House of Lords Journal Volume 62
7 June 1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 62: 7 June 1830', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 62: 1830, pp. 625-646. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16361 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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Contents

Die Lunæ, 7 Junii 1830.
Bp. Lincoln et al. v. Rennell, in Error. Giles v. Grover & Pollard, in Error. Mellish v. Richardson, in Error. Perth Navigation, &c. Bill, Petitions for & against. Bankrupt Laws, Petition from Huntingdon respecting. Criminal Laws, Petition of The Ld. Mayor, &c. of London for Revision of. Slavery, Petitions for Abolition of: (Kingston upon Hull:) Thornton & Clayton: Baptists of Shipley: Bradford: Inhabitants of Shipley: Wilsden cum Allerton: Bowling: Horton: North Bierly: Graduates of University of Oxford. Viscount Lifford's Claim, Lords sworn to give Evidence on. Beer, Petition from Beverley respecting Consumption of, on Premises of Vendor. Sir W. G. Cumming's Estate Bill. Welsh Mining Co's Estate Bill. Sir W. P. Campbell's Estate Bill. Port Glasgow Harbour, &c. Bill. Royal Military Canal Account delivered. Bankrupt Act Amendment Bill, Petition of W. Clapcott et al. respecting: Comee on the Bill deferred. Roman Catholic, &c. Worship, Petition from Deaneries of Rochester & Malling against compulsory Attendance on. Hay's Estate Bill, Petition against, referred to the Com ee. Lords summoned, Order for, discharged. Abolition of Fees on Demise of the Crown Bill. Message to H.C. for Reports from East Retford Election Com ee. King's Bench Prison, Petition of R. S. Tighe respecting. Galway Town Regulation Bill, Petition from Galway in favor of: Bill to be printed. Agricultural Distress, Petitions respecting: (Grantham:) Stamford: Folkingham. Meltham Inclosure Bill, Marshal of King's Bench to bring W. Rayner to be examined by the Com ee. Cotton Factories, Petitions relative to employing Children in: (Weavers, Stockport:) Blackburn: Preston: Congleton: Ashton under Lyne, &c: Oldham. Watching, &c. Parishes Bill, Petition from Calne in favor of. Stamp Duties (Ireland), Petition from Ballycallan, &c. against Encrease of. Rother Levels Drainage Bill, Petitions in favor of, referred to the Comee: (Bodiam, &c:) Wittersham, &c: Tenterden & Rolvenden: Northiam & Beckly. Dundalk Roads Bill, Petition against, from Louth. Stamp Duty on Medicines, Petition of Chemists of Manchester for Repeal of. Emigration & Home Colonization, Petition from Frome Selwood respecting. Spirits & Stamps, (Ireland,) Petition from Tipperary against Encrease of Duty on. Ashborne & Belpar Road Bill: Message to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to it. Dovor Improvement Bill: Message to H.C. with Amendments to it. Greece, Address for Papers respecting, Courtown Harbour Bill. Galway Canal Bill. Baal's Bridge Bill. Commons Answer to Message of this Day. Greece, Address for Papers respecting. Hunter v. Roughead & Melrose. Hall's Estate Bill Specially reported. D. of Bedford's Bill. G. Smith's Naturalization Bill. J. C. Smith's Naturalization Bill. East Retford Election Bill: Witnesses discharged from Attendance on it. Adjourn.

Die Lunæ, 7 Junii 1830.

DOMINI tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Ds. Lyndhurst, Cancellarius.
Archiep. Cantuar.
Archiep. Ebor.
Epus. Bath. et Well.
Epus. Exon.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Bristol.
Epus. Roffen.
Epus. Landaven.
Epus. Rapoten.
Ds. De Clifford.
Ds. Willoughby de Eresby.
Ds. Dacre.
Ds. Clinton.
Ds. Petre.
Ds. Clifton.
Ds. Teynham.
Ds. Clifford of Chudleigh.
Ds. Colville of Culross.
Ds. Napier.
Ds. Boyle.
Ds. Hay.
Ds. King.
Ds. Monson.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Dynevor.
Ds. Montagu.
Ds. Douglas of Douglas.
Ds. Gage.
Ds. Auckland.
Ds. Selsey.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. Rolle.
Ds. Bayning.
Ds. Fitz Gibbon.
Ds. Carbery.
Ds. Dufferin & Claneboye.
Ds. Redesdale.
Ds. Ellenborough.
Ds. Arden.
Ds. Sheffield.
Ds. Mont Eagle.
Ds. Manners.
Ds. Hill.
Ds. Melbourne.
Ds. Ker.
Ds. Ormonde.
Ds. Ravensworth.
Ds. Delamere.
Ds. Bexley.
Ds. Penshurst.
Ds. Somerhill.
Ds. Farnborough.
Ds. Wharncliffe.
Ds. Seaford.
Ds. Fife.
Ds. Clanwilliam.
Ds. Durham.
Ds. Skelmersdale.
Ds. Wallace.
Comes Bathurst, Præses.
Comes Rosslyn, C. P. S.
Dux Norfolk, Marescallus.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Leeds.
Dux Newcastle.
March. Winchester.
March. Lansdowne.
March. Salisbury.
March. Hertford.
March. Bute.
March. Camden.
March. Cleveland.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Chesterfield.
Comes Essex.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Doncaster.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Morton.
Comes Rosebery.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Cowper.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Cornwallis.
Comes Hardwicke.
Comes Ilchester.
Comes De Lawarr.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Hillsborough.
Comes Clarendon.
Comes Norwich.
Comes Mansfield.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Malmesbury.
Comes Charlemont.
Comes Wicklow.
Comes Caledon.
Comes Limerick.
Comes Charleville.
Comes Manvers.
Comes Grey.
Comes Harrowby.
Comes Verulam.
Comes Brownlow.
Comes Morley.
Comes Glengall.
Comes Eldon.
Comes Howe.
Comes Vane.
Comes Amherst.
Comes Cawdor.
Vicecom. Arbuthnott.
Vicecom. Duncan.
Vicecom. Melville.
Vicecom. Lorton.
Vicecom. Gordon.
Vicecom. Granville.
Vicecom. Goderich.

PRAYERS.

Bp. Lincoln et al. v. Rennell, in Error.

The Order of the Day being read for hearing Counsel to argue the Errors assigned upon the Writ of Error, wherein George Lord Bishop of Lincoln, and others, are Plaintiffs, and Frances Henrietta Rennell Widow is Defendant; and for the Judges to attend;

Counsel were accordingly called in:

And the Plaintiffs Counsel being fully heard; as also the Defendant's Counsel in Part;

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further arguing of the said Errors be put off to Thursday next; and that the Judges do then attend.

Giles v. Grover & Pollard, in Error.

The Order of the Day being read for hearing Counsel to argue the Errors assigned upon the Writ of Error wherein Daniel Giles Esquire is Plaintiff, and Harry Grover and James Pollard are Defendants; and for the Judges to attend;

Ordered, That the arguing of the said Errors be put off sine Die.

Mellish v. Richardson, in Error.

The Order of the Day being read for hearing Counsel to argue the Errors assigned upon the Writ of Error wherein William Mellish is Plaintiff, and George Richardson is Defendant; and for the Judges to attend;

Ordered, That the arguing of the said Errors be put off sine Die.

Perth Navigation, &c. Bill, Petitions for & against.

Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Bankers, Manufacturers, Traders and other Persons residing and carrying on Commercial Concerns in the City of Perth, its Suburbs, and immediate Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act for enlarging, improving and maintaining the Port and Harbour of Perth, for improving the Navigation of the River Tay to the said City, and for other Purposes therewith connected;" and praying their Lordships "to pass the same into a Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Upon reading the Petition of the Guildry Incorporation of the City of Perth, North Britain; taking notice of the last-mentioned Bill, and praying their Lordships "to grant a more extended popular Commission for carrying the Provisions of the same into Effect, or at any rate to grant that it shall be provided by the Bill that Six at least of the Commissioners from the Town Council of the said City shall be chosen from the Trades Members thereof:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Bankrupt Laws, Petition from Huntingdon respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Bankers, Merchants and Traders of the Borough of Huntingdon, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to refuse to sanction the proposed Alteration in the Bankrupt Laws, that all Commissions of Bankrupt within Eighty Miles of the Metropolis shall henceforth be executed in London:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Criminal Laws, Petition of The Ld. Mayor, &c. of London for Revision of.

Upon reading the Petition of The Lord Mayor, Aldermen and Commons of the City of London, in Common Council assembled; praying their Lordships "to take into Consideration the Laws relating to Capital Punishment, with a view to their Revision, and the Amelioration of the Punishment of Death for Crimes relating to Property unattended with personal Violence:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Slavery, Petitions for Abolition of: (Kingston upon Hull:)

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town and Neighbourhood of Kingston upon Hull, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships would immediately adopt such Measures as, in their Wisdom, may seem good, for the complete Abolition of the System of Slavery, at once revolting to Humanity and contradictory to the Principles and Precepts of our Holy Religion; and with this view, that their Lordships would immediately proceed to pass an Act by which it shall be declared, that, after a certain Day to be fixed, (and that not a distant one,) in any British Colony, the first Breath which an Infant's Lungs inspire shall be the Breath of Freedom, and that no Human Being shall there be born a Slave:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Thornton & Clayton:

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Thornton and Clayton, in the Parish of Bradford, Yorkshire, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships to take the earliest Period for the Consideration of the tremendous Evil of Slavery, and to extinguish it for ever in all Parts of His Majesty's Dominions; and to extend the Blessings of British Freedom to all who are under the British Sway:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Baptists of Shipley:

Upon reading the Petition of the Persons whose Names are thereunto subscribed, being the Minister and Members of the Congregation of Protestant Dissenters of the Baptist Denomination at Shipley, Yorkshire, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to take the Subject of Slavery into their serious Consideration at the earliest possible Period, with a view to the immediate and total Extinction of it in all Parts of His Majesty's Dominions, and to the Introduction of a much injured Race to the Enjoyment of Constitutional Freedom:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Bradford:

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town and Neighbourhood of Bradford, in the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to consider the Impolicy and Injustice of retaining in a State of Slavery so many Thousands of unoffending British Subjects; and to adopt such immediate and effective Measures as their Lordships Wisdom may deem suitable for the complete and speedy Abolition of Slavery in all the British Dominions, as indispensably necessary to ensure the temporal, moral and religious Improvement of the Negroes, as essential to the Dignity of the British Crown and the Integrity of the Constitution, as absolutely necessary for satisfying the almost unanimous Wishes of a Christian Public, and as the only Means of averting the righteous Displeasure of a compassionate, a just and an Almighty God:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Inhabitants of Shipley:

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Shipley, in Yorkshire, and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to consider the Impolicy and Injustice of retaining in a State of Bondage Thousands of unoffending British Subjects; and to adopt such effective Measures as their Lordships Wisdom may deem best calculated to obtain the speedy and effectual Abolition of Slavery in all the British Dominions:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Wilsden cum Allerton:

Upon reading the Petition of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the Townships and District of Wilsden cum Allerton, in the Parish of Bradford and County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "from a Regard to the Claims of Justice, the Interests of the Country, the Integrity of the Constitution, which declares against Slavery, and, more than all, from a supreme Reverence for the mild Spirit and Divine Precepts of Christianity, to fix an early Period when every unoffending British Subject in His Majesty's Colonies now in a State of Slavery, and every future Generation, shall be raised to a Participation of the Rights and Privileges enjoyed by other Classes of His Majesty's Subjects, and when the whole unsightly Fabric of Slavery shall fall to rise no more:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Bowling:

Upon reading the Petition of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the Township of Bowling, in the Parish of Bradford, County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to distinguish the Close of their present Session by anew recording their Disapprobation of the unjust, unconstitutional and unchristian System of Slavery, that a Hope of the speedy Demolition of it may cheer every Friend of Humanity in His Majesty's Dominions; and to fix the Time when every Chain shall be snapt asunder, and every unoffending Captive under the Sway of the British Sceptre be raised to a full Participation of British Rights and Privileges, both Civil and Religious:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Horton:

Upon reading the Petition of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of the Township of Horton, in the Parish of Bradford, in the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "speedily to uproot the System of Slavery, so unjust as well as ruinous; to enact the immediate Freedom of the future Generation; and to determine the very earliest Period, compatible with Prudence, for the Liberation of every Slave in His Majesty's Dominions; that they may be raised effectually and decisively (according to the Resolutions of The House of Commons in 1823) to a Participation of the Rights and Privileges enjoyed by other Classes of His Majesty's Subjects:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

North Bierly:

Upon reading the Petition of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of North Bierly, in the Parish of Bradford, and County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "not to rise from their present Session without renewing the Pledge of 1823 for the Abolition of Slavery, and adopting effectual and decisive Measures, altogether independent of the Colonial Legislatures, for the just Liberation of British Slaves, for an equitable Remuneration to those who may suffer by this Act of Justice, and for the complete and final Abolition of British Slavery, which the Petitioners will not cease to urge with all due Respect and requisite Earnestness:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Graduates of University of Oxford.

Upon reading the Petition of the Graduate and Undergraduate Members of the University of Oxford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships to adopt forthwith such decided Measures as shall deprive the Slaveholder of his Power over the Person of the Slave, and terminate as speedily as possible the System of Slavery in every Part of His Majesty's Dominions:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Viscount Lifford's Claim, Lords sworn to give Evidence on.

The Lord Archbishop of Armagh, The Earl of Harrowby and The Viscount Lorton, were severally sworn, at the Table, by The Lord Chancellor, in order to give Evidence before the Committee for Privileges to whom the Petition of James Viscount Lifford, praying, "That his Right to vote at the Elections of Peers of Ireland to sit in the Parliament of the United Kingdom may be admitted by their Lordships," stands referred.

Beer, Petition from Beverley respecting Consumption of, on Premises of Vendor.

Upon reading the Petition of the Gentry, Clergy, and other Inhabitants of the Borough of Beverley and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That in carrying into Effect the Measure for repealing the Duties on Beer, and for allowing a general Sale of it by Retail, which is calculated to do Good, the greatest Caution may be taken that great Evils do not arise out of it; and that the Bill now before Parliament may contain Restrictions to prevent the Consumption of Beer upon the Premises of the Vendors, except under proper Regulations, and the Sanction of proper Authority:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Sir W. G. Cumming's Estate Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act for selling the Entailed Lands and Estates of Gordonstown and others, in the County of Elgin and Forres, belonging to Sir William Gordon Gordon Cumming Baronet, or so much thereof as may be necessary, and to apply the Price arising therefrom in the Payment of the Debts affecting or that may be made to affect the said Lands and Estates;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Welsh Mining Co's Estate Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act for dissolving a certain Partnership Company known by the Name of The Welsh Iron and Coal Mining Company," and for enabling the Directors and Trustees thereof to dispose of the Estate and Effects of the Concern, and divide the Surplus, after Payment of the Debts and Expences, amongst the Shareholders of the Capital Stock therein; and for other Purposes;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Sir W. P. Campbell's Estate Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

To return the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable Sir William Purves Hume Campbell of Marchmont, Baronet, and the Heirs of Entail of the Lands and Barony of Greenlaw, in the County of Berwick, to grant Feus of Parts of the said Lands and Barony; and for other Purposes therein mentioned;" and to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to the same, without any Amendment.

Port Glasgow Harbour, &c. Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for improving the Harbour of Port Glasgow, constructing a Wet Dock or Wet Docks adjacent thereto, and for altering the Road leading from Port Glasgow to Glasgow, near the said Harbour;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Bill was read the First Time."

Royal Military Canal Account delivered.

The House being informed, "That Mr. O'Neil, from the Commissioners of the Royal Military Canal, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to the Directions of an Act of Parliament,

"An Account of all Rates and Tolls, and Receipts of Money and Disbursements, and Balances remaining of any such Receipts of Rates and Tolls, upon the Royal Military Canal, for the Year ending 31st December 1829."

And then he withdrew.

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Account do lie on the Table.

Bankrupt Act Amendment Bill, Petition of W. Clapcott et al. respecting:

Upon reading the Petition of William Clapcott of Christchurch, in the County of Hants, Esquire, and of the other Persons whose Names or respective Partnership Firms are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to take the Petitioners Case into Consideration, and to afford to them and others similarly situated that Relief which can only be granted by the Legislature, either by adding to the Bill now before their Lordships, intituled, "An Act to explain and amend an Act of the Sixth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for amending the Laws relating to Bankrupts," a Provision to render valid Commissions of Bankrupt founded on Acts of Bankruptcy committed before the 1st Day of September 1825, which Commissions are rendered invalid by the Statute passed in the Sixth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act to amend the Laws relating to Bankrupts," which repeals from the said 1st Day of September all the prior Statutes relating to Bankrupts, or by such other Means as to their Lordships Wisdom shall seem most fit for remedying the Omission or Defect in the said Statute:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Comee on the Bill deferred.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to be put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to explain and amend an Act of the Sixth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for amending the Laws relating to Bankrupts;"

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Monday next.

Roman Catholic, &c. Worship, Petition from Deaneries of Rochester & Malling against compulsory Attendance on.

Upon reading the Petition of the Clergymen of the Deaneries of Rochester and Malling, in the Diocese of Rochester, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "to take such Measures as in their Wisdom they may judge best to secure to Protestants in our Army the same Measure of Toleration which is enjoyed by their Roman Catholic or Heathen Fellow Soldiers, the not being compelled to take part in the Superstitious Rites of the Roman Catholic and Greek Churches:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Hay's Estate Bill, Petition against, referred to the Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of John M'Ilwaine of Lisfannon, in the County of Donegall, Yeoman; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act for establishing and carrying into Execution the Trusts created by the last Will and Testament of John Gwyn, late of the City of Londonderry, Merchant, deceased; and for incorporating the Trustees therein named, for the better and more effectual Execution of the Charities appointed by said Will; and for other Purposes;" and praying their Lordships, "That he may be heard by his Counsel and Agents at the Bar of this House, or before their Lordships Committee, on the Bill:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed, and that the Petitioner be at liberty to be heard by his Counsel and Agents against the same, as desired; and that Counsel be heard for the Bill, at the same Time, if they think fit.

Lords summoned, Order for, discharged.

The Order of the Day being read for the Lords to be summoned;

Ordered, That the said Order be discharged.

Abolition of Fees on Demise of the Crown Bill.

Ordered, That the Bill, intituled, "An Act to abolish all Fees and Stamp Duties chargeable on the Renewal of all Appointments, Commissions, Grants, Pensions and Patents consequent on the Demise of the Crown," be read a Second Time To-morrow; and that the Lords be summoned.

Message to H.C. for Reports from East Retford Election Com ee.

Ordered, That a Message be sent to the House of Commons, to request that they will be pleased to give Directions to the proper Officer to attend at the Bar of this House with the Original Reports made from the Select Committee appointed by that House in 1827 to try and determine the Merits of the Petition of Sir Henry Wright Wilson and of Darker Parker and others, severally complaining of an undue Election and Return for the Borough of East Retford, in the County of Nottingham.

King's Bench Prison, Petition of R. S. Tighe respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of Robert Stearne Tighe, late of Michelstown, in the County of West Meath, Esquire, but now a Prisoner for Debt in the Custody of William Jones Esquire, Marshal of the Marshalsea of the King's Bench; complaining of the Conduct of the said William Jones, and of the Regulations existing in the said Prison, and the profligate Habits of the Prisoners confined therein; and praying, "That their Lordships may be pleased to take the Subject into their most serious and earliest Consideration, with a view to the Institution of such an Investigation as may afford a reasonable Ground to hope for a Remedy, by fully ascertaining the Nature, the Extent and the Causes of the Abuses to which the Petitioner humbly but earnestly seeks to obtain the Attention of their Lordships, under a firm and honest Conviction that those Abuses will be found to have been the Result of the habitual and long-continued Neglect by the Marshal of this Marshalsea of the essential Duties prescribed to him by the Statute Law of the Land, and by the Patent under which he has held his Office; and that their Lordships may be pleased to adopt such Measures as may admit Petitioner to the Proof of his Allegations, comprehending the various Charges which he has at different Times preferred upon Oath; or that their Lordships may be pleased to adopt such other Course as to their Lordships Wisdom may appear most fitting to put a prompt and effectual Termination to the Evils of such a System:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Galway Town Regulation Bill, Petition from Galway in favor of:

Upon reading the Petition of the Land Owners, Merchants, Traders, Freeholders and Inhabitants of the Town and County of the Town of Galway, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of an Act of the Fourth Year of His Majesty King George the First, relative to the Right of Admission to the Freedom of the Corporation of Galway, and also of an Act of the last Session of Parliament for the Relief of His Majesty's Roman Catholic Subjects; and praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to explain or amend the said Statutes, so as to extend to Roman Catholics the same Right of Admission to the Freedom of said Corporation as is now enjoyed by Protestants:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Bill to be printed.

Ordered, That the Bill, intituled, "An Act to repeal so much of an Act passed in Ireland in the Fourth Year of the Reign of King George the First, for the better regulating the Town of Galway, and for strengthening the Protestant Interest therein, as limits the Franchise created by the said Act to Protestants only," be printed.

Agricultural Distress, Petitions respecting: (Grantham:)

Upon reading the Petition of the Owners and Occupiers of Land in the Town and Neighbourhood of Grantham, in the County of Lincoln, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Stamford:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Owners and Occupiers of Land in the Neighbourhood of Stamford, in the County of Lincoln, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Folkingham.

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Owners and Occupiers of Land in the Town and Neighbourhood of Folkingham, in the County of Lincoln, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; severally praying, "That their Lordships will take the fatal Pressure upon our National Industry, the Importation of Foreign Wool, Woollen Rags, Hides and Tallow, into their most serious Consideration, and lay such Duty on Foreign Wool and Rags as will tend to rescue this once happy County from that Ruin which at present threatens such speedy and inevitable Destruction:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Meltham Inclosure Bill, Marshal of King's Bench to bring W. Rayner to be examined by the Com ee.

Ordered, That the Marshal of the King's Bench, or his Deputy, do forthwith bring William Rayner, a Prisoner in his Custody, to the Bar of this House, in order to his being sworn to give Evidence before the Committee to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act to amend an Act of His late Majesty, for inclosing Lands in the Manor of Meltham, in the Parish of Almondbury, in the West Riding of the County of York," stands committed; and that the said Marshal, or his Deputy, do also bring the said William Rayner to this House To-morrow, at One o'Clock, in order to his being examined as a Witness before the Committee on the said Bill; and that the said William Rayner do bring with him the Minutes of the Commissioners under the Meltham Inclosure Act, and all other Books and Papers relating to the Execution of his Duty as a Commissioner under the said Act, in order to their being produced before the said Committee.

Cotton Factories, Petitions relative to employing Children in: (Weavers, Stockport:)

Upon reading the Petition of the Dressers and PowerLoom Weavers employed in the Cotton Manufactories of Stockport, in the County of Chester, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to enact a Law imposing adequate Penalties upon all Persons who shall have any Labourer under Twenty-one Years of Age in actual Work in any Cotton Mill for more than Ten Hours and a Half in any One Day, such Hours to be between Six o'Clock in the Morning and Six in the Evening:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Blackburn:

Upon reading the Petition of the Working Spinners and others employed in Cotton and other Factories, and in Cotton and other Mills, in the Town of Blackburn, and in the Neighbourhood thereof, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Preston:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Operative Spinners and others employed in the spinning of Cotton Wool into Yarn in Preston and its Neighbourhood, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; severally praying, "That their Lordships will take the Condition of the Children employed in Cotton Factories, and the Hours of Labour allotted to them, into their most serious Consideration, and will procure the Enactment of such a Law as will effectually put a Stop to Grievances of which, for the Benefit of themselves and their Children, and of the Country at large, they so justly complain:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Congleton:

Upon reading the Petition of the Cotton Spinners and others employed in Cotton and Silk Factories in Congleton and its Neighbourhood, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to pass a Law entirely prohibiting the Employment of Persons under Twentyone Years of Age in the Night in Cotton and Silk Mills:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ashton under Lyne, &c:

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Ashton under Lyne, Stayley Bridge and Mossley, in the County Palatine of Lancaster, and also of Dukinfield, Newton and Hyde, in the County Palatine of Chester, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to pass a Law entirely prohibiting the working of any Steam Engines and Water Wheels, in Cotton Mills and Factories, more than Ten Hours and a Half on any One Day, and Eight Hours and a Half on Saturdays:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Oldham.

Upon reading the Petition of the Operative Spinners and others employed in the spinning of Cotton in Oldham and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will pass such a Law as shall completely prohibit the Employment of Persons under Twenty-one Years of Age in the Night in Cotton and other Factories:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Watching, &c. Parishes Bill, Petition from Calne in favor of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Guild Stewards, Burgesses and Inhabitants of the Borough and Town of Calne, in the County of Wilts, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act to make Provision for the lighting and watching of Parishes in England and Wales;" and praying their Lordships, "That the same may pass into a Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Stamp Duties (Ireland), Petition from Ballycallan, &c. against Encrease of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the United Parishes of Ballycallan, Kilmanagh and Killaloe, in the County of Kilkenny, Ireland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That any Measure for the Encrease of Stamp Duties in Ireland may be not only rejected, but that Measures of further Exemption from Taxation, such as may seem to their Lordships meet and expedient, and which the Circumstances of the Country loudly demand, be forthwith adopted and carried into immediate Effect:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Rother Levels Drainage Bill, Petitions in favor of, referred to the Comee: (Bodiam, &c:)

Upon reading the Petition of the Owners and Occupiers of Land, Traders and others, Inhabitants of the Parishes of Bodiam, Ewhurst and Salehurst, in the County of Sussex, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act to amend an Act of the Seventh Year of His present Majesty, for more effectually draining and preserving certain Marsh Lands or Low Grounds in the Parishes of Sandhurst, Newenden, Rolvenden, Tenterden, Wittersham, Ebony, Woodchurch, Appledore and Stone, in the County of Kent, and Ticehurst, Salehurst, Bodiam, Ewhurst, Northiam, Beckly, Peasmarsh, Iden and Playden, in the County of Sussex;" and praying, That their Lordships will not, by enforcing the Order for admitting Ten Feet Water into the Rother, deprive the Petitioners of the Navigation thereby intended to be given, and cause certain Destruction to their Lands; but that their Lordships will, by allowing the proposed Bill to pass into a Law, ensure the Petitioners the Benefit before intended, which at the same Time will secure an improved Drainage to their Low Grounds:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed.

Wittersham, &c:

Upon reading the Petition of the Owners and Occupiers of Lands and other Inhabitants of the Parishes of Wittersham, Stone and Ebony, in the Isle of Oxney, in the County of Kent, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of the last-mentioned Bill, and praying, "That their Lordships will protect their Lives as well as Property from the certain Danger to which both will be exposed if the Provisions of the Decree and former Act in the said Petition mentioned are to be enforced; and that their Lordships will allow the present Bill to pass into a Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed.

Tenterden & Rolvenden:

Upon reading the Petition of the Owners and Occupiers of Lands, Traders and others, Inhabitants of the Parishes of Tenterden and Rolvenden, in the County of Kent, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of the last-mentioned Bill, and praying, "That their Lordships will not permit the Destruction of Six thousand Acres of valuable Marsh Lands sewing into the Rother, on the Presumption the admitting the Tidal Waters into the Rother would benefit the Harbour of Rye; and that their Lordships will allow the proposed Bill to pass into a Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed.

Northiam & Beckly.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants and Owners and Occupiers of Land in the Parishes of Northiam and Beckly, in the County of Sussex, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of the last-mentioned Bill, and praying, "That their Lordships will allow the same to pass into a Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed.

Dundalk Roads Bill, Petition against, from Louth.

Upon reading the Petition of the Landholders, Merchants, Traders and other Inhabitants of the County of Louth, Ireland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of a Bill lately depending in this House, intituled, "An Act for repairing and maintaining the Roads from the Town of Dundalk, in the County of Louth, to the Towns of Castle Blayney and Carrickmacross, in the County of Monaghan;" and praying their Lordships "to reject the same in toto, as it would be attended with an oppressive, unjust and unnecessary Tax on the Public; but should it be the Opinion of their Lordships that it should be referred to a Committee of their Lordships, that they will then be pleased to hear the Petitioners by Agent and Counsel against the same, and also to grant sufficient Time to produce Witnesses from Ireland to corroborate the Allegations of the Petitioners; and that their Lordships will institute an Enquiry this present Session into the Abuses that exist in the Irish Turnpike System generally, that same may be reformed:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Stamp Duty on Medicines, Petition of Chemists of Manchester for Repeal of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Chemists and Druggists of Manchester, in the County of Lancaster, and the Neighbourhood, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to grant them Relief by a Repeal of the Medicine Stamp Act, or by exempting from its Operation all Medicines or Medicinal Compounds whatsoever which are not strictly proprietary, or by such other Means as their Lordships shall deem expedient:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Emigration & Home Colonization, Petition from Frome Selwood respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Parish of Frome Selwood, in the County of Somerset, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to pass a Bill authorizing Parishes to borrow a limited Sum of Money from Government or other Sources for the Purpose of colonizing at Home the Poor unable to obtain Work, or for employing them on Land proper for the Purpose, governed by a System well regulated, and containing a Provision for the Children of the Colonists; or for colonizing the Poor in our Foreign Possessions; and to liquidate the Principal and Interest of such Loan by Annual Instalments, (which the Petitioners are unable at present to do;) which Measure would tend to the Improvement of the Condition of the Poor and to the Diminution of the Parish Expenditure:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Spirits & Stamps, (Ireland,) Petition from Tipperary against Encrease of Duty on.

Upon reading the Petition of the Gentry, Clergy and Freeholders of the County of Tipperary, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to take into Consideration the Impolicy of the proposed Encrease of Duties on Home-made Spirits and Stamps in Ireland, and adopt such a wise and enlarged System of Policy as may afford Relief to Ireland, and thus promote the general and true Interests of the whole British Empire:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ashborne & Belpar Road Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing the Road from Ashborne, in the County of Derby, to a Messuage or Public House in the Occupation of John Frost, near Belpar Bridge, in the said County of Derby."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Cox and Mr. Farrer;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

Dovor Improvement Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to amend Two Acts of His late Majesty, for paving, cleansing, lighting and watching the Town of Dovor, and for removing and preventing Nuisances and Annoyances therein."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, with the Amendments, shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. with Amendments to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To return the said Bill, and acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the same, with some Amendments, to which their Lordships desire their Concurrence.

Greece, Address for Papers respecting,

Ordered, That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, to request that His Majesty will be graciously pleased to order that there be laid before this House, "A Copy or Copies of any Communications addressed by The Porte to the Plenipotentiaries of the Allied Courts, expressing its Desire to obtain the Reduction of the Frontiers fixed by the Protocol of the 22d of March 1829."

Ordered, That the said Address be presented to His Majesty by the Lords with White Staves.

Courtown Harbour Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to amend an Act passed in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for the completing the Harbour of Courtown, near Brenogue Head, in the County of Wexford."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

L. Bp. Bath & Wells.
L. Bp. Exeter.
L. Bp. St. Davids.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Bp. Rochester.
L. Bp. Landaff.
L. Bp. Raphoe.
L. De Clifford.
L. Willoughby de Eresby.
L. Dacre.
L. Clinton.
L. Petre.
L. Clifton.
L. Teynham.
L. Clifford of Chudleigh.
L. Colville of Culross.
L. Napier.
L. Boyle.
L. Hay.
L. King.
L. Monson.
L. Holland.
L. Dynevor.
L. Montagu.
L. Douglas of Douglas.
L. Gage.
L. Auckland.
L. Selsey.
L. Calthorpe.
L. Rolle.
L. Bayning.
L. Fitz Gibbon.
L. Carbery.
L. Dufferin & Claneboye.
L. Redesdale.
L. Ellenborough.
L. Arden.
L. Sheffield.
L. Mont Eagle.
L. Manners.
L. Hill.
L. Melbourne.
L. Ker.
L. Ormonde.
L. Ravensworth.
L. Delamere.
L. Bexley.
L. Penshurst.
L. Somerhill.
L. Farnborough.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Seaford.
L. Fife.
L. Clanwilliam.
L. Durham.
L. Skelmersdale.
L. Wallace.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. President.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Norfolk.
D. Richmond.
D. Beaufort.
D. Leeds.
D. Newcastle.
M. Winchester.
M. Lansdowne.
M. Salisbury.
M. Hertford.
M. Bute.
M. Camden.
M. Cleveland.
E. Westmorland.
E. Chesterfield.
E. Essex.
E. Carlisle.
E. Doncaster.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Morton.
E. Rosebery.
E. Tankerville.
E. Cowper.
E. Stanhope.
E. Cornwallis.
E. Hardwicke.
E. Ilchester.
E. De Lawarr.
E. Radnor.
E. Hillsborough.
E. Clarendon.
E. Norwich.
E. Mansfield.
E. Carnarvon.
E. Malmesbury.
E. Charlemont.
E. Wicklow.
E. Caledon.
E. Limerick.
E. Charleville.
E. Manvers.
E. Grey.
E. Harrowby.
E. Verulam.
E. Brownlow.
E. Morley.
E. Glengall.
E. Eldon.
E. Howe.
E. Vane.
E. Amherst.
E. Cawdor.
V. Arbuthnott.
V. Duncan.
V. Melville.
V. Lorton.
V. Gordon.
V. Granville.
V. Goderich.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet To-morrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Galway Canal Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for making and maintaining a Navigable Cut or Canal from Lough Corrib to the Bay of Galway; and for the Improvement of the Harbour of Galway."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Baal's Bridge Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the Improvement of the Shannon Navigation from the City of Limerick to Killaloe, by rebuilding the Bridge called Baal's Bridge, in the said City."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Commons Answer to Message of this Day.

The Messengers sent to the House of Commons this Day, being returned, acquainted the House, "That the Commons return for Answer, That they will direct one of their Clerks to attend with the Reports, as desired by their Lordships."

Greece, Address for Papers respecting.

Ordered, That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, to request that His Majesty will be graciously pleased to order that there be laid before this House, "Copies of or Extracts from all Communications received from the Ambassadors of the Allied Powers, in consequence of the Instruction of the 2d July 1828, relating to the Boundaries of Greece, and the Wishes and Wants of the Greek People:"

And also, "Copies of or Extracts from further Communications received relating to Blockades established by the Greeks, and the raising of those Blockades."

Ordered, That the said Address be presented to His Majesty by the Lords with White Staves.

Hunter v. Roughead & Melrose.

Upon reading the Petition and Appeal of James Hunter of Wellfield, Writer in Dunse, only surviving Trustee and Executor of the late James Roughead, Tenant of Jardinfield; complaining of Three Interlocutors of the Lord Ordinary in Scotland, of the 10th of June and 1st of July 1824, and the 17th of January 1826; also of Three Interlocutors of the Lords of Session there, of the First Division, of the 1st, (signed 2nd,) 16th and 23d of February 1827; also of Four Interlocutors of the said Lord Ordinary, of the 6th of March and the 3d of July 1827, of the 3d of June 1828 and the 12th of May 1829; also of Seven Interlocutors of the said Lords of Session, of the First Division, of the 19th of June, Two of the 11th of July, of 28th November (signed 1st December) 1829, in so far as it finds the Expences fall to be paid out of the Trust Funds, and excepting in so far as it finds the Petitioner entitled to the Expences of realizing the Crop therein mentioned, and remits to the Accountant to amend his Report; Two of the 2d of March and One of the 15th (signed 20th) of May 1830; and praying, "That the same may be reversed, varied or altered, so far as complained of, or that the Appellant may have such Relief in the Premises, as to this House, in their Lordships great Wisdom, shall seem meet; and that Mrs. Isabel Roughead, or Dickson, or Melrose, and William Melrose her Husband for his Interest, may be required to answer the said Appeal:"

It is Ordered, That the said Mrs. Isabel Roughead, or Dickson, or Melrose, and William Melrose, may have a Copy of the said Appeal, and do put in their Answer or respective Answers thereunto, in Writing, on or before Monday the 5th Day of July next; and Service of this Order upon the said Respondents, or upon any one of their known Agents in the Court of Session in Scotland, shall be deemed good Service.

Hall's Estate Bill Specially reported.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to authorize the granting of Building and Mining Leases of certain Parts of the Estates now subject to the Trusts of the Will of Benjamin Hall Esquire, deceased, and of other Estates which may be hereafter conveyed or settled upon the same Trusts; and also the Appropriation and Grant of other Part of the said Estates for the Erection of a Church;" "That the Committee had met, and considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that all the Parties concerned in the Consequences of the Bill had appeared and consented thereto, except Augusta Hall, Wife of Benjamin Hall Esquire, (the Son,) who is entitled to her Jointure under an Indenture of Appointment made on the 3d of December 1823, in virtue of a Power contained in the Will of the said Benjamin Hall, the Testator mentioned in the Bill; and also except William Jones Esquire, one of the Trustees of a Term of One hundred Years created by the said Indenture of Appointment for securing the said Jointure, the said Augusta Hall and William Jones being proved to be at Rome; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to their Lordships, with some Amendments."

Which Report, being read by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

Then the Amendments made by the Committee to the said Bill, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Then an Amendment was made by the House to the said Bill.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

D. of Bedford's Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for prohibiting Burying and Funeral Service in a Chapel of Ease intended to be built for the Parish of Saint George Bloomsbury, in the County of Middlesex," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Party concerned had given his Consent to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Ordered, That the said Bill be ingrossed.

G. Smith's Naturalization Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for naturalizing George Smith," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made some Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

J. C. Smith's Naturalization Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury also reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for naturalizing John Christopher Smith," was committed; That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made some Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments, being read Twice by the Clerk, were agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Bill, with the Amendments, be ingrossed.

East Retford Election Bill:

The Order of the Day being read for the further Consideration and Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to prevent Bribery and Corruption in the Election of Burgesses to serve in Parliament for the Borough of East Retford;" and for the Lords to be summoned; and for permitting Counsel to examine Witnesses in support of the Bill; and for hearing Counsel on the Petition of the Burgesses of the Borough of East Retford, in the County of Nottingham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, praying their Lordships, "That the said Bill may not pass into a Law;"

Counsel were accordingly called in.

Then John Tenney was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name John Tenney?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of East Retford?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1812, when Mr. Marsh and Mr. Osbaldeston were elected?"

"I do not particularly recollect it."

"Did you promise your Vote to either of those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"To which?"

"To both."

"Do you know the Angel Inn at Retford?"

"Yes."

"Were you there any Time after the Election, when Mr. Hannam was there?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Sum of Money there?"

"Yes."

"How much?"

"Nineteen Pounds."

"Had you previously received any Sum of Money?"

"Lent Money, which I expected I should have to pay again to Mr. Hannam; I was under Mr. Hannam's Employ at the Time."

"How much had Mr. Hannam advanced you?"

"Two Pounds."

"Did you ever repay Mr. Hannam those Two Pounds?"

"Never."

"But you received, in addition, Nineteen, at the Angel Inn?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1818, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were elected?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen, or either of them, your Vote?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Not from neither of them."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"Never."

"Did you receive any Packet?"

"No."

"Was any left at your House, to your Knowledge?"

"There was a Packet came, but not to me; I was living with my Father at the Time."

"What was your Father's Name?"

"John Tenney."

"Was he a Burgess?"

"No."

"Did your Father get the Money?"

"Yes."

"Did he afterwards pay it to you?"

"No."

"Were you present when the Packet came?"

"No."

"Had you any Communication with your Father about it?"

"Yes. I was not at Home at the Time the Postman brought the Packet."

"Did you come to any Arrangement with your Father about the Money?"

"No; I never came to any further Arrangement about it."

"Did you make any Enquiry of your Father respecting the Money?"

Mr. Adam objected to the Question.

(By a Lord.) "Did your Father live in the same House with yourself?"

"Yes."

"You were a Voter, and your Father was not a Voter?"

"Yes."

"Did you apply to your Father for that Money?"

"No."

(Mr. Law.) "Did your Father give you any Information respecting it?"

"Yes."

(By a Lord.) "What did you do upon that Information?"

"He told me there was a Packet came; and I told my Father that he might do as he liked with it."

"You told your Father that he might do with that Packet as he chose?"

"Yes, that was so; it was Two Days before I saw my Father after he had received it."

"How do you know that your Father received it?"

"He told me so himself."

"He is not a Voter?"

"No."

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Father dead?"

"Yes, he is. He did not say it belonged to me as a Voter."

"Did you promise your Vote in the Election of 1820, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were again elected?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any Packet after that Election?"

"No."

"Did you receive any Money?"

"No."

"Was your Father supporting you at the Time?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Communication with him on the Subject of the Packet?"

"No."

"Not after that Election?"

"No, not after that."

"Did he make any Remark to you?"

"No."

"Had you a Wife living there?"

"No."

"Did you give any Directions respecting any Sum of Money?"

"No."

(By a Lord.) "Do you mean to say you do not know of any Packet having been received at your House after that Election?"

"No, not after that Election."

(Mr. Law.) "At your Father's House?"

"Not to my Knowledge."

"Did your Father pay you any Sum of Money?"

"No."

(By a Lord.) "Did he pay any Money on your Account, or for you?"

"He paid divers Sums of Money for me, more than I can enumerate."

"At various Times?"

"At various Times, and oft."

"Did he pay more for you at the Period as to which the Gentleman is asking you, than upon other Occasions?"

"No."

(Mr. Law.) "Did you give any Direction or any Permission to your Father with respect to the Application of any Money after the Election of 1820?"

"No."

"Whom did you vote for at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"In 1808 you were made a Freeman?"

"Yes."

"Your Father was not a Freeman?"

"No."

"Did you get your Freedom by Servitude?"

"Yes."

"With whom?"

"John Mason."

"Who was he?"

"A Cordwainer."

"Were you a Cordwainer?"

"Yes."

"Were you so in the Years 1814, 1818 and 1820?"

"Yes."

"Did you see Mr. Osbaldeston yourself?"

"At the Election."

"Did he canvass you?"

"No."

"Do you remember whether any body canvassed you for Mr. Osbaldeston?"

"No, nobody at all."

"There was no Poll?"

"There was no Poll."

"Then you did not give any Promise to Mr. Osbaldeston or to Mr. Marsh?"

"No."

"You say you received at the Angel Nineteen Pounds, and that Hannam had advanced you Two Pounds before?"

"Yes."

"Did I understand you to say you expected to repay that Two Pounds?"

"I understood so at the Time."

"When was it that Hannam advanced you that Two Pounds?"

"I think as much as Two Years after the Election of Osbaldeston and Marsh; I was then in his Employ as his Gardener at that Time."

"Was that on account of Wages, or what?"

"I thought Wages at the Time; but he is in Debt to me now, occasionally."

"At that Time was he in Debt to you Two Pounds?"

"I considered more."

"Hannam being indebted to you Two Pounds, did you apply to him for Money?"

"His Son Richard told me, I being working in the Garden - my Father was in Norfolk; he sent for me to go there. I mentioned it to his Son Richard that I was short of Money to take so long a Journey as Downham Market. He said, "Oh, John, you shall not be short of Money by Two or Three Pounds, if you want it."

"In 1818 you voted for Evans and Crompton?"

"Yes."

"Did they canvass you?"

"No."

"Did any body canvass you for them?"

"No."

"Did they in 1820?"

"No."

"Did you see either of them before the Election in 1820?"

"No."

"In 1826 you voted for Dundas and Wrightson?"

"Yes."

"Did they canvass you?"

"No."

"Who canvassed you for Dundas?"

"It was by Letter."

"You never saw Sir Robert, perhaps?"

"Yes, I saw Sir Robert, but I had promised him before I saw him."

"Had you any Talk with him about your Vote?"

"No."

"Did you promise Wrightson?"

"Only by Letter."

"Did you see him before the Election?"

"No, not at all."

"Which Day did you vote for him?"

"On the first Day."

"Had you any Difficulty in getting to the Poll?"

"Yes."

"Was there any Riot or Tumult?"

"Yes, very much."

"Could you distinguish who made the Riot?"

"Some Special Constables, that were sworn in to keep the Peace."

"Did those Special Constables wear any Colours in their Hats?"

"No."

"Was there any Riot amongst the Mob?"

"Oh, very great."

"What was that about?"

"Upon my Word I cannot say, for I was very glad to get out from amongst them."

"Were you present when Sir Robert was assaulted on the Broad Stone?"

"No."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Joseph Marshall was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"How many Years have you been a Burgess?"

"Ever since 1816, I think."

"Do you remember the first Election, when Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans were Candidates, in the Year 1818?"

"Yes, I recollect that."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"Yes."

"After that Election did you receive any thing?"

"I received One Packet."

"What did that Packet contain?"

"Twenty-one Pounds."

"Did you receive One or Two Packets after that Election?"

"One Packet, I think."

"Refresh your Memory?"

"I think I am right."

"You think you received One?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive One or Two?"

"One, I think."

"Do you recollect the Second Election, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were again Candidates?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen the second Time?"

"Yes, I promised those Gentlemen the second Time."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"I received One Packet."

"What did that contain?"

"It contained the same as the other."

"For whom did you vote at the last Election?"

"The last Election of all, Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"Who canvassed you for the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas himself."

"Are you an Inhabitant of Retford?"

"No."

"Where do you live?"

"At Rotherham."

"What passed between you and him at the Canvass?"

"He asked me if I would serve him with my Vote and Interest; I told him I would if I lived."

"Did you go and vote?"

"Yes."

"Were you in Retford on the Day of polling?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Difficulty in polling?"

"No."

"Who canvassed you for Mr. Wrightson?"

"He canvassed me himself."

"What passed between you and him?"

"Nothing but the same."

"Have you received any Packets since that Election?"

"No."

"Are you quite sure?"

"Yes."

"Did nothing pass between you and Mr. Wrightson about Packets or Money?"

"No."

"No Expectation was held out?"

"No."

"And you did receive none?"

"No."

"Who canvassed you for the Election of 1818?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect; I do not keep those Things in my Mind; Mr. Evans did, I recollect."

"What passed between you and him?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect."

"Try your Recollection?"

"I cannot recollect; he asked me whether I would serve him with my Vote and Interest, and I told him I would."

"Did any thing pass about any Packet you were to receive?"

"No."

"Did he hold out any Promises of Money?"

"No."

"He merely asked you for your Vote and Interest?"

"Yes."

"When you received the Twenty-one Pounds had you any Idea from whence it came?"

"No."

"Were you surprized at receiving it?"

"Yes, I was surprized; I was very glad to see it."

"How did it come to you?"

"A Stranger brought it."

"Do you know the Person who brought it?"

"No; I do not know him if I were to see him again."

"How was it brought?"

"In a Letter."

"At what Time of Day?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect."

"Were you at Home?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive it yourself?"

"Yes."

"Was it in the Day-time or in the Evening?"

"In the Day-time."

"What Time of the Year was it?"

"I am sure I cannot state."

"In 1820, did Mr. Crompton canvass you?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Or Mr. Evans?"

"Mr. Evans canvassed me, I know."

"Were you canvassed by any body for Mr. Crompton?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Did any body ask you whether you would vote for Mr. Crompton?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Did you hear that Mr. Crompton was to be a Candidate?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you say to any body that you would vote for Mr. Crompton?"

"I cannot recollect."

"But you did, in point of fact, vote for him?"

"Not particularly; I cannot recollect."

"But you did vote for Mr. Crompton?"

"There was no voting."

"You supported the Two Candidates?"

"Yes; but there was no voting."

"If there had been a Polling, you would have voted for them both?"

"Yes."

"Was there any thing, on the second Election, passing between you and Mr. Evans respecting a Packet?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Was there any thing said about its being as it had been before?"

"No."

"Was any Promise of Money held out to you?"

"I cannot recollect that there was."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Brown was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name Thomas Brown?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1818, when Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were the Candidates?"

"Yes."

"To whom did you promise your Vote upon that Election?"

"Mr. Ingilby."

"I am not speaking of that Election just now; I will come to that by and by. When Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton were the Candidates?"

"I promised them both."

"Did you receive any Packet or Money after that Election?"

"There was a Packet; but I do not know where it came from."

"What was in the Packet?"

"Twenty-one Pounds."

"Were there One or Two Packets after the Election of 1818?"

"I only received One."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1820, when the same Gentlemen were Candidates again?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise your Vote upon that Occasion?"

"I promised them both."

"Did you receive any Packet after that second Election?"

"Yes, there was Packets came."

"How many?"

"One."

"One only?"

"One only."

"What did it contain?"

"Twenty Guineas."

"You mentioned the Election of Mr. Ingilby; was that Mr. William Ingilby?"

"Yes."

"He stood at the same Time with General Charles Crawford?"

"Yes, I believe he did."

"Which of those Two Gentlemen did you promise?"

"William Ingilby."

"Him only?"

"Yes."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"There was a Packet came."

"Only One?"

"Only One."

"What did that contain?"

"Twenty-one Pounds."

"For whom did you vote at the last Election, when Sir Robert Dundas, Mr. Wrightson and Sir Henry Wilson were Candidates?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

"Perhaps you recollect the Election of Robert Crawford Esquire and Robert Hugham, the Year before Mr. Ingilby's?"

"No, I do not."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"You do not recollect Robert Crawford's Election?"

"No."

"In what Year was that?"

"I cannot recollect."

"When were you made a Freeman of Retford, if you do not recollect that Election?"

"I am sure I cannot tell you."

"Try to recollect how many Years ago was it?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect."

"You do not recollect when you were made a Freeman?"

"No."

"How old are you?"

"About Forty-three."

"Do you remember how long after you became of Age you were made a Freeman?"

"One-and-twenty."

"Then it is Two-and-twenty Years ago since you were made a Freeman?"

"Yes, I believe it is."

"Are you sure you voted for William Ingilby?"

"Yes."

"What Year was that Election in?"

"I cannot recollect."

"How long had you been a Freeman when you voted for Sir William Ingilby?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Perhaps you had been a Freeman Four or Five Years?"

"I do not recollect."

"Will you say that you had been a Freeman Four or Five Years, or not?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Have you any Recollection what Period of Time elapsed between your being made a Freeman and your voting for Ingilby?"

"No."

"It may have been Ten Years?"

"I cannot recollect at this Time."

"How do you know that you voted at all?"

"I promised him, I think."

"Are you quite sure you voted for him?"

"Yes."

"How old were you at that Time?"

"I cannot recollect."

"You do not recollect how long you had been a Freeman, but you did vote for him?"

"Yes."

"Did he canvass you himself?"

"Yes."

"Where did you see him?"

"In Retford."

"How long have you been a Freeman?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Have you not the least Recollection how long it was after you had been made a Freeman that Ingilby's Election took place?"

"No, I have not."

"You are sure you have been a Freeman only Twoand-twenty Years?"

"Yes; I am Forty-three Years of Age."

"You were made a Freeman at Twenty-one?"

"Yes."

"Recollect how long you had been a Freeman before you voted for Sir William Ingilby?"

"I cannot at present."

"Are you quite certain you did vote for him?"

"Yes."

"What makes you recollect that; are you more than Forty-three?"

"I do not know whether I am or not."

"Do you know the Year in which you were born?"

"Not at this present Moment."

"Nor the Year of your Admission?"

"No; I cannot recollect just now."

"Was not Sir William Ingilby's Election in the Year 1807?"

"I am sure I do not know; I cannot recollect just now."

"Upon whose Interest did Sir William Ingilby stand?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"What are you; what Business in Life are you?"

"A Cordwainer."

"You do not know what Interest Mr. Ingilby stood upon?"

"No, not at present."

"Did he stand upon the same Interest as General Charles Crawford?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"Did you see him before you promised him your Vote?"

"No, I never saw him before."

"Did you see him with any body?"

"No; by himself."

"In 1818, who canvassed you?"

"I cannot recollect just now."

"Did you vote in 1812 for Marsh and Osbaldeston?"

"No; I was not in England then."

"Where were you then?"

"I was soldiering."

"In 1818, who canvassed you?"

"I cannot recollect just now."

"I wish you would try to recollect; you have not come here to say that you cannot recollect; did you know Mr. Thornton?"

"Yes, I have seen him; I knew him when he came to our House."

"Who came with him in 1818?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"How did you know him then?"

"He came to canvass me."

"Had you known him before?"

"No; but he made use of his Name."

"When he came, what passed between you and him?"

"He axed me for my Vote."

"Did you promise him your Vote?"

"Yes."

"Did he make you any Promise or Offer as the Price of your Vote?"

"No."

"He simply asked you for your Vote, and you said he should have it?"

"Yes."

"When did you see Evans, or did you see him at all?"

"He came at the same Time; not the same Day."

"Who came with Evans?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"Are you sure you ever saw Evans?"

"Yes."

"Where did he come to?"

"He came to our House."

"How do you happen to recollect that?"

"I voted for him."

"Do you recollect what passed when he came to canvass you?"

"Yes; he axed me for my Vote."

"Did you give it him?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did he make any Promise to you?"

"No."

"Of no sort or kind?"

"No."

"After this, you say you received a Packet?"

"There was a Packet came; I do not know where it came from."

"How do you know it was at that Time; did you see it?"

"No; a Man brought it, and left it at the House."

"Did he see you?"

"No; I did not see him hardly."

"Did you see him at all; did you see him?"

"Yes; but I did not know him."

"At what Time of the Day or Night was it?"

"It was Night; it was dark."

"What did he say?"

"He opened the Door, and flung it in."

"In what Time of the Year was it?"

"The Winter Time."

"You are quite sure of that; that it was in the Nighttime and the Winter Time?"

"Yes."

"You received only One?"

"No."

"Did you open it directly?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect how it was directed?"

"There was no Direction upon it."

"Was it a common Piece of Paper?"

"Yes; it was in Writing Paper."

"Like a Letter?"

"Yes."

"But no Direction?"

"There was my Name upon it, you know."

"It was directed to Thomas Brown?"

"Yes."

"You opened it directly, did you?"

"Yes."

"What did you find in it?"

"Twenty-one Pounds."

"In what Shape?"

"Notes."

"Were they Five Pound Notes or Ten Pound Notes?"

"There were Four different Notes, and an odd one."

"In 1820, who canvassed you?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect just now."

"Did you see Mr. Crompton upon that Occasion?"

"Yes."

"If you cannot recollect who canvassed you, how do you know that you saw Mr. Crompton?"

"He canvassed me Twice."

"Who canvassed you in 1820; did Mr. Crompton?"

"He canvassed me Twice."

"Who canvassed you in 1820; did Mr. Crompton?"

"I cannot say nought about the Year; but he canvassed me Twice."

"You have said that you recollect the Election of 1820; do you not recollect the Election of 1820?"

"No, I cannot recollect just now."

"If you do not know whether there was an Election in 1820, or not, how came you to tell Mr. Law that you received a Packet in 1820?"

"I received a Packet, but I cannot recollect in what Year it was."

"Cannot you recollect in what Year the Election was?"

"Not just this Minute."

"Have you forgotten it since you told Mr. Law, or did you tell Mr. Law it was 1820 without knowing any thing about it; did you say it was 1820 without recollecting any thing about it; why did you tell Mr. Law that you remember the Election of 1820?"

"I cannot recollect now, your Honour."

"But you recollected it then, did not you?"

"Yes."

"If you recollected it Ten Minutes ago, why do not you recollect it now?"

"You have fluttered me so."

"I have not fluttered you; I asked you whether you recollect an Election in 1820?"

"I cannot recollect it, indeed, just now."

"Did you not recollect it just now, when you told my Friend about it?"

"I cannot say nought about it."

"Can you say you were canvassed if you do not recollect any thing about the Election?"

"He canvassed me Twice."

"Upon either of those Occasions did he make you a Promise of any sort or kind?"

"No, he did not."

"Did Mr. Evans canvass you then?"

"Yes."

"How often?"

"Twice."

"Where were you when he canvassed you the second Time?"

"In Retford."

"In what Part of Retford?"

"In Cannon Gate, East Retford."

"In a House?"

"Yes."

"In whose House?"

"In my Father's House."

"Were you working for your Father?"

"Yes."

"Was he a Shoemaker?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect what you were doing when Mr. Evans came to canvass you?"

"Yes; I was getting my Dinner."

"Have you a clear Recollection of that?"

"Yes."

"What did he ask you to do?"

"He axed me for my Vote."

"Did you promise him?"

"Yes."

"Did he say any thing to you about any Consideration for your Vote?"

"No."

"After the second Election, you say you received One Packet?"

"Yes."

"Who gave it you?"

"I do not know who brought it."

"Did you see the Man bring it?"

"I did not know him."

"Did you see the Man?"

"Yes; he came and flung it into the House."

"Did you see him fling it into the House?"

"Yes."

"You saw him fling it into the House?"

"Yes."

"Was that Packet directed?"

"To Thomas Brown."

"What did that Packet contain?"

"Four Notes and an odd one."

"Like the rest?"

"Yes."

"You received only One Packet on that Occasion?"

"Yes."

"You promised Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans both?"

"Yes."

"If there had been a Poll, should you have voted both for Mr. Crompton and Mr. Evans?"

"Yes."

"But you received but One Packet after 1818?"

"No."

"And you received but One Packet after 1820; is not that so?"

"Yes."

"You promised them both, and you received but One?"

"Yes."

"Who canvassed you in 1826?"

"Sir Robert Dundas and Wrightson, I think."

"Did they come together?"

"No."

"Which came first?"

"Mr. Wrightson."

"Where did he come to?"

"To Sheffield."

"You were living at Sheffield then?"

"Yes."

"Do you carry on the Business of a Shoemaker at Sheffield?"

"Yes."

"Do you keep a Shop?"

"No."

"Mr. Wrightson came over to you?"

"Yes."

"Did any body come to you?"

"No, not to our House."

"What passed between you; did he ask you for your Vote?"

"Yes."

"Had you known him before?"

"No."

"Had you known that his Father had an Estate in that Neighbourhood?"

"No; he was quite a Stranger to me."

"Did you promise him?"

"Yes."

"Did he make any Promise to you of any sort or kind upon that Occasion?"

"No."

"How long before the Election was it that you saw Mr. Wrightson?"

"I cannot recollect just now, I am sure, how long it was."

"Was it a Year, or Six Months, or One Month, or how long?"

"It was a good Distance of Time."

"What do you call a good Distance of Time at your Shop at Sheffield; do you mean a Month or a Week?"

"About Six Months."

"It was about Six Months before the Election that Mr. Wrightson came, and he came first?"

"Yes."

"Did Sir Robert Dundas come afterwards?"

"Yes."

"How long before the Election did he come?"

"Not long after the other."

"Did any body come with him?"

"No."

"What passed between you and Sir Robert Dundas?"

"He asked me for my Vote."

"And you promised him, as you did Mr. Wrightson?"

"Yes."

"Did he say any thing as to your having any Advantage?"

"No."

"Have you received any Money since 1826?"

"There was a Packet dropped."

"After 1826?"

"Yes."

"There was a Packet after 1826?"

"Yes."

"After the last Election?"

"Yes."

"How long after the last Election was there a Packet left; at what Distance of Time?"

"Oh, I cannot tell you the Time."

"How long after the Election of 1826 was it?"

"I cannot say."

"Have you no doubt you received a Packet?"

"No."

"What did it contain?"

"Four Notes and an odd one."

"Exactly the same as that you received in 1818 and 1820?"

"Yes."

"Where did you receive that?"

"In Sheffield."

"In your own House?"

"Yes."

"Who brought it?"

"I do not know, I am sure."

"Was it the same Man that brought the other Two?"

"Oh, I cannot answer for that."

"Are you sure it was not the same Man?"

"I did not take that Notice."

"You saw him very distinctly, did you?"

"No; he opened the Door, put it on the Table, and off he went."

"Did he ask whose House it was?"

"No; he opened the Door, put it on the Table, and off he went."

"How long have you lived in Sheffield?"

"Twelve or Fourteen Years."

"How long did you live in that House in Sheffield?"

"This last House? about Seven Years I have lived in this last House."

"How long did you live in this House in Sheffield at which you say this Packet was left after 1826?"

"About Seven Years."

"Did you live from 1819 to 1826 in Sheffield in that House?"

"Yes."

"Have you ever seen Sir Robert Dundas or Mr. Wrightson, except upon those Occasions you have mentioned?"

"No."

"Now you state that a Man came and tossed in a Packet, without asking whose House it was?"

"Yes."

"Had you a whole House, or a Lodging?"

"A whole House."

"In what Part of Sheffield?"

"Silver Street."

"At what Time of the Day was it this was left?"

"In the Evening."

"What Time in the Evening?"

"About Six o'Clock."

"What were you doing?"

"Sitting by the Fire."

"What Time of the Year was it?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect."

"Have the goodness to recollect as nearly as you can?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect."

"Try to recollect?"

The Witness was admonished to attend to the Questions, and to answer them.

"I cannot recollect."

"Was it Summer or Winter?"

"Summer."

"You are sure of that?"

"Yes."

"Was it in the Middle of Summer?"

"It was about Harvest Time."

"You were sitting at the Fire at Six o'Clock in the Evening in the Middle of Harvest Time, when this Man came and left you this Packet?"

"He flung it on the Table."

"Did you open it directly?"

"Yes."

"There were Four Five Pound Notes, and a One?"

"There were Four, and an odd one."

"When did you change those Four Five Pound Notes?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Upon your solemn Oath?"

"I cannot recollect."

"It was the next Summer after the Election, was it?"

"Well, I cannot recollect just now."

"But you shall recollect if you tell these Stories; how long after the Election was it you received it; was it a Month or a Twelvemonth?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Endeavour to recollect?"

"I cannot recollect."

"Cannot you recollect whether it was One Month or Twelve Months?"

"I cannot."

"That you received these Twenty Guineas as a Bribe?"

"I cannot say."

"Cannot you tell me whether it was the same Year, or the next?"

"I cannot."

The Witness burst out crying.

"Was it in the same Summer, or the next, that you received this Packet?"

"I cannot say."

"Did you receive Twenty Guineas?"

"I cannot swear now."

"Where did you take it to be changed?"

"I cannot recollect just now."

"Did you take it to any Bank?"

"I did not take it at all."

"Have you got it still?"

"No."

"What did you do with it?"

"They were changed, but I did not change them."

"Who changed them?"

"My Wife, I imagine."

"Will you swear you gave those Notes to your Wife?"

"Yes."

"What is your Wife's Name?"

"Catherine Brown."

"Is she alive still?"

"Yes; she was when I left her at Sheffield."

"Did you see in what Bank Notes they were?"

"No; I cannot read."

"How do you know they were Four Five Pound Notes?"

"By changing them."

"With whom did you change them?"

"I do not know; she changed them."

"How did you tell that they were Four Five Pound Notes?"

"She told me so."

"Your Wife can read, can she?"

"She can read a little."

"Can she read Writing?"

"Yes, I believe she can."

"Have you any doubt whether she can or not?"

"She can tell Figures, and so I think she can read."

"When did you give those Notes to your Wife to be changed?"

"As soon as I opened the Packet."

"When did she go and get them changed?"

"She changed One soon afterwards."

"Do you mean the next Day?"

"No; that Evening."

"Where did she go to get it changed?"

"She did not say to me any thing about where she changed it."

"Why did she go out to change a Five Pound Note after Six o'Clock at Night?"

"She did not get that changed, but the One Pound Note."

"You recollect that distinctly?"

"Yes."

"Cannot you recollect then, whether it was the same Year or the next Year after the Election?"

"I am sure I cannot tell; she changed the One Pound Note, I know."

"When did she change any other?"

"She changed another soon afterwards to buy a few Clothes, you know."

"Where did she buy them?"

"At different Shops."

"What sort of Clothes; for herself or for you?"

"For both."

"Do not you recollect what Shops she bought the Clothes at?"

"Yes; she bought them at different Shops."

"Tell me the Name of any Shopkeeper?"

"I cannot tell you just now; I cannot recollect just now."

"Cannot you tell me the Names of any of the Shopkeepers that she bought any Things of?"

"Not just now; I cannot recollect."

"How many Shops did she buy from?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect just now."

"Do you expect to be believed if you go on in this Way?"

"I hope so."

"When did you change the other Five Pound Notes?"

"We paid some Rent with One."

"How much?"

"Six or Seven Shillings."

"Did you change a Five Pound Note to pay Six or Seven Shillings Rent?"

"She did."

"How long after?"

"A Day or Two after."

"Was that before she bought the Clothes?"

"No; after she bought the Clothes."

"Did she spend the whole Five Pounds in Clothes?"

"No, not altogether then."

"How came she to change a Five Pound Note to pay the Six or Seven Shillings Rent due?"

"Because she wanted some more Cash."

"Whom did she pay the Six or Seven Shillings to?"

"She paid it to the Landlord."

"Who was he; what was his Name?"

The Witness stood without answering.

"Have you forgot your Landlord's Name that you changed Five Pounds to pay Six or Seven Shillings to?"

"I am sure I cannot recollect his Name just now."

"For what Time was it the Rent was due?"

"A weekly Rent."

"How many Weeks?"

"Three Weeks."

"Was it exactly Six Shillings?"

"Yes; Two Shillings a Week."

"How many Rooms had you in your House?"

"Two."

"Can you get in Retford a House with Two Rooms at Two Shillings a Week?"

"Yes."

"Will you swear that was the Rent you paid?"

"Yes."

"How long had the Rent been due?"

"Three Weeks."

"Three Weeks were due exactly at the Time you paid it?"

"Yes."

"What did you do with the rest of the Money?"

"I am sure I cannot tell you just now."

"When did you change the Third?"

"I am sure I do not recollect when I changed the Third."

"Who changed it?"

"My Wife, I expect."

"You do not know what Bank Notes they were?"

"No."

"You only know they were Five Pound Bank Notes from your Wife's Account?"

"No."

"What was done with the Ten Pounds for the Third and Fourth?"

"I do not certainly know just now."

"Do you mean to tell their Lordships that you, who lived in a House of Two Shillings a Week, do not know what became of Ten Pounds?"

"It went for one little Thing or another."

"What little Things?"

"Tea and Sugar."

"Do you mean to say you spent Ten Pounds on Tea and Sugar?"

"No; and a little Beer."

"What other Things?"

"Little Articles for the House."

"How long did the Twenty-one Pounds last you?"

"I cannot say."

"Oh yes, you can; how long was it before it was spent?"

"I spent very little of it there myself."

"You have said that your Wife spent it; how long was it before it was all gone?"

"Very like a Month or Six Weeks."

"How did you live after it was gone?"

"I worked for more."

"Were you working all the while this Money was going?"

"No."

"You did not work at all?"

"Yes, a little."

"Less than you did before it came or after it was gone?"

"Yes, a little."

"From whom did it come; from Sir Robert Dundas?"

"I do not know from whom it came."

"Have you any Idea whom it came from?"

"No."

"You will swear this took place after the Election of 1826, that is, after the last Election, when you voted for Sir Robert Dundas and Wrightson, who made you no Promise they would pay you any thing?"

"A Packet came; I do not know from whom it came."

"You will swear that it was after the last Election; upon your solemn Oath, do you swear that?"

"I cannot recollect just now."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Isaac Dean was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Price.) "Are you a Freeman of Retford?"

"I am."

"How many Years have you been a Freeman?"

"I cannot exactly speak to that."

"About how many?"

"About Eleven, I think."

"Were you a Freeman at the first Election of Mr. Evans and Mr. Crompton?"

"I was."

"Did you promise those Gentlemen?"

"I did."

"After that Election, did you receive any thing?"

"I received a Packet."

"What did it contain?"

"It contained Twenty-one Pounds."

"Did you receive, after the Election in 1820, One or Two Packets?"

"I received another."

"What did that contain?"

"The same."

"For whom did you vote in 1826?"

"For Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson."

Cross-examined by Mr. Stephenson.

"Do you live in East Retford?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been there?"

"I cannot recollect; I should think Twenty Years."

"Are you come up from East Retford now?"

"Yes."

"How long have you been in Town?"

"Better than a Fortnight."

"Where have you been living in Town?"

"At the Bear and Staff."

"Have any other Burgesses of East Retford been living with you there?"

"Yes."

"How many?"

"Four or Five, I believe."

"Have you had any Conversation with them about this Business?"

"Not any thing respecting-"

"Respecting what?"

"Respecting the Bill that is in hand now."

"You are quite sure of that?"

"I am confident of that."

"Do you recollect the Name of any of them?"

"John Walker is one; Brown -"

"What Brown?"

"Thomas Brown."

"The Person who has just been examined?"

"Yes."

"Have you been with him in the Course of this Evening?"

"I have been at the House with him."

"Before he came here?"

"We were altogether at the Bear and Staff."

"This Evening?"

"Yes."

"What Time did you leave it?"

"About Five o'Clock."

"Have you been in his Company ever since?"

"I have been in the Lobby with him."

"Since Five o'Clock?"

"I cannot speak exactly."

"Who else was there besides?"

"Samuel Brown, I believe I see'd there."

"Who else?"

"Tenney."

"Who else?"

"Marshall, I believe."

"Give me the Names of all your Friends there, who were Burgesses of East Retford?"

"Walker, Marshall, Tenney, the Two Browns; I believe that is all."

"Have you all been there a Fortnight?"

"Well, I should think Walker and myself have; I think the others have not been so long."

"You have had no Conversation with each other about this Matter?"

"Not any concerning this Evidence."

"But about the Matter of the Borough of East Retford?"

"No."

"You have carefully abstained from that?"

"Yes, I have."

"And so have they?"

"As far as my Knowledge goes."

"Have you had no Conversation with Mr. Heptinstall upon the Subject?"

"Yes, I had a little."

"What has passed?"

"He asked me about this Packet, whether I knew from whom I received it; and I said, I did not; and that was all."

"Do you recollect who canvassed you before the Election in 1820?"

"Mr. Evans, I believe."

"Mr. Evans himself?"

"Yes, to the best of my Recollection."

"He came to East Retford?"

"Yes, he did."

"Do you recollect what passed between you and him?"

"Indeed I cannot."

"He asked you for your Vote?"

"Yes, and I promised him."

"Any thing more?"

"Not that I can recollect."

"Did he hold out any Inducement to you that you should have this Packet?"

"Nothing of the kind."

"Did he make any Allusion to Money if you gave him your Vote and Interest?"

"No."

"Or of Favor and Patronage?"

"No, none at all."

"So that you gave him your Vote on an entirely pure and disinterested Motive?"

"Certainly I did."

"When did you get this Packet?"

"I cannot recollect."

"How long after the Election?"

"It was a long while after the Election."

"Was it a Twelvemonth?"

"Yes, longer than that, I should think."

"Two Years?"

"I cannot exactly speak to that, but I think not so much as Two Years; but it was above a Twelvemonth, I am confident."

"At what Time in the Year did it come to you?"

"I do not recollect."

"At what Time of the Day?"

"It was at Night."

"Were you called up to receive it?"

"No, I was not."

"Do you know who brought it to you?"

"I do not."

"Was it put into the House?"

"A Person knocked at the Door."

"Did you open the Door?"

"Yes."

"You took the Packet out of his Hand?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you open it yourself?"

"I did."

"And you found in it, what?"

"This Twenty-one Pounds."

"Had you an Idea you should receive it?"

"No."

"Were you surprized at receiving it?"

"Yes, and agreeably surprized."

"You did not expect it?"

"No."

"Nor did you know the Subject to which it referred?"

"No, I did not."

"In 1826, who canvassed you?"

"Sir Robert Dundas canvassed me himself."

"What passed between you and him?"

"Indeed I cannot speak to that."

"As to his asking you for your Vote?"

"He asked me, and I promised him."

"Did he make you any Promise of Money, or any Inducement of any kind?"

"No."

"Did he promise you any Place under Government?"

"No."

"Did Mr. Wrightson canvass you?"

"Yes, he did."

"Did he hold out any Inducement to you?"

"None whatever."

"Have you received any Packet since that Election?"

"No, not at all."

"Did you receive any Favor from either of those Gentlemen?"

"None whatever."

"Were you present at the Election?"

"Yes."

"Did you poll?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Difficulty in getting up to the Poll?"

"No, I had not."

"At what Time in the Day did you vote?"

"About Two o'Clock."

"Were you in the Town Hall?"

"Yes, I was."

"Was the Town in a quiet State?"

"Not at all Times of the Day."

"Were the Military called in?"

"Yes."

"Do you know Mr. Foljambe's House?"

"Yes, very well."

"Did you see it after the Election?"

"Yes."

"Were any of the Windows broken?"

"Yes, a great many."

"Were there any drunken Mobs about the Town?"

"At Times there were."

"What Colours did they wear?"

"Pink and Blue."

"Whose Colours were they?"

"Sir Henry Wright Wilson's."

"Did you know Mr. Henry Cromwell Brown?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did he take any Part in these Matters?"

"Yes, I believe he did."

"For whom?"

"For Sir Henry Wright Wilson."

"Was not he active?"

"Well, I cannot speak to that."

"You did not see him take any active Part?"

"Not very particularly."

"Did you know that he was an Agent of his?"

"It was understood so."

"Did you know Mr. Sharp?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Conversation with him about disfranchising the Borough?"

"Not any."

"Do you know Mr. Fisher?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Conversation with him?"

"No."

"Or Mr. Newton, Mr. Hannam's Clerk?"

"No."

"Do you know Mr. Hornby?"

"Yes, I know him."

"Do you know whether he took any active Part in getting up the Evidence before the Committee?"

"I heard that he took an active Part."

"Do you know any Voter who has communicated to you that Hornby had any Communication with him?"

"No, I do not."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Walker was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name John Walker?"

"Yes."

"Are you a Burgess of Retford?"

"Yes."

"I believe you did not vote at the last Election?"

"I did not."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to, in the first instance, at the last Election?"

"Sir Robert Dundas."

"You afterwards changed your Mind?"

"I did."

"Did you belong to any Benefit Club, where the Freemen assembled?"

"There was the Blue Club."

"Did you belong to that?"

"Yes."

"Did you belong to any Club frequented by Friends of Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson, at any Time?"

"I cannot say to that."

"Had you any Conversation with the Freemen in the Interest of Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson, after you had left their Party?"

"Very like I had; but I cannot recollect what it was."

"Had you any Conversation with any of the Voters in Sir Robert Dundas's Interest, whom you can name, upon the Subject of your having changed your Party?"

"Yes; several."

"What were their Names?"

"William Wright of Mettersey; William Clayton of Warsop."

"Do any others occur to you at this Moment?"

"George Wass of Kirton."

"Can you state any Observation made by those Voters to you upon your changing your Party?"

"I told them Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson were in favor of the Catholic Question, and that my Opinion was, that I did not like them to support that."

"Did either of them say any thing to you about that?"

"They would not support the Catholic Question at the Time."

"Did they say any thing to you about the Consequence of it?"

"Not that I know."

"Was Sir Henry Wright Wilson's Name mentioned?"

"Yes; I mentioned it myself."

"Did either of the Party you have named make any Observation about Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"They liked his Principles very well."

"Was there any thing they objected to, if they liked his Principles?"

"That is all; they wanted his Principles against the Catholic Question."

"I speak to you of the Friends of the other Party?"

"Several of the other Party had promised Sir Robert Dundas and Mr. Wrightson; but they would not run from their Pledges."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1818?"

"I do."

"Whom did you promise your Vote to?"

"Mr. Evans and Mr. Samuel Crompton."

"Did you receive any Money after that Election?"

"There were Packets left at my House."

"How many?"

"Two."

"What did they contain?"

"Either Forty Pounds or Forty Guineas."

"The Two together?"

"Yes."

"Do you recollect the Election of 1820?"

"Yes."

"Whom did you promise then?"

"The same Two."

"Did you receive any thing after that Election?"

"Yes; Two Packets, of Twenty Guineas each."

"Are you a Petitioner against this Bill?"

"I dare say I am."

"Have you signed a Petition?"

"I have signed several."

"Did you get a Suit of Clothes before the last Election?"

"I dare say I did."

"Have you any Doubt you did?"

"I have none."

"From whom did you get them?"

"Mr. William Bower gave them to me as a Present."

"What is he?"

"A Gentleman at Retford."

"Is he a Brother-in-Law of Mr. Hornby's?"

"Yes, he is."

"Do you recollect going with any Freemen to Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"I dare say I did; but I cannot recollect who they were now."

"How many of them were you with then?"

"I cannot say. I have been at various Times to Sir Henry Wilson."

"Did you make any Proposal to Sir Henry Wright Wilson, in the Presence of the other Freemen that went with you?"

"Never."

"Did they, in your Presence?"

"Never."

"What passed when you went to Sir Henry Wright Wilson with the other Freemen?"

"They told him they had come to support his Interest, as he was for his King and Church and State; they did not like the Catholic Question at the Time; and they should give him their Vote."

"What else passed?"

"Nothing more that I recollect; and he was quite satisfied with them for the Assistance."

"Did they say nothing more?"

"Not that I recollect."

"Did you know Mr. Dickinson?"

"Yes."

"Did you go to him?"

"Yes, many Times."

"At that Time?"

"At the Time the Election was agate."

"Were there any Freeman with you?"

"Yes, there were."

"Was any Proposition made to Mr. Dickinson by the Freemen who were with you?"

"Not that I recollect."

"Is that your Handwriting?" (The Petition against the Bill being shewn to the Witness.)

"It is."

Cross-examined by Mr. Adam.

"You signed that Petition after you had read it, I suppose?"

"I did."

"Is that a Petition to be heard at the Bar of this House in support of the Elective Franchise of the Freemen of Retford?"

"It is to support the Borough of East Retford."

"Upon the last Election you voted for Sir Henry Wilson?"

"I did not vote at all."

"Had you promised Sir Robert Dundas?"

"I had."

"At the Time, you thought Sir Robert Dundas would be a Friend to what you thought the Church and King?"

"We had nothing against Sir Robert Dundas except the Catholic Question."

"When you found he was for the Catholic Question you withdrew your Support?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise Sir Henry Wright Wilson?"

"Yes, I did."

"Why did you not vote for him?"

"Our Agent, Mr. Hornby, recommended us, Thirty or Forty of us, not to go up to vote."

"Your Agent?"

"Yes; the Agent for that Party."

"And you followed his Advice?"

"Yes."

"How many were there of you whom he recommended not to go up to poll?"

"Thirty or Forty."

"At what Time of Day was that?"

"Very early in the Morning."

"The first Day?"

"Yes."

"Do you know how many of the Thirty or Forty Persons did not go up to vote?"

"They all did."

"Do you know whether any of those Thirty or Forty abstained from voting at all?"

"I do not."

"Are you quite sure those Thirty or Forty did not vote at all?"

"They did not."

"Can you recollect the Names of any of them?"

"William Wright was one; if I had a List of them I could soon tell you."

"There were Thirty or Forty who, in consequence of Mr. Hornby's Advice, did not vote?"

"Yes."

"Were they Persons who declared they would vote for Sir Henry Wilson, because he was against the Catholics?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Conversation with them upon the Subject of their Votes?"

"No further than that they did not like the Catholic Question; at the Time they were of my Opinion."

"That was the Reason they would have voted for Sir Henry Wilson?"

"Yes."

"I need not ask you whether you received any Money' from Sir Henry Wilson?"

"I never did."

"Your only Reason for voting for him was that you approved of his Principles?"

"Yes."

"And you have signed that Petition with a view to preserving the Elective Franchise to the Town?"

"Yes, I have."

"You say that William Wright was one of the Thirty or Forty?"

"He was."

"Where does he live?"

"He lives at Mettersey."

"How far is that from Retford?"

"Seven or Eight Miles."

"Was John Andrews one?"

"I do not know; he was at Mansfield, Twenty Miles off."

"You do not think he was one?"

"I believe not."

"Was Robert Appleby one?"

"Yes."

"Where does he live?"

"At Retford."

"William Brown junior, was he there?"

"There are several Browns."

"William Brown the younger?"

"I believe he was one of them."

"I meant against the Catholics; was he one of the Thirty or Forty who did not vote on account of Mr. Hornby's Advice?"

"I think he was, but I am not sure."

"John Burton the younger, was he one of them?"

"He was one of them; but whether he voted I cannot say."

"Was he one of the Thirty or Forty?"

"I think he was."

"You are not sure whether he voted, but you have no doubt that he was one of the Thirty or Forty that Hornby advised not to vote?"

"I think he was."

"William Baker?"

"He was one."

"Thomas Baker?"

"Thomas Baker was one of them, I think."

"Thomas Battey?"

"I am not sure, so as to say."

"Samuel Buxton?"

"He was one."

"Do you remember James Barker?"

"I do."

"Was he one of them?"

"He was one of them."

"Thomas Booth?"

"I know him very well; I think he was one."

"Do you know Thomas Buxton?"

"Yes."

"Was he one?"

"Yes, he was."

"John Butler?"

"I cannot say much for him."

"By not being able to say much for him, you mean you do not recollect?"

"I do not."

"Samuel Beckett?"

"I think he was one."

"Mr. Cottam?"

"Mr. Alderman Cottam?"

"Joshua Cottam?"

"Well, well, I cannot say indeed."

"Dawber Cook?"

"I know Dawber Cook, and I think he was one."

"A Man of the Name of Rushby?"

"Yes, I think he was one."

"Those are the Names which you recollect whom Mr. Hornby advised not to vote?"

"Yes."

"Was John Dodsley one?"

"I cannot say to that."

"Thomas Giles?"

"Yes."

"Samuel Hindley?"

"Yes."

"Stephen Hemsworth, what is he?"

"A Plumber and Glazier."

"Do you recollect whether he was one?"

"I think he was."

"Just take a Moment's Time to consider?"

"I know him well."

"Was not he for No Popery?"

"He was."

"Was not he one of the Thirty or Forty?"

"I think he was, but I will not be quite certain."

"Richard Hurst, do you know him?"

"Yes, I know him."

"Was he one of that Meeting?"

"I cannot say."

"Stephen Rose Haworth?"

"He was on that Side of the Question."

"Was he one of the Party that Hornby advised?"

"He advised those in the White Hart all to do so."

"Did you all wear White Hats?"

"No; I said in the White Hart."

"You had a Meeting at the White Hart, and Hornby came there on the Part of Sir Henry?"

"Yes."

"And then you arranged it was better you should not vote that Day?"

"Yes."

"Was William Hemsworth one of the Party?"

"Yes."

"And Richard Hindley?"

"I cannot say to that."

"John Hudson, what is he?"

"I cannot say."

"Was Robert Hudson one?"

"Yes, I think he was."

"Was Robert Johnson one of the Party?"

"I cannot say."

"John Kirkby?"

"I cannot say."

"Edward Ogle?"

"He was. He was of the Party."

"Who were at that Meeting?"

"I cannot say."

"George Palfreyman?"

"He was there."

"Robert Rushby?"

"Yes."

"John Whittlaw?"

"Yes, he was there."

"And John Walker?"

"Yes; that was myself."

"Joshua Cottam, do you remember?"

"Yes, I remember him very well."

"Was he one of the Party?"

"I cannot say whether he was in the White Hart at the Time."

"John Thornton the younger, he was not there?"

"He is dead, so it is no Use speaking of him."

"Was Mr. Parker there?"

"I do not know; I cannot say, indeed, at this Moment."

"I was going to ask you a few Questions about the Election in 1818. Who canvassed you at the Election in 1818; did Evans, or Crompton, or both?"

"Mr. Evans did."

"How long before the Election; do you remember?"

"Some Time."

"You promised him your Vote?"

"I told him I would consider of it."

"Did you ultimately promise him?"

"I did not."

"Did you intend to vote for him if there had been a Poll?"

"Yes."

"Did he know that?"

"Well, I cannot say, I am sure."

"Did he know it from you?"

"I told him I might very likely be on his Side."

"Did you see him again?"

"I never saw him but once."

"Did you see him about your Vote: but on that Occasion I refer to, Evans's first Election, you told him you would consider of it, but you had not made up your Mind?"

"I did."

"Did you ever see him before the Election took place, except upon that Occasion?"

"No."

"Upon that Occasion did Mr. Evans promise you any thing?"

"No."

"Did you see Mr. Crompton at the Election?"

"I saw him on the Election Day, in the Morning."

"Had he canvassed you?"

"Not 'till then. He asked me then, whether I would support him, and I said, yes."

"About those Packets; where did you get them?"

"One Night, very late, there was a Person knocked and inquired for me; I got up from Supper and went to the Door; and he said, Here is a Letter for you; I said, What is it? he said, It is for you; and I said, I was obliged to him, and took it."

"Did Mr. Crompton canvass you before the Election in 1820?"

"I cannot say whether he did or not."

"Do you remember seeing him before the Election?"

"Yes."

"Had you any Conversation with him about your Vote before that; perhaps you do not recollect; if not, I shall not press you?"

"I do not."

"Did you see Mr. Evans upon that Occasion?"

"Yes."

"Did he canvass you?"

"Yes."

"Did you promise him?"

"I did."

"Did he make you any Promise before you engaged to serve him?"

"No."

"In 1826, the first Time, you promised Sir Robert Dundas?"

"I did."

"Did he make you any Promise?"

"No, he did not."

"Did you see him after you changed your Mind in consequence of finding he was for the Catholics?"

"No."

"But having changed your Opinion, in consequence of finding that, you determined to vote against him?"

"Yes."

"You thought the Change of Circumstances entitled you to withdraw your Promise?"

"I did."

"Did you receive any Money from any body in 1826?"

"Never."

"How long ago were you made a Freeman?"

"Eleven or Twelve Years."

"Then the first Election you remember was in the Year 1818, was it."

"Yes, it was?"

"Did you mix much in the Elections of 1818 and 1820?"

"No, I cannot say that I did a deal, then."

"Do you know a Witness that has been here; Edward Cromwell Brown?"

"I do."

"Was he Agent for Sir Henry Wright Wilson at the Election, or was he not?"

"I believe he was."

"Attend to the Question; was he his Agent at the Time of the Election?"

"I believe he was."

"He had been so before, I believe?"

"He was not on the Election Day; a little before the Election he was; but he was turned out."

"Did Mr. Hornby succeed him?"

"He did."

"Did you mix in the Elections of 1818 and 1820; did you take a Part in them, or not?"

"No."

"Have you ever heard the Words "All right," in Retford, used in any particular Sense?"

"It is used all over the Country; but after the Meeting in the House of Commons to scrutinize Sir Robert's Election, it was got up in Mr. Hornby's Office to say "All is right" meant the having Forty Guineas."

"After the scrutinizing about Sir Robert's Election it was got up in Mr. Hornby's Office?"

"Yes; to say that it was Forty Guineas. Mr. Hornby recommended the Freemen to say that."

(Mr. Law.) "Were you present when Mr. Hornby recommended that?"

"I was."

(Mr. Adam.) "You were present when Mr. Hornby recommended to the Freemen to say that the Expression "All is right" meant Forty Guineas?"

"Yes."

"Was that all which was said by Mr. Hornby?"

"It was to unseat the Members; that was what it was to be said for."

Re-examined by Mr. Law.

"You say you have received nothing since the Election of 1826?"

"I have not."

"When was it you received the Suit of Clothes you have mentioned?"

"A long while before the Election."

"How long before the Election?"

"I cannot say, but a long while."

"After you had promised your Vote to Sir Henry Wilson, you received a Suit of Clothes?"

"Yes."

(By a Lord.) "How many Months was it before the Election?"

"It was some Months."

"Was it a Twelvemonth?"

"I cannot say."

(Mr. Law.) "You say you received it from Mr. Bower, Mr. Hornby's Brother-in-Law?"

"Mr. Bower, for my Exertion at the Election, made me a Present of them."

"For your Exertion at what Election?"

"The last Election."

"Then how came you to say you received them a Twelvemonth before the Election?"

"It was before the Election I received those."

"Then how came it, if you received them for your Exertions at the Election, that you received them before?"

"It was at the Time that the Catholic Question was in very great Vogue in Retford; and it was then so much objected to, that they persuaded us, several of us, to withdraw our Promises, and to support the Interests of Sir Henry Wright Wilson; I persevered, and went round to do all in my Power."

(By a Lord.) "Not at the Election?"

"No; many Months before the Election."

(Mr. Law.) "How long before the Election did Sir Henry Wright Wilson go to Retford?"

"A very little Time, I think; I think it might be a few Months before ever Sir Henry came, but I am not certain of that."

"Have you ever paid for the Clothes since?"

"Never. I have been on the Moors, shooting with Mr. Bower, and fishing with him, and had been a Servant to him many Times before the Election Months."

"You have stated that Mr. Hornby recommended the Freemen to say what "All is right" meant?"

"Yes."

"Have the goodness to state who were present besides yourself and Mr. Hornby, when that took place?"

"Well, I think there were several."

"Who were they?"

"I think Alderman Meekly was one."

"Will you swear he was present?"

"I cannot swear."

"Name another?"

"I think George Palfreyman was."

"Will you swear that?"

"No."

"Name another?"

"I think Buxton was."

"Will you swear that?"

"No."

"Which Buxton?"

"Samuel."

"Name another?"

"I cannot say; there was a many."

"Will you name a single Person who you will swear was present, just to make a second?"

"Mr. Meekly I remember more about."

"Will you swear he was there?"

"I will swear he was in the House when Mr. Hornby mentioned it; whether he was present when he mentioned it I cannot say."

"Will you swear he was present?"

"Yes."

"In what Room was it, and where?"

"In what he called his Office?"

"Where?"

"In Retford."

"Where?"

"Facing the Street; a little Room facing the Street."

"In Retford?"

"Yes."

"In what Street?"

"I do not know whether it is Moorgate Parish or the Corporation."

"As you answered my Learned Friend, that Mr. Hornby recommended to the Freemen to say so; be so good to state what he said when he desired them to commit Perjury?"

"He mentioned that they were not to stick on Trifles or Niceties."

"What else?"

"Nothing else."

"Were not you shocked?"

"We were drinking and tearing about at that Time."

"Did you knock him down?"

"No."

"This is the first Time you have mentioned it?"

"Yes."

"This is the first Time you have mentioned it?"

"No; I have mentioned it to several."

"To whom?"

"I cannot say now."

"Upon your Oath, will you name any Individual upon the Earth to whom you have mentioned it?"

"Well, I cannot say."

"Will you name a single Person to whom you have made this Statement 'till my Learned Friend asked you these Questions?"

"I cannot recollect to whom I did state it."

(By a Lord.) "Have you stated it to any body?"

"I think I have; but I do not know whether I have or not."

(Mr. Law.) "How many Persons were present in the Room, that you recollect, when Hornby recommended to those Men to commit Perjury?"

"There were several."

"Who were the Persons who were shocked by this, which they must be?"

"Mr. Meekly mentioned it; something about being shocked"

"Did he say he was shocked?"

"No, he did not say it in those Words."

"What did he say?"

"I cannot say."

"Will you swear he said any thing?"

"He said something; but I cannot say the Words."

"Will you swear he was there to say any thing?"

"Yes."

"What passed when he was there. You deliberately swore that he recommended to the Freemen to give that Explanation of "All was right." State what Hornby said."

"He said something about Trifles and Niceties."

"Will you swear that was invented in Mr. Hornby's Office? What passed when he invented it in his Office?"

"It was to unseat the Member."

"I was not asking you about the Use of the Words Trifles and Niceties, but respecting Mr. Hornby having invented that about "All is right" in his Office; what did he say upon that Subject?"

"He said it was to unseat the Members; we were not to stick upon Trifles."

"Who said that?"

"Mr. Hornby."

"What was to unseat the Members?"

"To say they had received the Forty Guineas; that they were to say they had received the Forty Guineas."

(By a Lord.) "Tell us all that Mr. Hornby said upon the Subject to which you have been asked."

"He said something "All is right," but it is a Word that has been in Retford a long Time, and all over the Country; but that the People were to come up to unseat the Members, and that they were to say they had all Forty Guineas."

"What you have stated was what Mr. Hornby said at the Time?"

"Yes."

"You heard him say it?"

"Yes."

"Who were present besides yourself at the Time?"

"I think one was Alderman Meekly."

"What was his Christian Name?"

"William."

"Is he alive?"

"I believe he is."

"Mention somebody else?"

"I think there was Samuel Buxton; that he was one."

"Can you swear that?"

"No, I cannot swear that."

"Name any other?"

"I think there was George Palfreyman."

(Mr. Law.) "Will you swear that any one of those Parties was present; will you undertake to say so?"

"No, I will not swear that."

"Has there been one yet that you will undertake to mention; that you will swear was present?"

"I have told you that Mr. Meekly I think, was there; but I cannot swear that."

"You cannot even swear that he was there; now, having recalled your Attention to it, will you swear, or will you not swear, that Alderman Meekly was there - William Meekly?"

"It is so long since, I do not like swearing."

"Will you repeat again what Mr. Hornby said?"

"Mr. Hornby said that "All right" meant that they were to have your Forty Guineas."

"What was to be done; did he, when he explained what "All was right" meant, say what further was to be done?"

"That they were not to stick on Niceties or Trifles, or something to that Effect; Niceties or Trifles, or something of that kind."

"Did you ever see Mr. Hornby afterwards?"

"Yes."

"Were you ever in his Office?"

"Yes."

"After that Recommendation?"

"Yes."

"Did you quarrel with him?"

"Yes."

"How soon after this did you quarrel with him?"

"I cannot say."

"How many Times had you been with him?"

"Several Times; I went to get some Money of him; he drew some Money, and gave a Receipt for it, and I never got it of him."

"What did any of the Freemen who were present say upon this shocking Proposition being made, that they were to swear "All is right" meant Forty Guineas?"

"I cannot say what they said."

"Did they say any thing?"

"I cannot say."

"How many were there?"

"There were several."

"Did they say a Word?"

"I am sure I cannot say."

"Did you say any thing?"

"Well, I cannot say."

"Can you not tell me whether you said any thing when this Proposition was made?"

"No, I cannot."

"Did you attend the Committee in the House of Commons?"

"I never was examined."

"Did you attend the Committee in the House of Commons?"

"I was up in London."

"Did you come up as a Witness?"

"I am sure I do not know."

The Witness was admonished to attend to the Question, and answer it.

"I was up in London with them."

(By a Lord.) "Did you attend the Committee; were you present before the Committee?"

"No, I was not before the Committee."

(Mr. Law.) "Were you required to come up to attend the Committee, or did you come up of your own Accord?"

"Mr. Dickinson ordered me to come up."

"But you were not examined?"

"No, I was not."

"With whom did you come up; did you come up with Hornby?"

"I did not."

"On which Side were you to be a Witness?"

"I am sure I do not know; I expect Mr. Hornby's Side."

"When did you change Sides at the Election?"

"Before the Election."

"How long before?"

"A long Time."

"How long was it before you quarrelled with Hornby after the Election; were the Clothes worn out at the Time, or was it a short Time after?"

"I quarrel with such a Man! he had drawn for my coming up to London as soon as I came up."

"Had you any Quarrel about being called as a Witness?"

"I had a Quarrel with him about the Money he had drawn for my Expences; and he said he had received none; and I wrote to Sir Henry, and he said he had drawn it."

"Was your Quarrel after you came up to attend the Committee of the House of Commons?"

"I never had any Quarrel, except asking him for my Money."

"You had no Quarrel but upon that Subject?"

"Not that I know of."

"Nor until you came up to attend the Committee of the House of Commons?"

"No."

"How many Times did you see Hornby after this Conversation you have spoken to, before your attending the Committee of the House of Commons?"

"I cannot say, indeed."

"Did you see him daily between the Time of this supposed Conversation at his Office and your coming up to attend the Election Committee?"

"I saw him several Times."

"Did you see him every Day?"

"No."

"Nearly every Day?"

"No; I saw him many Times."

"Did you never complain of his having endeavoured to make you and the rest of the Burgesses come and say what was false?"

The Witness hesitated.

Further examined by Mr. Adam.

"Who paid your Expences for coming up to attend the Election Committee?"

"As I understood, Sir Henry Wright Wilson did; but I never received it."

"Mr. Dickinson desired you to come up?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Dickinson take a Part on Sir Henry Wright Wilson's Side?"

"He was in favor of him."

"When you came to London, with whom did you reside; with other Witnesses?"

"Yes; I was amongst Mr. Hornby's Witnesses; I was with them in London."

"What House did you put up at?"

"Mr. Brown's Family Hotel in Palace Yard."

"How many Days were you kept in London?"

"Perhaps a Fortnight."

"Did you see Hornby from Time to Time after he came back from the Sitting of the Committee to the Hotel?"

"I do not know that I spoke to him."

"Did you see him in the Hotel?"

"Yes."

"Did he live in the Hotel as well as you?"

"I believe he did; but he was up Stairs."

"And the Witnesses were down Stairs?"

"Yes."

"You had not much Conversation with him?"

"No."

"Who told you you might leave London; that the Business was over, and you might go Home again?"

"Mr. Hornby."

"Who paid the Bill at Brown's Hotel?"

"I think either Mr. Hornby or Mr. Yatman."

"You did not?"

"No, I did not."

"You lived there for a Fortnight, and paid nothing?"

"I did not."

"Who paid your Expences up to London?"

"A Person of the Name of Thomas Batty."

"What is he?"

"He is a Freeman; a Burgess."

"Was he one of the Forty Persons Mr. Hornby advised not to vote?"

"He was."

"Did he come up with you?"

"Yes."

"You lived at Brown's Hotel?"

"Yes."

"Who paid your Expences?"

"Mr. Hornby sent Two Sovereigns by a Person of the Name of William Jackson to pay for my Coach."

"Is he alive?"

"I believe he is."

"Was he a Voter on Mr. Hornby's Side?"

"Yes."

"What was the Money which you say Mr. Hornby had given a Receipt for?"

"Seven Pounds."

"For what?"

"For my Loss of Time."

"Have you ever signed a Receipt for Seven Pounds?"

"Never."

"Did you apply to Sir Henry Wilson to know whether he had a Receipt in your Name for Seven Pounds?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did he say that he had such a Receipt?"

Mr. Law objected to the Question.

Mr. Adam was heard in support of the Question.

The Counsel was informed, "That he was entitled to the Circumstances of the Quarrel, or the supposed Quarrel, but that was not to be taken to establish the Fact that that Circumstance had any Existence in reality."

(Mr. Adam.) "What did Sir Henry Wright Wilson tell you?"

"He shewed me a Receipt in Mr. Hornby's Handwriting for my Money."

"Had you seen Mr. Hornby's Handwriting before that?"

"Yes, I had."

"Was that his Handwriting?"

"Yes; and Mr. Dickinson said it was his Handwriting."

"Have you received the Seven Pounds?"

"I have not."

"You have not?"

"I have not."

(By a Lord.) "On what Occasion did this Conversation to which you have alluded pass?"

"I found that the other Witnesses received some Money for their Time, and I enquired of Mr. Hornby, whether I was not to be paid for mine."

"You have stated that Mr. Hornby told the Freemen to say that "All right" meant Forty Guineas; when did that Conversation pass between you and Mr. Hornby?"

"It was some Time before we came to London."

"How long?"

"I am sure I cannot say."

"Was it a Month?"

"Very like it might."

"Was it Six Weeks?"

"I am sure I cannot tell."

"How many Persons were present?"

"There were several."

"How many?"

"I cannot say."

"Were there Ten?"

"Well, I cannot say."

"Were there Five?"

"Yes, there was Five, I know."

"Were there Eight?"

"I think there was."

"There were not Ten?"

"I cannot say; there might be as many."

"Did you know them all?"

"I did at the Time, but I cannot recollect now."

"Did you know them all at that Time?"

"Yes."

"Were they all Freemen?"

"Yes."

"Did they all vote for Sir Henry Wilson?"

"They had either voted for him or promised to do so."

"And you cannot recollect any one of them, upon your Oath, to have been present?"

"I think Mr. Meekly was one, and I think Buxton and George Palfreyman."

"Will you swear those Three Men were present?"

"No, I cannot."

"Will you swear that any one of them was present?"

"Yes, there was Palfreyman; I can swear to him, I think."

"Can you swear that any other was present?"

"I cannot swear to any other."

"Can you swear to Palfreyman being present?"

"Yes."

"And you can swear to no other Person?"

"I know there was several there."

"But you can swear to no other Person, can you?"

"Mr. Meekly was there, I will swear."

"Can you swear to any other Person?"

"I cannot."

"Have the goodness to state exactly what Mr. Hornby said; how did he begin?"

"Well, I cannot say; it was at the Time they was getting up a Petition to the House."

"Who were they?"

"Mr. Hornby, and all the Information they could get from several Witnesses."

"Who were they that were getting up the Petition?"

"I cannot say now; Mr. Hornby was the Person, I suppose, that got it up."

"Did any body else assist him in getting it up?"

"I am sure I cannot say."

"How did he begin; did he make a Speech to you all?"

"I cannot say."

"How came he to say this; whom did he address it to?"

"He addressed it to all of us."

"How did he say it; state the Words he made use of?"

"Something that we must unseat the Members, or something of that kind."

"What else did he say?"

"I am sure I cannot say. He said a deal, but I am sure I cannot recollect."

"How did this begin, out of what Conversation, when you swear that he said doing the right Thing meant giving Forty Guineas?"

"To the best of my Recollection, a Person of the Name of George Palfreyman had been drinking at Mr. Hindley's with George Thornton, and he had said "All should be right," meaning that; and that was the first that brought it to Mr. Hornby's Office."

"George Palfreyman brought it up?"

"About "All is right;" that was Mr. George Thornton."

"What did Mr. George Thornton say?"

"He was not there."

"How did you know that Palfreyman had been drinking with George Thornton?"

"He came and told us he had."

"Did George Thornton say that "All was right," or George Palfreyman?"

"I cannot say that; they were drinking at Mr. Hindley's, a private House, together."

"You did not hear that?"

"No; he was of the opposite Party; Mr. Thornton was a Purple, and he was a Blue."

"George Palfreyman said that George Thornton said All was right?"

"Yes."

"What did Mr. Hornby say?"

"He said that meant Forty Guineas."

"What did George Palfreyman say?"

"I am sure I cannot say now."

"Then Mr. Hornby did not invent the Word "All was right?"

"He did not. It has been a great Word all over the Country, "All is right," upon the Coaches, and so on; but the last Election, since the Scrutiny took place, it was then brought up."

"It has been a common Word?"

"Yes; all over the County. I have been in a great many different Companies."

"What did you understand by it?"

"I never understood it to mean that before. I have heard the Guards and Coachmen going on "All is right," and different Things."

"What did George Palfreyman understand by it?"

"He said it meant Forty Guineas."

"George Palfreyman did?"

"George Palfreyman stated that he had been with Mr. Hindley, and that he was drinking with Mr. George Thornton, and that he said that all should be right, and that it meant that."

"Then it was George Palfreyman mentioned this in the Presence of Mr. Hornby?"

"Yes; and Mr. Hornby said that it meant Forty Guineas."

"Did George Palfreyman tell you the Story of what had passed with Mr. George Thornton?"

"Yes."

"And that George Thornton said "All was right" meant Forty Guineas?"

"No; Mr. Hornby said it meant Forty Guineas."

"What did George Palfreyman say it meant?"

"He laughed."

"What did he say, when he told the Story, it meant?"

"I cannot say; he laughed."

"What did he say when he said he had been drinking with them, and all this passed about its being "All right?"

"I do not recollect any more."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off 'till To-morrow; and that the Lords be summoned.

Witnesses discharged from Attendance on it.

Ordered, That John Tenney, Stephen Hurst, Joseph Marshall, Robert Rushby, Thomas Brown and Isaac Dean be discharged from further Attendance on this House upon the last-mentioned Bill.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Martis, octavum diem instantis Junii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.