House of Lords Journal Volume 62
25 May 1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 62: 25 May 1830', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 62: 1830, pp. 523-545. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16354 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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Contents

Die Martis, 25 Maii 1830.
James & Spencer v. Price & Gott. Comrs of Charitable Donations et al. v. Harris et al. Amicable Assurance Society v. Bolland et al. Marquis of Hastings's Estate Bill, Standing Orders on Private Bills dispensed with, & Bill passed: Message to H.C. with it. Monks Risborough Inclosure Bill. Meltham Inclosure Bill. Criminal Returns Repeal Bill. Canada Legislative Assembly Bill. Elgin Roads, &c. Bill. Macclesfield Waterworks Bill. Dovor Improvement Bill. E. of Strathmore v. Dundas et al. Appellant's Petition for an early Day, referred to Appeal Comee. Law of Scotland, Petition from Procurators, Perthshire, respecting. Bankrupt LawsAmendment Bill. Watching &c. Parishes Bill, Petitions in favor of: (St. Crux, York:) St. Michael le Belfrey, York: St. Peter, York: St. John Delpike, York. Assizes for West Riding of Yorkshire, Petitions for Removal of, to Wakefield: (Dewsbury:) Septon: Ossett. Stamp Duty, (Ireland,) Petitions of Inhabitants & Printers of Kilkenny against encreasing. Criminal Laws, Petitions from Waterford & Worcester respecting. Slavery, Petitions from Chelmsford & Wortley for Abolition of. Duty on Coals, Petition from South Shields for Reduction of, referred to Com ee on the Coal Trade. Duty on Sprits, &c. (Ireland), Petition from Cork against Encrease of. East India &c. Trade, Petition of The Chamber of Commerce, Forfarshire, for opening, referred to East India Comee. Kingsbury Episcopi Inclosure Bill: Dundalk Roads Bill: Rickmersworth Road Bill: Messages to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to the 3 preceding Bills. Ld. Cremorne's Estate Bill: Message to H.C. with it. Ashborne & Belpar Road Bill. Sunderland Harbour Bill. Glasgow Road Bill. Queensferry Improvement Bill. North Level Drainage Bill. Maxwell & Co. v. Stevenson & Co. Sheffield Waterworks Bill: Message to H.C. with Amendments to it. Sir J. Colquhoun v. Colquhoun, Respondent's Petition to receive his Case, referred to Appeal Comee. G. Smith Leave for a Naturalization Bill: Bill read. J. C. Smith Leave for a Naturalization Bill: Bill read. Polloc & Govan Railway Bill, Petition against. Letter from The East India Co. to The Governor General in Bengal, delivered, & referred to East India Comee. Australian Co's Bill. Bogs Draining (Ireland) Bill. British Spirits, Petition from Forfarshire, &c. against Encrease of Duty on. Dundee Harbour Bill, Petitions in favor of: (Blairgowrie:) Lochee: Nine Incorporated Trades of Dundee: Newburgh: Letham: Kirriemuir: Forfar. Taxes (Ireland), Petition from Waterford against encreasing. British Spirits, Petition from Ross-shire against Encrease of Duty on. M. of Donegall v. Houlditch et al. Appellant's Petition for an early Day, &c. referred to Appeal Comee. Viscount Lifford's Petition, claiming a Right to vote for Peers for Ireland, referred to Comee for Privileges. The King's Signature Bill presented: Standing Orders 26 & 155 to be considered on it: Select Committee appointed to search for Precedents as to the Mode of the affixing The King's Signature. Conference on the Conduct of Sir J. Barrington. Order of the Treasury, remitting Duties on certain West India Produce, Ordered. Clifton Bridge Bill. Emeris's Estate Bill. Duke of Argyll's Estate Bill. Polloc & Govan Railway Bill. Humbert's Naturalization Bill. Beverley Road Bill, Consideration of Amendments put off for 6 Months. Suits in Equity Bill. Masters in Chancery Bill. Register of Chancery Bill. Boydell Leave for a Divorce Bill: Bill presented: Order for 2d Reading: Petitioner to attend. East Retford Election Bill: Re-examined by Mr.Law. Witnesses discharged from further Attendance on it: E. Dernie to attend on it. Gordon's Estate Bill Specially reported. Duke of Buccleuch's Estate Bill. Ld. Rokeby's Claim, Com ee put off. Netterville Peerage, Com ee to meet: Witnesses to attend the Comee. Adjourn.

Die Martis, 25 Maii 1830.

DOMINI tam Spirituales quam Temporales Præsentes fuerunt:

DUX CUMBERLAND.
DUX GLOUCESTER.
Archiep. Cantuar.
Ds. Lyndhurst,
Cancellarius.
Archiep. Ebor.
Epus. Londinen.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. Wigorn.
Epus. Bath. et Well.
Epus. Lich. et Cov.
Epus. Exon.
Epus. Bristol.
Epus. Carliol.
Epus. Roffen.
Epus. Cestrien.
Epus. Rapoten.
Ds. De Clifford.
Ds. Willoughby de Eresby.
Ds. Dacre.
Ds. Petre.
Ds. Saye & Sele.
Ds. Arundell of Wardour.
Ds. Clifton.
Ds. Teynham.
Ds. Clifford of Chudleigh.
Ds. Gower.
Ds. Forbes.
Ds. Colville of Culross.
Ds. Belhaven & Stenton.
Ds. Boyle.
Ds. King.
Ds. Monson.
Ds. Boston.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Ducie.
Ds. Dynevor.
Ds. Rodney.
Ds. Montagu.
Ds. Kenyon.
Ds. Braybrooke.
Ds. Douglas of Douglas.
Ds. Auckland.
Ds. Mendip.
Ds. Dundas.
Ds. Dawnay.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. De Dunstanville & Bassett.
Ds. Rolle.
Ds. Wellesley.
Ds. Bayning.
Ds. Northwick.
Ds. Fitz Gibbon.
Ds. Carbery.
Ds. Dufferin & Claneboye.
Ds. Dunalley.
Ds. Loftus.
Ds. Alvanley.
Ds. Redesdale.
Ds. Rivers.
Ds. Ellenborough.
Ds. Arden.
Ds. Sheffield.
Ds. Barham.
Ds. Mont Eagle.
Ds. Manners.
Ds. Hill.
Ds. Meldrum.
Ds. Melbourne.
Ds. Prudhoe.
Ds. Ormonde.
Ds. Glenlyon.
Ds. Maryborough.
Ds. Ravensworth.
Ds. Delamere.
Ds. Bexley.
Ds. Penshurst.
Ds. Somerhill.
Ds. Farnborough.
Ds. Wharncliffe.
Ds. Feversham.
Ds. Tenterden.
Ds. Clanwilliam.
Ds. Durham.
Ds. Skelmersdale.
Ds. Wallace.
Comes Bathurst, Præses.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux St. Albans.
Dux Leeds.
Dux Devonshire.
Dux Rutland.
Dux Wellington.
March. Winchester.
March. Lansdowne.
March. Salisbury.
March. Hertford.
March. Bute.
March. Exeter.
March. Camden.
March. Hastings.
March. Ailesbury.
March. Bristol.
March. Cleveland.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Winchilsea & Nottingham.
Comes Essex.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Doncaster.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Albemarle.
Comes Rosebery.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Dartmouth.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Brooke & Warwick.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Hardwicke.
Comes De Lawarr.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Spencer.
Comes Norwich.
Comes Talbot.
Comes Grosvenor.
Comes Digby.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Liverpool.
Comes Malmesbury.
Comes Charlemont.
Comes Wicklow.
Comes Caledon.
Comes Romney.
Comes Chichester.
Comes Limerick.
Comes Nelson.
Comes Gosford.
Comes Charleville.
Comes Manvers.
Comes Grey.
Comes Harewood.
Comes Verulam.
Comes Brownlow.
Comes Morley.
Comes Beauchamp.
Comes Glengall.
Comes Eldon.
Comes Howe.
Comes Dudley.
Comes Cowdor.
Vicecom. Arbuthnott.
Vicecom. Maynard.
Vicecom. Doneraile.
Vicecom. Duncan.
Vicecom. St. Vincent.
Vicecom. Melville.
Vicecom. Sidmouth.
Vicecom. Lorton.
Vicecom. Gordon.
Vicecom. Granville.

PRAYERS.

James & Spencer v. Price & Gott.

After hearing Counsel further in the Cause wherein Thomas James and James Spencer are Appellants, and James Price and William Augustus Gott are Respondents:

It is Ordered, That the further Hearing of the said Cause be put off sine Die.

Comrs of Charitable Donations et al. v. Harris et al.

Ordered, That the Hearing of the Cause wherein The Commissioners of Charitable Donations, and others, are Appellants, and Thomas Harris, and others, are Respondents, which stands appointed for this Day, be put off sine Die.

Amicable Assurance Society v. Bolland et al.

Ordered, That the Hearing of the Cause wherein The Amicable Assurance Society are Appellants, and James Bolland, and others, are Respondents, which stands appointed for this Day, be put off sine Die.

Marquis of Hastings's Estate Bill, Standing Orders on Private Bills dispensed with, & Bill passed:

The Order of the Day being read for taking into Consideration the Standing Orders relative to Private Bills, in order to their being dispensed with on the Bill, intituled, "An Act for vesting the Settled Estates of The Most Honorable George Augustus Francis Rawdon Hastings Marquis of Hastings, situate in Scotland, in the said Marquis in Fee;" and for the Lords to be summoned;

The said Standing Orders were read by the Clerk.

Ordered, That the said Standing Orders be dispensed with on the said Bill.

Then the said Bill was read the Third Time.

Then several Amendments were made to the said Bill.

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. with it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Stephen and Mr. Wing field;

To carry down the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence thereto.

Monks Risborough Inclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Thomas Fremantle and others;

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parish of Monks Risborough, in the County of Buckingham;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to their Lordships Amendment made thereto.

Meltham Inclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to amend an Act of His late Majesty, for inclosing Lands in the Manor of Meltham, in the Parish of Almondbury, in the West Riding of the County of York;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Criminal Returns Repeal Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to repeal an Act of the Fifty-fifth Year of His late Majesty, for procuring Returns of Persons committed, tried and convicted for Criminal Offences and Misdemeanors;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Two Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Canada Legislative Assembly Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to amend so much of an Act of the Thirty-first Year of His late Majesty for making more effectual Provision for the Government of the Province of Quebec;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Ordered, That the said Bill be printed.

Elgin Roads, &c. Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for rebuilding the Bridges over the Rivers Spey and Findhorn, for making Accesses thereto, and for making and maintaining certain new Roads in the County of Elgin;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Macclesfield Waterworks Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Egerton and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for better supplying the Inhabitants of the Borough of Macclesfield, in the County of Chester, with Water, and to establish the Rates payable for the same;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Dovor Improvement Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Egerton and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to amend Two Acts of His late Majesty, for paving, cleansing, lighting and watching the Town of Dovor, and for removing and preventing Nuisances and Annoyances therein;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Three Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

E. of Strathmore v. Dundas et al. Appellant's Petition for an early Day, referred to Appeal Comee.

Upon reading the Petition of Thomas Bowes Earl of Strathmore, Appellant in a Cause depending in this House, to which James Dundas, and others, are Respondents; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to appoint an early Day for hearing the Petitioner's Appeal, without waiting for the Appeals which have been set down before it to be previously disposed of:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Law of Scotland, Petition from Procurators, Perthshire, respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Persons whose Names are thereunto subscribed, being Members of the Society of Procurators before the Courts of Law in Perthshire; praying their Lordships, "That the Bill for uniting the Benefits of Jury Trial in Civil Causes with the ordinary Jurisdiction of the Court of Session, and for making certain other Alterations and Reductions in the Judicial Establishments of Scotland, may receive Alterations and Additions in the several Particulars stated in the said Petition:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Bankrupt LawsAmendment Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to be put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to explain and amend an Act of the Sixth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for amending the Laws relating to Bankrupts;"

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Friday next.

Watching &c. Parishes Bill, Petitions in favor of: (St. Crux, York:) St. Michael le Belfrey, York:

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Parish of Saint Crux, in the City of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Parish of Saint Michael le Belfrey, in the City of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act to make Provision for the lighting and watching of Parishes in England and Wales;" and severally praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to pass the same into a Law, and that the Parishes in the City of York may not be excepted from the Operation and Benefit thereof:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

St. Peter, York:

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Parish of St. Peter the Little, in the City of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

St. John Delpike, York.

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Parish of St. John Delpike, in the City of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of the last-mentioned Bill, and severally praying their Lordships "to pass the same into a Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Assizes for West Riding of Yorkshire, Petitions for Removal of, to Wakefield: (Dewsbury:)

Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Manufacturers and other Traders of the populous and ancient Town and Township of Dewsbury, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to pass a Law to hold the Assizes at the Town of Wakefield within and for the West Riding of the County of York, by Adjournment from York:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Septon:

Upon reading the Petition of the Clergy, Gentry, Freeholders, Merchants, and others, Inhabitants of the Township of Septon, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Assizes and General Gaol Delivery for the Business of the said West Riding may in future be held at Wakefield:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ossett.

Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Manufacturers, Tradesmen and others, Inhabitants and Householders of Ossett, in the Parish of Dewsbury, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships would be pleased to sanction and encourage a Measure so fraught with Public Good as the Removal of the Assizes for the West Riding of Yorkshire from York to the Town of Wakefield:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Stamp Duty, (Ireland,) Petitions of Inhabitants & Printers of Kilkenny against encreasing.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the City of Kilkenny, Ireland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Proposal for assimilating the Stamp Duty between Ireland and England may be rejected by this House as impolitic, unjust and demoralizing:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Upon reading the Petition of the Letter Press Printers of the City of Kilkenny, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to cause a full and minute Enquiry to be made into all the Circumstances connected with the Assimilation of the Irish Newspaper Stamp Duties with those of England, which will enable their Lordships to pursue a Course more judicious and beneficial to the Community, and avert the manifold Disadvantages which by the passing of the Measure must necessarily be entailed on a Class of Men who, above all others, from the peculiar Nature of their Occupation, are the least capable of undertaking any other Employment:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Criminal Laws, Petitions from Waterford & Worcester respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Local Directors and Manager of the Provincial Bank of Ireland at Waterford; praying, "That their Lordships will not withhold from them that Protection to their Property which they would derive from a more lenient Law than that inflicting Death for Forgery:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Upon reading the Petition of the Magistrates, Clergy, Bankers and other Inhabitants of the City of Worcester and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to make such effectual Amelioration in the Criminal Laws, so far as they relate to the Punishment of Death for Forgery, as in their Wisdom shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Slavery, Petitions from Chelmsford & Wortley for Abolition of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town and Neighbourhood of Chelmsford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That such effectual Measures may be adopted, without further Delay, for the Abolition of Slavery, as shall be necessary to secure to every Subject of the Crown of England the Three great and primary Rights of every British Subject, personal Security, personal Liberty and private Property; that a Law may be immediately passed awarding a severe and adequate Punishment for all Persons who shall henceforward be guilty of the Crime of converting British-born Children, of whatever Colour, into Slaves; and that the Duties on the East and West India Sugar may be equalized:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Upon reading the Petition of the Minister and Members of the Congregation of Protestant Dissenters of the Independent Denomination assembling at Wortley near Leeds, Yorkshire, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to take the Subject of Slavery into their serious Consideration, and as early as possible to adopt those Measures which will lead to the Abolition of a System cruel and antichristian, and which will give to those degraded Beings, the Slaves, a full Participation in those sacred Rights which belong to all the Family of Man:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Duty on Coals, Petition from South Shields for Reduction of, referred to Com ee on the Coal Trade.

Upon reading the Petition of the Ship Owners of the Port of Newcastle upon Tyne, residing at South Shields, in the County of Durham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Allegagations contained in their Petition, the Truth of which they are prepared to prove, if called upon, may be referred to the Committee of their Lordships on the Coal Trade, and such Relief afforded, by reducing the Duty on Sea-borne Coals, as the Shipping Interest in the Coal Trade, whether considered as a Nursery for Seamen for His Majesty's Navy, or a very important Branch of the Commercial Marine of the Country, may be thought justly entitled to:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Select Committee appointed to take into Consideration the State of the Coal Trade in the United Kingdom, together with the Duties of all Descriptions and Charges affecting the same, as well in the Port of London as in the several other Ports in the United Kingdom.

Duty on Sprits, &c. (Ireland), Petition from Cork against Encrease of.

A Petition of the Proprietors and Occupiers of Land in the County of Cork, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, was presented and read; praying their Lordships "not to alter the Scale of Spirit Duties as arranged in 1825; to revise the Stamp Duties in Ireland with a view to their Reduction rather than to their Encrease; and to give every practicable Encouragement to the Home Production of Tobacco."

Ordered, That the said Petition be received as the Petition of Richard Townsend, High Sheriff, who only has signed it.

East India &c. Trade, Petition of The Chamber of Commerce, Forfarshire, for opening, referred to East India Comee.

Upon reading the Petition of the Members of The Chamber of Commerce and Manufactures for Forfarshire, and the Directors thereof, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Trade to the East Indies and China be opened, and left free and unfettered to individual Enterprize and Exertion; and that The East India Company's Charter, conferring exclusive Privileges, be not renewed; or to do otherwise as to their Lordships may seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Select Committee appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China.

Kingsbury Episcopi Inclosure Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parish of Kingsbury Episcopi, in the County of Somerset."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Dundalk Roads Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for repairing and maintaining the Roads from the Town of Dundalk, in the County of Louth, to the Towns of Castle Blayney and Carrickmacross, in the County of Monaghan."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Rickmersworth Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing the Road from the Town of Rickmersworth, in the County of Hertford, through the Village of Pinner, to or near the Swan Public House at Sudbury Common in the Turnpike Road leading from Harrow to London."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to the 3 preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Ld. Cremorne's Estate Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable the Guardian of The Right Honorable Richard Lord Cremorne, an Infant, to carry into Effect a Contract entered into for the Purchase of Rockcorry Castle and adjoining Lands, in the County of Monaghan, in Ireland."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. with it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To carry down the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence thereto.

Ashborne & Belpar Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing the Road from Ashborne, in the County of Derby, to a Messuage or Public House in the Occupation of John Frost, near Belpar Bridge, in the said County of Derby."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

L. Bp. London.
L. Bp. Winchester.
L. Bp. Worcester.
L. Bp. Bath & Wells.
L. Bp. Lichfield & Coventry.
L. Bp. Exeter.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Bp. Rochester.
L. Bp. Chester.
L. Bp. Raphoe.
L. De Clifford.
L. Willoughby de Eresby.
L. Dacre.
L. Petre.
L. Saye & Sele.
L. Arundell of Wardour.
L. Clifton.
L. Teynham.
L. Clifford of Chudleigh.
L. Gower.
L. Forbes.
L. Colville of Culross.
L. Belhaven & Stenton.
L. Boyle.
L. King.
L. Monson.
L. Boston.
L. Holland.
L. Ducie.
L. Dynevor.
L. Rodney.
L. Montagu.
L. Kenyon.
L. Braybrooke.
L. Douglas of Douglas.
L. Auckland.
L. Mendip.
L. Dundas.
L. Dawnay.
L. Calthorpe.
L. De Dunstanville & Bassett.
L. Rolle.
L. Wellesley.
L. Bayning.
L. Northwick.
L. Fitz Gibbon.
L. Carbery.
L. Dufferin & Claneboye.
L. Dunalley.
L. Loftus.
L. Alvanley.
L. Redesdale.
L. Rivers.
L. Ellenborough.
L. Arden.
L. Sheffield.
L. Barham.
L. Mont Eagle.
L. Manners.
L. Hill.
L. Meldrum.
L. Melbourne.
L. Prudhoe.
L. Ormonde.
L. Glenlyon.
L. Maryborough.
L. Ravensworth.
L. Delamere.
L. Bexley.
L. Penshurst.
L. Somerhill.
L. Farnborough.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Feversham.
L. Tenterden.
L. Clanwilliam.
L. Durham.
L. Skelmersdale.
L. Wallace.
D.CUMBERLAND.
D.GLOUCESTER.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Abp. York.
L. President.
D. Richmond.
D. Beaufort.
D. St. Albans.
D. Leeds.
D. Devonshire.
D. Rutland.
D. Wellington.
M. Winchester.
M. Lansdowne.
M. Salisbury.
M. Hertford.
M. Bute.
M. Exeter.
M. Camden.
M. Hastings.
M. Ailesbury.
M. Bristol.
M. Cleveland.
E. Denbigh.
E. Westmorland.
E. Winchilsea & Nottingham.
E. Essex.
E. Carlisle.
E. Doncaster.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Albemarle.
E. Rosebery.
E. Ferrers.
E. Dartmouth.
E. Tankerville.
E. Brooke & Warwick.
E. Fitzwilliam.
E. Hardwick.
E. De Lawarr.
E. Radnor.
E. Spencer.
E. Norwich.
E. Talbot.
E. Grosvenor.
E. Digby.
E. Carnarvon.
E. Liverpool.
E. Malmesbury.
E. Charlemont.
E. Wicklow.
E. Caledon.
E. Romney.
E. Chichester.
E. Limerick.
E. Nelson.
E. Gosford.
E. Charleville.
E. Manvers.
E. Grey.
E. Harewood.
E. Verulam.
E. Brownlow.
E. Morley.
E. Beauchamp.
E. Glengall.
E. Eldon.
E. Howe.
E. Dudley.
E. Cawdor.
V. Arbuthnott.
V. Maynard.
V. Doneraile.
V. Duncan.
V. St. Vincent.
V. Melville.
V. Sidmouth.
V. Lorton.
V. Gordon.
V. Granville.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Sunderland Harbour Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the Improvement and Preservation of the River Wear and Port and Haven of Sunderland, in the County Palatine of Durham."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Glasgow Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for maintaing and repairing the Road leading from the City of Glasgow, through Cowcaddens, to the North End of the Bridge over that Part of the River Kelvin called the Milnford of Garscube, and for making, repairing and maintaining the Road leading from Blackquarry Toll Bar, by Possil, to the Bridge across the River Alexander at Langbank, in the Counties of Lanark and Stirling."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Queensferry Improvement Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the further Improvement and Support of the Passage across the Frith of Forth called the Queensferry."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

North Level Drainage Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for improving the Drainage of the Lands lying in the North Level, Part of the Great Level of the Fens called Bedford Level, and in Great Portsand, in the Manor of Crowland, and for providing a Navigation between Clows Cross and the Nene Outfall Cut."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Maxwell & Co. v. Stevenson & Co.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing the Cause wherein Messieurs Maxwell and Company are Appellants, and Thomas Stevenson and Company are Respondents:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Cause, by Counsel at the Bar, on the first vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed.

Sheffield Waterworks Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for better supplying with Water the Town and Parish of Sheffield, in the County of York."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill with the Amendments, shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. with Amendments to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To return the said Bill, and acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the same, with some Amendments, to which their Lordships desire their Concurrence.

Sir J. Colquhoun v. Colquhoun, Respondent's Petition to receive his Case, referred to Appeal Comee.

Upon reading the Petition of Robert Colquhoun Esquire, Respondent in a Cause depending in this House, to which Sir James Colquhoun Baronet is Appellant; praying their Lordships, "That his printed Case may be received:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

G. Smith Leave for a Naturalization Bill:

Upon reading the Petition of George Smith of Leeds, in the County of York, Pork Butcher; praying their Lordships, "That Leave may be given to bring in a Bill for his Naturalization:"

It is Ordered, That Leave be given to bring in a Bill, according to the Prayer of the said Petition.

Bill read.

Accordingly, The Earl of Shaftesbury presented to the House a Bill, intituled, "An Act for naturalizing George Smith."

The said Bill was read the First Time."

J. C. Smith Leave for a Naturalization Bill:

Upon reading the Petition of John Christopher Smith of Bradford, in the County of York, Pork Butcher; praying their Lordships, "That Leave may be given to bring in a Bill for his Naturalization:"

It is Ordered, That Leave be given to bring in a Bill, according to the Prayer of the said Petition.

Bill read.

Accordingly, The Earl of Shaftesbury presented to the House a Bill, intituled, "An Act for naturalizing John Christopher Smith."

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Polloc & Govan Railway Bill, Petition against.

Upon reading the Petition of John Hamilton, Robert Maxwell and Robert Reid, Merchants in Glasgow; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act for making and maintaining a Railway from the Lands of Polloc and Govan to the River Clyde, at the Harbour of Broomielaw, in the County of Lanark, with a Branch to communicate therefrom;" and praying their Lordships, "That the same may not pass into a Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Letter from The East India Co. to The Governor General in Bengal, delivered, & referred to East India Comee.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Preston, from the Court of Directors of The East India Company, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to an Order of Friday last,

"Copy of a Letter from the Court of Directors of The East India Company to The Governor General in Council at Fort William in Bengal, in the Territorial Finance Department, dated 19th May 1830."

And then he withdrew.

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Paper do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Paper be printed.

Ordered, That the said Paper be referred to the Select Committee appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China.

Australian Co's Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to amend an Act for granting certain Powers and Authorities to a Company to be incorporated by Charter, to be called "The Australian Agricultural Company," for the Cultivation and Improvement of Waste Lands in the Colony of New South Wales; and for other Purposes relating thereto."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Bogs Draining (Ireland) Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the draining and allotting the Bogs of Ireland;"

Ordered, That the said Bill be read a Second Time on Friday next.

British Spirits, Petition from Forfarshire, &c. against Encrease of Duty on.

Upon reading the Petition of the Proprietors and Occupiers of Land in Forfarshire, Perthshire and Fifeshire, attending the Weekly Corn Market held at Dundee, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to preserve the protecting Difference in the relative Duties on Rum and British Spirits consumed in England, as established in 1825:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Dundee Harbour Bill, Petitions in favor of: (Blairgowrie:) Lochee:

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants and Householders of the Town and Parish of Blairgowrie, in Perthshire, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Manufacturers, Householders and others of Lochee, in the County of Forfar, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Nine Incorporated Trades of Dundee:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Nine Incorporated Trades of the Royal Burgh of Dundee, assembled in Common Hall, under their Common Seal:

Newburgh:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants and Householders of the Burgh and Parish of Newburgh, in the County of Fife, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Letham:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Manufacturers and Householders of Letham, in the County of Forfar, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Kirriemuir:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Manufacturers and Householders of Kirriemuir, in the County of Forfar, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Forfar.

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Manufacturers and Householders of the Burgh of Forfar, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act for more effectually maintaining, improving and extending the Harbour of Dundee, in the County of Forfar;" and severally praying their Lordships, "That the same may pass into a Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Taxes (Ireland), Petition from Waterford against encreasing.

Upon reading the Petition of the Landed Proprietors, Landholders and Freeholders of the County of Waterford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will refuse to sanction the Measures now proposed for augmenting the Taxation, which already presses so severely upon the Resources and productive Industry of Ireland:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

British Spirits, Petition from Ross-shire against Encrease of Duty on.

Upon reading the Petition of the Freeholders, Commissioners of Supply, Heritors, Justices of the Peace, and other Inhabitants of the County of Ross, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships not to sanction the proposed Encrease of Duties on British Spirits:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

M. of Donegall v. Houlditch et al. Appellant's Petition for an early Day, &c. referred to Appeal Comee.

Upon reading the Petition of George Augustus Marquess of Donegall, Appellant in a Cause depending in this House, to which Edward Houlditch, and others, are Respondents; praying, "That their Lordships will appoint an early Day for the Hearing of this Appeal; and that in the mean time the said Edward Houlditch, John Houlditch, James Houlditch and Francis Stubbs may be restrained from proceeding in their Suit in the Court of Chancery in Ireland, save as to the Examination of Witnesses:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Viscount Lifford's Petition, claiming a Right to vote for Peers for Ireland, referred to Comee for Privileges.

Upon reading the Petition of James Viscount Lifford of that Part of the United Kingdom called Ireland, setting forth, "That the Petitioner's Father James late Viscount Lifford, deceased, sat in the House of Lords of Ireland before the Union as Viscount Lifford, and died on or about the 15th Day of April last, leaving their Lordships Petitioner his eldest Son and Heir: That the Petitioner as such eldest Son is now Viscount Lifford, and claims to be entitled to vote at the Elections of Peers of Ireland to sit in the Parliament of the United Kingdom;" and therefore praying, "That his said Claim may be admitted by their Lordships:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Lords Committees for Privileges, to consider and report.

The King's Signature Bill presented:

The Order of the Day being read for the Lords to be summoned;

It was moved, "That His Majesty's most gracious Message delivered to the House Yesterday be now read."

The same was accordingly read by the Clerk.

Then The Lord Chancellor presented to the House a Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable His Majesty to appoint certain Persons to affix His Majesty's Royal Signature to Instruments requiring such Signature."

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Ordered, That the said Bill be printed.

Standing Orders 26 & 155 to be considered on it:

Ordered, That the Standing Orders Nos. 26 and 155, relative to Bills not being read or proceeded in Twice the same Day, be taken into Consideration on Thursday next, in order to their being dispensed with on the last-mentioned Bill; and that the Lords be summoned.

Select Committee appointed to search for Precedents as to the Mode of the affixing The King's Signature.

It was moved, "That a Select Committee be appointed to examine and report Precedents of such Proceedings as may have been had as to the Mode of affixing The King's Signature to any Public Instruments requiring the Sign Manual."

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Ordered, That the Lords following be appointed a Select Committee to examine Precedents of such Proceedings as may have been had as to the Mode of affixing The King's Signature to any Public Instruments requiring the Sign Manual; and to report to the House:

E. Carnarvon.
E. Malmesbury.
E. Grey.
E. Eldon.
V. Melville.
V. Sidmouth.
V. Gordon.
L. Bp. London.
L. Holland.
L. Wellesley.
L. Manners.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Tenterden.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Chancellor.
L. Abp. York.
L. President.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Richmond.
D. Devonshire.
D. Wellington.
M. Lansdowne.
M. Camden.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet To-morrow, at Twelve o'Clock at Noon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Conference on the Conduct of Sir J. Barrington.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Lord Francis Leveson Gower, and others;

To desire a Conference with this House upon a Matter of high Importance and Concern, respecting the due Administration of Justice.

And then they withdrew.

It was moved "to agree to the said Conference, as desired, and to appoint it presently in the Painted Chamber."

The same was agreed to.

And the Messengers were again called in, and informed, "That the Lords agree to a Conference, as desired, and appoint it presently in the Painted Chamber."

Then the Lords following were named Managers of the Conference:

V. Melville.
L. Bp. London.
L. Ellenborough.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. President.
M. Lansdowne.
E. Malmesbury.

The House being informed, "That the Managers for the Commons were ready for the Conference in the Painted Chamber;"

The Names of the Managers for this House were called over:

And the House was adjourned during Pleasure, and the Lords went to the Conference:

Which being ended, the House was resumed:

And The Lord President reported, "That they had met the Managers for the Commons at the Conference, which on their Part was managed by Lord Francis Leveson Gower and others, who acquainted the Managers for the Lords, that the Commons had agreed to an Address to be presented to His Majesty for the Removal of Sir Jonah Barrington from his Office of Judge of the High Court of Admiralty in Ireland; to which they desire the Concurrence of their Lordships; which Address is as follows:

"Most Gracious Sovereign,

"We, Your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Commons, in Parliament assembled, beg leave humbly to represent to Your Majesty, that the Office of Judge of the High Court of Admiralty in Ireland is an Office of Dignity and Importance, on the impartial and incorrupt Execution of which the Honour of the Crown, and the Protection of the Rights and Interests of many, both of Your Majesty's Subjects and of Foreigners engaged in Maritime Pursuits, greatly depend:

"That by Letters Patent under the Great Seal of Ireland bearing Date the 23d May 1797, Doctor Barrington, now Sir Jonah Barrington, was appointed to the said Office of Judge of the High Court of Admiralty in Ireland:

"That it appears to Your faithful Subjects that Sir Jonah Barrington, as Judge of the High Court of Admiralty in Ireland, did in the Years 1805 and 1806, under colour of his Official Authority, apply to his own Use Two Sums amounting to £500 9s. 2d. out of the Proceeds of the Derelict Ship 'Nancy,' then lodged in the Hands of the Registrar of that Court; and that he did in the Year 1810, in a similar Manner, apply to his own Use the Sum of £200 out of the Proceeds of the 'Redstrand' Derelict:

"That it appears to Your faithful Subjects, That Sir Jonah Barrington has been thereby guilty of serious Malversation in the Discharge of his Office of Judge of the High Court of Admiralty; and that it is unfit, and would be of bad Example, that he should continue to hold the said Office:

"We therefore humbly pray Your Majesty, That Your Majesty will be pleased to remove Sir Jonah Barrington from the Office which he holds of Judge of the High Court of Admiralty in Ireland."

Ordered, That the said Address be taken into Consideration on Friday the 4th of June next; and that the Lords be summoned.

Order of the Treasury, remitting Duties on certain West India Produce, Ordered.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, "A Copy of an Order from the Board of Treasury directing the Custom House Duties heretofore levied upon West India Produce, subject to the Four and Half per Cent. Duty to the Crown, to be remitted."

Clifton Bridge Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for building a Bridge over the River Avon, from Clifton, in the County of Gloucester, to the opposite Side of the River in the County of Somerset; and for making convenient Roads and Approaches to communicate therewith," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Emeris's Estate Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for confirming a Partition made by George Marmaduke Alington and Samuel Rowe Esquires of Estates in the County of Lincoln devised in undivided Moieties by the respective Wills of Sarah Rowe and Elizabeth Rowe deceased," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Duke of Argyll's Estate Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for empowering George William Duke of Argyll and his Trustee to borrow a Sum of Money, and to make it a Charge on the Estate of Argyll, upon certain Conditions," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Polloc & Govan Railway Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for making and maintaining a Railway from the Lands of Polloc and Govan to the River Clyde, at the Harbour of Broomielaw, in the County of Lanark, with a Branch to communicate therefrom," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Humbert's Naturalization Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for naturalizing Francis Joseph Humbert," was committed.

Beverley Road Bill, Consideration of Amendments put off for 6 Months.

The Earl of Shaftesbury also reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and otherwise improving the Road from Beverley, by Molescroft, to Kendell House, and from Molescroft to Bainton Balk, in the County of York," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments were read by the Clerk as follow; (vizt.)

"Pr. 2. L. 3. Leave out ("Road") and insert ("Roads")

"L. 4. Leave out ("Road") and insert ("Roads")

"L. 9. Leave out ("Road") and insert ("Roads")

"Pr. 3. L. 2. Leave out ("more effectually")

"L. 5. After ("and") insert ("the Road")

"Pr. 5. L. 18. Leave out ("Road") and insert ("Roads")

"Pr. 9. L. 5. Leave out ("Road") and insert ("Roads")

"Pr. 10. L. 11. Leave out ("Road") and insert ("Roads") and in the same Line after ("Horse") insert ("or") and also in the same Line leave out ("or Cattle")

"L. 15. After ("Horse") insert ("or") and in the same Line leave out ("or Cattle")

"L. 30. Leave out ("Road") and insert ("Roads")

"L. 31. After ("Horse") insert ("or") and in the same Line leave out ("or Cattle")

"L. 34. Leave out ("Road") and insert ("Roads")

"Pr.11. L. 5. Leave out ("Road") and insert ("Roads")

"L. 6. After ("Horse") insert ("or")

"L. 7. Leave out ("or Cattle")

"L. 8. Leave out from ("thereof") to ("Provided") in Press 12, Line 2, and insert Clauses A and B.

"Clause A. And be it further enacted, That none of the Tolls hereby authorized to be taken shall be applied in or towards the Repair of any Branch Road upon which there shall not be a Toll Gate erected or continued under the Authority of the said Trustees; and no more of the Tolls or other Monies arising by virtue of this Act shall be laid out or expended upon the said Branch Road, or in the Payment of any Principal Money borrowed on the Credit only of the Tolls arising or payable upon such Branch Road, or the Interest thereof, than shall be actually raised or received upon or in respect of such Branch Road."

"Clause B. And be it further enacted, That as well all the Monies which before the Commencement of this Act shall have been raised or produced by virtue of the said recited Acts of the Sixth, Twenty-seventh and Forty-eighth Years of the Reign of His said late Majesty King George the Third, hereby repealed, and which shall remain undisposed of, and also all the Monies which shall be produced under or by virtue of this Act, shall be applied, in the first place, in Payment of all the Charges and Expences which shall have been incurred in applying for and obtaining and passing this Act; in the second place, in paying and discharging the Interest now in arrear and accruing and becoming due upon the several Mortgages and Securities which have been already made and granted or which shall be at any Time hereafter made or granted upon the said Tolls in pursuance of this Act; and, in the next place, in defraying the Expences of making, erecting and keeping in Repair Toll Gates, Weighing Engines, Toll Houses, and other Buildings upon the said Roads, and of widening, repairing, preserving and otherwise improving the said Roads, and in putting this Act into Execution in all other respects; and lastly, in reducing, paying off and discharging the Principal Sums for the Time being due and to become due on Security of the Tolls and Duties granted by this Act, and to or for no other Use or Purpose whatsoever."

"Pr. 12. L.6. Leave out ("Road") and insert ("Roads")

"L. 15. Leave out ("Road") and insert ("Roads")

"In the Title of the Bill:

"L.1. Leave out ("more effectually")

"L. penult. After ("and") insert ("the Road")

Ordered, That the said Amendments be taken into Consideration on this Day Six Months.

Suits in Equity Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the Third Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for further facilitating the Administration of Justice in Suits and other Proceedings in Equity;" and for the Lords to be summoned;

Ordered, That the said Bill be read the Third Time To-morrow; and that the Lords be summoned.

Masters in Chancery Bill.

Ordered, That the Bill, intituled, "An Act to regulate the Salaries and Emoluments of the Masters in Ordinary of the High Court of Chancery, and the Clerks employed in the Offices of the said Masters," be read a Second Time To-morrow; and that the Lords be summoned.

Register of Chancery Bill.

Ordered, That the Bill, intituled, "An Act to regulate the Office of Register and Keeper of the Register and Registers of the High Court of Chancery," be read a Second Time To-morrow; and that the Lords be summoned.

Boydell Leave for a Divorce Bill:

A Petition of Samuel Boydell of Ilchester, in the County of Somerset, Gentleman, praying their Lordships, "That Leave may be given to bring in a Bill to dissolve his Marriage with Jane Boydell Boydell his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes," being offered to be presented to the House;

The House was informed, "That Mr. Charles Boydell was attending."

He was Ordered to be called in:

And being called in accordingly, and sworn at the Bar, delivered a Copy of the Proceedings for a Divorce a Mensâ et Thoro, and the Definitive Sentence of Divorce, in the Consistory Court of The Bishop of London, intituled, Boydell against Boydell;" which he said he had examined with the Originals, and that the same were true Copies:

And then he withdrew.

Ordered, That the said Proceedings and Sentence do lie on the Table.

Then the said Petition was presented and read.

Ordered, That Leave be given to bring in a Bill, according to the Prayer of the said Petition.

Bill presented:

Accordingly, The Earl of Shaftesbury presented to the House a Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Samuel Boydell with Jane Boydell Boydell his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes."

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Order for 2d Reading:

Ordered, That the said Bill be read a Second Time on Wednesday the 9th of June next, and that Notice thereof be affixed on the Doors of this House, and the Lords summoned; and that the said Samuel Boydell may be heard by his Counsel, at the said Second Reading, to make out the Truth of the Allegations of the Bill; and that the said Jane Boydell may have a Copy of the Bill, and that Notice be given her of the said Second Reading; and that she be at liberty to be heard by her Counsel what she may have to offer against the said Bill at the same Time.

Petitioner to attend.

Ordered, That Samuel Boydell do attend this House on Wednesday the 9th of June next, in order to his being examined upon the Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Samuel Boydell with Jane Boydell Boydell his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes," if the House shall think fit, whether there has or has not been any Collusion, directly or indirectly, on his Part, relative to any Act of Adultery that may have been committed by his Wife; or whether there be any Collusion, directly or indirectly, between him and his Wife, or any other Person or Persons, touching the said Bill of Divorce, or touching any Proceedings or Sentence of Divorce had in the Ecclesiastical Court at his Suit, or touching any Action at Law which may have been brought by him against any Person for Criminal Conversation with his the said Samuel Boydell's Wife; and also whether, at the Time of the Adultery of which he complains, his Wife was, by Deed, or otherwise by his Consent, living separate and apart from him, and released by him, as far as in him lies, from her conjugal Duty, or whether she was, at the Time of such Adultery, cohabiting with him, and under the Protection and Authority of him as her Husband.

East Retford Election Bill:

The Order of the Day being read for the further Consideration and Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to prevent Bribery and Corruption in the Election of Burgesses to serve in Parliament for the Borough of East Retford; and for the Lords to be summoned; and for permitting Counsel to examine Witnesses in support of the Bill; and for hearing Counsel on the Petition of the Burgesses of the Borough of East Retford, in the County of Nottingham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, praying their Lordships, "That the said Bill may not pass into a Law;"

Counsel were accordingly called in.

Then George Brown was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name George Brown?"

"It is."

"Are you a Burgess of East Retford?"

"I am."

"When were you admitted; in what Year?"

"I think, in 1798 or 1799; I will not be certain which."

"Do you recollect the Election in 1818, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were elected?"

"I do."

"Did you promise your Vote previous to that Election?"

"I promised my Vote to both Candidates."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"I did once receive, certainly, an Envelope-a blank Envelope, either with Twenty or Twenty-one Pounds in it."

"Did you promise your Vote in the Election of 1820?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"I do not recollect that I did."

"Did not you also receive, in the second Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton?"

"It was in the second Election I did receive either Twenty or Twenty-one Pounds."

"Did you receive One or Two Parcels?"

"I do not recollect having received more than One."

"With regard to the previous Election of 1818, did you not receive any Packet after that Election?"

"I do not recollect that I did."

"Where were you residing at the Time?"

"I was residing in Manchester."

"Do you recollect the early Part of 1819; were you then living at Manchester?"

"Yes, I was."

"Did you not receive any Packet at Manchester, in any Part of that Year?"

"I was a Commercial Traveller; and being so much out, that Packet may have been received, and I not recollect it. The Packet to which I allude was received in my Absence."

"After your Return, was any Money produced to you in the Year 1819?"

"I do not recollect that there was."

"Can you undertake to say one way or the other?"

"I cannot; not to swear it."

"Did you vote, or promise your Vote, when Mr. Robert Crawford and Mr. John Jeffrey were elected?"

"No, I did not; I did not vote for that Interest."

"Did you vote against those Gentlemen?"

"I do not think I was at that Election."

"Do you recollect the Election of Sir William Ingilby and General Charles Crawford?"

"I do."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Well, I do not recollect that I did; I might have received a very great deal, if I had been so disposed."

"Did you refuse any thing after that Election?"

"I refused at the Time; the Election Day."

"Whom did you refuse on the Election Day?"

"A Person of the Name of Slater."

"What was he; was he a Voter?"

"No."

"Had you any Money offered to you at any other Election that you refused in like Manner?"

"No, I had not."

"When was it you might have had a great deal of Money, if you had been so disposed?"

"The Day of the Election I do not recollect, but it was at that Time when the Newcastle Party certainly wished to have brought in Two Members, and they only brought in One; Sir William Ingilby was brought in in the Place of a Mr. Higham. I was fetched out of Norfolk at the Time; and it was the very Day that I appeared at the Poll a large Sum of Money was offered me by the Newcastle Party."

"And which you refused?"

"I did refuse it, from Principle; I would not be bought and sold."

"Did you vote at the Election of Robert Crawford Esquire and John Jeffrey Esquire?"

"I believe I did not; I believe there was no Opposition, consequently I did not go down."

"Do you recollect the Election of Mr. Osbaldeston and Mr. Marsh?"

"I do."

"Did you take any Part in that Election?"

"Yes, I went down."

"For whom did you go down?"

"I voted for Osbaldeston and Marsh, both."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"The last Election I voted for Sir Robert Henry Wright Wilson."

"Was your Family established at Manchester in 1818, did you say?"

"Yes, they were."

"And in 1819?"

"Yes."

"In what Way did you receive the Packet you have mentioned, after the Election of 1820?"

"I really do not know, being from Home; I am not prepared to say."

"Who handed it to you?"

"My Wife informed me of it when I returned."

"Is that Lady resident at Manchester now?"

"Yes, she is."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"What are you now?"

"I am a Commission Agent."

"Where do you reside?"

"In Manchester."

"Do you carry on Business in a large Way now?"

"Pretty well; not extensive."

"How long have you been a Freeman of Retford?"

"Six-and-thirty Years, I presume."

"What was the first Election you remember?"

"Petrie and Amcotts's; that was the first Election that I voted at."

"Whom did you vote for?"

"I believe I voted for them both."

"Do not you recollect?"

"I cannot recollect; it is a long Time ago."

"Did they stand on the same Interest?"

"Yes, I think they did; that there was a joint Interest towards the latter End of the Canvass, previous to the Election."

"Only towards the latter End of the Canvass?"

"I think towards the latter End."

"Did they stand against the Duke's Interest, or upon it?"

Against the Duke's Interest."

"Did they succeed?"

"They succeeded; and the Newcastle Party was thrown out at that Election."

"Did you receive any Money upon that Occasion?"

"Upon my Word I cannot recollect; I do not recollect receiving any thing at that Period."

"I mean with reference to the Election?"

"I received nothing but for my Expences in attending."

"You received for your Expences in attending?"

"Yes."

"Do you mean that you received a Sum of Money sufficient for your Expences?"

"I suppose I did."

"Recollecting that you received a Sum of Money sufficient for your Expences, have you any Doubt whether you received any Money on any other Account; or are you quite certain you did not?"

"I really cannot speak as to being positive about it."

"But you have no Recollection that you did?"

"I cannot recollect."

"In what Year was that; was it in 1796?"

"I cannot tell; it was very soon after I became of Age to vote; but I do not know the Year, being so far back."

"In Sir William Ingilby's Election, you say you might have received a great deal of Money?"

"I might."

"What do you mean by a great deal of Money?"

"I might have received a Thousand Pounds from the opposite Party."

"Then the Market Price has fallen at Retford?"

"I do not know that was the general Market Price."

"Was your Vote of any pecuniary Value beyond that of any other Freeman?"

"It was at the Time; and I will explain that."

"Were you to give a Plumper?"

"Yes; it was a Plumper which I gave for Sir William Ingilby."

"Did you get the Thousand Pounds?"

"No; that was at the opposite Party; for I was brought out of Norfolk, and my casting Vote gave the Election to Sir William Ingilby."

"You did not receive any thing then?"

"No; I did not receive any thing from that Party."

"Then how do you know that you might have received any thing?"

"I had an Offer made to me by a Person of the Name of Slater, who was very strongly in the Interest of the Duke."

"What was Slater; what was his Line of Life?"

"I think he was what may be termed the Corporation Bailiff; something in that Way."

"What may be termed the Corporation Bailiff is the Head of the Corporation?"

"No; a sort of Under Bailiff."

"There are Senior and Junior Bailiffs at Retford?"

"Yes; but he was not in that Office."

"Do you mean he was the Serjeant at Mace?"

"He was something in that Way."

"He offered you a Thousand Pounds?"

"Yes; he offered me as I was going up to the Town Hall. In fact, I was in a very ill State of Health, and was supported by Two Gentlemen to the Town Hall."

"Did he know you were going to vote for the other Side?"

"He did."

"Did he offer you this Thousand Pounds?"

"He said, if I would vote for the Newcastle Party he would insure me a Thousand Pounds."

"He did not produce the Money?"

"No, I did not see it."

"Who were the Gentlemen attending you at that Time; are they alive?"

"They are both dead."

"What were their Names?"

"One was a Brother of mine, and another was the Landlord of the House I was at."

"Was there a considerable Crowd about you at the Time?"

"Yes, there was; they were very glad to see me."

"Was this Offer made in a Whisper?"

"I was called on one Side, certainly."

"You left your Friends, and went on one Side?"

"An Offer had been made to my Brother previously."

"You cannot know that?"

"I merely go by Information."

"There were Gentlemen with you, and he called you on one Side?"

"I stopped; and he said, "If you please, I wish to speak to you."

"Had he his Silver-laced Hat on?"

"No; he had no Insignia of Office on, that I recollect."

"Did you know him?"

"Oh yes, very well."

"You knew him to be the Serjeant at Mace?"

"I knew he had something to do with the Corporation, but I did not know his Office."

"Did he beckon you aside?"

"He wished to speak to me."

"Where did you go?"

"Not Three Yards. The Party with me withdrew, and he spoke to me. When he made me the Offer, I said, "I will lose my Existence first; I have made my Promise."

"You refused to take a Thousand Pounds for your Vote?"

"Yes."

"I hope it is not a rare Thing with you in the Town of Retford. Do you believe it would have been paid if you had given your Vote?"

"From the Anxiety he manifested at the Time, I have no doubt he had a real Intention."

"And you had the Virtue to resist?"

"Yes."

"In the Year 1802, had you any Bribe at all?"

"No, I was never bribed in my Life."

"I am glad to hear that; the Reason of my asking that is, that you said something about a Packet in 1820?"

"Yes; I said there was a Packet, but who it was from I do not know."

"You voted for Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton?"

"Yes."

"For both of them?"

"Yes, for both of them."

"But One Packet came?"

"I remember a Packet being spoken of."

"Did you ever see that Packet?"

"No, I never did."

"Who told you of it?"

"My Wife told me."

"Except as your Wife told you, cannot tell?"

"I told her to keep the Money, for I considered it as found; and I made her a Present of it."

"You did not apply it to your own Use?"

"Oh no."

"Had you any Suspicion at the Time that it had to do with the Retford Election?"

"I did not know whether it had; it came from some Friend, but I did not know from whom."

"You gave it to your Wife as a Treasure-trove, and told her to take it as a Present?"

"Yes."

"In 1826, you voted for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Promise from him?"

"None whatever."

"Did you receive any Money subsequently to voting?"

"None."

"Had you any Inducement to vote for him?"

"Yes, I had, from his Principles."

"You voted in 1826, as you had in 1796, for your Principles?"

"Yes."

"And never received a Bribe in your Life?"

"I never was bribed."

"Did you ever give your Vote as a Freeman of Retford from a corrupt Motive, or to the best of your Judgment?"

"Always to the best of my Judgment, from Principle."

"Not influenced by any pecuniary Consideration?"

"Certainly not."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"You say you desired your Wife to keep the Money?"

"Yes; I made her a Present of it."

"Had you any Doubt from whom it was sent?"

"I did not know from whence it came; I could have no Doubt about it."

"Do you mean to state to their Lordships that you had any Doubt from whence and for what Purpose it was sent?"

"I do not know as to the Doubt; I had no Doubt some Friend sent it, but who it was I do not know."

"When you told your Wife to keep it, did you consider what it applied to?"

"No; I had no particular Application of the Idea to my own Mind where it came from, or to apply it in any way particularly."

"Do you mean seriously, on your Oath, to represent to their Lordships that you had no Idea whence it came, or for what Purpose?"

"I did not know from what Friend it came."

"Had you any Doubt that it had reference to the Election?"

"It might or it might not."

"At the Time you directed your Wife to keep this, had you any Doubt it came with reference to the Election?"

"It is most probable that it had."

"Had you any Doubt, when you desired the Money to be so applied, that it came with reference to the Election?"

"It is so long back that I cannot give a positive Answer to that; I might suppose it came from some Friend belonging to the Election, or interested in it."

"Had you any Doubt, when you told your Wife to keep it as found, as you considered it, that it related to the Election?"

"Well, I think myself that I did suppose it came from some Friend."

"In reference to the Election?"

"With reference to the Election."

"Why, if you had the Virtue to refuse a Bribe, did you not take some Steps to return it?"

"I did not know from whom it came."

"How much had you the Virtue to receive, in the Shape of Expences, after the Election of Petrie and Amcotts?"

"Perhaps Seven or Eight Pounds, necessary Expences in treating my Friends, and so on. I certainly took an Interest to bring them in."

"Having taken an Interest to bring them in, do you mean to represent that you did not receive more than Seven Pounds for Expences?"

"You are speaking as to the Election itself; not subsequently."

"As to the Election; we will get subsequently afterwards."

"I was paid necessary Expences, certainly, which had been incurred; fetching in Freemen, and so on; going over to Sir Wharton Amcotts, and a Variety of other Things, and so on, were paid me."

"What did the Expences paid you amount to?"

"Perhaps Seven or Eight Pounds."

"Not more?"

"No, not more."

"Do you mean to represent to their Lordships, that you did not receive a Packet, or Sum of Money, after that Election?"

"Yes, I did."

"How much did it contain?"

"Twenty-one Pounds; Twenty Pounds or Twentyone Pounds, I will not be certain which."

"I am now speaking of the Election of Petrie and Amcotts. Did not you say you received about Seven Pounds for your Expences, and that you received, after that Election, a Packet containing Twenty Guineas; is that so, or not?"

"Yes, it is."

"That is in addition to the Packet received after 1820?"

"Surely. I beg your Pardon; I thought you were speaking of Petrie and Amcotts."

"It is in addition to that you received after 1820?"

"Yes, exactly."

"They were Two separate Packets?"

"Yes."

"As that was the Election at which you had had the Virtue to refuse the Thousand Pounds, can you state to their Lordships why you did not return the Money which came, from wherever it came from?"

"I did not know whom it did come from."

"Do you mean, upon your Oath, to state to their Lordships, that you had any Doubt that was with reference to the Election of Petrie and Amcotts; had you the slightest Doubt?"

"No, I had not, at that Time; but you were speaking subsequently of the last Election."

"We had gone back to Petrie's Election. Have you any Doubt whatever, that the Twenty Guineas you received after Petrie and Amcotts's Election had reference to the Election?"

"I believe it had."

"As you had the Virtue, which my Learned Friend has described, to refuse the Thousand Pounds, how came you not to return the Money, having no Doubt it had reference to that Election?"

"I did not know whom it came from; only that it might have reference to the Parties."

"Were you well acquainted with Mr. Petrie?"

"Yes; I knew Mr. Petrie."

"With Sir Wharton Amcotts?"

"Yes."

"Did you know their Agents at that Election; as you had been yourself conducting Voters?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did it occur to you, that it would be conducting yourself with the Virtue you had shewn before, to return to either of those Gentlemen the Twenty Guineas you had received?"

"I did not know that I had it from them."

"Had you any Doubt it came out of their Pockets?"

"I do not know."

"Was it soon after?"

"It was subsequent to the Election; probably Twelve Months, or Eighteen Months?"

"Had your Virtue oozed out in the mean time that you had before, when you refused the Thousand Pounds; how came you not to return it, if you thought it had reference to the Election?"

"I was not certain whom it came from; that was the Reason."

"It was from that Uncertainty whom it came from?"

"If a Person gets Twenty Pounds or Twenty Guineas, and that has no Name to it, how does he know whom to transmit it back to?"

"Having stated you had not the slightest Doubt that it was with reference to the Election, did you take any Steps to return it?"

"No."

"Did you recommend to Mrs. Brown to take Measures for returning it?"

"I do not recollect that I did."

"Did you tell her to apply it to her own Purposes?"

"I do not recollect whether I did or not."

"Have you any Doubt that you did?"

"I suppose I did."

(Mr. Adam.) "Petrie and Amcotts's Election was in the Year 1796, was it not?"

"I believe it was."

"Do you mean to say it was after that Election you received this Packet?"

"Yes."

"You were a very young Freeman then?"

"Very young."

"Where were you residing?"

"I was residing at Retford at the Time."

"Were you then the Agent or Rider that you speak of?"

"I was in the House; I was Apprentice; my Master died, and I had then the Management of the Business."

"You were living in Retford, in the Management of your deceased Master's Business?"

"Yes."

"Were you married at that Time?"

"No."

"How old were you?"

"Probably about One-and-twenty."

"That was the first Election you had any Personal Concern in?"

"It was."

"I thought this was the Election you had your Expences paid?"

"I had some few Expences paid, in going over to Sir Wharton Amcotts, and coming up to London with the London Voters."

"Had you known any thing about Elections before that Time?"

"Very little."

"How long after the Election was it that this Packet found its Way to you?"

"That I cannot say."

"Do you think it was a Year, or Two Years?"

"At so distant a Period, I cannot speak to it; it might be Twelve Months."

"Had you any Conversation with Petrie and Amcotts, at the Time you promised your Vote?"

"In what respect?"

"Had you any about your Vote?"

"Yes."

"Did they canvass you?"

"They canvassed me, certainly."

"At the Time they canvassed you, had they any Conversation with you about your Vote?"

"Yes; I promised Mr. Petrie a Plumper at the Time, provided Sir Wharton Amcotts did not come forward; but he came forward immediately after, and then it was generally understood that Mr. Petrie and Sir Wharton Amcotts would unite their Interest."

"Sir Wharton Amcotts was a Gentleman of that Neighbourhood at that Time?"

"Yes."

"Were your Family connected with him?"

"Yes; all our Family voted for him."

"Had he an old Interest in the Town?"

"Yes."

"Had he or any of his Family an Interest in the Town before?"

"Yes."

"How came you to make a Reservation, that you must divide your Vote if he came forward?"

"On this Account, that he had expressed an Intention and then withdrew it, and came forward afterwards."

"When did you first see this Packet you have spoken of?"

"I cannot speak as to that."

"Whom did you get it from?"

"That I cannot say."

"Did you open it yourself?"

"Well, really I cannot say; not the Particulars about it."

"Can you tell me what it contained?"

"I remember it was either Twenty Pounds or Guineas."

"Was it in Guineas or Paper?"

"That I cannot tell."

"How do you know there was Twenty Pounds or Guineas, if you forget all these Particulars?

"I only know there was that Amount; but whether in Paper or Gold I am not able to say."

"How it found its Way to you you cannot tell?"

"No."

"Or from whom, you cannot tell?"

"No, I cannot tell."

"Was any Promise ever made to you before you gave your Vote, about your receiving Money?"

"No, none whatever."

"And you had no Notion in the World from whom this Money came?"

"No, I had none in the least whatever; the Money was always in Blank Envelopes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John White was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Is your Name John White."

"Yes."

"In what Line of Life are you?"

"A Cordwainer."

"Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been a Freeman of Retford; was it about the Year 1813?"

"Sixteen or Seventeeth Years."

"Do you recollect the Election when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates for the first Time?"

"Yes."

"Was that the first Election at which you were a Freeman?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise either of those Gentlemen?"

"Both of them."

"After that Election, did you receive any Packets?"

"Yes, I believe I did."

"How many?"

"Well, I believe I received one myself, and another Person received another for me."

"What did that Packet contain?"

"Four Fives and a One Pound Note."

"Did any other Person give you another Packet about that Time?"

"No."

"You told me just now, that some other Person had received a Packet?"

"My Father did receive one."

"Did your Father deliver any Packet to you?"

"He did not deliver it as a Packet to me."

"What did he deliver to you?"

"He delivered me some Money out of it."

"What was the Money?"

"The same Quantity."

"At the Time he delivered that Money to you, did he say what he thought it was?"

"He told me a Gentleman gave it to him, whom he did not know."

"Where were you a residing at that Time?"

"At Hayton; a Village Three Miles from Retford."

"How long was it from the Time you received the first Packet to the Time your Father gave you that Money?"

"I think it was about a Fortnight."

"Was your Father a Freeman?"

"No."

"With respect to the Election of 1820, the second Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans; did you promise your Vote to those Gentlemen again?"

"To both of them."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"The same Quantity."

"Do you mean by that, Two Sums of £21 each?"

"Yes; Two Sums of £21 each."

"For whom did you vote at the last Election?"

"Mr. Dundas and Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"Were you canvassed at all on behalf of Sir Robert Dundas?"

"I was."

"Who canvassed you?"

"I believe a Clerk belonging to Mr. -I forget his Name; but a Merchant in Liverpool."

"You are residing at Liverpool now, are you not?"

"Yes, I am."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"Do you recollect who canvassed you in 1818?"

"Yes; I believe the Gentlemen canvassed me personally."

"Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"Yes."

"Did they say any thing to you about your Vote?"

"Nothing further than wishing for my Vote."

"They asked you for your Vote and Interest?"

"Yes; that was all."

"Did they make any Allusion to any Packet at the Time they canvassed you?"

"Not at all."

"Did you expect to receive any Packet after the Election?"

"Not at all."

"Were you surprised at the Receipt of it?"

"Certainly, I was surprised at its coming, without any Signature."

"Was it directed to you?"

"Yes."

"Where were you residing when it came?"

"In Hayton."

"Three Miles from Retford?"

"Yes."

"Do you know when it came?"

"I cannot tell the Day of the Month."

"At what Time of the Year?"

"I know it was in a coolish Time of the Year, but I cannot tell whether it was in the latter End of the Year; I know it was in a cold Time of the Year."

"Was it in the Morning, the Evening, or the Middle of the Day?"

"It was in the Afternoon; it was about Four o'Clock."

"Did you see the Person who left it?"

"Yes."

"Did you know him?"

"No; I never saw him in my Life before, to my Knowledge."

"What passed?"

"He laid it down on the Table, and asked me what my Name was; and he said then it was all right."

"Did you understand any thing by the Words "all right?"

"No; he said it was all right; that it was my Name, when I told my Name."

"Did you attach any Meaning to the Words "all right?"

"Not at all; only I understood he was right when I told him my Name; he asked me whether my Name was John White."

"And then he said it was all right, and left the Packet on the Table?"

"Yes."

"Did you open the Packet immediately?"

"No, not immediately."

"How soon did you open it?"

"Perhaps a few Minutes."

"Then you found Four Five Pound Notes and a One Pound Note in it?"

"Yes."

"How long was this after the Election of 1818?"

"I cannot say, but perhaps from Four to Six Months."

"Then your Father said something to you about a Packet?"

"He said some Gentleman had given him one that he did not know, but he asked him whether he was Father to John White."

"Did he or you open the Packet?"

"He opened the Packet, and would not tell me what it was then, or any thing."

"When was this?"

"It was after the first Election."

"How long?"

"Why, perhaps Four Months after."

"That came before the other then?"

"Before the last? No; I believe I received the first myself."

"That, you said, was about Six Months after the Election; then if your Father received One Four Months after the Election, that must have been the first?"

"No; I understood you the first Election; I received the first myself, and then the other came in that Way; I received no more than One, and my Father One."

"Do you know at what Time your Father received that?"

"I cannot say; but I know it was within a Fortnight of my receiving the other."

"Do you know how long he had it in his Possession?"

"He gave it me that very Night, I was told, they left it me; he received it, and he brought it to me that Night."

"Where did he receive it?"

"In the Town of Retford."

"He did not say where he got it?"

"No; he told me he could not tell me."

"You were very much surprised at receiving it?"

"Yes; I was more surprised than receiving the first."

"They were Two unexpected Presents?"

"Yes."

"In 1820, who canvassed you?"

"They canvassed me both themselves."

"They came and called upon you?"

"Yes."

"Was there any thing said to you with reference to those Packets?"

"Not at all."

"They did not ask you whether you had had the good Fortune to receive any thing after 1818?"

"Never a Word."

"They never alluded to the Four Five Pound Notes and the One Pound Note?"

"No; they never mentioned a Word of it."

"You promised them your Vote?"

"Yes."

"Did you poll?"

"There was no Poll."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Yes; the same as the other."

"Did you vote at the last Election?"

"Yes."

"For whom?"

"For Sir Henry Wright Wilson and Mr. Dundas."

"Did you know their Principles?"

"Why, I never enquired their Principles; but I knew them very well by what I heard."

"You liked the Men?"

"No, I cannot say I did, one of them, very well."

"Which was that?"

"Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"Did you give him your Vote, notwithstanding?"

"Yes; I told him at the Time."

"It was very honest in you to give him your Vote?"

"Mr. Brown and -I forget the other, pressed me."

"Do you know any thing of Mr. Brown?"

"Yes, very well."

"Where does he live?"

"He lived in Retford at the Time, but I do not know where he lives now."

"Are you a Friend of his?"

"I do not know, as to a Friend; I have not seen him lately."

"What did he say when he canvassed you for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"He told me a great deal that was false about him."

"Do you happen to recollect it?"

"Yes, I recollect a Part. He said, they were determined on having an Election, for the other Party was in for full Redemption Men again; and I said, before he got Redemption Men, I would leave the other Party; then, when I got over to Retford, I found there had never been any thing of the sort, but the one was trying as much as the other; then, on that, I was determined on leaving him, 'till I came to the Hall; then, when they put it to me, instead of saying Wrightson, I brought it out Wright Wilson."

"You made a Mistake?"

"Yes."

"Then the Information that Mr. Brown gave you was inaccurate?"

"Yes."

"What he told you was not true?"

"No."

"So far as you have had Communication with Mr. Edward Cromwell Brown, you found he was capable of making Statements not founded in Fact?"

"I did not find him to be a Friend."

"You made a Mistake, and voted for Wilson, meaning to vote for Wrightson?"

"Yes."

"Was there any Promise made to you previous to the Election of 1826?"

"Not at all."

"Have you received any Money since?"

"No, not a Farthing."

"You had left Retford some Time?"

"Yes; Nine Years."

"You are residing there now?"

"No."

"When were you asked to come up here?"

"Sunday Morning, between Twelve and One o'Clock."

"Have you seen any body since you came to Town with reference to this Affairs?"

"I have seen them that sent for me up."

"Who is that?"

"Mr.Heptinstall."

"Did he examine you as to the Evidence you were to give before their Lordships?"

"No; they told me what they wanted me for, about the Affair of receiving Packets; that was all."

"He recalled to your Recollection the Subject of the Packets?"

"Yes."

"Can you recollect what he said?"

"Whether I had received any Money, or not; or whether I had not ever had a Promise of it; that was just all he mentioned to me."

"He asked you those Two Questions?"

"Yes."

"What did you say?"

"I told him I could answer that."

"Were those the Words you used?"

"Yes; I did not state to him whether I had or not."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Cutler was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Thomas Cutler?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Do you live at West Retford?"

"Yes."

"When were you a Freeman first?"

"In 1812."

"How long before the Election in 1812; a few Months?"

"About Two Months."

"Did you promise your Vote at that Election?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise it to?"

"To Mr. Marsh and Mr. Osbaldeston."

"Did you know the Angel Inn at Retford?"

"Yes."

"Did you find yourself there in the Year 1814; did you go there?"

"Not in the Year 1814."

"Did you see Mr. Hannam there?"

"Not in the Year 1814."

"Was it before that?"

"No."

"Was it after that?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect the Date?"

"No, I do not exactly; but it was in 1815."

"When you were at the Angel Inn, did you receive any Money?"

"Yes."

"From whom?"

"I do not know."

"Was it a Stranger?"

"Yes."

"Was Mr. Hannam present?"

"Yes."

"How much Money did you receive?"

"Twenty-one Pounds."

"Do you recollect the Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton in 1818?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote at that Election?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise it to?"

"I promised it to Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election in 1818?"

"I received some Packets."

"What did the Packets contain?"

"Twenty Guineas each."

"Did you promise your Vote in 1820?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"The same."

"Two Packets?"

"Yes."

"Containing Twenty Guineas each?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Have you signed any Petition against this Bill?"

"Yes."

"Did you sign it yourself, or employ any Person to sign it for you?"

"I signed it myself."

"Is that your Signature?" (The Petition against the Bill being shown to the Witness.

"I believe that is my Handwriting."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"You were a Freeman in 1812, were not you?"

"Yes."

"How old were you then?'

"Twenty-one."

"Were you of Age when you voted?"

"Yes."

"Did I understand you to say that you were made a Freeman only a Month before the Election?"

"I was made a Freeman the last Monday in August; the Election was the 8th of October."

"How did they receive your Vote; if you were a Freeman of only a Month's Standing, how came you to be allowed to vote?"

"I was sworn in to vote."

"You were sworn in only in August, and the Election was in October?"

"Just so."

"Was your Father a Freeman?"

"No."

"How did you happen to be a Freeman?"

"By Servitude."

"Who canvassed you upon that Election; Mr. Marsh or Mr. Osbaldeston?"

"They both canvassed me."

"Was Mr. Osbaldeston there himself?"

"Yes."

"He asked you himself?"

"Yes."

"And Mr. Marsh too?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Marsh make you any Promise?"

"No."

"Did you make Mr. Marsh any Promise?"

"I promised him my Vote."

"Did they go about the Town together, or separately?"

"They came separately."

"Who went about the Town with Mr. Marsh?"

"I do not remember."

"Was Mr. Marsh known to the Town?"

"No."

"Who introduced him; was he with any of the Townsmen?"

"I cannot say."

"Who canvassed with Mr. Osbaldeston?"

"I cannot say; I think Mr. Kirke was with him."

"Any body else?"

"Well, I cannot remember who it was."

"You think it was in 1815 you went to the Angel?"

"Yes."

"Why did you fix on 1815; how many Years after the Election was it?"

"About Two Years and a Half."

"Was there any body there besides Mr. Hannam?"

"There was some Gentleman there, but I did not know him."

"Who gave you the Money?"

"I think the Gentleman."

"Was any thing said about how much you were to have?"

"No."

"Did they give you the Money at once, without saying any thing at all?"

"I did not hear any body say any thing."

"How did you happen to go?"

"I had a Message came."

"You said nothing, and they gave you Twenty Guineas?"

"I did not know what I went for until I got into the Room."

"When you got in, who told you what you were come for?"

"Mr. Hannam; he axed me whether my Name was Thomas Cutler, and told the other Gentleman to give me Twenty Guineas."

"And he did that?"

"Yes, he did."

"In 1818, you were canvassed by Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton?"

"Yes."

"Who went round with them; did they come together or separately?"

"I cannot remember who came with them at first."

"Who came with them at last?"

"I think Mr. Thornton was with them for one."

"Who was he with?"

"Mr. Evans."

"Who was with Mr. Crompton?"

"Mr. Foljambe."

"Do you mean to swear that Mr. Foljambe asked you for your Vote for Mr. Crompton?"

"No; Mr. Crompton ax'd me himself."

"Did Mr. Crompton ask you himself?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Foljambe say any thing to you about it?"

"No."

"Though Mr. Foljambe was with Mr. Crompton, he said nothing at all to you; but Mr. Crompton asked you for your Vote himself?"

"Mr. Foljambe said he was come with Mr. Crompton, but he did not ax me for my Vote; Mr. Crompton axed me for my Vote and Interest."

"At that Time, was any Promise made to you about any Money, or any Packet, or any thing else?"

"No."

"Who came with Mr. Evans?"

"I think Mr. John Thornton."

"Did Mr. Evans or Mr. Thornton canvass you?"

"Mr. Evans."

"Did you promise him?"

"Yes."

"Did he make you any Promise about Money or any thing else?"

"No."

"In 1820, did they come together or separately?"

"They came separately."

"Each of them asked you for your Vote again?"

"Yes."

"Did either of them make you any Promise then in Consideration of your Vote?"

"No."

"Did you, upon the Occasion of their coming, receive any Promise for giving your Vote?"

"No."

"About the Packets after the Election of 1818; did you receive them at the same Time?"

"No."

"How long afterwards did you receive them?"

"Perhaps a Twelvemonth."

"Was it more or less?"

"I think it was hardly a Twelvemonth."

"Did you receive more Packets than One upon that Occasion?"

"No; One each."

"Did you receive them One each at the same Time?"

"No."

"Where did you receive the first?"

"I cannot say. In my own House; it was left at my House."

"Did you find it there, or who gave it to you?"

"It was directed to me."

"Did you find it directed to you unopened?"

"Yes; I received it myself."

"Did you open it yourself?"

"Yes."

"How did you receive the second?"

"That I received in the same Way."

"Was it left by Day or by Night?"

"By Night."

"Were they both left by Night?"

"No, not both of them."

"Did you receive the second yourself?"

"I opened them all myself."

"How long after the Election of 1820 was it that you received the Packets upon that Occasion that you mentioned?"

"I cannot exactly say how long."

"Was it a Year, or Two or Three Years?"

"I cannot say how long it was; upon my Oath, I cannot say."

"Did you receive these yourself?"

"Yes."

"At the same Time?"

"No, not at the same Time."

"When did you receive those after the Election of 1820?"

"I received One at my own House."

"Was that the first?"

"Yes, I think so."

"From whom did you receive it?"

"I do not know."

"Do you mean that somebody left it there you did not know?"

"I do not know how it came."

"Did you open that yourself?"

"Yes."

"How did the second come?"

"It came in the same Way."

"In 1826 you voted for Dundas and Wrightson?"

"Yes."

"Did they canvass you?"

"Yes."

"Separately, or together?"

"Separately."

"Did you promise your Vote to them separately?"

"Yes."

"Did Dundas, in the first place, when he asked you for your Vote, make you any Promise?"

"No."

"Or any body on his Account?"

"No."

"Did Wrightson make you any Promise?"

"No."

"Did you receive any Promise?"

"No."

"Did you receive any Money after the Election of 1826?"

"No."

"On what Day of the Election did you vote?"

"The first Day."

"Was there any rioting when you went up?"

"Not exactly when I went up; there was rioting."

"Was there before you came away?"

"Yes."

"Could you get away in Quietness and Peace?"

"I got away as well as I could; as I could get through the Crowd."

"Was there a Mob, and rioting going on?"

"Yes."

"Was it dangerous?"

"Yes."

"Who made the Riot; was it Dundas's or Wilson's People?"

"I do not know; it was the Town's people."

"Did they wear Colours?"

"Some of them."

"What Colours did the People wear that were rioting?"

"They wore Pink."

"Whose Colours were the Pink?"

"Sir Henry Wright Wilson's."

"Did you see an Attack upon the Bank?"

"No, I did not see that."

"Did you see the Bank afterwards, when the Windows were broken?"

"No, I did not."

"Did you see the Bailiff, when he was knocked down with a Stone?"

"No, I did not."

"You do not go to the Turk's Head, do you?"

"No."

"You do not know any thing of a Club meeting there?"

"I have heard a Report of a Committee being there."

"As you do not frequent the Turk's Head, perhaps you do not know any thing of it?"

"No."

"Do you know Mr. Sharp?"

"Yes."

"Has he any thing to do with the Club?"

"I do not know; it is reported that he has."

"Do you mean Mr. Sharp a Merchant, or what is he?"

"I mean Mr. Sharp who keeps a Raff Yard."

"Is he a Timber Merchant?"

"Yes."

Re-examined by Mr.Law.

"You mentioned Foljambe and Kirke; were not those Gentlemen with Sir Robert Dundas when he canvassed you?"

"Mr. Foljambe."

"Who was with Mr. Wrightson when he canvassed you?"

"Mr. Kirke."

"Do you know George Thornton?"

"Yes."

"Did you see him at the Canvass?"

"No."

"Whom else did you see besides Mr. Kirke with Mr. Wrightson?"

"There were several Gentlemen, but I cannot recollect who they were besides."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Shaw was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Is your Name John Shaw?"

"Yes."

"What are you?"

"A Brush-head Turner."

"Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Freeman?"

"Between Twelve and Thirteen Years."

"Do you remember the first Election of Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans, in 1818?"

"Yes, I dare say I do."

"Were you a Freeman at that Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise any Gentleman your Vote before that Election?"

"No."

"Do you mean to state that you did not promise either of those Gentlemen your Vote?"

"Yes; I promised Master Evans my Vote."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"Yes, I believe I did."

"What was that?"

"I received a Packet."

"What did it contain?"

"I think Twenty Guineas."

"Was that the only Packet you received?"

"I received Two Packets after the first Election."

"What did the second Packet contain?"

"The same Number."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1820, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans stood a second Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote to either of those Gentlemen before that Election?"

"Yes; I believe I promised my Vote to Mr. Crompton the first and second Election."

"Did you promise Mr. Evans?"

"Yes."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"I did."

"How much?"

"The same Quantity."

"Do you mean by that Two Packets?"

"Yes."

"Did they contain Twenty-one Pounds each?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you vote for on the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson Esquire."

"Who canvassed you in the Year 1818, with Mr. Evans?"

"I am sure I cannot speak to who the other was that was with him at the Time."

"Or Mr. Crompton?"

"I cannot speak to that."

"Who canvassed you in the Year 1826?"

"I believe Sir Robert Dundas."

"Who was with Sir Robert Dundas?"

"To the best of my Knowledge, I think Mr. Kirke was."

"Did Mr. Wrightson canvass you?"

"Yes, I believe he did."

"Who was with him when he canvassed you?"

"I think Mr. Kirke was with him too."

"Do you know Mr. Foljambe of Retford?"

"Yes."

"Did you see him on the Canvass at any Time?"

"Not that I know of; to the best of my Knowledge, I did not."

"Mr. Thornton?"

"No; I think there was nobody in the House but the Gentleman who canvassed me."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"How old are you?"

"About Thirty-four Years of Age."

"You were made a Freeman when you were Twentyone?"

"I was between Twenty-one and Twenty-two."

"Were you a Freeman by Birth?"

"By Servitude."

"Whom did you serve?"

"I served my Apprenticeship with John Burton."

"What was he?"

"A Brush-head Turner."

"What is a Brush-head Turner?"

"That makes the Brush-heads ready for bristelling."

"You say Mr. Evans canvassed you in 1818?"

"Yes, I believe so."

"Are you quite sure of that?"

"Yes."

"Who was with him at the Time?"

"I am sure I cannot speak to that, who was with him; I believe there was nobody came into my House but he himself."

"Was that before the first or the second Election?"

"Both Times."

"Were not you canvassed at all by Mr. Crompton?"

"Yes."

"When did Mr. Crompton canvass you?"

"Somewhere about the same Time; but I cannot speak to a Week or two."

"But before the Election?"

"Yes."

"When Mr. Evans canvassed you, what did he say?"

"He asked me for my Vote and Interest."

"Did he say any thing more?"

"No, he did not."

"Did he say any thing about his intending to give you Twenty Guineas, or any other Sum?"

"No; no Sum at all."

"Nor any thing of the same sort?"

"No."

"Nor any Promise of a Place, or any thing of that sort?"

"No."

"Or that he would afterwards put you forward in your Brush-head Line?"

"No; he never did no such a Thing."

"Did you vote for him without any Promise?"

"Yes."

"You say you received Two Packets?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive them with your own Hand?"

"I believe I did."

"Who gave them to you?"

"A Person that I did not know; I never see'd him in my Life before, nor since, to my Knowledge."

"Was he a Retford Man?"

"No, I think not, or I should have known him."

"Were you acquainted with Westby Leadbeater; did you know a Man of that Name; is he any Relation of yours?"

"No, he is not."

"Do not you remember the Town Crier?"

"Yes, I remember the Town Crier."

"Was not his Name Westby Leadbeater?"

"I believe it was."

"Was not it Westby Leadbeater who gave it you?"

"No, it was not."

"You knew Westby Leadbeater well enough to know that?"

"Yes."

"Do you know Mr. John Thornton?"

"Yes."

"Are you quite sure it was not he?"

"No, I am sure it was not him."

"Do you know Colonel Kirke?"

"Yes."

"It was neither he nor Mr. Foljambe?"

"No, I am sure it was not."

"Alderman Cottam?"

"No, it was not."

"But a Person you did not know?"

"No."

"And you never saw him before?"

"No, nor since, to my Knowledge."

"Was it Mr. Hannam?"

"No."

"You say you have received it yourself?"

"Yes."

"Was it in Money, or in Bank Notes?"

"I believe there was One Twenty Pound Bank Note."

"Had you any Notion from whom it came?"

"No, that I had not."

"When was it you received the first Packet; my Learned Friend has asked you whether it was at the first Election, or soon after the first Election?"

"From Eighteen Months to Two Years, to the best of my Recollection; I cannot speak to a Month or Two."

"That would be in the latter Part of 1819?"

"I cannot speak to a Month or Two."

"The second Time you received Two other Packets, in 1820?"

"Yes."

"After that Election, had you any Promise made to you at all by Mr. Evans?"

"No, none at all."

"Had any thing more passed at the Time of the Canvass than you have stated?"

"No; he asked me for my Vote, and I gave it."

"And the same with Mr. Crompton?"

"Yes."

"You are quite sure of that?"

"Yes."

"After that, when was it you received those Packets; how long after the Election?"

"I am sure I cannot tell."

"Was it Months and Months?"

"Yes; it was several Months."

"Who gave you the Packets the second Time?"

"I cannot speak to that; I did not know the Person."

"Did you receive them with your own Hand, or were they left at your House?"

"One was left at my own House, at the Time I was not within."

"How do you know Packets were left?"

"They were put into the House."

"Who gave them to you?"

"I believe my Mother gave them to me."

"Is your Mother alive?"

"Yes."

"What is her Name?"

"They call her Malady Shaw."

"Where does she reside?"

"In Retford."

"What did she tell you when you first saw the Packet?"

"She gave me the Packet."

"Did she say who gave it her?"

"No; she told me she did not know the Person that gave it to her."

"In 1826, you say Colonel Kirke was with Sir Robert Dundas when he canvassed?"

"Yes."

"Was not Colonel Kirke a Person very well known in the Town?"

"Yes, I believe he was."

"Did not he reside there?"

"Yes."

"Was he a Gentleman of Property in the Place?"

"Yes."

"Had he been a Colonel in the Army?"

"Yes, I believe he was."

"Did he take much Interest in the Election?"

"No, very little."

"Was he merely walking with Sir Robert Dundas?"

"Yes."

"Do you know whether he was a personal Friend?"

"That I do not know."

"Did he introduce Sir Robert Dundas to you?"

"I do not know that he did."

"Was he merely walking in the Street with him?"

"Yes."

"Did he appear to take any particular Interest in it?"

"No, none at all."

"Was Mr. Wrightson there at the Time?"

"No; they came separate, by themselves."

"Was it the same Day?"

"No; I think not the same Day."

"Which came first?"

"Sir Robert Dundas."

"Had he been long in the Town before Mr. Wrightson came?"

"No, I think not."

"I thought he had been some Months there?"

"I cannot speak to that."

"Colonel Kirke was with Mr. Wrightson?"

"Yes, I think he was."

"Are you quite sure of that?"

"Yes, I am quite sure he was with Mr. Wrightson."

"As well as Sir Robert Dundas?"

"Yes."

"They both stood on the same Interest then, I suppose?"

"I cannot speak to that."

"Had they the same Colours?"

"I cannot speak to that."

"Did you vote?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Promise, either from Sir Robert Dundas or Mr. Wrightson, before the Election?"

"No, none at all."

"Have you received any thing since the Election?"

"No, not at all."

"Do you expect to receive any thing?"

"No."

"Which Day did you give your Vote?"

"I gave my Votes both in one Day."

"You must have given them both at the same Time, of course?"

"Yes."

"Was it the first or second Day; you said there were Two Days polling?"

"The first Day."

"Were you much impeded by Riots that Day?"

"Yes, I believe I was."

"Was that the Beginning or the End of the Day's Poll?"

"The Beginning."

"Were you obliged to come in early to be protected from the Mob?"

"Yes."

"How were you all put into the Place?"

"By Constables."

"Early in the Morning?"

"I think we went in at Nine in the Morning."

"Guarded by Constables?"

"Yes."

"What was the Reason of that, if it was so quiet as some Folks say?"

"I cannot speak to that, I am sure."

"Was not there a great Riot?"

"Yes, there was."

"A Riot made by Sir Henry Wright Wilson's People?"

"Yes, as we supposed."

"Not by your People?"

"No."

"Was there a great deal of Anger after that Election, about Sir Henry Wright Wilson losing his Election; were not the People on Sir Henry Wilson's Side very angry?"

"Yes, I believe they were."

"Do you remember any of them saying that they would disfranchise the Borough in consequence?"

"No, I cannot say that I heard them say that."

"Do you know any thing of the Birmingham Club?"

"Yes, to my Sorrow, I do."

"What do you know about it, to your Sorrow?"

"At the Time of the Election I had got my Arm broken in Two Places; I was running away, when the People saw One of our Party; there was a Mob came directly; I was going over East Retford Bridge; they said, "Here is a Purple coming."

"Those were your Colours?"

"Yes. They ran after me like a Pack of Hounds after a Fox; and I had my Arm hung in a Sling; I got away; I jumped over a Wall, and tumbled down, and made my Arm very bad; it had been set only Three Weeks; and then I had to get over another Wall, and into the River, and I crossed the River; that is all; they did not go any further."

"That was the sort of Treatment the Purples had?"

"Yes."

"What did they say you were all going to do that they were so angry with you for?"

"They supposed that those Two Gentlemen meant to vote for the Catholic Interest, that was it."

"They took you for a Fox upon that Occasion?"

"They hunted me in the Way I have stated."

Examined by the Lords.

"Did you swim the Idle?"

"Yes, it was the Idle. They did not follow me over the River; I got Half Way over before they got over the Wall; and when they saw I was so deep, they would not follow me."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then William Palmer was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name William Palmer?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"When were you admitted a Burgess?"

"About Twelve or Thirteen Years ago."

"Was it in the Year 1817, or how long before the Election of 1818?"

"Well, I cannot remember it; it was about Thirteen Years that I have been a Burgess."

"Did you promise your Vote at the Election in 1818, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were elected?"

"Yes, I did."

"To whom?"

"To Mr. Evans."

"Did you promise Mr. Crompton?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Yes, I did."

"What did you receive?"

"I received a Packet."

"What did it contain?"

"It contained a few Notes, but what they were I cannot tell."

"What did you do with them?"

"I laid them out, to the best of my Knowledge, for the Benefit of myself and my Family."

"Did you receive One or Two Packets for the Benefit of your Family?"

"I received Two."

"Did the other contain the same Sum?"

"The very same, I think, as near as I can recollect."

"Recollecting to the best of your Knowledge that they contained the same Sum, can you help us to what the Sum was?"

"No, I cannot."

"Did you promise your Vote at the Election of 1820?"

"Yes, I think I did vote for the same Gentlemen."

"You promised them?"

"Yes; to the same Gentlemen."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Yes, I did."

"What did you receive?"

"Well, I cannot recollect."

"One or Two Packets?"

"Two again."

"The same in each?"

"No, I cannot speak to them."

"What Sum was in either of them?"

"I am sure I cannot answer to that."

"As nearly as you can recollect?"

"Then there might be about Eight or Ten Notes, but what they counted to I cannot recollect."

"Do you mean to say that you do not recollect the Amount?"

"I am sure I do not."

"Do you recollect whether the Sum was made up Pounds or Guineas?"

"I am sure I do not know that."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Master Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"Who canvassed you at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas at first."

"Himself?"

"Yes."

"Are you an Inhabitant of Retford?"

"Yes, when I am at Home."

"How long have you been there?"

"Ever since I was born, and I have never resided anywhere else."

"You have come up straight from the Town of East Retford?"

"No, not exactly; I fell from the Coach."

"Independently of that, you came up straight from East Retford?"

"I believe I came on by the same Coach."

"Were you left behind?"

"No; I was in front when I fell from it."

"Who canvassed you for Mr. Wrightson?"

"Himself."

"In the Town of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"Were not Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson together?"

"Mr. Wrightson was by himself when he canvassed me; no other Gentleman with him."

"Was Sir Robert Dundas canvassing in Person?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect what he said to you?"

"He asked me for my Vote."

"And you promised your Vote?"

"Yes."

"And to Mr. Wrightson the same?"

"The same Amount, to the best of my Recollection."

"Did they say any thing to you about Packets?"

"No; I never knew any thing of it."

"Did they say any thing to you about all right?"

"No; I never heard that, to the best of my Recollection, 'till I heard the Guard mention it to the Coachman."

"Have you received any Packet or Money since the Election of 1826?"

"No, I am sure I have not."

"Do you expect to receive any?"

"No, I am sure I shall not."

"Are you disappointed at not receiving any?"

"No."

"Who canvassed you in 1818, the first Election you voted?"

"Sir Robert Dundas."

"No; he was not a Candidate at that Time?"

"Mr. Evans, I think."

"He canvassed you himself, did he?"

"Yes."

"Mr. Thornton did not?"

"Oh no; he had no Person with him."

"He was alone?"

"Yes."

"What did he say to you?"

"He axed me for my Vote."

"Did you promise him?"

"Yes."

"Had you an Expectation of a Packet?"

"No, not at all."

"Were you surprised when you got it?"

"Rather."

"Did Mr. Crompton canvass you?"

"Yes."

"Did he say any thing to you about a Packet?"

"No."

"How long after the Election of 1818 did those Packets arrive at your House?"

"I cannot justly say; I should think, to the best of my Knowledge, between Eighteen Months and Two Years."

"Who gave them to you?"

"Why, one Sunday Morning a Person came to my House, and rapped me out of Bed, at One o'Clock on Sunday Morning."

"Do you mean in the Middle of the Night?"

"On the Sunday Morning, about One o'Clock."

"In the Night-time?"

"Yes, in the Night-time; but I call it the Morning. He rapped me out of my Bed. As soon as he rapped at the Door, I got up, and said, "Halloo! who is there?" He looks up to me, and says, "Is your Name William Palmer?" I said, "Yes." He said, "Come down; I want you." I said, "Very good;" and I came down. I went down; and he said, "Your Name is William Palmer?" I said, "Yes." He said, "I have brought you a small Parcel;" and I said, "Is there any thing to pay for it?" and he said, "Oh no; you are very welcome to it;" and I returned my Thanks, and said I was obliged to him; and went to Bed again."

"What did you do with it?"

"I laid it out."

"Had you a Candle?"

"No; it was in the Dark when I opened it."

"How did you know it was Money?"

"I did not know 'till the Morning; I had no Tinderbox in the House, or I might have struck a Light."

"What was in it?"

"There was a few Notes, but I did not know what at the Time."

"You were surprised?"

"Yes; when he brought me the Packet I had little Idea of it came into my Mind."

"Had you any reference to the Election at the Time you received it?"

"Not at all."

"In 1820, how did you receive your Packet?"

"I cannot speak to that; not exactly."

"What Time of the Year was it?"

"I cannot recollect, to speak the Truth, I am sure; I was not at Home when it came to my House; I merely know I did receive one."

"Did you open it yourself?"

"I think it was open when I got Home; I am almost sure it was."

"Was there any Writing upon it?"

"There was no Name upon it."

"Were you married at the Time?"

"Yes, I was."

"You believed it might have been opened?"

"I am sure I cannot speak to that; it was opened."

"You found the Packet open?"

"Yes."

"What was there in it?"

"It might be Six or Eight Pounds; but I cannot tell."

"You cannot tell me how long it was after the Election of 1820?"

"Not certainly, I cannot."

"Were you present at the last Election?"

"Yes."

"Was there any Disturbance?"

"Yes; I saw a great deal myself."

"You did not get a similar Injury to that you got from falling from the Coach?"

"I got as much, and something of the same kind; for I got Two or Three Coats torn from my Back. I could not get another for a long Time; and I got my Nose broken. It was all bad Luck for me."

"Who did?"

"The Blue Club, and People of that sort; I was against the opposite Party of the Burgesses."

"You happened to be a Burgess?"

"Yes, or they would not have meddled with me; they generally knew the Burgesses."

"Was this Mob the Inhabitants of the Town?"

"Chiefly; not the Freemen."

"Who were the principal Movers of this Mob?"

"I do not know; Blackguards of the Town, I suppose."

"Do you know Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes, I do, very well."

"Was he one of them?"

"I never saw him there personally, but I know him."

"He is a respectable Attorney, is not he?"

"Not exactly for that."

"Do you think that he is not an Attorney, or not respectable?"

"Yes, he is a full Attorney, but not respectable."

"Do you know Mr. Newton?"

"Yes, I do."

"He is a Clerk of Mr. Hannam's?"

"He was; but I have not seen him lately."

"Was he one of the Mob?"

"I do not know; I durst not go near enough to judge of it, whether he was amongst them; I was happiest when I was farrest from him."

"Did you know Mr. Hornby?"

"Yes, I knowed him."

"Any thing to his Advantage?"

"Nothing to his Good, I think."

"Do you know Mr. Sharp?"

"Yes, I do."

"What do you know of him?"

"Only as belonging to the Secret Committee, I understood."

"What Secret Committee?"

"There is a Secret Committee held in the Turk's Head at Retford."

"What is that to do?"

"It was held there; I am not able to tell, but I do believe it is called a Secret Committee; I did not know 'till this Morning; but I understand he is one of that Society."

"That there is a Secret Committee held at the Turk's Head at Retford, but you do not know their Object?"

"No."

"It may be Treason, or Disfranchisement of the Borough?"

"No; I understand it is for the Disfranchisement of the Borough; that is what I judge from."

"Do you know Mr. Fisher?"

"Yes, I do."

"Is he one of them?"

"I think he formed another."

"Do you know Edward Cromwell Brown?"

"Yes, I do."

"Was he at the Election in 1826?"

"Yes."

"Did he take an active Part in it?"

"He was there about."

"Was not he Sir Henry Wright Wilson's Agent?"

"I cannot say; he did not canvass me, for he would know I would not serve him. I saw him driving about in Coaches."

"Is he on the Secret Committee?"

"Not that I know of; I have not heard his Name mentioned."

"With respect to the Two Packets; did you at the Time promise any one of the Candidates in anticipation of receiving Money?"

"No, I never could, for they never mentioned such a Thing to me."

"The Votes you have given have been honest and good Votes?"

"They have, and free from the Expectation of One Farthing from any of the Gentlemen."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then James Dernie was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Is your Name James Dernie?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Burgess of Retford?"

"About Ten or Eleven; I do not know to a Year exactly."

"Do you remember the first Election, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Were you a Freeman at that Time?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise either of those Gentlemen your Vote before that Election?"

"Yes; both of them."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"Yes; I believe I did."

"What did you receive?"

"I received a Packet with some Money in it."

"What did the Packet contain?"

"Twenty-one Pounds, I believe."

"Did you receive, after that Election, One or more Packets?"

"I think I received Two more besides."

"After the Election of 1818, did you receive One or Two Packets?"

"Two, I think."

"What did the second Packet contain?"

"Twenty-one Pounds."

"Do you remember the second Election, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were Candidates, in 1820?"

"Yes; I remember that Election."

"Did you promise your Vote again to those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"Yes."

"What was it?"

"I think it was Twenty-one Pounds."

"One Packet, or Two?"

"Two, I believe, there were."

"Did both those Packets contain the Sum you mention?"

"Yes."

"For whom did you vote at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Who canvassed you?"

"Sir Robert Dundas."

"Who was with Sir Robert Dundas when he canvassed you?"

"I believe he was by himself."

"Did you see Mr. Foljambe on the Canvass?"

"No."

"Look at that Parchment." (The Petition against the Bill being shewn to the Winess.) "Is that your Name and Handwriting?"

"It is."

Cross-examined by Mr. Alderson.

"When was it that you signed that Petition?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"Who brought it to you?"

"I really do not know who brought it."

"Are you sure that you signed it?"

"Yes, I am sure I signed it."

"Do you know what you signed?"

"I really do not know exactly; I signed it, I suppose, because the others did."

"Have you any Recollection of the Contents of it?"

"No, not at all."

(By a Lord.) "Was it read over to you?"

"A few Words, I believe, were."

(Mr. Alderson.) "Were the Words that were read over to you only the Signatures of Persons who signed before you, or the Petition itself?"

"The Petition, I believe."

"Was it about the Disfranchisement of the Borough then?"

"I really cannot speak to that."

"Have you seen what it is you are now looking at?"

"I know my Name; I did not see any thing more, as I know of."

"After you had signed it, they subponaed you here; summoned you to attend?"

"Yes."

"Did you communicate to them what you were able to prove?"

"No; I never asked them any Question at all."

"Did they ask you any?"

"No."

"How came you here?"

"I came here on Thursday."

"Did you go to Mr. Heptinstall's Office?"

"Yes."

"Did not he examine you?"

"No."

"Had you no Conversation with him about what you were to prove?"

"Oh no."

"None at all?"

"No."

"Will you swear that?"

"Yes."

"Had you no Conversation at all with him?"

"No; I do not know that I had."

"None about what you were to be paid?"

"No."

"Have you had no Conversation about what you were to be paid for your Evidence?"

"No; some of our Men told me there was to be only Half a Guinea a Day."

"For all the Days you stayed?"

"Yes."

"Not only the Days you gave Evidence, but the Days you stayed?"

"Yes; and coming up and going back, I suppose, altogether; and little enough."

"You think that is too little?"

"Yes."

"What are you by Trade?"

"A Cordwainer."

"Can you make as much as that?"

"Yes."

"Then you will be a Loser by your Evidence?"

"I am sure I shall."

"Besides your Freedom. You say you have been only Ten or Eleven Years a Freeman, and yet you remember the first Election of Evans and Crompton; that is above Twelve Years ago?"

"I told you I could not say to a Year."

"Then you have been a Freeman more?"

"Yes; perhaps it is so."

"Perhaps you do not remember the first?"

"Yes, I do."

"Did you vote at the first?"

"Yes."

"There was no voting, I believe?"

"No; but I promised them both."

"Was there any thing passed between you and Mr. Evans more than his asking you for your Vote, and your saying you would give it?"

"Nothing at all."

"Did he promise you any Packet or Money, or any thing?"

"No."

"Nor a Place; an Exciseman's Place?"

"No."

"Did you expect any thing from him?"

"No; I could not expect it."

"You did not expect any thing?"

"No, I did not."

"Was it the same with Mr. Crompton?"

"Yes."

"You did not expect it from him?"

"No."

"Nor he did not promise you any thing?"

"No."

"How soon after the Election was it those Packets came?"

"Really I cannot hardly tell you; but I suppose it was nearly a Year."

"Did you receive them yourself?"

"Yes."

"With your own Hand?"

"They were laid down in the House."

"Did you see the Man that brought them in?"

"Yes, I believe I did."

"Who was he?"

"I really do not know who he was."

"Are you well acquainted with the Retford Men?"

"Yes."

"Was it a Retford Man?"

"I really cannot say."

"Can you say it was not a Retford Man?"

"I cannot say whether it was or was not."

"It might be a, Retford Man?"

"It might be; I cannot say indeed whether it was or not."

"Did the same Man deliver both Packets?"

"I cannot say."

"How did those come; just tell us the Transaction, how it was?"

"It was brought in the same Way, and laid down; I did not see it at the Time it was brought; I was at work when it was left for me."

"Not in your House?"

"In my Mother's."

"Do you know any thing about it, except what your Mother told you?"

"She told me there was some Money come in a Packet for me."

"Did you see the Man bring it in?"

"No, I did not; not the second Time."

"Was that the second Packet of the first Election, or the Packet after the second Election?"

"The second Packet after the first Election."

"You know only what your Mother told you?"

"Yes."

"Is your Mother alive?"

"Yes."

"Is she at Retford?"

"Yes."

"She can give Evidence exactly about this?"

"Yes, she can."

"What is her Name?"

"Elizabeth Dernie."

"Is she married still?"

"Yes."

"Is your Father alive?"

"Yes."

"Is he a Freeman?"

"No."

"You got yours by Servitude?"

"Yes."

"On the second Election, who delivered the Packets to you?"

"I really do not know."

"Was it the same Person?"

"I really cannot say."

"It might be a different one?"

"Yes, it might be."

"Had you any Promise, before the second Election, of any Packet, or Money, or any thing of Value?"

"No."

"Had you any Expectation, at the Time you promised your Vote, of any thing being sent?"

"No."

"The third Time you were asked, who was with Sir Robert Dundas; did you see any body going about with him in the Town?"

"Yes."

"Who was that?"

"Really I cannot tell; they were the Gentlemen of the Town."

"Is it the Custom of your Place for the Gentlemen of the Town to go round with the Candidates with whom they are friendly?"

"Yes; some of the Gentlemen."

"Do you know Colonel Kirke?"

"Yes, I did."

"He was a Gentleman of Respectability in the Town?"

"Yes."

"Mr. Foljambe is a Gentleman of Respectability?"

"Yes."

"A Banker?"

"Yes."

"His Father was Member for Yorkshire, we understand?"

"I did not know him."

"He lived at Osterton; do you know that Place?"

"Yes."

"Do you know whether Mr. Foljambe the Nephew lives at Osterton?"

"Yes, I believe he does."

"Do you remember the old Gentleman living at Osterton?"

"No; I never knew him."

"He went about to the People, did he?"

"Yes, he did, the first Election, I believe."

"Which Election?"

"It was the first of Mr. Evans's."

"Do you know whether Mr. Evans and Mr. Foljambe were very good Friends; Mr. Crompton and he were Friends, were not they?"

"I do not know."

"Do you know whether Mr. Crompton and Mr. Foljambe visited one another?"

"I do not know."

"Mr. Crompton used to live in Yorkshire?"

"That I do not know."

"You do not know whether Mr. Crompton and Mr. Foljambe were old Friends?"

"I really do not know."

"You had not the least Promise, from either Sir Robert Dundas or Mr. Wrightson, before the last Election?"

"No."

"Is Mr. Wrightson a Country Gentleman, residing at Cusworth near Doncaster?"

"Yes."

"How far is that from Retford?"

"About Eighteen Miles."

"Mr. Wrightson is a Gentleman living at Cusworth, you say?"

"Yes."

"Do you know whether Sir Robert Dundas has Connections in Yorkshire?"

"That I do not know, indeed."

"You do not know his Family, do you?"

"No."

"Have you had any thing since the last Election?"

"Nothing at all."

"Had you any Expectation of receiving any thing?"

"No."

"You have never had any Expectation of receiving any thing, nor a Promise of receiving it?"

"No."

"You say you were at the last Election; did you vote?"

"Yes, I voted."

"Whom did you vote for?"

"For Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson?"

"You performed your Promise?"

"Yes."

"Was there a Riot?"

"Yes; there was a Disturbance in the Town."

"Did not you hear, after that, that the People who were angry at Sir Henry Wilson's being beaten said they would disfranchise the Borough?"

"Yes; I heard of that."

"Do you know of any Club which exists, called the Birmingham Club, or Turk's Head Club?"

"Yes."

"Are the People who formed that Club Sir Henry Wright Wilson's People?"

"Yes, I suppose they are."

"Was Mr. Newton one of Sir Henry Wright Wilson's People?"

"I cannot say."

"Did you know Mr. Sharp?"

"Yes."

"Was he active for Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"I really do not know."

"What is Mr. Sharp; he is a Raff Merchant, is not he?"

"Yes."

"He keeps a Raff Yard?"

"Yes."

"What is a Raff Merchant at that Place; Timber, is not it?"

"Yes; he deals in Timber."

"Are there a great Number of other People who associate with them?"

"Yes, at Times, I understand."

"You say you know Mr. Newton and Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes."

"And Mr. Sharp?"

"Yes."

"Do they all go to the Club too?"

"Yes, I believe they do; I think they do."

"Have you seen the Watch which has been sent to one of them?"

"I have heard of a Watch sent to Mr. Sharp."

"By the Birmingham People?"

"Yes."

"To get the Borough there?"

"Yes."

(By a Lord.) "You said your Mother had given you a Sum of Money that came in a Packet?"

"Yes."

"Did she make use of the Word "Packet?"

"A Packet or a Letter."

"Did she use the Word "Packet?"

"Yes; I think she said that it was a Packet that came for me."

"Was that the first Time you ever heard the Word "Packet" mentioned?"

"Well, I cannot speak to that."

"Will you swear that your Mother told you that some Money had come in a Packet, or that it came in a Letter or a Parcel?"

"I will not say that she told me that there was a Packet, or Letter, or Parcel."

"Have you any Recollection of the Word "Packet" having been mentioned by her?"

"No."

"The Counsel asked you Two Questions running; he said, "Did you promise your Vote in 1820?" and you said, "Yes." He said then, "Did you receive a Packet after the Election?" and you said, "Yes." That was evidently put for the Purpose of insinuating that the Packet was in consequence of the Promise. Did you receive any Packet in consequence of any Promise made to you during the Election?"

"Not before the Election."

"Was any Promise made to you at any Time of having a Packet for your Vote?"

"No, never."

"Did you ever hear the Word "All right" at Retford, as applying to Election Matters?"

"Yes, I have."

"Whom did you hear it from?"

"Many People; many different People; it is a regular Word in the Town, "All is right."

"How long is it since you heard that Word?"

"On this last Election."

"Was that about the Time of the Election Committee?"

"I really cannot state."

"Did not Sir Henry Wright Wilson petition against Sir Robert Dundas?"

"Yes."

"Was it about that Time you heard this?"

"Yes, I dare say it was."

"Did you ever hear it before that?"

"I cannot say that I did."

"Did you ever hear the Word "Joss?"

"No, I cannot say that I did."

"Never in your Life?"

"No, I cannot say that I did."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Benton was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name John Benton?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Retford Burgess?"

"Yes."

"When were you admitted a Burgess?"

"In 1795 or 1796."

"Do you know Mr. Hannam?"

"Yes."

"Have the goodness to look at those Words, "John Benton," and tell me whether that is your Handwriting?" (A Paper being shewn to the Witness.)

"Yes."

"Now you may look at that Letter; is that a Letter you addressed to Mr. Hannam?" (The same being shewn to the Witness.)

"Yes, it is."

The Letter was read as follows:

"Sir,

"I am inform'd you are paying the Burgess their Money for Mr. Osbold-Deston; shall be much oblidge if you will have the goodness to send mine by the Bearer, Mr. Rasin.

"I am, Sir,

"Your most obedient Servant,

"Jno. Benton."

"Mansfield, June 15th, 1815."

"Do you remember the Election of 1818?"

"Yes."

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were Candidates at that Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise to vote for them?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Yes, I did."

"What did you receive?"

"I received a Packet containing Twenty-one Pounds."

"Did you receive One or more Packets?"

"I received only One at that Election."

"Did you afterwards receive another?"

"Not' till the next Election."

"Whom did you promise at the Election of 1820?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"After that Election, you received a Packet?"

"Yes."

"What did that contain?"

"The same."

"Do you mean, that after each Election you received only One Packet?"

"No; I received One the first, and Two the second."

"Had you promised Mr. Crompton your Vote at that Election?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"For Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Did you vote at the Election of 1802, when Mr. Robert Crawford and John Jeffrey Esquire, were elected?"

"I did."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"No."

"Whom did you vote for; those Two Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect when William Ingilby Esquire and General Charles Crawford were elected?"

"Yes."

"Did you vote for or against those Gentlemen?"

"I voted for General Crawford and Mr. Higham."

"That was in 1806; not in 1807?"

"Yes."

"In 1806, when you voted for General Crawford and Mr. Higham, did you receive any Packet after that Election?"

"No, I did not."

"You are quite clear about that?"

"Yes."

"Did you vote at the next Election, when William Ingilby Esquire and General Charles Crawford were elected?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any after that Election?"

"No, I did not."

"Are you quite clear about that?"

"Yes."

"Not having received after those Elections, how came you to write that Letter to Mr. Hannam, after the Election of 1812?"

"Because I was informed that Mr. Hannam was making Presents to the Burgesses at the Time."

"Did you learn it from any of the Voters?"

"That was the Person that I mentioned that he had informed me of it."

"Was he a Burgess?"

"I cannot exactly remember the Name."

"Rasin is the Name?"

"No; he was a Mansfield Man; not a Burgess of Retford."

"Is not he a Voter at Retford?"

"No; he is a Resident at Mansfield."

"Had you any Conversation with any other Freeman about it?"

"No, I had not."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"Were you canvassed in the Election of 1812?"

"I was not canvassed at all; I was not at the Election on the Election Day."

"You took no Part in it?"

"No."

"You took no Interest whatever in the Election?"

"No, not the least."

"Mr. Rasin is not a Burgess?"

"No, he is not."

"You just stated, that in the Elections of 1802, 1806 and 1807, you voted, and received no Money after those?"

"Yes; just so."

"Had you any Application?"

"No; not from Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton."

"You received none after 1826?"

"No."

"There were Seven Elections at which you have voted, and only Two after which you have received those Packets?"

"Yes."

"Did you make any Promise to Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton; did you receive those Packets on Condition of giving your Vote?"

"No, never."

"Were you surprised at receiving those Packets?"

"Yes, rather so."

"Who gave it to you?"

"Indeed I do not know; one was flung into my Shop, and one of my Boys found it in the Morning, and gave it to me."

"How did the other come?"

"The other came by a Person coming into the Shop and bringing it. I was in the Shop."

"Did any thing pass?"

"He asked me whether my Name was Benton. I told him, "Yes." He said he had a Parcel for me."

"Have you ever had any Conversation with the Freemen about this Subject?"

"No."

"Did you ever have any Conversation with William Baker about it?"

"No, not to my Knowledge."

"Did you ever have any Conversation with William Baker about Election Money?"

"No, not to my Knowledge."

"If he has said so, he must have said that which was not true?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off to Thursday next; and that the Lords be summoned.

Witnesses discharged from further Attendance on it:

Ordered, That George Brown, John White, Thomas Cutler, John Shaw, William Palmer, James Dernie and John Benton be discharged from further Attendance on this House on the last-mentioned Bill.

E. Dernie to attend on it.

Ordered, That Elizabeth Dernie do attend this House forthwith, in order to her being examined as a Witness upon the Second Reading of the last-mentioned Bill.

Gordon's Estate Bill Specially reported.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for vesting Part of the Estates devised by and settled to the Uses of the Wills of James Gordon Esquire, and of his Son James Gordon Esquire, both deceased, situate in the Counties of Hertford and Somerset, and in the Island of Antigua, in the West Indies, in Trustees, to be sold, and for laying out the Monies thence arising in the Purchase of other Estates; and for other Purposes;" "That the Committee had met, and considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true, and that all the Parties concerned in the Consequences of the Bill had consented thereto in the Manner required by the Standing Orders of this House, except Charles Andrew Caldwell of Savile Row, in the County of Middlesex, Esquire, at present residing at Paris, in the Kingdom of France, and Charlotte Anne the Wife of the said Charles Andrew Caldwell, (the said Charlotte Anne Caldwell being One of the Tenants in Common in Remainder under the Will of James Gordon the Son, mentioned in the Bill,) and the said Charles Andrew Caldwell for and in Right of his said Wife, the said Persons being proved to be at Paris; but that The Reverend George Caldwell of Cheltenham, in the County of Gloucester, Clerk, appeared and consented to the Bill on the Behalf of the said Charles Andrew Caldwell and Charlotte Anne his Wife, by virtue of a special Power of Attorney for that Purpose, which was produced to the Committee and duly proved; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to their Lordships, with some Amendments."

Which Report, being read by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

Then the Amendments made by the Committee to the said Bill, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Duke of Buccleuch's Estate Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for exchanging the Estates in the County of Northampton of which The Most Noble Walter Francis Douglas Montagu Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry is Tenant in Tail under the Will of The Most Noble John late Duke of Montagu, deceased, for some of his Settled Estates in the Counties of Lancaster and York of which he is Tenant for Life under the Will of The Most Noble Elizabeth late Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry, deceased," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

Ld. Rokeby's Claim, Com ee put off.

Ordered, That the Sitting of the Committee for Privileges, to whom the Petition of Matthew Baron of Rokeby, praying their Lordships, "That his Right to vote at the Election of Peers of Ireland to sit in the Parliament of the United Kingdom may be admitted," stands referred, which stands appointed for To-morrow, be put off to Friday next.

Netterville Peerage, Com ee to meet:

Upon reading the Petition of James Netterville Esquire, of Frehane, late of Coarsefield, in the County of Mayo, in Ireland, claiming the Title, Dignity and Honor of Viscount Netterville of the Kingdom of Ireland; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to appoint the Committee for Privileges to meet to consider of the Petitioner's said Claim on Wednesday the 9th of June next, or on such other Day as to their Lordships may seem fit:"

It is Ordered, That the Committee for Privileges do meet to consider of the said Claim on Wednesday the 9th of June next, as desired; and that Notice thereof be given to The Attorney General, and also to The Attorney General and Solicitor General for Ireland.

Witnesses to attend the Comee.

Ordered, That The Honorable Anne Tisdall, Sir Simon Bradstreet Baronet, Thomas Higgins, Martin Ryan, Richard Weld Esquire, Anne Netterville Widow, Deborah Abbott Widow, and Francis Ffrench Esquire, do attend this House on the 8th Day of June next, to be sworn, in order to their being examined as Witnesses before the Committee for Privileges to whom the last-mentioned Petition stands referred.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Mercurii, vicesimum sextum diem instantis Maii, horâ decimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.