.
Epus. Roffen.
Epus. Cestrien.
Epus. Rapoten.
Ds. De Clifford.
Ds. Dacre.
Ds. Petre.
Ds. Arundell of Wardour.
Ds. Clifton.
Ds. Teynham.
Ds. Clifford of Chudleigh.
Ds. Gower.
Ds. Colville of Culross.
Ds. Boyle.
Ds. Hay.
Ds. King.
Ds. Monson.
Ds. Boston.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Foley.
Ds. Dynevor.
Ds. Montagu.
Ds. Braybrooke.
Ds. Auckland.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. De Dunstanville & Bassett.
Ds. Rolle.
Ds. Bayning.
Ds. Northwick.
Ds. Fitz Gibbon.
Ds. Carbery.
Ds. Dufferin & Claneboye.
Ds. Dunalley.
Ds. Alvanley.
Ds. Redesdale.
Ds. Rivers.
Ds. Ellenborough.
Ds. Arden.
Ds. Sheffield.
Ds. Barham.
Ds. Mont Eagle.
Ds. Hopetoun.
Ds. Hill.
Ds. Melbourne.
Ds. Prudhoe.
Ds. Ker.
Ds. Ormonde.
Ds. Glenlyon.
Ds. Maryborough.
Ds. Ravensworth.
Ds. Bexley.
Ds. Penshurst.
Ds. Somerhill.
Ds. Wharncliffe.
Ds. Feversham.
Ds. Durham.
Ds. Skelmersdale.
Ds. Wallace.
Comes Bathurst, Præses.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Grafton.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Leeds.
Dux Portland.
Dux Newcastle.
Dux Wellington.
March. Lansdowne.
March. Salisbury.
March. Hertford.
March. Bute.
March. Camden.
March. Cleveland.
Comes Huntingdon.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Winchilsea & Nottingham.
Comes Essex.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Albemarle.
Comes Jersey.
Comes Rosebery.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Cowper.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Hardwicke.
Comes Ilchester.
Comes De Lawarr.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Spencer.
Comes Norwich.
Comes Mansfield.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Malmesbury.
Comes Wicklow.
Comes Caledon.
Comes Romney.
Comes Chichester.
Comes Limerick.
Comes Charleville.
Comes Manvers.
Comes Grey.
Comes Harewood.
Comes Verulam.
Comes Brownlow.
Comes Morley.
Comes Howe.
Comes Stradbroke.
Comes Vane.
Comes Cawdor.
Vicecom. Arbuthnott.
Vicecom. Maynard.
Vicecom. Duncan.
Vicecom. St. Vincent.
Vicecom. Melville.
Vicecom. Lorton.
Vicecom. Gordon.
Vicecom. Granville.

PRAYERS.

Burns & Grier v. Stewart.

The Answer of Duncan Stewart Esquire, Writer in Edinburgh, to the Petition and Appeal of John Burns and Robert Grier, was this Day brought in.

Marriage Law, Petition of Freethinkers of Dewsbury for Alteration of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Elder and Deacon of the Church of God meeting in Dewsbury, and known as Freethinking Christians, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to make such Alteration in the Law respecting the Solemnization of Marriage as will remove the Hardships under which the Petitioners labour:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Assizes for West Riding of Yorkshire, Petition from Heckmondwike for Removal of, to Wakefield.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Heckmondwike, in the Parish of Birstal, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Assizes for the West Riding may be removed from York to Wakefield:"

"It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ellesmere & Chester Canal Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable the United Company of Proprietors of the Ellesmere and Chester Canal to make a Reservoir, and to establish Vessels for the Conveyance of Goods from Ellesmere Port across the River Mersey; and also to amend and enlarge the Powers of the Act relating to the said Canal."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Peebles Roads Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and keeping in Repair the Turnpike Roads in the County of Peebles, for making and maintaining certain new Roads, and for rendering Turnpike certain Parish Roads, in the said County."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Queensferry Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled "An Act for more effectually repairing and keeping in Repair the Road from Cramond Bridge to the Town of Queensferry, the Road leading Westward therefrom, through Dalmeny, to Echline, and the Road from the West End of the said Town of Queensferry to the Town of Linlithgow, in the County of Linlithgow."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to the 3 preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Stephen and Mr. Wingfield;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Monks Risborough Inclosure Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parish of Monks Risborough, in the County of Buckingham."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, with the Amendment, shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. with an Amendment to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To return the said Bill, and acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the same, with One Amendment, to which their Lordships desire their Concurrence.

Hildyard's Estate Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for vesting the Estates in the County of Lincoln devised by the Will of Mary Hutton deceased, in Trustees, upon Trust to sell the same, and for laying out the Monies arising from such Sales in the Purchase of more convenient Estates, to be settled to the same Uses."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Poore's Estate Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for exchanging a Fee-Simple Estate belonging to Edward Dyke Poore Esquire, situate at Ablington; in the County of Wilts, for an Estate under Settlement, devised by the Will of the late Edward Poore Esquire, situate at North Tidworth, in the same County; and for authorizing the Investment of a Sum of Money in the Purchase of other Lands, to be settled to the like Uses."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H.C. with the 2 preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To carry down the said Bills, and desire their Concurrence thereto.

East India Co. Account respecting, Ordered.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, "A Statement of the Account between the Territorial and Commercial Branches of the Affairs of The East India Company, in each Year, from the 1st May 1814 to the latest Period, drawn upon the Principle observed in the Accounts transmitted to the Government of Bengal as Enclosures to the Letters of the Court of Directors in the Territorial Finance Department."

Polloc & Govan Railway Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for making and maintaining a Railway from the Lands of Polloc and Govan to the River Clyde, at the Harbour of Broomielaw, in the County of Lanark, with a Branch to communicate therefrom."

"Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

D. CUMBERLAND.
L. Bp. London.
L. Bp. Winchester.
L. Bp. Bath & Wells.
L. Bp. Lichfield & Coventry.
L. Bp. Gloucester.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Bp. Rochester.
L. Bp. Chester.
L. Bp. Raphoe.
L. De Clifford.
L. Dacre.
L. Petre.
L. Arundell of Wardour.
L. Clifton.
L. Teynham.
L. Clifford of Chudleigh.
L. Gower.
L. Colville of Culross.
L. Boyle.
L. Hay.
L. King.
L. Monson.
L. Boston.
L. Holland.
L. Foley.
L. Dynevor.
L. Montagu.
L. Braybrooke.
L. Auckland.
L. Calthorpe.
L. De Dunstanville & Bassett.
L. Rolle.
L. Bayning.
L. Northwick.
L. Fitz Gibbon.
L. Carbery.
L. Dufferin & Claneboye.
L. Dunalley.
L. Alvanley.
L. Redesdale.
L. Rivers.
L. Ellenborough.
L. Arden.
L. Sheffield.
L. Barham.
L. Mont Eagle.
L. Hopetoun.
L. Hill.
L. Melbourne.
L. Prudhoe.
L. Ker.
L. Ormonde.
L. Glenlyon.
L. Maryborough.
L. Ravensworth.
L. Bexley.
L. Penshurst.
L. Somerhill.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Feversham.
L. Durham.
L. Skelmersdale.
L. Wallace.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Abp. York.
L. President.
D. Richmond.
D. Grafton.
D. Beaufort.
D. Leeds.
D. Portland.
D. Newcastle.
D. Wellington.
M. Lansdowne.
M. Salisbury.
M. Hertford.
M. Bute.
M. Camden.
M. Cleveland.
E. Huntingdon.
E. Denbigh.
E. Westmorland.
E. Winchilsea & Nottingham.
E. Essex.
E. Carlisle.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Albemarle.
E. Jersey.
E. Rosebery.
E. Ferrers.
E. Tankerville.
E. Cowper.
E. Fitzwilliam.
E. Hardwicke.
E. Ilchester.
E. De Lawarr.
E. Radnor.
E. Spencer.
E. Norwich.
E. Mansfield.
E. Carnarvon.
E. Malmesbury.
E. Wicklow.
E. Caledon.
E. Romney.
E. Chichester.
E. Limerick.
E. Charleville.
E. Manvers.
E. Grey.
E. Harewood.
E. Verulam.
E. Brownlow.
E. Morley.
E. Howe.
E. Stradbroke.
E. Vane.
E. Cawdor.
V. Arbuthnott.
V. Maynard.
V. Duncan.
V. St. Vincent.
V. Melville.
V. Lorton.
V. Gordon.
V. Granville.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Bruce v. Bruce.

The Lord Chancellor acquainted the House, "That the Clerk Assistant had received the Copy of the Disposition and Deed of Entail referred to in the Cause wherein James Carstairs Bruce Esquire is Appellant, and Thomas Bruce Esquire is Respondent, Ordered to be laid before the House on the 14th Day of this instant May."

Ordered, That the said Paper do lie on the Table.

Taxes, Ireland, Petition of Corporation of Smiths, Dublin, against encreasing.

Upon reading the Petition of The Master, Wardens, and Brethren of the Corporation of Smiths, or Guild of St. Loy, Dublin, in Post Hall assembled, under their Common Seal; praying their Lordships "not to impose additional Taxes in Ireland, which must have the certain Effect of overflowing the Cup of Bitterness which the Hand of Poverty has so long held to the Lip of their afflicted Country:"

"It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Limerick Road Bill:

The Order of the Day being read for the Third Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for improving and repairing the Road leading from Newcastle, in the County of Limerick, to the City of Limerick, and from thence to Charleville, in the County of Cork;"

It was moved, "That the said Bill be now read the Third Time."

Which being objected to;

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Then the said Bill was read the Third Time.

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

Eyre's Petition claiming the Earldom of Newburgh.

The Earl of Shaftesbury (by His Majesty's Command) presented to the House A Petition of Thomas Eyre to His Majesty, praying His Majesty, "That it may be declared and adjudged that the Petitioner is entitled to the Honors and Dignities of Earl of Newburgh, Viscount Kinnaird, and Baron Livingstone, of Flacraig;" together with His Majesty's Reference thereof to this House.

Which Petition and Reference were read by the Clerk, and are as follow; (viz t.)

"To The King's Most Excellent Majesty.

"The humble Petition of Thomas Eyre, claiming to be Earl of Newburgh;

"Sheweth,

"That by Letters Patent bearing Date the 31st Day of December 1660, in the Twelfth Year of the Reign of King Charles the Second, James Livingstone Viscount Newburgh, in Scotland, was created Earl of Newburgh, Viscount Kinnaird and Baron Livingstone, of Flacraig, in the Kingdom of Scotland, to hold the said Dignities to him and his Heirs whatsoever: That the said James Livingstone possessed and enjoyed the said Dignities by virtue of the said Letters Patent until the Year 1670, when he died, and was succeeded in the said Dignities by Charles his Son and Heir, who as such possessed and enjoyed the said Dignities until his Death, which happened in 1694: That the said Charles Earl of Newburgh left a Daughter, Charlotte Maria, his only Child and Heir, him surviving, who thereupon succeeded to the said Dignities: That the said Charlotte Maria, in or about the Year 1713, was married to The Honorable Thomas Clifford, eldest Son and Heir Apparent of Hugh Lord Clifford, by whom she had Two Daughters, Frances and Anne, and no other Issue: That the said Frances Clifford died, unmarried and without Issue, in the Year 1771; and the said Anne Clifford was married, first to Giacomo Count Mahoni, an Alien, and secondly to Don Carlo St. Severino, also an Alien: That the said Anne Clifford by her first Husband had One Daughter, who was born out of the King's Allegiance, and no other Issue; and the said Daughter of the said Anne Clifford was married to Prince Giustiniani, an Alien: That all the Descendants of the said Anne Clifford are Aliens: That the said Anne Clifford had no Issue by her said Second Husband.

"That the said Charlotte Maria Countess of Newburgh, after the Death of the said Thomas Clifford, which happened in or about the Year 1719, was married to The Honorable Charles Radclyffe, by whom she had Issue James Bartholomew, who assumed and bore the Title of Earl of Newburgh, and James Clement Radclyffe, Charles Radclyffe, Thomasine Radclyffe, Barbara Radclyffe, Charlotte Radclyffe and Mary Radclyffe; which said James Bartholomew, James Clement, Charles, Thomasine, Barbara, Charlotte and Mary were the only Issue of the said Charlotte Maria Countess of Newburgh by the said Charles Radclyffe: That the said Charles Radclyffe the Son, and Thomasine Radclyffe, died respectively without Issue before the Year 1751: That the said James Clement Radclyffe died without Issue in the Year 1788: That the said Barbara Radclyffe died, unmarried and without Issue, in the Year 1768: That the said Charlotte Radclyffe died, unmarried and without Issue, in the Year 1800: That the said Charles Radclyffe, Husband of the said Charlotte Maria Countess of Newburgh, was attainted of High Treason in the Year 1716, and sentenced to be executed, and was executed, under the Sentence of Attainder, in the Year 1746, leaving him surviving the said Charlotte Maria Countess of Newburgh, who died in the Year 1755: That the said James Bartholomew, called Earl of Newburgh, died in the Year 1786, leaving a Son, Anthony James called Earl of Newburgh, and Anne Radclyffe, his only Issue: That the said Anthony James was born within The King's Allegiance in the Year 1762, and died without Issue in the Year 1816: That the said Anne Radclyffe died, unmarried and without Issue, in the Year 1785.

"That the said Mary Radclyffe, in the Year 1755, married Francis Eyre of Warkworth, in the County of Northampton, Esquire, by whom she had Issue Francis, who, as her eldest Son and Heir at Law, upon the Death of the said Anthony James called Earl of Newburgh, assumed and bore the Title of the said Earldom, and died in the Year 1827, leaving Your Petitioner his eldest Son and Heir.

"That until the passing of the Act of the Tenth Year of Your Majesty's Reign, for the Relief of Your Majesty's Roman Catholic Subjects, Your Petitioner and his Ancestors have been disqualified and deprived of the Power of exercising the Rights and Privileges of the said Titles of Honor which have descended to them respectively: That since the passing of the said Act Your Petitioner has been occupied in collecting the Evidence necessary to support his Claim of Right to the said Honors.

"Your Petitioner therefore most humbly prays Your Most Excellent Majesty, that it may be declared and adjudged that Your Petitioner is entitled to the said Honors and Dignities of Earl of Newburgh, Viscount Kinnaird and Baron Livingstone, of Flacraig.

"And Your Petitioner shall, &c.

"For the Petitioner,

Fras. Townsend,

College of Arms,

Agent."

"Whitehall, 21st May 1830.

"His Majesty being moved upon this Petition, is graciously pleased to refer the same to The Right Honorable The House of Peers, to examine the Allegations thereof, as to what relates to the Petitioner's Title therein mentioned, and inform His Majesty how the same shall appear to their Lordships.

Robert Peel."

Ordered, That the said Petition, with His Majesty's Reference thereof to this House, be referred to the Consideration of the Lords Committees for Privileges; whose Lordships having considered thereof, and heard such Persons concerning the same as they shall think fit, are to report their Opinion thereupon to the House.

Humbert's Naturalization Bill, Certificate read:

A Certificate of The Right Honorable Robert Peel, One of His Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State, "That Francis Joseph Humbert, Son of George Hans Humbert by Magdalina Zeigler his Wife, born at Manheim, in Germany, had produced to him satisfactory Proof that he is a Person well affected to His Majesty's Royal Person and Government, and of orderly Life and Conduct," was produced and read, pursuant to the Standing Order.

Humbert takes the Oaths:

Francis Joseph Humbert took the Oaths appointed, in order to his Naturalization.

Bill read 2 a & committed.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for naturalizing Francis Joseph Humbert."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet To-morrow, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

The King's Message respecting His Sign Manual:

The Duke of Wellington acquainted the House, "That he had a Message from His Majesty, under His Royal Sign Manual, which His Majesty had commanded him to deliver to their Lordships."

And the same was read by The Lord Chancellor, and is as follows; (viz t.)

"GEORGE R.

"His Majesty thinks it necessary to inform The House of Lords, that His Majesty is labouring under severe Indisposition, which renders it inconvenient and painful to His Majesty to sign with His own Hand those Public Instruments which require the Sign Manual.

"His Majesty relies upon the dutiful Attachment of Parliament, to consider without Delay of the Means by which His Majesty may be enabled to provide for the temporary Discharge of this important Function of the Crown, without Detriment to the Public Service.

"G. R."

And the said Message being again read by the Clerk;

Address thereupon.

Ordered, Nemine Dissentiente, That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, to assure His Majesty that this House deeply laments that His Majesty is labouring under severe Indisposition.

To assure His Majesty that this House earnestly and anxiously hopes that, by the Favour of Divine Providence, His Majesty's Health may be re-established at an early Period; and that this House will proceed to consider without Delay of the Means by which His Majesty may be relieved from the Pain and Inconvenience of signing with His own Hand those Public Instruments which require the Royal Sign Manual, and may be enabled to provide for the temporary Discharge of this important Function of the Crown, without Detriment to the Public Interests.

Ordered, That the said Address be presented to His Majesty by the Lords with White Staves.

Lords summoned.

Ordered, That all the Lords be summoned to attend the Service of the House To-morrow.

Dundee Harbour Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hume and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually maintaining, improving and extending the Harbour of Dundee, in the County of Forfar;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Glasgow & Garnkirk Railway Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hume and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending certain Acts for making the Glasgow and Garnkirk Railway; and for raising a farther Sum of Money;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Highgate Grammar School Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Hume and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable The Wardens and Governors of the Possessions, Revenues and Goods of the Free Grammar School of Sir Roger Cholmeley Knight, in Highgate, to pull down their present Chapel, and to contribute towards the Erection of a new Chapel or Church in Highgate; and for other Purposes;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Three Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Carlisle Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing the Road from Carlisle to Penrith, and from Penrith to Eamont Bridge, in the County of Cumberland."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

Australian Co's Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to amend an Act for granting certain Powers and Authorities to a Company to be incorporated by Charter, to be called "The Australian Agricultural Company," for the Cultivation and Improvement of Waste Lands in the Colony of New South Wales; and for other Purposes relating thereto."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

New Cross Roads Bill, read 2 a & committed:

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to improve the Road through the Town of Bromley, in the County of Kent."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Wednesday next, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Petition against it, referred to the Com ee:

Upon reading the Petition of Richard Stockwin, Surveyor of the Highways of the Parish of Bromley, in the County of Kent; taking notice of the last-mentioned Bill, and praying their Lordships, "That he may be heard against a certain Part of the said Bill, either by himself or his Agent or Counsel:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed, and that the Petitioner be at liberty to be heard against the same by himself, or his Agent or Counsel, as desired; and that Counsel be heard for the Bill at the same Time, if they think fit.

All Lords added to the Com ee:

Ordered, That all the Lords who have been or shall be present this Session, and are not named of the Committee to whom the last-mentioned Bill stands committed, be added thereto.

Com ee to appoint a Chairman.

Ordered, That the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed do appoint their own Chairman.

Beer Trade, Petition from Stratton respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Hundred of Stratton, in the County of Cornwall, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "for the Removal of the Malt Tax, or even of a Portion of it equal in Amount to the present Beer Duty, which would be more beneficial to the Operative Classes in general than the Measure for the Repeal of the Duty on Beer:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Hop Duty, Petition from Seddlescomb for Repeal of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Occupiers of Land, and others connected therewith, in the Parish of Seddlescomb, in the County of Sussex, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to repeal the Duty on Hops:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Hollingrake's Patent Bill, Standing Order No. 173 dispensed with, & Bill passed:

The Order of the Day being read for taking into Consideration the Standing Order No. 173, respecting Bills for the Extension of the Term of Letters Patent, in order to its being dispensed with on the Bill, intituled, "An Act for prolonging the Term of certain Letters Patent granted to James Hollingrake, for an improved Method of manufacturing Copper or other Metal Rollers, and of casting and forming Metallic Substances into various Forms with improved Closeness and Soundness of Texture;" and for the Lords to be summoned;

The said Standing Order was read by the Clerk.

Ordered, That the said Standing Order be dispensed with on the said Bill.

Then the said Bill was read the Third Time.

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, with the Amendments, shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. with Amendments to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To return the said Bill, and acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the same, with some Amendments, to which their Lordships desire their Concurrence.

Marquess of Hastings's Estate Bill Specially reported:

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for vesting the Settled Estates of The Most Honorable George Augustus Francis Rawdon Hastings Marquis of Hastings, situate in Scotland, in the said Marquis in Fee;" "That the Committee had met, and considered the said Bill, and had enquired how far the Standing Orders of the House relative to Private Bills had been complied with, and found that none of the said Standing Orders had been complied with on this Bill; but after a full Investigation into the Matter of the Bill, it has appeared to this Committee, that, under the special Circumstances of this Case, the said Orders should be dispensed with upon the said Bill; and the Committee had examined the Allegations of the Bill, and had found the same to be true; and that The Marquis of Hastings had consented to the Bill; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to their Lordships, with some Amendments."

Which Report, being read by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

Then the Amendments made by the Committee to the said Bill, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Standing Orders relative to Private Bills to be considered on it.

Ordered, That the Standing Orders relative to Private Bills be taken into Consideration To-morrow, in order to their being dispensed with on the last-mentioned Bill; and that the Lords be summoned.

Warriner's Estate Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for vesting Estates, of which Gifford Warriner Esquire, a Lunatic, is Tenant in Tail, in Trustees, for Sale, and also for effecting a Partition of certain Parts thereof, and for granting Leases," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Criminal Laws, Petition from Glastonbury for Alteration of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Bankers and other Inhabitants of the Town of Glastonbury and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That, both for the better Protection of Property and the invariable Prosecution and adequate Punishment of that heinous Offence Forgery, the Penalty of Death may be commuted in such Manner as may appear to their Lordships best adapted to effect those important Ends:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Home-grown Tobacco, Petition from Waterford against proposed Duty on.

Upon reading the Petition of the Cultivators of Tobacco in the City and Neighbourhood of Waterford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will not, by imposing a Duty on Homegrown Tobacco, legislate upon a Point of such National Importance, not only to the Neighbourhood of that City but to the Country at large, amounting to a Prohibition of the Growth of Tobacco, without summoning and examining Individuals whose Experience in the Growth may enable them to give satisfactory Information, so as to shew the Advantages derivable from its Cultivation at Home, as well as that a Duty to the Extent proposed would act as a Prohibition:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Disabilities of the Jews, Petition from Great Yarmouth for Removal of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Borough of Great Yarmouth, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will take into their immediate Consideration the Petitions that have been presented on behalf of that once favoured but now oppressed People, the Jews, and repeal all the Penal Laws at present in force against them:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Slavery, Petition from Southampton for Abolition of.

Upon reading the Petition of the several Persons whose Names are thereunto subscribed, Inhabitants of the Town and County of Southampton, and of the immediate Neighbourhood; praying their Lordships "to take into Consideration the Condition of Slavery, and to carry into Effect the Wishes and Declarations of the Petitioners as therein mentioned, or otherwise to ameliorate Slavery by such Means as their Lordships shall deem expedient:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Stamp Duty, (Ireland,) Petitions from Kilkenny against Encrease of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Members of The Benevolent Society of Kilkenny, in Ireland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Assimilation of Stamp Duty between England and Ireland, as contemplated, may not pass this House, inasmuch as it must materially diminish the Means for relieving the sick and destitute Poor of Kilkenny:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Kingsbury Episcopi Inclosure Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parish of Kingsbury Episcopi, in the County of Somerset," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Dundalk Roads Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for repairing and maintaining the Roads from the Town of Dundalk, in the County of Louth, to the Towns of Castle Blayney and Carrickmacross, in the County of Monaghan," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Ld. Cremorne's Estate Bill, Report of Judges in Ireland read, & referred to the Com ee on the Bill.

The Report of the Judges in Ireland, to whom was referred a printed Copy of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable the Guardian of The Right Honorable Richard Lord Cremorne, an Infant, to carry into Effect a Contract entered into for the Purchase of Rockcorry Castle and adjoining Lands, in the County of Monaghan, in Ireland," to take the Consent of Thomas Ellis Esquire, as Guardian of the said Richard Lord Cremorne, was read.

Ordered, That the said Report be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed.

Greece, Papers respecting, delivered.

The Viscount Gordon (by His Majesty's Command) laid before the House,

"Papers relative to the Affairs of Greece, in Three Classes.

"Class A.

"Protocols of Conferences held in London.

"Class B.

"Protocols of Conferences held at Constantinople.

"Class C.

"1. Convention of Alexandria.

"2. Blockade of the Dardanelles.

"3. Raising of Greek Blockades."

Together with Lists thereof.

Which Lists were read by the Clerk as follow; (viz t.)

"Class A.

Protocols of Conferences held at London between the Plenipotentiaries of Great Britain, France and Russia.

No.1.-Protocol of Conference of July 12, 1827.

Annexes.

A.-Instruction to the Ambassadors of the Three Powers at Constantinople.

B.-Form of first Declaration to be addressed to The Ottoman Porte.

C.-Form of second Declaration to be addressed to The Ottoman Porte.

D.-First Instruction to the Admirals of the Three Powers in the Levant.

E.-Form of Declaration to be addressed to the Provisional Government of Greece.

F.-Second Instruction to the Admirals of the Three Powers in the Levant.

No. 2. Protocol of Conference of September 10, 1827.

Annex.

A.-Note of the Russian Plenipotentiary.

No. 3. Protocol of Conference of September 17, 1827.

No. 4. Protocol of Conference of October 15, 1827.

No. 5. Secret Protocol of Conference of October 15, 1827.

Annexes.

A.-Instructions to the Admirals of the Three Powers in the Levant.

B.-Ditto - Ditto.

C.-Secret Ditto.

No. 6. Protocol of Conference of December 12, 1827.

Annexes.

A.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Guilleminot to The Baron de Damas; Constantinople, November 11, 1827.

B.-Joint Note of the Ambassadors of the Three Powers to The Reis Effendi; Constantinople, November 10, 1827.

C.-Copy of a Dispatch from Mr. Stratford Canning to Sir Henry Wellesley; Constantinople, November 11, 1827.

No. 7. Protocol of Conference of March 12, 1828.

Annexes.

A.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Nesselrode to The Prince of Lieven; St. Petersburgh, December 25,1827/January 6,1828.

(Inclosures in Annex A.)

1. Extract of a Dispatch from M. de Ribeaupierre to Count Nesselrode; Buyukdéré, December 4/15; 1827.

2. Translation of a Letter from The Grand Vizir to Count Nesselrode; November 30/December 12, 1827.

B.-Copy of a Note from The Earl of Dudley to The Prince of Lieven; Foreign Office, March 6, 1828.

C.-Instructions to the Admirals of the Three Powers in the Levant.

D.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Nesselrode to The Prince of Lieven; St. Petersburgh, February 14/16;, 1828.

(Inclosures in Annex D.)

1. Extract of a Report from General Paskewitch; December 24, 1827.

2. Turkish Hatti-Chérif; December 20th, 1827.

No. 8. Protocol of Conference of June 15, 1828.

Annexes.

A.-Copy of a Note from The Earl of Dudley to The Prince of Lieven; Foreign Office, March 25, 1828.

B.-Copy of a Note from The Earl of Dudley to The Prince de Polignac; Foreign Office, April 5, 1828.

C.-Copy of a Dispatch from The Count de la Ferronays to The Prince de Polignac; Paris, April 20, 1828.

D.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Nesselrode to The Prince of Lieven; St. Petersburgh, April 17/29;, 1828.

(Inclosures in Annex D.)

1. Copy of a Circular Dispatch from Count Nesselrode to the Ministers of Russia at Foreign Courts; St. Petersburgh, April 14/26;, 1828.

2. Russian Declaration of War (same Date.)

3. Manifesto of The Emperor of Russia (same Date.)

4. Proclamation to the Inhabitants of Moldavia and Wallachia.

E.-Copy of a Note from The Earl of Dudley to The Prince de Polignac; Foreign Office, May 9, 1828.

F.-Copy of a Note from The Earl of Aberdeen to The Prince of Lieven; Foreign Office, June 6, 1828.

G.-Instructions to the Admirals of the Three Powers in the Levant. (Same as at Pages 32 in Original, and 205 in Translation.)

No. 9. Protocol of Conference of July 2, 1828.

Annexes.

A.-Instructions for the Ambassadors of the Three Powers.

B.-Copy of a Letter from The Reis Effendi to the Ambassadors of France and Great Britain.

C.-Projêt of Answer to The Reis Effendi's Letter.

D.-Supplementary Instructions to the Ambassadors of the Three Powers.

E.-Supplementary Instructions to the Admirals of the Three Powers in the Levant.

No. 10. Protocol of Conference of July 19, 1828.

No. 11. Protocol of Conference of August 11, 1828.

Annexes.

A.-Projêt of Declaration relative to the sending of Troops to the Morea.

B.-Translation of a Letter from The Reis Effendi to The Duke of Wellington; Constantinople, July 6, 1828.

C.-Answer to The Duke of Wellington to Ditto; London, August 6, 1828.

No. 12. Protocol of Conference of August 18, 1828.

Annex.

A.-Instruction for the Admirals.

No. 13. Protocol of Conference of September 24th, 1828.

Annex.

A.-Instructions for the Plenipotentiaries of the Allied Powers in the Archipelago.

No. 14. Protocol of Conference of September 30, 1828.

Annexes.

A.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Nesselrode to The Prince of Lieven; Odessa, August 16/28;, 1828.

(Inclosure in Annex A.)

1. Copy of a Dispatch from Count Nesselrode to Admiral Count Heyden; Odessa, August 14/26;, 1828.

B.-Copy of a Note from The Earl of Aberdeen to The Prince of Lieven; Foreign Office, September 30, 1828.

C.-Memorandum of the Plenipotentiary of France.

D.-Notification to be made to The Ottoman Porte.

No. 15. Protocol of Conference of October 11, 1828.

Annexes.

A.-Instructions to the British and French Admirals relative to the Blockade of the Dardanelles by Russia.

B.-Do. to Do. relative to the Blockade of Candia.

No. 16. Protocol of Conference of November 16, 1828.

Annexes.

A.-Memorandum of the Plenipotentiary of France.

B.-Ditto of the Plenipotentiary of Great Britain.

C.-Ditto of the Plenipotentiary of Russia.

D.-Declaration of the Allied Courts to The Ottoman Porte, announcing their Provisional Guarantee of the Morea.

No. 17. Protocol of Conference of March 22, 1829.

Annexes.

A.-Memorandum of the Plenipotentiary of France.

B.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Nesselrode to The Prince of Lieven; St. Petersburgh, December22, 1828/January 3, 1829.

C.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Nesselrode to The Prince of Lieven; St. Petersburgh, January 14/26;, 1829.

(Inclosure in Annex C.)

Copy of a Dispatch from Count de Bulgari to Count Nesselrode; Poros, December 2/14;, 1828.

D.-Memorandum of the British Plenipotentiary.

No. 18. Protocol of Conference of April 21, 1829.

Annexes.

A.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Heyden to Sir Pulteney Malcolm; ægina, January 15/27;, 1829.

B.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Capodistrias to Sir Pulteney Malcolm; ægina, January 9/21;, 1829.

C.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Heyden to Sir Pulteney Malcolm; ægina, February 10/22;, 1829.

D.-Copy of a Letter from Count Heyden to The Pacha of Egypt; ægina, February 10/22;, 1829.

E.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Heyden to The Prince of Lieven; ægina, February 13/25;, 1829.

(Inclosures in Annex E.)

1. Copy of a Dispatch from Count Heyden to Count Nesselrode; ægina, February 13/25;, 1829.

2. Same as Annex D.

3. Same as Annex C.

4. Same as Annex E.

No. 19. Protocol of Conference of August 18, 1829.

No. 20. Protocol of Conference of August 29, 1829.

No. 21. Protocol of Conference of September 12, 1829.

Annex.

A.-Copy of a Dispatch from Count Guilleminot and Sir Robert Gordon to The Earl of Aberdeen; Constantinople, August 16, 1829.

(Inclosures in Annex A.)

1. Copy of a Letter from Count Guilleminot and Sir Robert Gordon to Count Capodistrias; Smyrna, June 9, 1829.

2. Copy of a Letter from Count Capodistrias to Count Guilleminot and Sir Robert Gordon; Napoli, June 15/27;, 1829.

3. Translation of a Letter from the Provisional Government of Greece to Mr. Dawkins; ægina, May 11/23;, 1829.

4. Translation of a Memorandum of the Provisional Government of Greece; Napoli, May24/June5, 1829.

5. Copy of a Note from Count Guilleminot and Sir Robert Gordon to The Reis Effendi; Constantinople, June 24, 1829.

6. Copy of a Note from Ditto to Ditto; Constantinople, July 9, 1829.

7. Translation of an Official Note from The Reis Effendi to Count Guilleminot and Sir Robert Gordon; Constantinople, August 15, 1829.

8. Copy of a Note from Count Guilleminot and Sir Robert Gordon to The Reis Effendi; Constantinople, August 15, 1829.

No. 22. Protocol of Conference of September 19, 1829.

No. 23. Protocol No. 1. of Conference of February 3, 1830.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Dispatch of the Ambassadors of Great Britain and France at Constantinople to The Earl of Aberdeen; Constantinople, September 9, 1829.

B.-Declaration of The Ottoman Porte; Constantinople, September 9, 1829.

C.-Instructions for the Plenipotentiaries of the Three Courts at Constantinople, relative to the immediate Establishment of an Armistice between the Turks and the Greeks.

D.-Instructions for the Residents of the Three Courts in Greece, on the same Subject.

E.-Instructions for the Admirals of the Three Powers, on the same Subject.

F.-Map of Greece, with the Boundaries marked thereon.

G.-Instructions for the Commissioners for laying down the Limits assigned for Greece.

H.-Instructions for the Plenipotentiaries of the Three Courts at Constantinople, relative to the Protocol of February 3, 1830.

I.-Instructions for the Residents of the Three Courts in Greece, on the same Subject.

No. 24. Protocol No. 2. of Conference of February 3, 1830.

No. 25. Protocol No. 3. of Ditto.

No. 26. Protocol of Conference of February 20, 1830.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Note of the Plenipotentiaries to The Prince Leopold of Saxe Cobourg.

B.-Answer of Prince Leopold to Ditto.

No. 27. Protocol of Conference of February 26, 1830.

Annexes.

A.-Instructions for the Plenipotentiaries of the Three Courts at Constantinople.

B.-Instructions for the Residents of the Three Courts in Greece.

No. 28. Protocol of Conference of April 6, 1830.

Annexes.

A.-Copy of a Letter from Prince Leopold to the Plenipotentiaries; Marlborough House, April 4, 1830.

No. 29. Protocol of Conference of May 14, 1830.

Annexes.

A.-Copy of a joint Dispatch from the Representatives of the Three Powers at Constantinople to The Earl of Aberdeen; April 24, 1830.

B.-Copy of a joint Note from the Representatives of the Three Powers at Constantinople to The Ottoman Porte; April, 8, 1830.

C.-Translation of an Official Note from The Reis Effendi to the Representatives of the Three Powers; Constantinople, April 24, 1830.

D.-Extract of a Dispatch from Mr. Dawkins to The Earl of Aberdeen; Napoli di Romania, April 20, 1830.

E.-Copy of a Note from the Residents of the Three Courts in Greece to the Greek Provisional Government; Napoli di Romania, April 20, 1830.

F.-Copy of the Answer of the Provisional Government of Greece; Napoli di Romania, April 4/16;, 1830.

G.-Circular addressed by the Provisional Government of Greece to its Naval and Military Commanders; Napoli di Romania, April 4/16;, 1830.

"Class B.

Protocols of Conferences held at Constantinople between the Plenipotentiaries of Great Britain, France and Russia.

No. 1. Protocol of Conference of August 16.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Instructions to the Three Interpreters; August 16.

B.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; August 16.

C.-Joint Letter to the Internuncio and the Prussian Minister; August 16.

No. 2. Protocol of Conference of August 17.

Annexes.

A.-Mr. Stratford Canning to Sir E. Codrington; August 17.

B.-Count Guilleminot to Admiral de Rigny; August 17.

C.-M. de Ribeaupierre to Admiral Count Heyden.

No. 3. Protocol of Conference of August 29.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Instructions to the Three Interpreters; August 29.

B.-The Internuncio to the Representatives of the Three Courts; Buyukdéré, August 17.

C.-The Prussian Minister to Ditto; August 17.

D.-Instructions for the Prussian Interpreter; August 17.

No. 4. Protocol of Conference of August 31.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; August 30.

B.-Joint Instructions to Ditto; August 31.

C.-Joint Report of Ditto; August 31.

D.- Mr. Stratford Canning to Sir E. Codrington; August 31.

E.-Count Guilleminot to Admiral de Rigny; August 31.

F.-M. de Ribeaupierre to Admiral Count Heyden; August 31.

No. 5. Protocol of Conference of September 4.

Annexes.

A.-Mr. Stratford Canning to the British Consuls and Agents in the Levant; September 8.

B.-Count Guilleminot to the French Ditto; September 6.

C.-M. de Ribeaupierre to the Russian Ditto; September 8.

D.-Letter of the Greek Government relative to the Attack made by the Austrian Squadron on the Island of Spezzia; Napoli de Romania, July 22.

E.-Report addressed to the Greek Government on the same Subject; Spezzia, July 21.

No. 6. Protocol of Conference of September 8.

Annexes.

A.-Reports of the Interpreter of Great Britain; September 4 and 5.

B.-Ditto of the Interpreter of France; September 5.

C.-Ditto of the Interpreter of Russia; September 5.

D.-Joint Instruction to the Three Interpreters; September 9.

No. 7. Protocol of Conference of September 9.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; September 9.

B.-Joint Instruction to Ditto; September 9.

No. 8. Protocol of Conference of September 14.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; September 11.

B.-Captain Hugon, of the Armide, to Count Guilleminot; Smyrna, September 6.

C.-Captain Hamilton, of the Cambrian, to Mr. Stratford Canning; ægina, September 2.

D.-M. Timoni to M. de Ribeaupierre; Smyrna, September 6.

(Inclosures in Annex D.)

1.-The English and French Admirals to the Greek Government; August 30.

2.-Instruction of Admiral de Rigny to Captain Hugon, of the Armide; August 31.

3.-Answer of the Greek Government to the Proposals of the Three Powers; September 2.

4.-Proclamation of the Greek Government.

E.-Admiral de Rigny to Count Guilleminot; Napoli de Romania, August 19.

F.-Ditto - - - to Ditto; August 22.

G.-Ditto - - - to Ditto (Extract;) Milo, August 26.

H.-Sir Edward Codrington to-August 30.

No. 9. Protocol of Conference of September 29.

Annexes.

A.-Sir Edward Codrington to Mr. Stratford Canning; Navarino, September 16.

B.-Admiral de Rigny to Count Guilleminot; September 18.

C.-Instructions of Admiral de Rigny to the Commander of the Magicienne; Milo, August 28.

No. 10. Protocol of Conference of October 12.

Annexes.

A.-Sir Edward Codrington to Mr. Stratford Canning; Navarino, September 25.

(Inclosures in Annex A.)

1.-Sir Edward Codrington to the Commander of the Ottoman Forces at Navarino; September 19.

2.-Ditto to the Commander of the Austrian Vessels at Ditto; September 19.

3.-Substance of a Letter from Captain Hamilton to Captain Fellowes; Navarino, September 20.

4.-Sir Edward Codrington to Ibrahim Pacha; Navarino, September 21.

5.-Sir Edward Codrington and Admiral de Rigny to Ditto; Navarino, September 22.

6.-Substance of a Letter from Sir Edward Codrington to Ditto; Navarino, September 24.

7.-Sir Frederick Adam to Sir Edward Codrington; Corfu, September 18.

B.-Admiral de Rigny to Count Guilleminot; Navarino, September 26.

C.-Instruction for the Austrian Interpreter; Buyukdéré, October 8.

D.-Count Guilleminot to Admiral de Rigny; September 30.

No. 11. Protocol of Conference of October 13.

Annexes.

A.-Letter from a Captain in His Majesty's Navy (Extract;) Smyrna, October 8.

B.-Captain Hotham to Captain Crofton; Cape Carabourno, October 7.

No. 12. Protocol of Conference of October 17.

No. 13. Protocol of Conference of October 29.

Annexes.

A.-Sir Edward Codrington to Mr. Stratford Canning; October 2 to 14.

(Inclosures in Annex A.)

1.-Sir Edward Codrington to Mustapha Bey; October 2.

2.-Mustapha Bey to Sir Edward Codrington; October 2.

B.-Captain Crofton to Mr. Stratford Canning; Smyrna, October 23.

C.-Admiral Count Heyden to M. de Ribeaupierre; Navarino, October 15.

No. 14. Protocol of Conference of October 31.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Instructions to the Three Interpreters; October 29.

B.-Joint Report of Ditto; October 30.

C.-M. Timoni to M. de Ribeaupierre (Extract;) Syra, October 22.

No. 15. Protocol of Conference of November 1.

Annexes.

A.-Sir Edward Codrington to Mr. Stratford Canning; Navarino, October 20.

B.-Admiral de Rigny to Count Guilleminot; October 20.

C.-Admiral Count Heyden to M. de Ribeaupierre; October 20.

No. 16. Protocol of Conference of November 2.

Annex.

A.-Joint Instruction to the Three Interpreters; November 2.

No. 17. Protocol of Conference of November 4.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; November 2.

B.-Joint Instruction to Ditto; November 4.

No. 18. Protocol of Conference of November 6.

Annex.

A.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; November 4.

No. 19. Protocol of Conference of November 7.

No. 20. Protocol of Conference of November 8.

Annexes.

A.-Report of the Interpreter of France; November 7.

B.-Ditto of Ditto of Great Britain; November 8.

C.-Ditto of Ditto of Russia; November 7.

No. 21. Protocol of Conference of November 9.

Annex.

A.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; November 9.

No. 22. Protocol of Conference of November 10.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Note of the Three Representatives to The Reis Effendi; November 10.

B.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; November 10

No. 23. Protocol of Conference of November 12.

Annex.

A.-Memorandum of a Conference between Count Guilleminot and The Reis Effendi; November 11.

No. 24. Protocol of Conference of November 14.

Annexes.

A.-The Internuncio to the Representatives of the Three Courts; November 13.

B.-Mr. Stratford Canning to the Internuncio; November 13.

C.-Joint Instruction to the Three Interpreters; November 14.

No. 25. Protocol of Conference of November 15.

A.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; November 14.

B.-First Memorandum communicated by the Ambassador of France; November 15.

C.-Second Ditto; November 15.

D.-Joint Instruction to the Three Interpreters; November 15.

No. 26. Protocol of Conference of November 16.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; November 15.

B.-Memorandum of a Conference between Mr. Stratford Canning and The Reis Effendi; November 15.

No. 27. Protocol of Conference of November 17.

Annexes.

A.-Memorandum of a Conference between M. de Ribeaupierre and The Reis Effendi; November 17.

B.-Joint Instruction to the Three Interpreters; November 21.

No. 28. Protocol of Conference of November 22.

Annex.

A.-Joint Instruction to the Three Interpreters; November 22.

No. 29. Protocol of Conference of November 23.

Annex.

A.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; November 23.

No. 30. Protocol of Conference of November 25.

Annexes.

A.-Report of a secret Interview with The Reis Effendi; November 24.

B.-Protocol of a Conference between the Three Ministers and The Reis Effendi; November 24.

C.-Joint Instruction to the Three Interpreters; November 27.

No. 31. Protocol of Conference of November 27.

Annexes.

A.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; November 27.

B.-Joint Instruction to Ditto; November 27.

No. 32. Protocol of Conference of November 29.

Annex.

A.-Joint Report of the Three Interpreters; November 28.

No. 33.-Protocol of Conference of December 1.

Annexes.

A.-Report of the British Interpreter; November 29.

B.-Report of the First Interpreter of France; November 29.

C.-Report of the First Interpreter of Russia; November 29.

D.-Instruction given by each of the Three Ministers to his Interpreter; December 1.

No. 34. Protocol of Conference of December 2.

No. 35. Protocol of Conference of December 3.

No. 36. Protocol of Conference of December 4.

Annexes.

A.-Report of the First Interpreter of France; December 2.

B.-Ditto Ditto December 3.

C.-Report of the British Interpreter; December 3.

D.-Report of the First Interpreter of Russia; December 3.

E.-Joint Instruction to the Three Interpreters; December 5.

"Class C.

Correspondence relative to the Convention of Alexandria.

No. 1. Mr. Barrow to Mr. Backhouse; Admiralty, September 17, 1828.

Inclosure.

Sir Edward Codrington to Mr. Croker; H.M.S. Asia, off Alexandria, August 9, 1828.

(Sub-Inclosures.)

A.-Protocol of a Conference held at Zante, on the 25th of July 1828, between Admirals Sir E. Codrington, De Rigny and Count Heyden.

Translation of Ditto.

B.-Memorandum of a Conference held at Alexandria, on the 6th of August 1828, between Sir E. Codrington and The Pacha of Egypt.

C.-Convention concluded by Sir E. Codrington with The Pacha of Egypt, on the 6th of August 1828.

Translation of Ditto.

Correspondence relative to the Blockade of the Dardanelles.

No. 2. Lord Heytesbury to The Earl of Aberdeen; Odessa, August 28, 1828.

No. 3. The Earl of Aberdeen to Lord Heytesbury; Foreign Office, September 21, 1828.

No. 4. The Prince of Lieven to The Earl of Aberdeen; September 19, 1828.

Translation of Ditto.

Inclosures.

Count Nesselrode to The Prince of Lieven; Odessa, August 16/28;, 1828.

Count Nesselrode to Count Heyden; Odessa, August 14/26;, 1828.

(See Class A, Pages 89 and 92, and Translation, Pages 248 and 251.)

No. 5. The Earl of Aberdeen to Lord Heytesbury; Foreign Office, October 2, 1828.

Inclosure.

The Earl of Aberdeen to The Prince of Lieven; Foreign Office, September 30, 1828.

(See Class A, P. 94.)

No. 6. Lord Heytesbury to The Earl of Aberdeen; Odessa, October 24, 1828.

Inclosures.

1.-Lord Heytesbury to Count Nesselrode; Odessa, October 20, 1828.

2.-Count Nesselrode to Lord Heytesbury; Odessa, October 10/22;, 1828.

Translation of Ditto.

No. 7. Lord Heytesbury to The Earl of Aberdeen; Odessa, October 25, 1828.

No. 8. Lord Heytesbury to The Earl of Aberdeen; St. Petersburgh, November 15, 1828.

Inclosure.

Count Nesselrode to Lord Heytesbury; St. Petersburgh, November 2/14;, 1828.

Translation of Ditto.

No. 9. The Earl of Aberdeen to Lord Heytesbury; Foreign Office, May 22, 1829.

Inclosure.

Admiral Ricord to the Dutch Consul General at Smyrna; on board the Emanuel, March 16, 1829.

Translation of Ditto.

No. 10. The Earl of Aberdeen to the Lords of the Admiralty; Foreign Office, May 29, 1829.

Inclosures.

1.-Same as No. 9.

2.-Protocol of Conference held at London, April 21, 1829.

(See Class A, Page 128, and Translation, P. 283.)

No. 11. The Prince of Lieven to The Earl of Aberdeen; Dover Street, June 13, 1829.

Translation of Ditto.

Correspondence relative to the Raising of Greek Blockades.

No. 12. The Earl of Aberdeen to Mr. Dawkins; Foreign Office, April 29, 1829.

No. 13. The Earl of Aberdeen to the Lords of the Admiralty; Foreign Office, April 29, 1829.

No. 14. The Earl of Aberdeen to Lord Stuart de Rothesay; Foreign Office, May 15, 1829.

Inclosures.

1.-Same as No. 12.

2.-Same as No. 13.

No. 15. Lord Stuart de Rothesay to The Earl of Aberdeen; Paris, May 22, 1829.

No. 16. Mr. Dawkins to The Earl of Aberdeen; ægina, May 22, 1829.

Inclosure.

Mr. Dawkins to Count Capodistrias; ægina, May 18, 1829.

Translation of Ditto.

No. 17. Mr. Dawkins to The Earl of Aberdeen; ægina, May 28, 1829.

Inclosure.

Count Capodistrias to Mr. Dawkins; ægina, May 11/23;, 1829.

(See Class A, Page 141, and Translation, Page 297.)

No. 18. The Earl of Aberdeen to Lord Stuart de Rothesay; Foreign Office, June 30, 1829.

No. 19. Lord Stuart de Rothesay to The Earl of Aberdeen; Paris, July 6, 1829."

Ordered, That the said Papers do lie on the Table.

Ld. Rokeby's Claim, Com ee to meet.

Ordered, That the Committee for Privileges, to whom the Petition of Matthew Baron of Rokeby, praying their Lordships, "That his Right to vote at the Election of Peers of Ireland to sit in the Parliament of the United Kingdom may be admitted," stands referred, do meet to consider of the said Claim on Wednesday next.

Sheffield Waterworks Bill Specially reported.

The Lord Wharncliffe reported from the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for better supplying with Water the Town and Parish of Sheffield, in the County of York;" and to whom were referred certain Petitions of the Inhabitants of Sheffield, and of Owners of Mill Property in and near Sheffield, severally praying their Lordships, "That they may be heard by themselves, their Counsel, Agents and Witnesses against the said Bill," "That the Committee had met, and considered the said Bill, and also the said Petitions against the Bill, and in the first place, proceeded to enquire how far the Standing Orders of the House relative to Bills for supplying Places with Water had been complied with, and thereupon certain Petitioners against the Bill, being Mill Owners, having tendered Evidence to prove that the said Standing Orders had not been complied with, inasmuch as it would be to the Prejudice of the said Mill Owners if the Bill passed into a Law, and that they had not been applied to previously to the Bill being brought to this House from the House of Commons, the Committee proceeded to hear such Evidence, when such Mill Owners withdrew their Objection; it then appeared to the Committee that the said Standing Orders had been complied with on this Bill; and the Committee had heard Counsel and examined Witnesses for and against the Bill, and had examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to their Lordships, with some Amendments."

Which Report, being read by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

Then the Amendments made by the Committee to the said Bill were read by the Clerk, as follow; (vizt.)

"Pr. 7. L. 24. Leave out from ("any") to ("in") in Line 27, and insert ("Springs, Watercourses and other Sources of Water which may be discovered.")

"Pr.18. L. 10. Leave out from ("Porter") to ("and") in Line 30.

"Pr. 95. L. 26. After ("Inspection") insert ("and may take Copies of or Extracts from the said Book or Books or any Part thereof")

And the said Amendments, being read a Second Time, were agreed to by the House.

Hickson's Marriage Annulling Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to declare void an alleged Marriage between Elizabeth Hickson, an Infant, and Thomas Buxton;" and for hearing Counsel for the same, as also Counsel on behalf of the said Thomas Buxton against the Bill; and for the Lords to be summoned;

Ordered, That the said Bill be read a Second Time on Thursday the 3d of June next; and that Counsel be then heard for the same, as also Counsel on behalf of the said Thomas Buxton against the Bill; and that the Lords be summoned; and that the Witnesses who were Ordered to attend do then attend.

Rickmersworth Road Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing the Road from the Town of Rickmersworth, in the County of Hertford, through the Village of the Pinner, to or near the Swan Public House at Sudbury Common in the Turnpike Road leading from Harrow to London," was committed; That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

East Retford Election Bill:

The Order of the Day being read for the further Consideration and Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, An Act to prevent Bribery and Corruption in the Election of Burgesses to serve in Parliament for the Borough of East Retford;" and for the Lords to be summoned; and for permitting Counsel to examine Witnesses in support of the Bill; and for hearing Counsel on the Petition of the Burgesses of the Borough of East Retford, in the County of Nottingham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, praying their Lordships, "That the said Bill may not pass into a Law;"

Counsel were accordingly called in.

Then Thomas Hudson was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Thomas Hudson?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of East Retford?"

"I am."

"When were you admitted a Burgess?"

"About Forty-three Years ago."

"In the Election of 1818, to whom did you promise your Vote, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton stood?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"I did not."

"Did you receive any Letter?"

"I did not."

"Did any one receive a Letter or Money on your Account, to your Knowledge?"

"There was a Packet left in the House one Evening."

"Did you see the Packet?"

"I did not."

"Did you receive any Money?"

"I did not."

"Who was living in your House at the Time?"

"A Person of the Name of Sarah Wann, a Housekeeper of mine."

"How were you enabled to know that the Packet was left?"

"Because she shewed me the Packet; the Case of it."

"Did she state that it contained Money?"

"She did not."

"Did she state to you what it contained?"

"She stated to me it contained some Paper inside; but the Amount I do not know."

(Mr. Adam.) "When did she make this Statement?"

"When I came Home in the Evening, or the next Day, she made a Statement to me."

(Mr. Law.) "When was the Packet produced to you?"

"The Evening after."

"What did she state to you, upon producing to you that Packet?"

"She stated to me as this, that there was something in it-something of the Paper kind."

"Do you mean, that she stated Paper merely?"

"She told me Paper."

"What sort of Paper?"

"I cannot tell what sort of Paper it was."

"Did she state to you what she had done with the Paper contained in this Packet?"

"I told her, when she told me of it, to put it away, and take care of it; but as to the Amount, I know no more of it than you do."

"What did she state the Paper to consist of?"

"She never stated any thing of that kind to me, what that consisted of."

"Do you mean to represent to their Lordships, that she stated that this Packet contained nothing but common Paper?"

"I do not say common Paper; it was Paper."

"Do you mean to represent that she simply said Paper, without Allusion to Money?"

"She never mentioned Money to me."

"Did you understand what she meant, when she stated that it contained Paper?"

Mr. Adam objected to the Question.

(By a Lord.) "She stated to you that there was Paper in it, but you say she did not state the Amount?"

"She never said any thing to me about the Amount of the Paper, not to my Knowledge."

Mr. Adam was heard in support of his Objection.

Mr. Law was heard in support of the Question.

The Counsel were informed, "That their Lordships must draw their own Inferences."

(Mr. Law.) "What did you mean by stating to their Lordships, that you did not know the Amount of the Paper?"

"Because I did not know it; and in fact I did not ask her any thing of the kind."

"What induced you to state that she did not state the Amount of it?"

"Because she never did."

"The Amount of what?"

"I do not know what you mean."

(By a Lord.) "She stated that there was Paper in it, but she did not state to you the Amount?"

"She did not state to me the Amount."

(Mr. Law.) "What did you mean by saying, that she did not state the Amount of it; did you mean by that, the Quantity of Paper in this Packet, or the Amount of Money?"

"The Amount of Money !-I see'd no Money."

"Do you mean the Amount of Money, or the Amount of Paper?"

"She never mentioned the Amount of Money or of Paper to me."

"What did you mean by stating to their Lordships, of your own Accord, "She did not mention to me the Amount?"

"I knowed nothing of the Amount; nothing at all; nor she never stated it to me."

"What did you mean by stating to their Lordships, that she did not mention to you the Amount; what did you mean by the Word "Amount" yourself?"

"I do not understand your Meaning at all."

The Witness was admonished to answer the Question.

"It is a hard Thing for a Man to answer to a Thing he does not know."

(Mr. Law.) "Do you mean to state to their Lordships, that you do not yourself know the Meaning of the Term you used, the Word "Amount?"

"You may call the Amount, if you please, a Sum of Money; but I cannot exactly say what the Sum was. Well, why should I know the Amount?"

"Did that Person afterwards account to you for any Sum of Money so received?"

"No, never. She was a Person I could trust with any thing."

"Did you authorize her to retain whatever was contained in that Packet for her own Use?"

"No, I never did."

"Or for yours?"

"Why, for my own Services, certainly."

"Do you, or not, upon your Oath, know whether any Money with which you had not personally supplied her was applied to your own Purposes by her?"

"Certainly it was."

"How much?"

"I cannot tell."

(Mr. Adam.) "Do you know that, except as she told you?"

"I cannot answer to that exactly, because I never kept no Account against her."

"Do you know as to the Application of the Money to which you have been asked, except as Mrs. Wann told you?"

"She sometimes told me how she had disposed of the Money in housekeeping, and the like of that."

"Do you know it from what she told you, or from any other Source?"

"I cannot speak to that."

(Mr. Law.) "Did she account to you at any Time for the Money so received?"

"When she had laid out the Money in housekeeping, she gave me the Account every Week."

"Did she give you Credit for any Sum not given by you to her?"

"I never asked her any Question of the kind."

(Mr. Adam.) "Were her Account in Writing?"

"Yes."

(By a Lord.) "What has become of this Account?" "Indeed I cannot say; I never took any Care of them, except from one Book to another."

"Are they lost?"

"I suppose they are."

(Mr. Adam.) "Have you ever looked for them, so as to be able to say whether they are lost or not?"

"No."

"How do you know that you should not find them if you searched?"

"I do not know; probably I might, if I searched."

(Mr. Law.) "Did you know of any other Packet after 1818?"

"No."

"Had you none produced to you but that one?"

"Not after that, nor never before."

"Do you mean to swear that you had not a second Packet produced to you by the same Person?"

"I do."

"You did not receive any second after 1818?"

"I never did."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to for 1820, when those Gentlemen, Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton, stood again?"

"To them again."

"Did you receive any Money or Packet after that Election?"

"Not any. I cannot recollect rightly. Yes, I did receive a Packet."

"One, or Two?"

"One."

"What did it contain?"

"To the best of my Knowledge, I think I can recollect that the Packet contained Forty Guineas."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"The last of all, I voted for Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. William Battie Wrightson."

"In the Year 1790, when Sir John Ingilby and William Henry Clinton Esquire were elected, whom did you vote for; did you vote for either of the successful Candidates-those Gentlemen?"

"I voted for them both."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Not One Farthing."

"Nor any one to your Use?"

"No; that I am certain of. After that Election, I left Retford, and came to London; and I was here Twoand-twenty Years."

"Then you had no Opportunity of interfering in Elections 'till 1818?"

"No."

"From 1790 to 1818, you took no Part in the Elections?"

"No; I was away the biggest Part of the Time."

"Did you, in the Interval between 1806 and 1818, vote or promise your Vote to any one?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect. If you can tell me who were the Candidates, perhaps I can think of it."

"William Ingilby and General Charles Crawford, in the Year 1807?"

"I voted for them."

"Did you receive any Packet after that Election, or any Money, upon your Oath?"

"No."

"Are you quite sure of that?"

"Quite certain."

"Did no one receive any for your Use, to your Knowledge?"

"No; no living Soul."

"Was this good Lady you are speaking of, the Housekeeper, living with you at that Time?"

"No, she was not."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"You have been in London, you say, for Two-andtwenty Years?"

"Yes, I have."

"We have heard that non-resident Freemen of Retford can poll, cannot they?"

"Oh yes; they can do that. I could do so."

"Were you ever canvassed during that Time?"

"Yes; I was canvassed by Mr. Petrie."

"That was since you left Retford and came to London?"

"Yes, exactly so."

"Do you remember in what Year?"

"I cannot remember that."

"Was it in 1796?"

"I cannot recollect; I do not keep such Things as that in my Recollection."

"Can you tell whether it was 1796 or 1802?"

"No, I cannot."

"But, however, you received no Money?"

"No, I did not."

"In 1826, you voted for Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise them your Votes?"

"I did."

"Did they give you any Promise of any thing?"

"They never said a Word of any thing of the kind to me."

"Have you received any Money since 1826?"

"No."

"In 1820, who canvassed you?"

"I am sure I forget."

"Where were you living, in Retford or London, at that Time?"

"In 1820 I was in Retford."

"Recollect who canvassed you then; did Mr. Evans himself, or Mr. Crompton?"

"I think they both did."

"Did you promise them?"

"I did."

"Did they promise you any thing?"

"No."

"In the Year 1818?"

"No; they never made any Promise to me, nor nothing of the kind."

"Are you a Freeman of any other Borough?"

"I am not."

"Mrs. Wayman kept your House for you?"

"Sarah Wann was her Name; begging your Pardon."

"How long did she keep your House?"

"Three Years."

"Were you in the habit of paying her Money, and she in the habit of disbursing the Money for you?"

"As far as the housekeeping went."

"Was that just the same through the whole of the Years 1818 and 1819; did you sometimes pay her Money, and did she sometimes pay your Accounts?"

"You have got into a wrong Year."

"Was there the same Course of Management in 1818 and the other Years?"

"I think, if I recollect right, this Gentleman was talking to me about Petrie and Amcott's Election, and Sir William Ingilby's."

"He was talking to you about the Money in 1818?"

"That was a Misunderstanding. When Sarah Wann lived with me I lost my first Wife; then she came to live with me; and then I married again."

"When did she live with you?"

"She lived with me in 1808, 1809 and 1810."

"You are sure she gave you a Packet, are you?"

"Yes, I am certain of that."

"Was it in 1808, 1809 or 1810, you got the Packet?"

"I cannot speak to that, as I do not recollect it."

"Did she live with you at any other Time?"

"No; because I married again after that, and then she quitted my Service."

"Did you vote in 1802, in General Crawford and Mr. Jeffrey's Election?"

"Yes, I voted then."

"Did you vote for the Duke's Interest, or whose Interest?"

"I voted for the Duke."

"They were both in the Duke's Interest, were not they?"

"Yes; and I voted, I think, for Mr. Bowles, if that was his Election."

"Did you vote for Crawford and Jeffrey?"

"I voted for Crawford, for One."

"Do you remember when you voted for Jeffrey?"

"I cannot say."

"They stood in the same Interest, did not they?"

"I believe they did."

"That was in the Duke's Interest, the Pink, was not it?"

"Yes, I think it was. I recollect there, that the Candidates were Burnham and Bowles, and Crawford and Jeffrey."

"You split, did you?"

"Yes."

"Whose Interest did Bowles stand on?"

"Upon his own, I suppose."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"You say this good Woman lived with you in the Years 1808, 1809 and 1810?"

"Yes."

"How long after the Election of Sir William Ingilby was it that your Housekeeper produced you this Packet?"

"I am sure I cannot tell; that Evening, or the Evening after; I cannot say which."

"The Evening of the Election Day?"

"No, no; it might perhaps be Eighteen Months after the Election."

"It appears you were mistaking the Year to which I was asking you. After the Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton, for the first Time, in the Year 1818, did you receive any Packet?"

"No, I think not."

"Consider that again?"

"No, I think I did not."

"Recollect; did you promise Mr. Evans your Vote?"

"I did."

"And him alone?"

"I promised him and Mr. Crompton Votes."

"I ask you whether after the Election of 1818, in the Year 1819, you did not receive a Packet, and more than One?"

"I am sure I forget, I do indeed."

"What, if any thing, did you receive in the Year 1819, which was after the Election in 1818."

"Whose was that?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton's first Election."

"The same Sum, I believe."

"What Sum?"

"Twenty Guineas each, I think."

(Mr. Adam.) "Do you mean to say that you received Two Sums of Forty Guineas, or only One?"

"Two Sums for the Two Elections."

"Two Sums of Forty Guineas each?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Denman was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Freeman?"

"About Twelve or Thirteen Years."

"Were you a Freeman at the Time of the Election of 1818?"

"Yes."

"When Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates for the first Time?"

"Yes, I was."

"Did you promise either of those Gentlemen before the Election?"

"Yes; I was canvassed by them; I promised them when they came round to canvass me."

"After that Election, at any Time, did you receive any Money?"

"I received a Packet."

"What did that Packet contain?"

"I cannot say now, to the best of my Knowledge."

"What did that Packet contain?"

"I do not know whether there were either One or Two Bills; whether it was either Twenty or Twenty-one Pounds."

"Did you receive, after that Election, One or Two Packets?"

"I only received One."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1820, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates the second Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to those Gentlemen again?"

"Yes; at least to those who came to canvass for them."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"I believe I received One Packet; the same as I had had before."

"What did that contain?"

"The same as the others."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election of 1826?"

"For Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"Are those the only Three Elections you remember?"

"I was never a Burgess before."

"Do you recollect any Election before that?"

"I had nothing to do with those."

"Where do you reside?"

"In London."

"Did you go down in the General Election of 1818?"

"I was not a Resident then in London; I was in the Country."

"Where did you reside then?"

"At Tuxford."

"What was your Business at Tuxford?"

"I was a Farmer."

"Did you go over to the Election, or stay away?"

"I went over on the Election Day."

"Was there any Opposition?"

"No, not at all."

"When was it that you received those Two Packets you received, or the One Packet, the first Time; how many did you receive after 1818?"

"One each Time."

"You say there was £20 or £21?"

"Yes; I cannot say exactly which."

"Did you promise both Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton?"

"I do not know whether I promised them both or not. At one Time Mr. Crompton came to canvass me, and I do not know to a Certainty which of them came to canvass me for the other; I was at Plough at the Time."

"Did somebody come to canvass?"

"I believe they did."

"You do not recollect whether you saw Mr. Evans yourself?"

"No."

"Or Mr. Crompton?"

"No."

"Was there any Promise made to you when they asked you for your Vote?"

"No."

"What passed at the Time of canvassing you?"

"I can state so far as this, that I never expected nor never had the least Promise of Money from no Gentleman whatever."

"On neither Election?"

"On neither Election."

"You were at Plough, I think you say?"

"Yes."

"Did they stop your Horses?"

"I saw some Gentlemen; I did not know their Business; but I made it my Business to come down to the Bottom of the Field to meet them?"

"Did they shake Hands with you?"

"I cannot say."

"I want to know how they canvassed?"

"I cannot say; if they asked me for my Vote I promised them, I have not the least Doubt."

"In 1820, where were you residing?"

"At the same Place."

"Did you see either Mr. Evans or Mr. Crompton on that Occasion?"

"No, I do not recollect that I did; I do not know now."

"Did you receive the Packet with your own Hands, or did any other Person receive it?"

"I never received any with my own Hands."

"How did it come to you?"

"My Father received it, I believe."

"How do you know that your Father received it?"

"Because he told me."

"When did he tell you so?"

"It was late when he brought this Packet to me."

"At what Time in the Year was it he brought the Packet to you?"

"I cannot say now."

"In what Year was it?"

"I cannot say, to a Certainty."

"Was it the same Year that the Election was, or the Year afterwards?"

"Indeed I do not know."

"Was it long after the Election, or soon after?"

"I believe it was a good length of Time; but I cannot say to no Certainty."

"Perhaps you can tell me better as to 1820, how long that was after the Election?"

"No."

"How did you get it?"

"I think he received it the same as the other."

"Do you remember any thing about it?"

"No; only that he had it sent to him, I believe, by some Person."

"Did he send it to you?"

"No; I was at Home; and he considered it the same as for himself."

"Is your Father a Burgess?"

"No."

"How came you to be a Burgess, as your Father was not?"

"I was an Apprentice."

"When did your Father tell you about this Packet?"

"I cannot say."

"How long after you heard of it was it that he told you of it?"

"I cannot recollect now how long it was."

"Did he give it you himself, or send it you?"

"I was living at Home with my Father."

"Did you see the Person who brought it?"

"No."

"Who gave it you into your own Hand?"

"My Father, I believe."

"Have you any Recollection of that?"

"No."

"Have you any Recollection of what he said when he gave it you?"

"No, I have not."

"Have you any Recollection of what he said when he gave it you, either Time?"

"No."

"All you know is, that, as far as you remember, your Father gave you the Packets after each Election, containing Twenty Pounds or Twenty Guineas?"

"Yes."

"How they came to him you cannot tell, and your Father never told you?"

"No."

"Did he give you the Money?"

"Yes."

"You did get the Money?"

"Yes."

"The last Time, you say you voted for Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Promise or Expectation then?"

"No, not at all."

"You say you made no Promise on either of the former Elections?"

"No."

"Have you had any Money since that?"

"No."

"In the last Four Years, you have had no Money?"

"No."

"Were you at the Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you see the rioting?"

"I saw very little of it; I was a Resident in London; and I was very glad to be out of it."

"On which Day did you vote; the first or the second?"

"The first."

"Had you any Difficulty in polling the first Day?"

"No; I got in very quietly; there was great Disturbance after I came out of the Hall."

"At what Time was that?"

"Four or Five o'Clock in the Afternoon."

"At what Time of the Day did the polling begin?"

"I cannot tell; it was rather late in the Day, I think, before the Poll commenced."

"What Time do you call late?"

"Ten or Eleven or Twelve o'Clock."

"For the first Four or Five Hours there was no Difficulty in polling?"

"There was no rioting."

"Had you any Difficulty in polling?"

"No; I squeezed in along with the rest."

"It was not difficult for a Person to poll the first Day?"

"No, not particularly."

Re-examined by Mr. Price.

"When you were canvassed in 1818, was Mr. John Thornton present?"

"I do not know, indeed."

"When those Gentlemen came into the Field, was Mr. John Thornton present?"

"I do not know."

"Did you know Mr. John Thornton?"

"Oh yes, of course I knew him; he was my Brotherin-Law."

"You say you received a Packet from your Father?"

"Yes."

"Did your Father receive another Packet besides?"

"No."

"Did you see any other Packet besides the One that your Father brought to you?"

"No."

"The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Willey was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Thomas Willey?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect the Election of Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh?"

"Yes."

"To whom did you promise your Vote upon that Occasion?"

"To Mr. Marsh and Mr. Osbaldeston."

"To both those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"Do you know the Angel Inn at Retford?"

"Yes."

"Were you there at any Time in the Year 1814?"

"No."

"Not in 1814?"

"No."

"Do you know Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes, I do."

"Were you at the Angel Inn at any Time when Mr. Hannam was there?"

"No."

"Did you receive any thing from Mr. Hannam after that Election?"

"Not myself."

"Did any one for you, to your Knowledge?"

"Yes."

"Who was it?"

"My Wife."

"What was received by her?"

"Twenty-one Pounds."

"Did you get the Money afterwards?"

"Yes; she brought it Home."

"Did she give it to you?"

"Yes."

"Did she state where she got it?"

"Yes."

"Where did she say she got it?"

"That she got it at the Angel."

"The Angel Inn in Retford?"

"Yes."

"In the Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans, in the Year 1818, whom did you promise upon that Occasion?"

"Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans."

"Did you receive any Packets, or not, after that Election?"

"Yes."

"How many?"

"Two."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty-one Pounds each."

"In the Election of 1820, did you promise those Gentlemen again?"

"Yes."

"What did you receive after that Election?"

"The same Quantity."

"Two Packets containing Twenty Guineas each?"

"Yes."

The Petition against the Bill was shewn to the Witness; and he was asked-

"Is that your Name and Handwriting?"

"Yes."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"How came you to sign that?"

"It was brought to me to sign; I did not know no Meaning for it."

"When was that?"

"I do not exactly know the Day."

"When were you sent for to come up here?"

"On Thursday last."

"You had signed this Petition before that?"

"Yes."

"Who came to you?"

"I forget his Name just now."

"Are you living in Retford now?"

"Yes; when I am at Home."

"Did you, at the last Election in 1826?"

"Yes."

"Did you vote?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you vote for?"

"Mr. Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Who canvassed you to vote for them; did they canvass you themselves?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise them?"

"Yes."

"Did they make any Promise to you of any kind?"

"No."

"Have you received any Money whatever since the Year 1820?"

"No."

"How long have you been a Freeman?"

"I think about Thirty-four Years."

"Do you remember the Elections before 1814?"

"Yes, I can remember something about them."

"Do you remember the Election in 1802?"

"Not particularly."

"General Robert Crawford and Jeffrey?"

"Yes; I remember something of that."

"Did you vote for them?"

"Yes."

"For whom?"

"General Crawford and Mr. Jeffrey."

"For the Duke's Candidates, were not they?"

"Yes."

"Have you known The Duke of Newcastle's Interest ever since you have known Retford?"

"I do not know."

"Has there not always been an Interest in your Time called the Duke's Interest?"

"Yes, I understood so."

"You have heard Persons say so since you have been a Freeman?"

"Yes, and before I was a Freeman."

"You belonged to the Duke's Interest?"

"Yes, at that Time."

"In 1802, did you receive any Money?"

"I do not know, I am sure, by the Year of our Lord; I cannot say."

"You remember Robert Crawford and Jeffrey?"

"Yes."

"After their Election, will you venture to say you received any Money?"

"Yes."

"Recollect yourself?"

"Yes; but I do not recollect the Time of the Year that the Election was in."

"You remember the Election?"

"Yes."

"Do you mean to swear that you received any Money after Robert Crawford and Jeffrey's Election?"

"There was some Packets came, I think."

"How many Packets came at that Time?"

"I do not know."

"Were there Four?"

"No; I think Two; but I cannot say."

"How did they come?"

"I do not know."

"Where were you living then?"

"I was living in Retford."

"Who brought them?"

"I do not know."

"What did they contain?"

"I think Twenty-one Pounds."

"Have you any Doubt of that?"

"No."

"You have no Doubt you received Two Packets in 1802 for Twenty-one Pounds each?"

"By the Year of our Lord, I do not know."

"But after the Election of Robert Crawford and Jeffrey; you remember that Election very well?"

"Yes."

"You are not confounding that with Crompton and Evans's, are you?"

"I do not know that I am."

"Have you any Recollection, upon your Oath, of having received any Money after Robert Crawford and Jeffrey's Election? Recollect, before you answer that Question."

"I do not know; not just at this Moment."

"Have you the least Recollection of it?"

"I do not recollect."

"Did you ever say to any body 'till To-day that you had?"

"I do not know; I do not understand the Question."

"Do you see the Gentleman who stands behind Mr. Law; Mr. Heptinstall, the Attorney?"

"Yes, I have seen him."

"Did he examine you?"

"No."

"Who examined you?"

"No Person examined me."

"You mean that no Person took from your Mouth the Substance of your Examination; what you knew?"

"No; no Person living."

"Has nobody spoken to you before you came here to be a Witness To-day, as to what you knew about Elections?"

"No."

"Did you ever say to any Human Being, 'till To-day, that Packets or Money were ever received after Robert Crawford and Jeffrey's Election?"

"I do not remember that Circumstance."

"You do not recollect whether any Money was received or not?"

"I recollect that I received Packets after that."

"After Crawford and Jeffrey's?"

"After Crawford and Jeffrey's and Mr. Evans's Election."

"Are not you confounding Mr. Evans and Crompton's Election with Jeffrey and Crawford's?"

"Jeffrey and Crawford's was before Evans's."

"When did you receive the Money; at Crawford and Jeffrey's, or not until Crompton and Evans's?"

"I received some Packets after Crawford's Election."

"That you swear?"

"Yes."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"My Learned Friend has asked you after Crawford and Jeffrey's Election; do you remember Crawford and Mr. Higham being elected?"

"I do not know much of them."

"Do you remember Sir William Ingilby and Charles Crawford being elected, in 1807?"

"Yes; I remember Sir William Ingilby's Election."

"Whom did you promise on that Election?"

"Sir William Ingilby."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Yes; I received a Packet."

"What did it contain?"

"Forty-two Pounds."

"Do you recollect Sir John Ingilby and William Henry Clinton's Election?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise then?"

"Sir John Ingilby."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"No."

"Do you remember William Petrie and Sir Wharton Amcott's Election?"

"Yes; I recollect something about it."

"Did you vote for either of those Gentlemen?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you receive any thing afterwards?"

"Yes."

"What did you receive afterwards?"

"Forty-two Pounds."

(By a Lord.) "Have you a Brother?"

"No; I have no Brother."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then George Whitlam was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been so?"

"Since 1820."

"You recollect the Election of 1820, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"No."

"Did you receive any Packet after it?"

"No."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"No."

"Did any Person receive any Money for you?"

"There was a Packet or something left when I was at my Father's."

"What did that Packet contain?"

"There was a Twenty Pound Note and a One Pound Note in it."

"Who delivered it you?"

"I do not know."

"Who gave it into your Hand?"

"I do not know."

"Where did you see it?"

"In my Father's House."

"Was your Father a Freeman?"

"No."

"To whom was it directed?"

"Well, I forgot to whom it was directed; I cannot speak to that."

"Who opened it?"

"I opened it."

"Who had the Money?"

"I had the Money out of it."

"What did you do with it?"

"I cannot swear to what I did with it."

"Did you keep it for your own Use?"

"Yes."

The Petition against the Bill was shewn to the Witness; and he was asked -

"Is that your Name and Handwriting?"

"Yes."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"When did you sign that Parchment?"

"I am sure I cannot tell now when it was."

"How long ago?"

"I cannot tell how long ago."

"As nearly as you can, tell me?"

"Perhaps Two or Three Months; a Couple of Months, perhaps."

"When were you summoned to attend here?"

"Last Thursday."

"Who summoned you?"

"I forget the Gentleman's Name; I think they called him Mr. Butt."

"Did he bring you up to Town with him?"

"No."

"How did you come when you did come?"

"I came by the Coach."

"When did you arrive?"

"On Friday."

"Were you examined upon your Arrival?"

"No."

"Where did you go upon your Arrival?"

"I went to Snow Hill, to Mr. Mills's, the White Swan."

"Whose Office did you go to?"

"I went to -"

"To Mr. Heptinstall's?"

"Yes."

"What passed between you and Mr. Heptinstall, when you first got to the Office?"

"I went to let Mr. Heptinstall know I had come to Town."

"What did he say to you?"

"I cannot tell the Words, I am sure; I do not know what Conversation took place, only that I should wish not to come before the Lords that Night, after being travelling all Night, and being fatigued."

"That you wished to refresh yourself before you came before their Lordships?"

"Yes."

"And of course Mr. Heptinstall, being a civil Man, let you do that?"

"He said I might attend here, and I did attend."

"You attended in Dishabille?"

"I attended here last Friday Night."

"Was nothing said to you about what you were to prove when you came here?"

"Nothing at all."

"They did not ask you?"

"No."

"They did not ask you, nor you did not tell them, what you could say?"

"No."

"Or what you were to come and be examined upon?"

"No."

"And you did not know what it was about?"

"I could not tell what it was about."

"What did you think it was about?"

"I could not tell."

"You could not tell what Information their Lordships expected of you?"

"No; I knew nothing about it."

"Did not Mr. Butt tell you any thing?"

"No."

"Only that you were wanted?"

"Yes."

"Were not you very much surprised?"

"Yes, I was very much surprised."

"You were surprised, I suppose, that so humble an Individual should attract their Lordships Notice?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Mee say any thing to you?"

"I have not seen Mr. Mee."

"What was the first Election you voted at?"

"1820."

"That was the second Election of Evans and Crompton?"

"That was the first Election I voted for."

"You said something about some Packets; who gave you those Packets?"

"I cannot tell who gave them to me; I was not at Home when they came."

"Do you know any thing about them, or of the Persons who gave them to you?"

"They did not give them to me; they sent them to my Father and Mother's House."

"You found them?"

"I saw a Packet there, and took it."

"When was that?"

"I am sure I cannot say."

"You must tell us as nearly as you can, as you have come all this Way?"

"I think it might have been Eighteen Months or so, or from that to Two Years, as nearly as I can guess."

"Was it about 1822?"

"Well, I cannot speak to that."

"Were both of them sent at the same Time?"

"I am sure I cannot tell."

"Did you ever receive Two?"

"Yes; I received Two Packets."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"Did you have any thing after that?"

"No."

"Nothing left at your Father's?"

"No."

"Are you sure of that?"

"I am sure of it."

"You were canvassed, were not you, before the last Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you not promise to vote for Dundas and Wrightson?"

"No."

"Whom did you promise to vote for?"

"Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"Before the Election?"

"Yes."

"How came you to vote for Sir Henry Wright Wilson; did he make you any Promise to pay you any thing?"

"No; there was no Promise made."

"Was any thing said about whether you should be paid?"

"Paid! - I never expected to be paid for any thing of the kind."

"Not on the Election?"

"No."

"Had you any Promise before the former Election; of course you could not have it; did you expect it?"

"I never had any Promise from any Person."

"Nor any Expectation?"

"No."

"Will you undertake to swear where the Packet came from?"

"I cannot say where it came from."

"The first Election you had no Promise, nor any thing at all?"

"No; nor the other Elections neither."

"How came you to vote for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?."

"Because he was a Man that agreed with my Principles."

"In what respect?"

"He said he was come forward for the Protestant Cause; to support the Protestant Cause."

"So you voted for the Protestant Cause last Time?"

"Yes."

Re-examined by Mr. Price.

"You remember the Election of 1820, when you promised Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"Yes."

"How long before that had you taken up your Freedom?"

"I took up my Freedom the Election Day Morning."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Burton was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name John Burton?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect Mr. Marsh and Mr. Osbaldeston's Election?"

"Yes."

"Do you know the Angel Inn at Retford?"

"Yes."

"Did you, at any Time in the Year 1814, go to the Angel Inn?"

"I did go there; but I am no Scholar."

"You are no Scholar; but you went to the Angel Inn?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Money there?"

"Yes; Ten Guineas."

"Did you see Mr. Hannam there at the Time?"

"Yes; I saw Mr. Hannam there."

"Do you recollect the Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton, in the Year 1818; their first Election?"

"I do not exactly recollect the Time."

"You recollect their first Election?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise to vote for on that Occasion?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money or Packets after that Election?"

"I received Packets after that Election."

"How many?"

"Two."

"What did they each contain?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"The next Election, in 1820, of those Gentlemen; whom did you promise then?"

"I promised them again."

"After that Election, did you receive any Packets?"

"Yes; I received Two."

"What did they contain?"

"They contained the same."

"Twenty Guineas each?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect the Election of Sir William Ingilby and General Charles Crawford?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise upon that Occasion?"

"Sir John Ingilby."

"Sir William Ingilby I am speaking of?"

"I do not speak of him."

"Did you vote for General Charles Crawford?"

"Yes."

"After that Election, did you receive any Packets?"

"No, none at all."

"Do you recollect when Robert Crawford Esquire and John Jeffrey Esquire were elected?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise then?"

"I promised them."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Yes; I received some."

"How much?"

"Two Twenty Guineas."

"Have the goodness to look at the Signature to that Petition, and state whether that is your Handwriting?"

(The Petition against the Bill being shewn to the Witness.)

"That was not my Handwriting; but it was written by my Direction, by my Son, in my House."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"How long have you been a Freeman?"

"I think it is about Four-and-thirty Years; it may be Five-and-thirty."

"Was Sir John Ingilby's Election the first you voted at?"

"No; not Sir John's; old Sir John's; I did not vote for him; I was not of Age. I am a Freeman born."

"When was the first Election you remember?"

"Petrie and Sir Wharton Amcotts; that was the first I had been in."

"Whom did you promise then?"

"Petrie and Amcotts?"

"You promised Petrie and Amcotts?"

"Yes."

"That was not in 1802?"

"I do not know; it will be Five-and-thirty Years come the Time."

"That was in 1796, then?"

"I dare say it was."

"In 1802 you voted for Jeffrey and Crawford?"

"Yes."

"Whose Interest did they stand on?"

"They stood on the Duke's Interest."

"Who stood against them?"

"There was Sir John Ingilby stood, I think, at that Time; I cannot recollect exactly, I do not keep such Things in my Head."

"I wish you would recollect who stood against Jeffrey and Crawford; you have told us some very strange Stories about that?"

"It was Mr. Bowles's Election."

"Jeffrey and Crawford were returned, were not they?"

"Yes."

"When did you say you got the Packets then; at the Election?"

"It was after the Election a good while."

"How long?"

"I cannot say exactly; it might be a Year."

"It might be Four Years?"

"I cannot say exactly."

"At what Time will you undertake to swear you received Money after that Election?"

"I cannot say; I am no Scholar."

"Recollect you are upon your Oath."

"I will speak the Truth, I know."

"How long after Jeffrey and Crawford's Election will you swear you received a Packet?"

"I cannot swear to a Month or Two."

"How long was it after that Election?"

"It might be a Year or a Year and a Half."

"It might be Two Years or Three Years?"

"I will conclude it to be between One Year and Two Years."

"At what Time of Year was it?"

"I am sure I cannot tell."

"Whether it was Summer or Winter, you cannot tell?"

"I cannot."

"Who gave it you?"

"I cannot tell."

"How did you get it?"

"How it was I cannot tell."

"Did you receive it Night or Morning?"

"I declare I cannot say."

"Did you receive it at Home?"

"Yes, it was received at Home."

"Will you swear you recollect receiving it at Home?"

"I am no Scholar."

"You may be no Scholar, but you must speak to the Facts you know."

"I will speak the Truth; I did not come here to tell a Lie."

"There is no Use in that Asseveration. Will you swear you received it in your own House?"

"I am sure I cannot exactly say; I know I recollect one Packet at Twelve o'Clock at Night, and the other in the Street."

"From whom did you receive that?"

"I am sure I cannot tell from what Quarter it came."

"Jeffrey and Crawford stood on the Duke's Interest?"

"I cannot say that those were the Packets at that Time."

"Jeffrey, Crompton and Crawford stood on the Duke's Interest?"

"Yes, when they did stand."

"You lived in Retford?"

"Yes."

"You swear that you received one Packet at Twelve o'Clock in the Night, the other in the Street?"

"Yes; but I will not be sure it was at that Election."

"That must have been for other Elections then?"

"I am no Scholar, therefore I cannot recollect Things."

"Are you Scholar enough to say, whether what you have been telling us, Crawford and Jeffrey's Election, did or did not take place after the Election of Crawford and Jeffrey; or had you Money paid on both Elections?"

"Mr. Petrie's, and Crawford's and Jeffrey's Election, and this, I remember."

"On what Occasion was it those came?"

"I cannot tell."

"Do you mean their Lordships to understand that you cannot tell that you received Money after Crawford and Jeffrey's Election?"

"Yes; I received Money, but I cannot say the Time."

"Will you swear you received it after Jeffrey and Crawford's?"

"Yes; but that was some Time back."

"Will you swear that you received that on account of Jeffrey and Crawford?"

"That I cannot; I do not know who gave it to me, nor how it came."

"Nor why it came?"

"No; nor why it came."

"Do you swear that you received a Packet in the Street, and another in the House?"

"Yes."

"From whom did you receive that in the Street?"

"I did not know the Person."

"Nor how you received that in the House?"

"No; nor I do not know how I received that in the House."

"How did that come there?"

"It was thrown into the House."

"Why did not you tell me all this before; why did not you tell my Friend all this? I understood you to say you voted for both Jeffrey and Crawford, who stood on the same Interest. Did not you say you received one Packet in the Night-time, and the other in the Street?"

"Yes."

"Did you know The Duke of Newcastle's Steward at that Time; Bettison?"

"I had not spoken any thing to Mr. Bettison."

"Did you know him at the Time?"

"I have seen him."

"Did you receive it from him?"

"No."

"Did you receive it from any body belonging to him?"

"Not as I know of; I do not know."

"Will you undertake to swear, upon your Oath, that you received Money after the Election of Robert Crawford and Jeffrey?-and now mind."

"Yes."

"At Ingilby's Election you received no Packet?"

"No."

"How did you receive that, after the Election of 1820?"

"It was sent to me, I know not how - who gave it to me. It was after the Election. I do not know the Person."

"Had you promised Crompton and Evans yourself?"

"Yes."

"Did they make any Promise to you?"

"No, none; nor no Gentleman whatever that ever I promised ever promised me any thing at all."

"Were not you very much surprised at receiving a Packet after Crawford and Jeffrey's Election?"

"Surprised! - I cannot say, indeed; I received it, but I did not know from whom."

"What did you receive after Crawford and Jeffrey's Election?"

"I have told you that I received Two Packets, but whether it was Crompton's or Jeffrey's Election, or whether the other, I cannot swear which; or whether it was Mr. Evans's, one of them, I cannot say; but I know I received Two, but at which Elections I cannot swear."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"You recollect Two Elections of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive after each of those?"

"Yes."

(Mr. Adam.) "Whom did you vote for in 1826; the last Election?"

"For Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"Did you promise him?"

"Yes."

"Did he canvass you?"

"Yes."

"Did he promise you any thing?"

"No."

"Had you ever promised to vote for Dundas and Wrightson?"

"Did I ever promise them? Yes; I promised Dundas."

"Did you not promise Wrightson too?"

"No."

"How came you not to vote for Dundas then?"

"I voted against him, because I recollected he was for the Roman Bill."

"Did you expect to get any thing by voting for him?"

"No."

"Why did you vote for Wilson?"

"Because I liked his Principles."

(Mr. Law.) "Sir Henry Wright Wilson was unsuccessful, and he has sent you nothing?"

"He has sent me nothing."

"You say that you received after the Elections of 1818 and 1820?"

"Yes."

"My Learned Friend has asked you about the Elections of Robert Crawford Esquire, and John Jeffrey Esquire; after their Elections, did you receive any Packets?"

"I received Packets; I received Forty Guineas."

"After their Election?"

"Yes."

"In addition to other Elections you have mentioned?"

"Yes."

(By a Lord.) "You have mentioned that your Son wrote your Name to the Petition; is he a Freeman?"

"I have one that is a Freeman, and one that is no Freeman."

"Which of them wrote this?"

"Him that is a little Boy I have."

"How long has the one who is a Freeman been a Freeman?"

"I am sure I cannot exactly say; he has taken up his Freedom, but he has never voted at all."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Richard Moore was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Is your Name Richard Moore?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Freeman?"

"I do not know."

"About how long?"

"I cannot tell whether it was Eight, Nine or Ten Years."

"Was it more than that?"

"Rather more; I cannot tell; it was Ten altogether."

"Do you remember the first Election, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates?"

"I remember the first Election."

"Do you remember the first Time that Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Were you a Freeman at that Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"Yes."

"What did you receive?"

"A Packet."

"How many; One or Two?"

"One."

"What did it contain?"

"I do not know."

"Who delivered it to you?"

"My Wife shewed it to me."

"Was it open?"

"No."

"Who opened it?"

"My Wife."

"Was it in your Presence?"

"Yes."

"What was inside the Letter?"

"I do not know."

"Was any thing inside?"

"Yes."

"What was it?"

"I do not know."

"Was there any Money, upon your Oath?"

"There was no Money, but Bills."

"What kind of Bills were they?"

"Pound Bills."

"What was the Amount of those Pound Bills?"

"One Pound."

"How many of them were there?"

"I do not know."

"Were there more than One?"

"Yes."

"What was the Amount of the whole?"

"I do not know."

"About how many?"

"I do not know how many; I never counted them."

"What became of them?"

"My Wife got them, and put them to the rest of her Money."

"Did you see them taken out?"

"No."

"Do you mean to say that upon your Oath?"

"I did not see them taken out."

"Did she open them in your Presence?"

"No."

"Neither did she tell you what they were-what was the Amount?"

"No; she did not tell me the Amount."

"Did you promise Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton before the Election of 1820, when they stood the second Time?"

"I promised them before the Election."

"Did you before the last Election, when they stood the second Time?"

"The second Time, I promised them."

"After that Election, did you receive any Packets?"

"No, I do not recollect."

"Refresh your Memory. After the Election of 1820, did you receive any Packets?"

"There was one thrown into my House, I think, in the Night."

"What did that Packet contain?"

"I do not know."

"Did you open it?"

"I did not."

"What became of it?"

"My Sister got it."

"Did she deliver it to you?"

"No."

"Did you see it at any Time?"

"She shewed it to me in a little Time afterwards."

"What was in it?"

"I do not know; I did not open it myself."

"Was it opened in your Presence?"

"She opened it in my Presence."

"What did it contain?"

"It contained Bills."

"Do you mean Bank Bills?"

"Bank Bills."

"How many?"

"I do not know how many."

"What was the Amount of the whole?"

"There was Three or Four, or Five or Six; I do not recollect seeing any more."

"Were they Pound Bills, or more?"

"They was Pound Bills."

"What do you mean by Pound Bills?"

"Pound Bills in Paper."

"Do you mean by Pound Bills, Twenty-shilling Bills, or Bills of larger Amount?"

"Twenty-shilling Bills."

"Were there any beside Twenty-shilling Bills?"

"Not as I recollect."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas."

"Any one else?"

"Mr. Wrightson."

The Petition against the Bill was shewn to the Witness; and he was asked-

"Is that your Handwriting?"

"Yes, I believe it is. I signed my Name to a Petition."

by Mr.Alderson.

"Will you swear it is your Handwriting?"

"I believe it is."

"Look at it again, and say whether it is your Name and Handwriting?"

"Yes, I believe it is mine."

"On what Occasion did you sign it?"

"I do not know."

"Who shewed it you?"

"I do not know; I do not recollect who it was."

"At what Time was it, can you tell?"

"I do not know whether it was Morning, Noon, or Night."

"Was it a Month ago, or Six Weeks, or Two Months?"

"I do not know whether it might be a Month or Two Months."

"After that, they sent for you here, did they?"

"Yes."

"You are sure of that?"

"Yes."

"When was it; when were you sent for to come here to illuminate us?"

"Last Thursday."

"Did you come up with the last Witness, Denman?"

"I came up and got here on Friday."

"Have you been examined by any body since you have been here?"

"No one."

"You have told the same clear Story to every body?"

"The same Story."

"Is your Wife alive?"

"Yes."

"And your Sister?"

"My Sister is dead."

"But your Wife is alive?"

"My Wife is alive."

"Does she live at Retford?"

"She lives at Retford."

"What is her Name?"

"Elizabeth Moore."

"You did not see either of those Packets yourself, I collect?"

"I did not see myself."

"I did not suppose you were the Packet; but did you see the Packet when it came?"

"I saw the Packet the next Day or Two after."

"Your Wife gave you something?"

"My Wife shewed it to me."

"She kept Part of it herself, according to your Statement?"

"I told her to put it by among her rest."

"The second Time, it was your Sister, was it?"

"The second Time, it was my Sister."

"You know no more about it than what they told you?"

"I know no more than what they told me."

"The last Time you say you voted for Wrightson and Dundas?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Promise, the last Time, of any thing for your Vote?"

"No."

"Had you any thing sent?"

"No."

"Had you any Promise beforehand from Evans and Crompton?"

"I never had no Promise from no Gentleman."

"Who canvassed you for Evans and Crompton?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Both themselves?"

"No; separate."

"Did each of them canvass you by themselves, or by somebody else?"

"They canvassed me themselves."

"What passed with you about your voting at that Time?"

"Well, they axed me for my Vote, and I promised them."

"Was that all they said, "Will you give me your Vote?" and you said you would?"

"I promised them I would vote for them, and that was all that passed."

"Was it the same the second Time?"

"Yes."

"And the same the third Time, for Dundas and Wrightson?"

"Yes, and the same the third Time."

Examined by the Lords.

"What Occupation do you follow?"

"I am a Shoemaker by Trade."

"Do you reside in Retford?"

"Yes."

"You say you came up last Friday?"

"Yes, I came up last Friday; I was here on Friday."

"Where do you live in London; where are you residing?"

"At John Denman's."

"Have you seen any of the Retford Voters since you came here?"

"There are Seven of us there."

"How came you to go there?"

"The Man was there when we came off the Coach, and axed us if we wanted Lodgings."

"When you came up to London you found a Man ready waiting to ask you whether you wanted Lodgings?"

"He was there when we got off the Coach."

"Did he ask all the Passengers?"

"He axed several as got off."

"Was the Coach entirely filled with Retford Voters?"

"No; there was only Four of us; Four or Five, I am not certain which."

"You all went to this House of his?"

"We all went to his House but One Man."

"Do you know who this Man was who invited you to go to his House?"

"John Denman axed us if we would go down there to his House."

"Was it John Denman himself?"

"Yes."

"To his own House?"

"Yes."

"He is a Freeman?"

"Yes."

"Have you seen any Attorney since you have been there?"

"Not as I recollect of."

"Have you seen any body who is not a Freeman of Retford who came to speak to you upon the Business?"

"There was a Man came to give me a Paper to attend this Place."

"Since you have been there?"

"Yes."

"Have you had any Talk with any body about this Business?"

"No."

"Had you no Talk amongst yourselves about it?"

"I never had no Talk with no one."

"Have you had no Conversation with any Witness who has been examined?"

"No."

"How many are there of you in this House; Seven or Eight?"

"Seven of us."

"Have you paid your Bill, or not?"

"No."

"Do you mean to pay for it?"

"Yes, I expect to pay it."

"You expect to have to pay for your Living?"

"Yes."

"Have you had any thing said to you about having your Expences paid, so much a Day, if you went up?"

"There was a Talk that we should have Half a Guinea a Day for our Expences."

"Who was the Talk among?"

"Talking among the Freemen, that that Man had got paid that went away last, Thomas Battye."

"What is Thomas Battye?"

"A Plumber and Glazier; he went away on Sunday."

"That he had got Half a Guinea a Day?"

"Yes; Half a Guinea a Day."

"Ever since he has been in London?"

"From the Time they came to going back."

"Do you expect to get your Half Guinea a Day too?"

"I do not know."

"Have any of you had any Clothes given to you?"

"I had none given to me."

"Will you swear you do not know that some Freemen have been dressed, and had Clothes given them, to appear here before their Lordships?"

"I do not know any thing about it."

"Do you mean to say you never heard of that?"

"I never heard of that."

"You know that you have not?"

"I have not myself, nor I do not know of any one that has."

"Did you ever make any Promise of your Vote for Money at any Time?"

"At no Time."

"Never?"

"No, never."

"Were you ever asked to give your Vote for Money?"

"No, never."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Robert Pashley was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Robert Pashley?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"When were you admitted; when did you become a Burgess?"

"Twelve or Thirteen Years ago."

"Was it in 1817?"

"I cannot recollect exactly."

"Was the first Election, after you became a Burgess, that of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to upon that Election?"

"Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans."

"Did you receive any Packets after that Election?"

"There was a Packet left at my Father's House."

"One or Two?"

"Two."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"What did you do with the Money?"

"My Father got it."

"Did you give it to him?"

"Yes; he had it."

"Do you remember the Election of 1820; the next Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to upon that Occasion?"

"Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans."

"Did you receive any Packets after that Election?"

"There were Two left at my Father's."

"What did they contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"Dundas and Wrightson."

"Where were you living at the Time of those Two Elections; at Retford?"

"Yes."

"In your Father's House?"

"Yes."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"How do you know your Father got it; you did not see him receive it, did you?"

"No, I did not."

"Did your Father tell you he had it then?"

"He said there was some Packets left for me in the House."

"When did he tell you that?"

"I think the next Day."

"Did you see the Packets at the Time?"

"The next Day I saw them."

"Did you see the Packets at the Time your Father told you so?"

"Yes, I saw them."

"At the same Time?"

"Yes."

"What Time in the Day was it you saw them?"

"In the Morning."

"When you got up?"

"Yes."

"Where did you see them?"

"In my Father's House."

"In what Part of your Father's House?"

"I saw them on the Table."

"In what Part?"

"In the House."

"Who was in the Room when you saw them?"

"My Father and myself."

"Was it then your Father spoke to you about it?"

"Yes."

"Which Time are you talking of?"

"I am talking of the last Time."

"That was in 1820?"

"Yes."

"At what Time in the Year was it that this happened?"

"I am sure I cannot say."

"Do not you know whether it was Summer or Winter?"

"I cannot say."

"How many Years after the Election?"

"It was a Year and a Half, I should think."

"Why do you think it was a Year and a Half?"

"It was somewhere about a Year and a Half."

"It might be Two Years and a Half. Why do you say it was somewhere about a Year and a Half; what Reason have you for fixing on that Time rather than any other?"

"A Year and a Half to Two Years; I cannot say nearer than that."

"Was it a Year and a Half, or Two Years?"

"I am sure I cannot exactly say."

"Was it in the Winter or the Summer?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect."

"How do you know it was not Three Years?"

"I am sure I think it was not."

"How do you know it was not, if you have no Circumstance to fix it in your Recollection?"

"I should think about a Year and a Half, as far as I can recollect."

"What Circumstance is there that fixes your Recollection to a Year and a Half rather than Two Years or One Year, which it might be?"

"I cannot recollect."

"If you cannot recollect, why do you choose to say a Year and a Half; when was the Election - at what Time in the Year?"

"I am sure I cannot tell you."

"If you can neither tell the Time of the Year of the Election, nor the Time of the Year you received this Packet, how can you tell me it was a Year and a Half?"

"To the best of my Recollection it was a Year and a Half or Two Years."

"Whether it was Summer or Winter you cannot tell?"

"No."

"What was your Father doing when he gave you this Packet?"

"He told me there was a Packet lying on the Table."

"What fixes this in your Memory?"

"I cannot exactly say what he was doing."

"In 1818, when did you see this Packet?"

"I had been out of Town, and he told me they were come, either the next Day or the Day after."

"Either the next Day or the Day after?"

"After it came to my Father's House."

"How can you tell it came to your Father's House?"

"He told me so."

"Had he the Packet at the Time he told you so?"

"I cannot say whether he had the Packet in his Hand, or whether it was on the Table."

"Are you sure it was either the one or the other?"

"Yes."

"How long was that after the Election?"

"It was Fifteen Months or Eighteen Months, or somewhere thereabout, after the Election."

"At what Time of the Year was it; why do you say Fifteen or Eighteen Months?"

"It was somewhere about that Time."

"Why do you fix Eighteen Months in both those Cases; I will bring it to your Memory?"

"I cannot recollect any further, any nearer."

"What are you?"

"A Plumber and Glazier."

"Do you carry on Business for yourself?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Freeman?"

"Twelve or Thirteen Years."

"Was your Father a Freeman too?"

"No."

"How did you get your Freedom then?"

"By Servitude."

"Is your Father a Plumber and Glazier?"

"No."

"What was he?"

"He was a Coal Merchant."

"Were you a Plumber and Glazier at the Time those Packets came?"

"Yes."

"Were you a Journeyman to any Individual?"

"Yes."

"To whom were you a Journeyman?"

"To Mr. Dawber."

"Was Mr. Dawber a Freeman?"

"Yes."

"In 1818, who canvassed you?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did they canvass you both together?"

"No, not both together."

"Did you promise them both?"

"Yes."

"Did either of them promise you any thing?"

"Not any thing."

"Who canvassed you in 1820 for them?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Each for himself?"

"Yes."

"Was that a joint or a separate Canvass?"

"A separate one."

"Did they make you any Promise at that Time?"

"Not at any Time at all."

"Was any thing said, except their asking you for your Vote, and your promising to give it?"

"Not any thing."

"In 1826, they canvassed you for Dundas and Wrightson?"

"Dundas and Wrightson."

"Did they come together?"

"They did not."

"Did you promise them?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did they make you any Promise?"

"Not any at all."

"Have you received any Money since?"

"Not any."

"Have you lived in Retford up to this Time?"

"No; I live in Retford now."

"Have you lived in Retford 'till you came up here?"

"Yes."

"When did you come up here?"

"Last Friday."

"Did you see Mr. Roberts lately, before you came; do you know a Person of that Name?"

"Yes."

"Where did you see him?"

"I saw him at his Shop."

"What Business does he carry on?"

"A Draper."

"Do you know whom he voted for at the last Election?"

"He is not a Freeman."

"Whose Interest did he support at the last Election?"

"I am sure I do not know."

"Do you know a Place called the Turk's Head?"

"Yes."

"Is there any Club there?"

"There is an Odd Fellows Club there."

"Is there a Birmingham Club there?"

"No."

"Do not you go much to the Turk's Head?"

"Very little."

"Can you take upon yourself to say there is not a Birmingham Club held there?"

"I cannot tell."

"Do you know Mr. Sharp?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Talk about your coming up here with him?"

"No."

"Did you see him at the Time of the Election in 1826?"

"I have seen him in the Street several Times."

"Did you have any Talk with him at that Time?"

"No."

"Which Day did you vote at the Election?"

"I am sure I cannot tell."

"Was it the first or the second Day?"

"The first Day."

"Was it before or after the Riots?"

"It was before the Riots."

"Did you see Mr. Sharp about that Time?"

"No."

"You know nothing of this Club at the Turk's Head?"

"I cannot recollect any thing about it; I know nothing about it."

"Did you ever hear any thing about "All right" in Retford?"

"No; I never heard such a Word."

"Or about "Tip?"

"No."

"Or "Tick?"

"No."

"Or "Joss?"

"No."

"Do you think those Words could ever have been very common at the Election Time in Retford without your having heard them?"

"I cannot say to that."

"Suppose any body has said that at Retford "All is right" was used in a particular Sense, and that "Joss" was understood in a particular Sense, should you believe him?"

"I cannot say; I do not know any thing about it."

"You have been at Three Elections yourself?"

"Yes."

"And promised for each of them?"

"Yes."

"And you say that at Two of them you got Money?"

"Yes."

"And yet you never heard of "All is right," or "Joss," or "Tick," or "Tip," or any of those fine Things?"

"No."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"Who was with Sir Robert Dundas when he canvassed you for your Vote; do you know Mr. Foljambe?"

"Yes."

"Was he with him?"

"I think he was."

"Did you know Colonel Kirke?"

"Yes."

"Was he with him?"

"I cannot say."

"Who was with Mr. Wrightson when he canvassed you?"

"I am sure I cannot tell."

"Did you see Foljambe or Kirke?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect whether they were with him or not."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Burton was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Is your Name Thomas Burton?"

"Yes."

"You are a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Freeman?"

"Since 1820."

"Do you remember the Election of 1820?"

"Yes."

"Were you a Freeman at that Time?"

"Yes."

"To whom did you promise your Vote?"

"To Mr. Crompton Esquire and Mr. Evans?"

"After the Election, did you receive any thing; any Packet?"

"There was a Packet in the Form of a Letter was conveyed to me."

"When did you see it?"

"I see'd it in my own Hands."

"Did you open it?"

"I opened it after a little while."

"What did you find in it?"

"I found in it the Sum of £21."

"Did you receive One or more Packets after that Election?"

"I received Two Packets; One more after the same Election."

"What did that contain?"

"To the same Effect."

"Do you mean to say there was £21 in it?"

"Yes; £21 in each Packet."

"For whom did you vote in the Year 1826, at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. William Battie Wrightson Esquire."

The Petition against the Bill was shewn to the Witness, and he was asked-

"Is that your Name and Handwriting?"

"Yes, it is."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"Do you know what is contained in that Parchment?"

"I do not know exactly; but I was told it was a Petition to be heard by Counsel."

"When did you sign it?"

"I signed it in my own House; the Time I cannot mention."

"Before you came here, I suppose?"

"Yes, to a Certainty."

"When did you come?"

"I came on Thursday last."

"Did you come with the last Two or Three Witnesses who have been examined?"

"Yes."

"Had you any body waiting for you at the Coach when you arrived?"

"Not waiting for me particularly."

"Waiting for you generally?"

"No."

"Whom was he waiting for? there was somebody waiting, I see by your Manner."

"I cannot tell that."

"Did any Person come to you when you arrived?"

"There was a Person came to me, to ask me where I was going to stop at."

"Did he recommend, you to a Lodging?"

"He said, if I would go to his House he would make me comfortable."

"Whom did he turn out to be?"

"John Denman."

"Did he afterwards introduce you to another Friend, Mr. Heptinstall?"

"Yes."

"Was Mr. Heptinstall there, as well as Mr. Denman, to welcome you to Town?"

"He conducted me to Mr. Heptinstall, to the Office."

"What did Mr. Heptinstall say to you upon your Arrival; did he receive you at the Office?"

"Yes."

"All of you together, or One at a Time?"

"There were not Two of us in together, I think; but I cannot recollect."

"Did you go in one after another to be examined?"

"We could not go in altogether; we went in One at Once."

"Why should you not go in altogether?"

"We could not go in bursting in like a Crowd; we could not go in all together."

"Did Mr. Heptinstall take down what you had to say in Writing?"

"I told him to take down my Name, for the Purpose I was come to this House for."

"What was that Purpose?"

"It was to come to be examined before my Noble Lords."

"Upon what Subject?"

"Upon the Electioneering Purpose, I expect it is."

"Is it an Electioneering Purpose to turn this into a Hundred; is it?"

"The Bill, I suppose, is to extend it to the Hundred."

"You consider that an Electioneering Purpose?"

"Yes; that is all I can say about it."

"Who gave you this Letter of 1820, you have spoken of?"

"I do not know; it was a Stranger to me."

"Were both Strangers?"

"Yes; both Strangers to me."

"Do you know Westby Leadbeater?"

"I did know him; he was the Crier."

"It was not he then?"

"Oh no! he was dead before that Time, I think; but I will not be certain, on my Oath."

"You are sure it was none of the Retford People that gave it you?"

"I am sure it was none of the Retford People that gave it me; indeed I cannot say who it was."

"You say that Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton canvassed you?"

"They did."

"What passed between you and Mr. Crompton when he canvassed you?"

"They axed me if I would give them the Promise to serve them in the Election; and I told them I would."

"Was that all that passed?"

"Yes."

"Was there any thing said about Money at that Time?"

"Not a Word."

"Was that all that passed between Mr. Crompton and you?"

"It was."

"What passed between you and Mr. Evans?"

"After the same System, he axed me whether I would be so kind as to promise him my Vote, and I told him I would."

"Did he say that it should be all right?"

"No, not a Word."

"Nor did he promise to joss you or tick you?"

"No, nothing of the kind."

"Have you heard any thing of that Expression being used?"

"No."

"When did you hear of that Expression being used?"

"I have never heard a Word of it 'till you axed me that Question."

"You said you voted for Dundas and Wrightson at the last Election?"

"Yes."

"Who canvassed you for Dundas?"

"Himself."

"Was any body with him?"

"There were some Gentlemen with him."

"Who were they?"

"I cannot recollect who they was."

"Do you know any of them?"

"I do not."

"Are you acquainted with Mr. Foljambe?"

"Not exactly, but I know him."

"Are you acquainted with Colonel Kirke?"

"I knew Colonel Kirke."

"You did not know any Gentleman who canvassed with him?"

"I cannot recollect who they were."

"Can you tell who canvassed you with Mr. Wrightson?"

"No, I cannot."

"Were Colonel Kirke and Mr. Foljambe with him?"

"I cannot say, indeed."

"Tell us what passed between you and Mr. Wrightson when he canvassed you?"

"He axed me for my Vote, and I promised him I would give it him."

"Was any thing said about its being as usual?"

"No, not a Word."

"You have received nothing?"

"No."

"Was there any thing of the kind said by Mr. Wrightson?"

"No."

"What are you by Trade?"

"A Baker."

"Do you live in Retford?"

"Yes."

"Did you vote?"

"Yes, I did, at the last Election."

"On what Day did you vote; the first or the second Day's Poll?"

"The first Day's Poll."

"You say you were there the first Day of the Election?"

"Yes."

"Was there any Difficulty in polling the first Day, before the rioting commenced?"

"There was; but the Constables kept Peace and Quietness as well as they could."

"Before the Bailiff was knocked down with a Stone, was there any Difficulty?"

"There was many Threats; there was People standing with Pickaxes and Shovels; and they said they would pull down the Hall Steps, and threatened us very hard as we went in."

"Why did they threaten you?"

"Because they supported, as I fancied, Two public Men that came into the House of Parliament."

"What where they for?"

"It was in the Town rumoured that they would vote for the Emancipation Bill."

"Did you mean that the independent Members would vote for the Emancipation Bill?"

"Yes; I call them independent Members."

"Did not they like them?"

"No; they fancied they would vote for the Bill."

"Sir Henry Wright Wilson was against it, I suppose?"

"Yes, he was against it; he pledged his Word and Honour that he would vote against it."

"In consequence of that, a Noise was made?"

"In consequence of that, the Noise and Disturbance began."

"And you were threatened, before you went in, with a Pickaxe?"

"Yes; we were scared in going up to the Hall; threatened in going up."

"Who scared you?"

"The Crowd all round us; but the Constables kept them off."

"Was it a very quiet Election, as some People have told us?"

"No; it was not very quiet, when they almost killed Sir Robert Dundas, knocked and kicked him about, and were breaking the Bank Windows; they were not very quiet then."

"How long did the Tumult last?"

"Why, I cannot exactly tell; the Soldiers were brought in after the Tumult."

"Who sent for the Soldiers into the Town?"

"That I do not know."

"Did the Soldiers come in for the independent Members, as you call them, or the other Side?"

"They were sent for to keep Quietness in the Town."

"Do you know any thing of the Birmingham Club?"

"I know nothing but Hearsay; I have no Knowledge but by Hearsay."

"Did you hear it from any Freeman?"

"I heard there was a Committee formed to take the Franchise away from them."

"Do you know whether Mr. Hannam belonged to it?"

"He was the Solicitor, we were told, for that Purpose."

"Was Newton the Secretary?"

"I do not know, indeed."

"Was Sharp one of the Members?"

"I understood he was a Member of it; I believe he was."

"Who is Newton?"

"I do not know."

"You do not know that he was a Clerk of Hannam's?"

"Yes; he was his Clerk, we understood."

"Sharp is a Timber Merchant?"

"Yes."

"He is a Man of considerable Property in the Town, is he not?"

"Yes."

"He could have a Vote?"

"No; he rents the Place."

"Has he no Property in the Place?"

"Not that I know."

Examined by the Lords.

"How long have you been in Town?"

"I came on Friday."

"Where do you live in Town?"

"At John Denman's."

"You live at his Menagerie; John Denman's?"

"Yes."

"Are you fed there too?"

"Yes."

"And clothed?"

"I do not understand you."

"You are fed there?"

"We board and lodge there."

"Had you any Clothes given you?"

"Oh no; what I have I brought with me from my own Home."

"Have you any Clothes there for the Witnesses to wear to go to the House?"

"No; what I have I brought with me."

"Are you sure there is no Coat and Waistcoat, and something else, hanging up in the Hall, for Witnesses to go to the House in?"

"I never saw any thing of the kind."

"You are sure of that?"

"I am sure of that."

"What do you expect to get a Day for coming here?"

"Indeed I cannot tell."

"Have you never heard any thing said by the Witnesses what they had got?"

"No; I have never heard any thing, except from Mr. Heptinstall. He told me that we must not expect to have more than 10s. 6d. a Day for our Expences. I told him it was very hard, for my Mistress was obliged to get a Journeyman to do the Business, and I was a Baker."

"You told Mr. Heptinstall this?"

"Yes."

"What does your Mistress pay the Journeyman?"

"That I cannot tell, for she would have one to get after I left Home."

"Had you left Directions with your Mistress to get another Workman?"

"Oh no; but she probably had to look out."

"Your Notion is, that she would be obliged to get a Journeyman?"

"Yes."

"What are the general Wages of Journeymen in Retford?"

"I do not know; I never had to get one."

"Did you never hear your Mistress say what one would cost?"

"No."

"You told Mr. Heptinstall that ought to be made good?"

"Oh no; but I told him I thought it was very small."

"What did Mr. Heptinstall say?"

"He said he believed it was agreed on, that that was to be the Pay for the Expences."

"When did you see Mr. Heptinstall?"

"On Saturday Morning, at his Office."

"You went to his Office?"

"Yes; to take him in my Name, that I was come."

"Did any body at Retford tell you to go to Mr. Heptinstall?"

"No; Mr. Butt served the Subpæna on me to attend; he told me to go there."

"The Officer of the House?"

"Yes."

"He told you to go to Mr. Heptinstall?"

"Yes."

"And he gave you his Direction?"

"Yes."

"When you got into the Office, what happened?"

"Nothing happened, as I recollect, except that I have said about this Statement as to the Expences."

"Nothing happened about the Nature of your Evidence of To-day?"

"No."

"Only about so much a Day?"

"Yes; he desired me to mention it to the rest that came up for this Purpose, what the Allowance was to be."

"Had you any Talk about the Packets, and those sort of Things; any thing about Money?"

"No, not a Word."

"Nothing but about the Payment of Expences?"

"Nothing but the Payment of the Expences while we are here."

"Have you ever mentioned to any body in Retford the sort of Evidence you could give?"

"No, not a Word; I could not tell what would be put to me 'till I came here."

"You know Hannam?"

"Yes."

"What is he?"

"An Attorney."

"Is he in great Business?"

"That I cannot say; I do not understand his Business."

"Do many Persons go to consult him about Law?"

"I cannot say that; indeed I do not know."

"Does he hold any Office in the Corporation of Retford?"

"No."

"Were you present at the last Election in 1826?"

"Yes, I was."

"Were you in the Town Hall at the Time?"

"Yes."

"Was not the High Bailiff very ill treated?"

"I was informed so; I did not see it."

"Who was it that was spit upon?"

"I do not know that."

"Did you never hear it?"

"I did not."

"Did you see what was done to the High Bailiff?"

"Yes; I believe they were pelting with Stones; and that they knocked him on the Back of the Head, and had like to have knocked him off his Horse; but there was a Guard on each Side of him at the Time."

"He came in with a Guard?"

"It was while he was going up to read the Riot Act; there was a Guard on each Side of him, as I was informed."

"You voted for Dundas and Wrightson, did you not?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did Sir Henry Wright Wilson canvass you?"

"Yes."

"Did he offer to give you any Money?"

"No. I told him indeed there was many more together; that I had pledged my Word to those Gentlemen, and did not choose to go back from it; and he said, "Damn your Vote; I do not want your Vote; I want your Principle."

"Did he state his Principles?"

"No."

"Did you ask him what those Principles were?"

"No; it was not my Duty, not to a Gentleman."

"Did you hear him declare his Principles from the Broad Stone?"

"At the Broad Stone he did declare his Principles, as I understood; but I did not hear them."

"Did the Mob pelt him?"

"No; they were on his Part, because he declared against the Emancipation Bill, and so the Inhabitants sided with him."

"But not the Voters?"

"Part of the Voters."

"Not the Majority?"

"No."

"He was not elected, was he?"

"No."

"How many voted for him?"

"To the best of my Recollection, Fifty-three."

"Were those all Men staunch to their Principles?"

"Indeed I do not know; I cannot tell their Minds."

"He did not damn their Votes, did he?"

"No, I should think he would not, as it was at their Request he came."

"There were Fifty-three voted for him?"

"Yes."

"Was not it well known before the Fifty-three went up to vote, that they had no Chance of carrying it their Way; that the Majority was against them?"

"It was known that the Majority was against him."

"How many voted for Dundas and Wrightson?"

"I think 119 for Wrightson, 121 or 122 for Sir Robert Dundas."

"Was not the Result of the Canvass well known some Months before the Election?"

"The Canvass was known."

"Was not it known among the Voters, that Dundas and Wrightson had 119, and Sir Henry Wright Wilson would only have 50?"

"I cannot recollect what passed."

"Was there any Doubt whether they would come in or not?"

"Oh, we felt no Doubt we should come in at the Election."

"And they despaired a great deal, did not they; they were not in much Spirits when they went up to poll? The Question does not refer to Brandy."

"They went in in that blackguard sort of Way; I was threatened with having my Tiles pulled off my House because I would not go from my Promise; my own Father, who has been here, threatened to pull the Tiles off my House if I would not turn; but I stuck to my Word; I pledged my Word, and that I would stand to it."

"You pledged your Word, without reference to Money?"

"No Money was ever mentioned to me since I have been a Freeman."

"Have you had any Money since the Election of 1826?"

"No, not a Farthing."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off 'till To-morrow; and that the Lords be summoned.

Witnesses discharged from further Attendance on it.

Ordered, That Samuel Francis Flower, Thomas Hudson, Robert Johnson, John Denman, Thomas Willey, George Whitlam, John Burton, Richard Moore, Robert Pashley and Thomas Burton, be discharged from further Attendance on this House on the last-mentioned Bill.

Crommelin Harbour Bill.

It was moved, "That the Order made on Friday the 21st of this instant May, "That the Bill, intituled, "An Act for establishing and maintaining the Harbour of Port Crommelin, in the Bay of Cushenden, in the County of Antrim," be read a Second Time on Friday next," be now read."

The same was accordingly read by the Clerk.

Ordered, That the said Order be discharged.

Ordered, That the said Bill be read a Second Time on Friday the 4th of June next.

Ld. Cremorne's Estate Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable the Guardian of The Right Honorable Richard Lord Cremorne, an Infant, to carry into Effect a Contract entered into for the Purchase of Rockcorry Castle and adjoining Lands, in the County of Monaghan, in Ireland," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Register of Chancery Bill presented.

The Lord Chancellor presented to the House a Bill, intituled, "An Act to regulate the Office of Register and Keeper of the Register and Registers of the High Court of Chancery."

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Ordered, That the said Bill be printed.

Masters in Chancery Bill presented.

The Lord Chancellor presented to the House a Bill, intituled, "An Act to regulate the Salaries and Emoluments of the Masters in Ordinary of the High Court of Chancery, and the Clerks employed in the Offices of the said Masters."

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Ordered, That the said Bill be printed.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Martis, vicesimum quintum diem instantis Maii, horâ decimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.