Fishersgate Half-Hundred

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Victoria County History

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T P Hudson (Editor), A P Baggs, C R J Currie, C R Elrington, S M Keeling, A M Rowland

Year published

1980

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Pages

130-131

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'Fishersgate Half-Hundred', A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1: Bramber Rape (Southern Part) (1980), pp. 130-131. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=18235 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


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FISHERSGATE HALF-HUNDRED


Shoreham-By-Sea, Kingston By Sea, And Southwick 1976

Shoreham-By-Sea, Kingston By Sea, And Southwick 1976

In the 19th century the half-hundred that lay in Bramber rape (fn. 1) comprised the four parishes of Kingston by Sea, New Shoreham, Old Shoreham, and Southwick. The name Fishersgate was applied to the hundred by 1188; (fn. 2) in 1086 it had been called Aldrington (Eldritune). It had then contained just over 60 hides, divided between Bramber and Lewes rapes: the part in Bramber, amounting to 14 or 22 hides, comprised two estates called Kingston, of which one was that later called Southwick. Shoreham, including Erringham, was then in Burbeach hundred, (fn. 3) as it remained in 1263 and 1316. (fn. 4) In 1275 Old Shoreham was said to have withdrawn itself from Burbeach hundred for more than 20 years, (fn. 5) but it continued to be taxed as part of Burbeach, (fn. 6) while New Shoreham, as a borough, was extra-hundredal. Part of Old Shoreham was represented at the Burbeach hundred view of frankpledge in 1538; (fn. 7) the whole was treated as part of Fishersgate half-hundred for the subsidy of 1570-1 (fn. 8) and in 1642, (fn. 9) and as extra-hundredal or a hundred of itself in 1670 (fn. 10) and 1816. (fn. 11) From 1811, however, both Old and New Shoreham were returned as part of Fishersgate halfhundred, along with Kingston and Southwick. (fn. 12)

The western half-hundred belonged to the lords of Bramber rape. (fn. 13) In 1651 its court leet met twice a year at Southwick. (fn. 14) Court rolls survive for 1538, 1598, and 1600, and there are drafts for 1703-15. In 1598 the court elected both a constable for the half-hundred and an alderman, (fn. 15) and the office of constable continued to be served until the mid 19th century. (fn. 16)

Footnotes

1 For the half-hundred in Lewes rape see V.C.H. Suss. vii. 274
2 Pipe R. 1188 (P.R.S. xxxviii), 188.
3 V.C.H. Suss. i. 439, 444, 447.
4 J.I. 1/912A rot. 44; Feud. Aids, v. 135.
5 Rot. Hund. (Rec. Com.), ii. 202.
6 Suss. Subsidies (S.R.S. x), 58, 163, 278; Suss. Lay Subsidy, 1524-5 (S.R.S. lvi), 72-3.
7 Arundel Cast. MS. M 279.
8 E 179/190/283.
9 W. Suss. protestation Returns (S.R.S. v), 154; Hist. MSS. Com. 4, 5th Rep. App. p. 132.
10 E 179/191/410 pt. 3 rot. 3.
11 E.S.R.O., QCR/2/1/EW 1.
12 Census, 1811 and later; cf. E.S.R.O., QCR/2/1/EW 2; Census, 1801, is evidently wrongly arranged.
13 e.g. Rot. Hund. (Rec. Com.), ii. 202-3; Arundel Cast. Archives, ed. Steer, ii, p. 49.
14 S.A.C. xxiii. 237, 239.
15 Arundel Cast. MSS. M 279-81; M 580.
16 See below, Southwick, Local Government.