Ealing and Brentford
Education

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Victoria County History

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T F T Baker, C R Elrington (Editors), Diane K Bolton, Patricia E C Croot, M A Hicks

Year published

1982

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Pages

162-170

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'Ealing and Brentford: Education', A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 7: Acton, Chiswick, Ealing and Brentford, West Twyford, Willesden (1982), pp. 162-170. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=22588&strquery= Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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EDUCATION. (fn. 2)

New Brentford charity school (St. Lawrence's) opened in 1703. It served several parishes, closed temporarily in 1714 when Ealing's children withdrew, and later probably took no more than 20 children a year. Many more were taught after 1786, when Old Brentford Sunday schools opened, followed by a girls' and a short-lived boys' school. Another Sunday school founded at New Brentford in 1810 apparently led to the enlargement of the boys' charity school and opening of a girls' school there in 1815. In 1819 309 pupils attended Old and New Brentford charity schools. Infants' schools were opened at Old Brentford in 1837 and at New Brentford in 1840, and a British school was opened in 1834. In 1843 92 pupils attended daily at Brentford: 15 at a common day school, 94 at 5 middle day schools, 114 at dame schools, and 759 at public elementary schools, 272 of them at the British school. (fn. 3)

Ealing children attended New Brentford charity school from 1703 until their own opened c. 1714. A girls' school was endowed in 1712 and a boys' in 1719, but in 1724 a single school (St. Mary's) contained boys and girls and apparently it was only in 1782 that separate schools were established. (fn. 4) The boys' school was much enlarged in 1817 and c. 1820, when there were 176 children in the two schools. An infants' school opened in 1837 and Ealing had 339 daily pupils in 1843: 50 at dame schools, 34 at common day schools, 36 at middle day schools, and 242 at charity and National schools. (fn. 5)

A rising demand for places after 1843 was met partly by existing schools, notably Brentford British school. The Ragged School Union had Sunday schools at Brentford from 1854 and from 1867 a free day school, which was replaced by St. Paul's schools in 1873. At Ealing the growth of the Ealing Dean and Grove districts led to the opening of a separate infants' school in 1857 and Ealing British school in 1859, the rebuilding of the girls' school in 1862, and the opening of St. John's National, Christ Church National, and the Wesleyan schools by 1874.

From 1871 demands for a school board, particularly by nonconformists, (fn. 6) were resisted by the Revd. E. W. Relton and other Anglicans. All schools charged fees, those of the Wesleyan and British schools being the highest; (fn. 7) many places therefore were not filled at Brentford, where the failure of some poor children to transfer to the new St. Paul's school resulted in a revival of the Ragged school. Under the Education Act of 1876 Ealing educational association was formed instead of a school board in 1877 to meet current deficits and pay for building extensions. Nominally interdenominational but dominated by Anglicans, it survived the opposition of the British school managers, since the ratepayers were overwhelmingly opposed to a board. (fn. 8) Apart from an unsuccessful voluntary rate in 1880, funds were raised by subscription until 1895, when Old Brentford became a separate civil parish. Rates levied for the association by Ealing council from 1896 were criticized because the demands did not indicate that they were volun tary, and by 1901 only one-third was collected. Average attendance under the association rose from 754 in 1878 to 2,388 in 1902 at Ealing. (fn. 9) By the late 1890s there may have been overcrowding but a request by the Board of Education for extra places in 1901 was ignored, as responsibility under the Education Act of 1902 was to pass to Ealing M.B., which duly became an autonomous part III authority. (fn. 10) At Brentford a census in 1898 revealed that 574 children of school age were not at school. (fn. 11) There were 716 absentees in 1901, (fn. 12) when Old Brentford school board was established. It achieved nothing before being superseded in 1903 by the county council. (fn. 13)

Ealing had too few places in 1903, when the population was growing rapidly. In addition to temporary schools, permanent ones were built by the borough engineer Charles Jones: Little Ealing, Northfields, Drayton Grove, Lammas, and North Ealing, (fn. 14) the first four containing large boys', girls', and infants' schools on a single site. Plans for a school on Ealing Dean common were dropped after local opposition. (fn. 15) Few places were needed in North Ealing, where most children were educated privately, (fn. 16) and elsewhere the council charged fees, which at Drayton Grove were higher than the Board of Education would permit. (fn. 17) After the First World War only Grange school replaced the voluntary schools as they closed. From 1931 school building was concentrated in the expanding north and west parts of the borough; although Jones's buildings were seen as outmoded by 1938, (fn. 18) it was only from 1952 that they were replaced. North Ealing's Montpelier school was still opposed as unnecessary in 1957. (fn. 19)

At Brentford all new needs between 1903 and 1914 were met by Ealing Road primary school. After the First World War, notwithstanding the closure of St. Lawrence's and Rothschild schools, only Lionel Road school was built. The opening of Green Dragon school in 1972 permitted the closure of Ealing Road and St. George's schools.

The county council established secondary schools for boys in 1913 and girls in 1926 at Ealing, where a selective central school was opened in 1925. Following the Hadow report, four of Ealing's council schools acquired a singlesex senior department and after the Education Act of 1944 the former central school became a grammar school. Secondary classes elsewhere used converted premises and the only change before the introduction of the comprehensive system was the transfer of two of the smaller secondary schools to the new Ealing Mead school in 1962. At Brentford the boys' and girls' senior schools and Gunnersbury Roman Catholic grammar school were the only secondary schools.

Ealing M.B. became an 'excepted district', responsible for primary and secondary education, under the Act of 1944, as did Brentford and Chiswick M.B. From 1965 they lay within Ealing and Hounslow L.B.s. When Hounslow adopted a comprehensive scheme in 1971, secondary and grammar schools were amalgamated but the structure was otherwise unchanged. When Ealing adopted a scheme in 1974, it established first schools for children aged 5-8, middle schools for those aged 8-12, and high schools for those aged 13 and over. The rearrangement entailed building extensions to some first and middle schools. The remaining secondary departments in older three-department schools were eliminated and Ealing Mead school was closed. The former county schools survived as high schools and Walpole school merged with Bordeston school, Hanwell, on a split site. A small educational foundation, formed from part of John Bowman's charity in 1904, had an income of c. £35 in 1973. (fn. 20) For Old Brentford the educational foundation established from the charities of Need and Taylor in 1856 had an income of c. £263 in 1979, spent largely on school libraries. (fn. 21)

Public schools. (fn. 22)

The general sources are those indicated above, p. 44, and the same abbreviations are used.

Boston Manor Ho. County I, Boston Manor Pk., Brentford. Opened 1940 at Boston Manor Ho., moved temporarily to St. Paul's sch. 1944. 67 I in 1955, 37 in 1957. Closed 1961. (fn. 23)

Brentford British, see Rothschild.

Brentford Canal Boatmen's.

Opened c. 1896 at mission in Isleworth, (fn. 24) moved c. 1904 to the Butts, (fn. 25) 1932 to two rooms at Brentford sr. schs., 1950 to former St. Lawrence's sch. in the Ham. (fn. 26) Irregularly attended by children of all ages. 1898 roll 500, a.a. 13. (fn. 27) 1950 roll 100, maximum attendance 18. (fn. 28) Closed by 1957.

Brentford Central Ragged, Old Spring Gardens. Opened 1867 as free day sch. in former British sch., where evening mtgs., held at various schs. since 1854, had been held on Sundays since 1860. (fn. 29) 1867 a.a. 117. 1871 a.a. 264. (fn. 30) Replaced by St. Paul's sch. 1873. (fn. 31)

Brentford Sch. For G, Clifden Rd. Opened 1968 as comprehensive sch. in former Brentford sec. mod. (fn. 32) Extended after 1971. Roll 1978: 1,080 SG.

Brentford Sec. Mod., Clifden Rd. Opened 1930 on single site as separate schs. (fn. 33) 1930 accn. 320 SB, 320 SG, a.a. 247 SB, 247 SG. 1936 accn. 360 SB, 440 SG, a.a. 241 SB, 301 SG. Extended 1954 but overcrowded 1955. (fn. 34) Became Brentford Sch. for G 1968, when B moved to Syon sch., Isleworth. (fn. 35)

Brentford Temp.

I, Upper Butts. Opened 1907 for 120. 1919 accn. 120, a.a. 64. 1927 accn. 120, a.a. 120. Closed 1932.

Brentford, New, Nat., see St. Lawrence's.

Brentford, Old, Nat., see St. George's.

Christ Church C.E. Middle, New Broadway. (fn. 36) Opened 1872 for B, 1886 for G. (fn. 37) Former I sch. for St. Mary's and Christ Church known as Christ Church I sch. 1878-1930, then as St. Saviour's. 1906 accn. 251 B, 234 G, 272 I, a.a. 217 B, 171 G, 113 I. 1919 accn. 203 B, 187 G, 254 I, a.a. 125 B, 135 G, 80 I. Reorg. 1921 for SB, JG. Again reorg. 1925, 1926, and 1930 for JM. (fn. 38) 1932 accn. 350 JM, a.a. 379. 1936 accn. 328 JM, a.a. 226. Middle sch. from 1974. Roll 1977: 325.

Compton First, Cavendish Ave. Opened 1972 for JMI. First sch. from 1974. Roll 1978: 160.

Drayton Temp., Alexandra Rd. Opened 1904 as St. James's JMI in former iron church. 1906 accn. 300, a.a. 251. Replaced by Drayton Grove sch. 1908. (fn. 39)

Drayton First, Drayton Grove. (fn. 40) Opened 1908 for BGI. 1919 accn. 300 B, 300 G, 336 I, a.a. 315 B, 275 G, 221 I. Reorg. 1936 for SB, JM. 1938 accn. 320 SB, 400 JM. I added 1939. (fn. 41) SB closed between 1957 and 1963. First sch. from 1974. Roll 1978: 159.

Ealing British, see Joseph Lancaster.

Ealing Central, see Walpole.

Ealing County B, Ealing Green. Opened 1913 for 330 SB on site of the Hall, (fn. 42) as sec. sch. with art and technical classes. Later called Ealing grammar sch. for B. Extended 1936, (fn. 43) 1961, 1964. Became Ealing Green high sch. 1974.

Ealing County G, Queen's Drive. Opened 1926 for SG in the Park. (fn. 44) Later called Ealing grammar sch. for G. Moved c. 1965 to Queen's Drive. Became Ellen Wilkinson high sch. 1974.

Ealing Dean, see St. John's.

Ealing Drill Hall Temp.

Opened 1904 for 320 I, closed 1905.

Ealing Green High, Ealing Green. Opened 1974 as SB comprehensive in former Ealing county grammar sch. Roll 1977: 690 SB.

Ealing Mead, Almond Ave. Opened 1962 as SB sec. mod., replacing Little Ealing sec. mod. (fn. 45) Closed 1974. (fn. 46)

Ealing Nat., see St. Mary's.

Ealing Rd.

Opened 1903-4 for BGI. 1906 accn. 370 BG, 300 I, a.a. 305 BG, 234 I. 1919 accn. 480 BG, 300 I, a.a. 382 BG, 226 I. Reorg. 1932 for JMI. 1938 accn. 440 JM, 300 I, a.a. 282 JM, 116 I. Closed 1975. (fn. 47)

Ealing Wesleyan, Broadway. (fn. 48) Opened 1874 for BG and probably I next to Meth. church. 1878 accn. 208, a.a. 88. Charged high fees, was refused grant 1891, (fn. 49) and was described as middle-class elementary 1893. Extended c. 1879 and rebuilt c. 1893. 1898 accn. 283, a.a. 275. 1906 accn. 215 BG, 68 I, a.a. 272 BGI. 1919 accn. 212 BG, a.a. 200 BG. Closed 1921, when pupils moved to Joseph Lancaster.

Ealing, Little, see Little Ealing.

Ealing, North, First And Middle, Pitshanger Lane. Opened 1911 for G from St. Stephen's C.E. and I. (fn. 50) 1919 accn. 400 GI, a.a. 33. B from St. Stephen's 1921. 1926 accn. 143 B, 400 GI, a.a. 112 B, 286 GI. Reorg. for JMI and extended c. 1935 on closure of B sch. 1938 accn. 460, a.a. 450. Combined first and middle sch. from 1974. Roll 1978: 520.

Ealing, South, Temp., Junction Rd. Opened 1914 for JMI. From 1922 called S. Ealing Good Shepherd hall temp. sch. 1919 accn. 300 JMI, a.a. 134. 1922 accn. 150, a.a. 131. Closed 1927.

Ellen Wilkinson High, Queen's Drive. Opened 1974 as comprehensive high sch. in former Ealing county G sch. Roll 1978: 1,100 SG.

Elthorne High, see Walpole.

Fielding First And Middle, Wyndham Rd. Opened 1953 as separate JM and I schs., (fn. 51) amalgamated 1967. (fn. 52) First and middle schs. from 1974. Rolls 1977-8: 210 and 265.

Grange First And Middle, Church Place. Opened 1925 for JM, 1927 and 1931 for I, 1931 for SG. (fn. 53) 1927 accn. 420 JM, a.a. 380. 1932 accn. 296 SG, 400 JM, 400 I, a.a. 166 SG, 386 JM, 316 I. First and middle schs. from 1974, when SG moved to Ellen Wilkinson. Rolls 1978: 320 and 258.

Green Dragon, North Rd., Brentford. Opened 1975 as JMI schs., replacing Ealing Rd. sch. Rolls 1977: 280 I, 290 JM.

Gunnersbury R.C., Gunnersbury Ave. Opened c. 1919 as sec. sch. in Boston Pk. Rd., (fn. 54) moved to Gunnersbury Ave. 1932, (fn. 55) and extended c. 1938 after bequest from Patrick Murphy (d. 1934). (fn. 56) Received grant 1939 (fn. 57) and became vol. aided grammar sch. 1944, J sch. closing 1947. 180 B in 1932, 331 in 1947, 374 in 1956. (fn. 58) Comprehensive from 1971, with lower sch. in Gunnersbury Ave. and upper sch. in new bldgs. at the Ride. Rolls 1977: 360 and 700 SB.

Gurnell Middle, Hathaway Gardens. Opened 1974 as middle sch. Roll 1977: 275.

Joseph Lancaster, Lancaster Rd. (fn. 59) Opened 1859 as Ealing British sch. for BGI. (fn. 60) Charged high fees and soon won good reputation. 1865 a.a. 103. 1871 a.a. 219. Extended c. 1880, c. 1887, 1895. Taken over by council as Joseph Lancaster sch. c. 1904. 1906 accn. 293 BG, 136 I, a.a. 326 BG, 131 I. 1919 accn. 248 BG, 123 I, a.a. 326 BGI. Replaced by Grange sch. 1925.

Lammas Temp

Opened 1904 for 312 M, closed 1905.

Lammas, Cranmer Ave. Opened 1910 for BGI. (fn. 61) 1919 accn. 398 B, 400 G, 460 I, a.a. 356 B, 365 G, 318 I. B and G formed Ealing central (later Walpole) sch. 1925, I remained until reorg. c. 1932 for JMI. 1938 accn. 370, a.a. 317. I moved to Fielding sch. 1953, when bldgs. occupied by Walpole sch. (fn. 62)

Lionel Rd., Brentford. Opened 1931 for JMI. Extended 1934, 1939. (fn. 63) 1932 accn. 300, a.a. 186. 1936 accn. 500, a.a. 380. Roll 1978: 249.

Little Ealing First And Middle, Little Ealing Lane. Opened 1905 for BGI. (fn. 64) Extended before 1919 and in 1950s. 1919 accn. 440 B, 440 G, 486 I, a.a. 367 B, 371 G, 315 I. Reorg. 1932. 1936 accn. 394 SB, 390 JM, 380 I, a.a. 324 SB, 327 JM, 270 I. SB moved to Ealing Mead 1962. First and middle schs. from 1974. Rolls 1977: 240 and 344.

Montpelier First And Middle, Helena Rd. Opened 1957 for JMI. First and middle schs. from 1974. Rolls 1978: 230 and 300.

Mount Carmel R.C. First And Middle, Little Ealing Lane. Opened 1968 for JMI. Combined first and middle sch. from 1974. Part of former Lourdes Mount private sch. taken over as annexe 1974 and used mainly by middle sch. 1977. Roll 1977: 364.

Northfields First And Middle, Balfour Rd.

Opened 1905 (fn. 65) for 400 B, 400 G, 446 I. 1919 accn. 440 B, 440 G, 486 I, a.a. 352 B, 317 G, 326 I. Reorg. 1932 for SG, JMI. 1936 accn. 314 SG, 440 JM, 380 I, a.a. 241 SG, 366 JM, 268 I. JMI moved by 1938. First and middle schs. from 1974. Rolls 1978: 190 and 180.

Rothschild, High Street, Brentford. Opened 1834 for BG as Brentford British sch. in Old Spring Gardens near One Tun Alley. (fn. 66) 1850 a.a. 250. (fn. 67) Moved 1859 to N. side of High Street. (fn. 68) Financed by subscriptions, especially from Rothschild family, and considered one of best schs. in London 1872. (fn. 69) Extended twice in 1880s and c. 1902. 1906 accn. 358 B, 190 G, 166 I, a.a. 278 B, 215 G, 113 I. Renamed Rothschild sch. by 1906 and taken over by Ealing M.B. 1919 accn. 282 B, 282 G, a.a. 240 B, 240 G. Closed 1930, on opening of Brentford sec. mod. sch. Bldg. demol. c. 1936 and replaced by health centre 1938. (fn. 70)

St. George's C.E., Clayponds Lane, Brentford. Originated in Sunday schs. near St. George's church and in sch. of industry. (fn. 71) Sunday schs. founded 1786 by vicar of Ealing and author Mrs. Sarah Trimmer (1741-1810) modelled on those of Robert Raikes. (fn. 72) 300 BG 1788. 60 B and 100 G 1796-1811. Closed 1824 but revived 1833 and 1839-80. 1843 a.a. 240. (fn. 73) Sch. of industry, later Green sch., founded 1787 by Mrs. Trimmer, had 40 G until 1810, 85 G 1811, and over 100 G 1834, when run by her daughters. Sch. of industry for B opened by 1796 but failed by 1807. (fn. 74) Nat. sch. for c. 100 I opened 1831, moving 1837 to bldg. for 178 W. of North Rd. (fn. 75) 1878 a.a. 149. 1893 a.a. 220. Moved 1893 to new bldg. for 480 BGI at corner of Clayponds Lane and Green Dragon Lane. (fn. 76) 1906 accn. 152 B, 152 G, 176 I, a.a. 152 B, 150 G, 184 I. 1919 accn. 144 B, 144 G, 151 I, a.a. 85 B, 129 G, 165 I. Bldgs. improved 1926, when renamed St. George's primary sch., (fn. 77) 1933, and 1937. 1927 accn. 288 JM, 151 I, a.a. 231 JM, 114 I. 1938 accn. 354 JMI, a.a. 203. Roll 1977: 60 JMI. Closed 1978. (fn. 78)

St. Gregory's R.C. First And Middle, Woodfield Rd. Opened 1953 for JMI as overflow for R.C. schs. in Greenford and Hanwell. Combined first and middle sch. from 1975. Roll 1978: c. 500.

St. John's First And Middle, Felix Rd. (fn. 79) Opened 1862 for BG in iron hall as Ealing Dean sch. (fn. 80) Hall moved to Felix Rd. and used as Nat. sch. for 60-70 I 1872, when sch. for 180 BG added. 1878 accn. 211 BGI, a.a. 127. Mixed sch. bldg. used for I 1882, when new mixed sch. built. 1885 accn. 522 BGI, a.a. 380. 1906 accn. 333 B, 333 G, 273 I, a.a. 427 B, 395 G, 288 I. 1919 accn. 298 B, 298 G, 234 I, a.a. 269 B, 269 G, 160 I. Transferred to Ealing M.B. 1932 and became JMI sch. (fn. 81) Bldgs. replaced 1973. Combined first and middle sch. from 1974. Roll 1977: 400.

St. John's R.C., Boston Park Rd., Brentford. Opened by 1866 in the Butts. 1865-6 a.a. 75. 1885 accn. 211, a.a. 151. Moved 1901 to Brook Rd. (fn. 82) 1906 accn. 142 BG, 124 I, a.a. 14 BG, 108 I. 1919 accn. 182 BG, 85 I, a.a. 172 BGI. Extended 1928. (fn. 83) 1932 accn. 284 BGI, a.a. 249. Pupils aged 5-15 (fn. 84) until seniors moved c. 1957, leaving sch. still overcrowded with 272 JMI in 1962. Moved to Boston Pk. Rd. 1968. Roll 1978: 256 JMI.

St. Lawrence's C.E., Brentford. Opened 1703 as char. sch. for BG. Financed by subscriptions, mainly from Ealing and Isleworth, and closed on opening of Ealing char. sch. 1714. (fn. 85) Curate J. Le Hunt retained 10 B and reopened sch. in own ho. 1715, (fn. 86) soon replaced by schoolroom for 20 B in the Butts. (fn. 87) Financed by subscriptions, sermons, and legacies, inc. rent charge of £37 10s. in 1819 under will (proved 1721) of Dorothy, Lady Capel, and £30 a year under will (dated 1810) of Mrs. Alithea Mary Stafford. (fn. 88) Parish children boarded 1735 and later employed, master being part-time tradesman. (fn. 89) 23 B and 13 G clothed and educ. 1811. (fn. 90) After merging with Sunday sch. of c. 1810, (fn. 91) new sch. ho. for 200 B opened in the Ham 1815, when bldg. in the Butts became sch. for G. (fn. 92) Dr. Bell's system adopted by 1819, when 146 B and 71 G. (fn. 93) Nat. schs. by 1835. (fn. 94) G moved 1840 to new sch. in Half Acre, paid for by legacies and Clitherow family; (fn. 95) bldg. in the Butts then used by I (fn. 96) until their move to Half Acre c. 1860. (fn. 97) 1870 accn. 457 BGI, a.a. 270. Extended c. 1885 and rebuilt 1893. (fn. 98) 1880-1912 a.a. c. 340. (fn. 99) 1919 accn. 207 B, 112 G, 131 I, a.a. 98 B, 94 G, 64 I. Closed 1931.

St. Lawrence's With St. Paul's, see St. Paul's.

St. Luke's C.E., Drayton Green. Opened 1902-3 for I in St. Luke's iron church. (fn. 1) 1906 accn. 110, a.a. 71. Replaced by Drayton sch. 1908. (fn. 2)

St. Mary's C.E. G, Ealing Green. Jane (d. 1712), widow of Sir William Rawlinson, (fn. 3) left £500 to clothe and educ. 20 G but there was no separate foundation until 13 a. near church were bought and leased out under Chancery decree of 1787. Sch. ho., with accn. for mistress, bought W. of Ealing Green 1795. 20 G clothed and educ. 1819, when Nat. system to be adopted. (fn. 4) 60 G educ. 1821 and 1857. I sch. added 1837 but moved 1857, when teaching was poor. (fn. 5) Sch. rebuilt 1862 (fn. 6) and extended 1894. (fn. 7) 1906 accn. 145, a.a. 174. 1919 accn. 128, a.a. 121. Reorg. 1921 for 128 SG and transferred to Ealing M.B. Closed 1926.

St. Mary's C.E. B, South Ealing Rd. (fn. 8) Opened c. 1714 as char. sch. (fn. 9) Sch. ho. built 1719 and used by B and G. (fn. 10) Boys' sch. ho., with accn. for master, built 1782. Financed by subscriptions, sermons, and legacies, (fn. 11) inc. rent charge of £37 10s. in 1819 under will (proved 1721) of Dorothy, Lady Capel, and £30 a year under will (dated 1810) of Mrs. Alithea Mary Stafford. 20 B clothed and educ. until 1817, when Nat. system adopted and schoolroom built for 100. 106 B educ. 1819, (fn. 12) 115 in 1845. Sch. rebuilt 1874 and extended 1890. I sch. added 1887. 1906 accn. 237 B, 120 I, a.a. 220 B, 235 I. 1919 accn. 187 B, 94 I, a.a. 173 B, 66 I. Reorg. 1921 for SB and I, 1922-3 for JM. 1927 accn. 272, a.a. 250. Closed 1939. (fn. 13)

St. Paul's C.E., St. Paul's Rd., Brentford. Opened 1873 for 522 BGI. (fn. 14) Extended 1883, with places for 200 I, and 1898. (fn. 15) 1906 accn. 248 B, 210 G, 322 I, a.a. 236 B, 209 G, 310 I. 1919 accn. 144 B, 171 G, 284 I, a.a. 140 B, 162 G, 236 I. Bldgs. condemned 1920. (fn. 16) Reorg. c. 1925 for M and I, 1930 for separate JM and I, 1932 for JMI. 1932 accn. 329 JM, 264 I, a.a. 308 JM, 154 I. Called St. Lawrence's with St. Paul's sch. 1953 on union of benefices. Extended 1966. Roll 1977: 210.

St. Saviour's C.E. First, the Grove. Opened 1861 as Nat. I sch. for St. Mary's and Christ Church in former Cong. chapel, I having been taught 1837-57 at charity (St. Mary's G) sch. and afterwards in overcrowded temp. premises. (fn. 17) Became Christ Church I sch. 1878. (fn. 18) Reorg. 1930 as St. Saviour's C.E. I sch. 1932 accn. 250, a.a. 173. Extended 1962 and 1974. First sch. from 1974. Roll 1978: 300.

St. Stephen's C.E., Pitshanger Lane. Opened after 1867 for BG in stables of Kent Ho. Moved 1882 to Pitshanger Lane. (fn. 19) 1906 accn. 146 BG, a.a. 92. G moved to N. Ealing sch. 1911. (fn. 20) 1919 accn. 143 B, a.a. 124. Closed when B moved to N. Ealing 1921.

Walpole, Cranmer Ave. Opened 1925 as Ealing central sch. 1926 accn. 320 B, 320 G, a.a. 245 B, 240 G. Reorg. 1937 as Ealing modern sch. (fn. 21) 1938 accn. 640 SM, a.a. 413. Extended 1945 as Walpole grammar sch., took over former Lammas I sch. 1953 and Little Ealing sec. mod. 1962. (fn. 22) Formed Elthorne high sch. with Bordeston sec. mod., Hanwell, from 1974. New bldgs. on Bordeston site under construction 1978. Roll 1978: 1,140 SM.

Special schools. (fn. 23) ASTON, see Cavendish.

Castlebar, Hathaway Gardens. Opened 1972 for multi-handicapped BG aged 4-13. Roll 1977: 120.

Cavendish, Cavendish Ave. Opened 1960 as Aston sch., Aston Rd., for emotionally disturbed BG aged 3-16. Moved 1971 to new Cavendish sch. Roll 1977: 31.

St. Mary's Rd. Girls' Home.

Opened at Ealing Ho. 1867, having moved from Acton, by Nat. Refuges for Homeless and Destitute Children. G educ. and trained in household work. Extended 1870 for G under age of 9. (fn. 24) Financed by subscriptions, (fn. 25) but parl. grant paid by 1884-5, when accn. 140, a.a. 78. 1906 accn. 140, a.a. 85. 1919 accn. 105, a.a. 76. Moved to Esher (Surr.) 1930. (fn. 26)

Springhallow, Aston Rd. Opened 1971 for autistic BG aged 3-16 in former Aston sch. A unit of Cavendish sch. until 1976. Roll 1978: 22.

Adult and technical education. (fn. 27) Evening classes for adults were held in 1842 (fn. 28) and during the winter from 1859 to 1863 or later, when half of the master's salary was borne by the boys' National school and half by subscriptions. (fn. 29) Ealing college of higher education derived from art classes held from c. 1884 and science classes added by 1895. At first they took place at Ealing free library, (fn. 30) by 1901 at the Hall, Ealing Green, and from 1913 at Ealing county school for boys. In 1929 they moved to the surviving building provided by the county council at the corner of St. Mary's and Warwick roads, which housed a school of arts, a technical institute, and evening intermediate schools. After several changes of name the building was called Ealing technical institute (later college) and school of art in 1937, Ealing technical college in 1961, and Ealing college of higher education in 1977. There were c. 220 full-time students in 1946, 450 full-time, 700 part-time, and 7,000 evening students in 1956, (fn. 31) and 1,800 full-time and 3,400 part-time students in 1977-8. New buildings were added in 1953, 1962, and 1966, when the college also took over the former girls' county school.

Private schools. (fn. 32)

In 1599 Thomas Haward taught 18 boys, mostly gentlemen's sons aged 6-17, at his father's house in Ealing. (fn. 33) In the 17th century and early 18th several schoolmasters were licensed. (fn. 34)

The Revd. William Dodd (1729-77), the forger, taught a few boys at his London house from 1766. (fn. 35) He rented a house at Pope's Cross near the west end of Pope's Lane, wrongly identified as Coldhall manor house, in 1769 (fn. 36) but had moved to Whitton in Isleworth by 1773. (fn. 37) Pupils included Philip Stanhope (d. 1815), who in 1773 succeeded his godfather the letter writer as earl of Chesterfield. (fn. 38) The same house became known as Goodenough House, where a school was kept by the Revd. Samuel Goodenough (1743-1827), later bishop of Carlisle, from 1772 until 1798 (fn. 39) and thereafter by his nephew William Goodenough until 1818. (fn. 40) Pupils included the prime minister Henry Addington, Viscount Sidmouth (1757-1844), in 1773-4, (fn. 41) the diplomat and collector Thomas Bruce, earl of Elgin (1766-1841), (fn. 42) the antiquary Barré Charles Roberts (1789-1810) from 1799 to 1805, (fn. 43) and the soldier Sir Robert Walpole (1808-76). (fn. 44) Among later principals were the Revd. William Moseley from 1820 to 1832, (fn. 45) George Mowbray Gilbert, with 42 boys in 1851, (fn. 46) and Frank Howard in 1853. (fn. 47) Goodenough House was demolished in 1858 and replaced by the Limes. (fn. 48)

The Revd.

Charles Wallington kept a boys' boarding school at Haven Green, wrongly thought to have been at Ealing House, where he lived from 1783 to 1822 (fn. 49) and was succeeded by the Revd. B. Greenlaw from 1823 to 1828. (fn. 50) The novelist Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Lord Lytton (1803-73), was a pupil. (fn. 51)

Great Ealing school was founded in 1698. (fn. 52) A Mr. Pierce was succeeded as master in 1768 by his son-in-law the Revd. Richard Badcock Shury, rector of Perivale, whose son-in-law the Revd. David Nicholas became headmaster in 1791. Nicholas (d. 1829) and his sons the Revd. George, who left in 1837, and the Revd. Francis Nicholas spent large sums on buildings and achieved a wide reputation. (fn. 53) The school, in a house known as the Old Rectory near the church, had 200 boys in 1811 (fn. 54) and 365 in 1820. (fn. 55) The curriculum was that of a public school, (fn. 56) and Louis-Philippe, later king of the French, taught geography and mathematics there in the early 19th century. (fn. 57) Pupils included the soldier Sir Robert Sale (1782-1845), (fn. 58) the publisher Charles Knight 1803-5, (fn. 59) John Henry Newman (1801- 90), (fn. 60) the composer Sir George MacFarren (1813-87), (fn. 61) and the Ealing-born scientist T. H. Huxley (1825-95). (fn. 62) After the school had moved to the Owls, built 1846-7, on the west side of St. Mary's Road, the Old Rectory made way for Ranelagh Road and part of the grounds were added to the churchyard. (fn. 63) The school was directed by Dr. Ebenezer Pearce in 1861, (fn. 64) the Revd. Edward Hedges in 1868, Charles Morgan in 1874, (fn. 65) and Dr. John Chapman, the Jewish educationalist, from 1881. (fn. 66) Under Morgan it was a day school, with subjects including bookkeeping and physical science. (fn. 67) After its closure in 1908 the Owls was replaced by Cairn Avenue and Nicholas Gardens. (fn. 68)

Ealing's private schools increased in the 19th century, from 9 'academies' in 1826 to 14 private schools in 1871, 22 in 1880, and 29 in 1900. There were still 26 in 1949 and 14 in 1979. (fn. 69) Brentford had comparatively few, 5 being listed in 1832, 6 in 1845, and 5 in 1890, none of them apparently long lived. (fn. 70)

Ealing Grove school, near Ealing green, (fn. 71) was founded in 1834 by Lady Noel-Byron, of Fordhook House. Interested in combining learning with practical skills, (fn. 72) she had visited Philipp Emanuel de Fellenberg at Hofwyl (Switzerland) (fn. 73) and appointed as first headmaster E. T. Craig, who had an Owenite background. (fn. 74) The curriculum eschewed corporal punishment and included drawing, carpentry, and gardening, with much use of equipment favoured by de Fellenberg and Pestalozzi. Boys from the age of 6, mostly poor, were taken for 2d. a week and boarders from the age of 12. (fn. 75) Despite a change of emphasis, advanced methods were still used when Lady Byron moved in 1842. (fn. 76) The school closed in 1852. (fn. 77)

C. N. Atlee, master of St. Mary's National school until 1835 and of Ealing Grove 1835-52, opened Byron House school, in the Park, in 1859 (fn. 78) and had 87 boys, aged 8-17, in 1861. (fn. 79) Atlee's son Charles continued it from 1866 (fn. 80) until 1886, when it was acquired by Dr. B. Brucesmith, (fn. 81) who in 1896 renamed it Ealing Grammar school and prepared boarders and day boys for the main public examinations. (fn. 82) It had 200 boarders in 1912, (fn. 83) and closed in 1917. (fn. 84)

Ealing college originated in Church House boys' school, founded in 1820 at the corner of Church Lane and St. Mary's Road. (fn. 85) Headmasters included Thomas Lovegrove in 1839, (fn. 86) William Quicke by 1851, (fn. 87) and William Rowlatt, under whom the school apparently declined, from 1864 to 1872. (fn. 88) Charles Taylor then took over and modernized the school, tripling the numbers by 1876. He moved it to new premises in the Mall at the corner of Hamilton Road, opened in 1880 as Ealing college, leaving Church House to be demolished in 1882. (fn. 89) It was called Hermosa school after Taylor's departure in 1886 and the Proprietary school from 1894 until its closure in 1901. (fn. 90) Girton House school for girls occupied the building from 1905 to 1923 (fn. 91) and Acton college moved there in 1925, when it was renamed Ealing college. In 1943 it was divided, the lower school moving to the former Hillsborough preparatory school in Creffield Road and the upper to the former Castle Hill school at no. 83 the Avenue in 1957. After transferring to no. 70 the Avenue, previously Wynnstay school, in 1961, (fn. 92) the lower school closed in 1973. (fn. 93) The upper school had 340 boys on the roll in 1978. (fn. 94)

Thorn House academy was founded in 1836 by William Henry Ray in the former master's house of Great Ealing school. (fn. 95) There were 36 boarders, aged 6 to 15, in 1851 and 77, aged 8 to 19, in 1871. (fn. 96) Under the Revd. Richard Mulcaster, Ray's successor from 1874, Thorn House was called a collegiate and commercial school. (fn. 97) Later headmasters were F. Bynoe by 1881, H. P. Greaves by 1887, (fn. 98) and Samuel Dyer, who in 1890 moved it to Warwick Road as the short lived Harlingen school. (fn. 99) In 1893 the original premises were occupied by St. Mary's college, which emphasized science (fn. 1) and closed in 1895, the building becoming a Liberal club until its demolition in 1902. (fn. 2)

Ealing Deanery middle-class school was promoted by Ealing Ruri-Decanal Association, to give prominence to religious instruction. (fn. 3) In face of opposition (fn. 4) the school opened in Brentford High street in 1864, with both day pupils and boarders. (fn. 5) Never self-supporting, the school closed in 1879. (fn. 6)

Girls' schools, which included Mrs. Robinson's school for ladies in 1790, (fn. 7) proliferated in the late 19th century. One at no. 9 Bonchurch Villas, the Grove, in 1866 (fn. 8) had moved by 1874 to Grosvenor House, no. 46 Windsor Road, (fn. 9) where in 1882 there was a ladies' collegiate school with a kindergarten. (fn. 10) It moved to the Hawthorns, no. 19 Ealing Common, in 1883, (fn. 11) had day girls and boarders in 1908, (fn. 12) and closed in 1912. (fn. 13)

Princess Helena college moved in 1882 from Regent's Park (St. Marylebone) to new buildings in 9 a. in Montpelier Road. (fn. 14) Founded in 1820 as the Adult Orphans Institution, to train governesses, it had changed its name in 1876 when partly evolving into a high school. (fn. 15) There was accommodation for 55 boarders and 100 day girls, (fn. 16) with a kindergarten which also took boys. Scholarships continued to be awarded to orphans in 1889. (fn. 17) The school moved in 1936 to Temple Dinsley (Herts.) (fn. 18) and in 1979 the site was occupied by Helena Court and Montpelier school.

Notting Hill and Ealing high school for girls, opened by the Girls' Public Day School Trust as Notting Hill and Bayswater high school, (fn. 19) moved in 1931 to Ealing, where many pupils lived. It took over some girls from Girton House, whose building at no. 2 Cleveland Road it occupied. The reorganized junior school opened at Redlands, no. 20 St. Stephen's Road, in 1935. The school was grant-aided under the Education Act, 1944, (fn. 20) until 1976. New buildings included a library in 1970 and science block in 1979. There were 643 girls aged 5-18 in 1978. (fn. 21)

Harvington school, until 1916 called Heidelberg college, (fn. 22) had opened by 1893 as a girls' day and boarding school at no. 67 Gordon Road. In 1908 it was at nos. 24 and 26 Castlebar Road, (fn. 23) where it remained in 1979.

Durston House, a boys' preparatory school, was founded in 1886 at no. 14 Castlebar Road, (fn. 24) under B. C. and R. M. Pearce, sons of Ebenezer Pearce of Great Ealing school. (fn. 25) Only day boys were taken after 1892. (fn. 26) Durston House retained expanded premises in Castlebar Road in 1978, with 200 boys. (fn. 27)

Hamilton House, opened in 1905 (fn. 28) in Hamilton Road, had moved by 1908 to Florence Road (fn. 29) and specialized in preparing boys for the Royal Naval College, Osborne. From 1973 numbers rose, (fn. 30) the juniors moving in 1974 to the former lower school of Ealing college at no. 70 the Avenue. (fn. 31) In 1978 it took girls aged 4-9 and boys aged 4-14. (fn. 32)

Lourdes Mount school for girls was started in 1923 by Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Mary at Rochester House, Little Ealing Lane, (fn. 33) which earlier housed Mrs. Robinson's girls' school in 1839, Dr. Northcott's military college from 1872, the Metropolitan Board asylum 1903-5, and Marylebone school for orphan girls 1910- 22. (fn. 34) Lourdes Mount, with 300 children in 1958, closed in 1971 on amalgamating with the convent of the Sacred Heart of Mary, Hillingdon. (fn. 35) Rochester House was bought by the Institution of Production Engineers in 1974. (fn. 36)

The convent of the Augustinians ladies' school opened in 1915 in new buildings in Hillcrest Road. Originally a day and boarding school for girls, with a day school for small boys, it was extended in 1932 (fn. 37) and had 325 day girls, aged 4-18, in 1978. (fn. 38)

St. Anne's convent school was founded in 1903 by the Sisters of Charity. It had 489 girls, aged 5-18, and 7 boys in 1978. (fn. 39)

St. Benedict's school originated in a school opened in 1902 by Father Sebastian Cave, following the establishment of a temporary chapel in 1896 by Downside abbey. (fn. 40) As Ealing Catholic school, renamed Ealing Priory school in 1916, it occupied Orchard Dene in Montpelier Road from 1906 before moving to no. 56 Eaton Rise in 1924. Orchard Dene was retained for boarders, no. 54 Eaton Rise was acquired in 1929, (fn. 41) and new buildings were added in 1937. (fn. 42) The school was called St. Benet's in 1938-9 and thereafter St. Benedict's. In 1948 the 445 boys included 200 juniors and in 1950 a separate middle school was formed. Elected to the Headmasters' Conference in 1951, (fn. 43) the school was still governed by Ealing abbey in 1979. There were then 220 boys in the junior school and 595 in the middle and upper schools, besides some girls in the sixth form. (fn. 44)

Ealing commercial college, a day and boarding school at nos. 1 and 2 Totnes Villas, Uxbridge Road, in 1888 replaced Eccleston collegiate school for boys. (fn. 45) Girls were taught at Ealing secretarial college, no. 51 the Mall, in 1912. (fn. 46) A branch of Clark's college was at no. 45 Uxbridge Road from 1910, then at no. 95 New Broadway, and finally, until 1965, at no. 83. (fn. 47) Pitman's college opened in 1914 at nos. 52-6 Uxbridge Road and leased part of Bilton House, built there in 1959, until c. 1968. (fn. 48) Gregg secretarial college started in 1926 at no. 3 Hamilton Road but by 1928 was at no. 36 Uxbridge Road and by 1954 at no. 8 Mattock Lane, (fn. 49) where it remained as the co-educational Gregg school in 1979. (fn. 50)

Footnotes

2 Following 8 paras. based on accounts of individual schs. below.
3 Jnl. Stat. Soc. of Lond. vi. 128.
4 J. M. Craddock, 'Ealing: 2nd Educ. Era' and 'Short Hist. of Educ. of Poor in Ealing' (TSS. in Ealing libr.).
5 Jnl. Stat. Soc. of Lond. vi. 128.
6 Para. based on Craddock, 'Ealing: 2nd Educ. Era' and 'Educ. of Poor'.
7 Brentford Advocate, 13 Sept. 1873.
8 e.g. Ealing Educ. Assoc. Rep. (1881). Several reps. are in M.R.O., D.R.O. 37/A12/2.
9 Rep. of Educ. Cttee. of Council, 1878 [C. 2342-1], p. 947, H.C. (1878-9), xxiii; List of Schs. under Admin. of Bd. 1902 [Cd. 1277], p. 167, H.C. (1902), lxxix.
10 Mdx. C.C. Primary and Sec. Educ. in Mdx. 1900-65.
11 M.R.O., SB/OB/1, p. 15.
12 Ibid. p. 49.
13 Ibid. (min. bk.).
14 Jones, Decade of Progress, 16 sqq.
15 Plan and cuttings (1906) in Ealing libr.
16 Ealing, 1901-51, ed. Scouse, 32.
17 E. P. H. Pugh, Drayton Schs. 1908-58 (1958), 3.
18 Cuttings in Ealing libr.
19 Inf. from the headmaster; see also Ealing Boro. Rep. of Development Plan Subcttee. 1946-7.
20 Char. Com. files.
21 Below, charities; inf. from chief executive's office, Hounslow L.B.
22 Private schs. are treated separately below.
23 M.R.O., MCC/E correspondence file 168; Yarde, 'Boston Manor', 20-1.
24 2nd Ann. Rep. of Canal Boatmen's Mission and Day Sch. 1897-8.
25 10th Ann. Rep. 1905-6.
26 Mdx. Independent, 29 Sept. 1950.
27 2nd Ann. Rep. 1897-8. See also Living Lond. ed. G. R. Sims (1901), ii. 66.
28 Mdx. Independent, 29 Sept. 1950.
29 Craddock, 'Ealing: 2nd Educ. Era'; Brentford cent. ragged schs. and town mission, Rep. (1867).
30 Brentford Cent. Ragged Schs. (1871).
31 Brentford Advocate, 13 Sept. 1873.
32 Hounslow L.B. Sec. Schs. Maintained by Council (1971).
33 Brentford and Chiswick U.D. Rep. of M.O.H. (1930).
34 M.R.O., MCC/E correspondence file 168.
35 Brentford and Chiswick As It Was, illus. 20.
36 Para. based on Nat. Soc. files; Jackson, Ealing, 278, in addition to the usual sources.
37 Craddock, 'Ealing: 2nd Educ. Era'.
38 Christ Church-Christ the Saviour (booklet).
39 Pugh, Drayton Schs. 1.
40 Para. based on Pugh, Drayton Schs. in addition to the usual sources.
41 Ealing Boro. Educ. in Ealing, 1877-1945.
42 The Times, 30 Oct. 1913.
43 Mdx. Educ. Cttee. Opening of Extension (1936).
44 The Times, 3 Feb. 1926.
45 Inf. from the headmaster, Little Ealing middle sch.
46 Inf. from the headmaster, Ealing Green high sch.
47 Inf. from the headmaster, Green Dragon J sch.
48 Para. based on P.R.O., ED 7/87; Jackson, Ealing, 281-2; Ealing Broadway Meth. Church 1869-1969 (centenary booklet), in addition to the usual sources.
49 Craddock, 'Educ. of Poor', 21, 32.
50 P.R.O., ED 7/87.
51 Case Against Reorg. of Ealing Schs. (1969).
52 Ealing L.B. List of Educ. Establishments (1966).
53 P.R.O., ED 7/87; Ealing Boro. Educ. in Ealing, 1877- 1945.
54 Brentford and Chiswick Times, 26 Nov. 1937.
55 The Times, 21 Jan. 1932.
56 Mdx. County Times, 25 May 1935; M.R.O., MCC/E correspondence file 139 (Gunnersbury R.C.).
57 M.R.O., MCC/E correspondence file 139.
58 Ibid. files 139, 139A, 168.
59 Para. based on Jackson, Ealing, 280-1, and Ealing Local Hist. Soc. Local Historian (1964), in addition to the usual sources.
60 P.R.O., ED 7/87; ibid. C 54/15502, no. 10.
61 Ibid. ED 7/87.
62 Case Against Reorg. of Ealing Schs. (1969).
63 Brentford and Chiswick U.D. Ann. Rep. of M.O.H. (1931); M.R.O., MCC/E correspondence file 168.
64 P.R.O., ED 7/87.
65 Ibid.
66 Faulkner, Brentford, Ealing and Chiswick, 135; P.R.O., C 54/11055, no. 17; Guildhall MS. 10465/149, pp. 68-9.
67 Mins. of Educ. Cttee. of Council, 1848-50 [1215], p. ccxiv, H.C. (1850), xliii.
68 P.R.O., C 54/15331, nos. 15-16; Brentford Brit. sch. min. bk. (1844-73) in Chiswick libr.; Turner, Brentford, illus. (grangerized copy in Chiswick libr.).
69 Rep. of Educ. Cttee. of Council, 1872 [C.812], p. 64, H.C. (1873), xxiv.
70 Brentford and Chiswick As It Was, illus. 20.
71 For the early schs., see D. M. Yarde, Life and Works of Sarah Trimmer (Hounslow and Dist. Hist. Soc. 1972).
72 D.N.B.
73 Ambulator (1796 and later edns.); Jnl. Stat. Soc. of Lond. vi. 130; St. George's par. notes 1880.
74 Ambulator (1796 and later edns.); Lysons, Environs, ii. 240; Brewer, Beauties of Eng. & Wales, x (5), 347; Rep. of Sel. Cttee. on Educ. H.C. 572, pp. 215-16 (1834), ix.
75 St. George's ch. Rep. of I Sch., Old Brentford, 1836-7; I Sch. (appeal leaflet, 1837); Guildhall MS. 10465/152, pp. 295 sqq.; Nat. Soc. files; Colvin, Dict. Brit. Architects, 40.
76 Nat. Soc. files.
77 Ibid.
78 Mdx. Chron. 13 Jan. 1978.
79 Para. based on Jackson, Ealing, 278-9, in addition to the usual sources.
80 M.R.O., D.R.O. 37/A11/1; Christ Church, Money Required for Char. Purposes (1863).
81 Nat. Soc. files.
82 Brentford and Chiswick Times, 8 Apr. 1938.
83 Brentford and Chiswick U.D. Rep. of M.O.H. (1928).
84 M.R.O., MCC/E correspondence file 168.
85 Turner, Brentford, 207-8; New Brentford MS. 17798.
86 MSS. in Chiswick libr.
87 M.L.R. 1718/4/54; 2nd Rep. Com. Educ. of Poor, H.C. 547, p. 100 (1819), x-B.
88 2nd Rep. Com. Educ. of Poor, 100-1; Digest of Schs. and Chars. for Educ. H.C. 435, p. 177 (1843), xviii.
89 New Brentford MS. 17515; T.L.M.A.S. xxiii. 176.
90 Lysons, Environs (Suppl.), 105.
91 T. T. Haverfield, Sermon Occasioned by Death of Mrs. Trimmer (1811).
92 Brewer, Beauties of Eng. & Wales, x (5), 804; P.R.O., C 54/9747, no. 8; C 54/9815, no. 3; Educ. of Poor Digest, 534; Boston man. ct. bk. in Chiswick libr.
93 Educ. of Poor Digest, 534.
94 Educ. Enq. Abstract, 556.
95 Nat. Soc. files; P.R.O., C 54/12291, no. 3; Faulkner, Brentford, Ealing and Chiswick, 76-7.
96 Faulkner, op. cit. 75; P.O. Dir. Six Home Counties (1845).
97 M.R.O., CMD. 2/145; New Brentford MS. 17808; P.R.O., C 54/15546, no. 3.
98 Rep. of Educ. Cttee. of Council, 1887 [C. 5467-I], p. 612, H.C. (1888), xxxviii; Nat. Soc. files.
99 Rep. of Educ. Cttee. of Council, 1893 [C. 7437-I], p. 912, H.C. (1894), xxix; Mdx. educ. cttee. Brentford division, Returns of Attendance (Apr. 1912).
1 Pugh, Drayton Schs. 1.
2 Ealing Boro. educ. cttee. Rep. of Sec. (1907-8).
3 Jackson, Ealing, 71.
4 Lysons, Environs, ii. 239; ibid. (Suppl.), 132-3; 2nd Rep. Com. Educ. of Poor, 81-2.
5 M.R.O., D.R.O. 37/G1/1, pp. 8, 74, 76; Faulkner, Brentford, Ealing and Chiswick, 210.
6 M.R.O., D.R.O. 37/A12/1.
7 Jackson, Ealing, 276.
8 Para. based on ibid. 276-8, in addition to the usual sources.
9 Lysons, Environs, ii. 238; ibid. (Suppl.), 132.
10 Craddock, 'Educ. of Poor'.
11 Many educ. chars. are listed in Jackson, Ealing, 285-6.
12 2nd Rep. Com. Educ. of Poor, 80.
13 Craddock, 'Ealing: 2nd Educ. Era'.
14 Nat. Soc. files; M.R.O., CMD 2/145.
15 Nat. Soc. files.
16 Ibid.
17 Ibid.; M.R.O., D.R.O. 37/G1/1, pp. 70 sqq.; P.R.O., C 54/15627, no. 17.
18 Jackson, Ealing, 278.
19 Ibid. 280.
20 St. Stephen's Church (1976).
21 Scouse, Ealing, 1901-51, 69.
22 Ibid.; Case Against Reorg. of Ealing Schs. (1969).
23 Inf. on special schs. has been supplied by the head teachers.
24 Mdx. County Times, 30 July 1870.
25 Jackson, Ealing, 284-5.
26 Mdx. County Times, 26 July 1930.
27 Para. based on inf. from Mr. A. W. Slater.
28 Mins. of Educ. Cttee. of Council, 1842-3 [520], p. 143, H.C. (1843), xl.
29 M.R.O., D.R.O. 37/A12/1.
30 Jones, Ealing, 137; Jackson, Ealing, 295.
31 Popular Pictorial, Feb. 1956.
32 Following subsection drafted by Mr. P. Hounsell.
33 P.R.O., E 163/24/35; Allison, Elizabethan Census of Ealing, 13-14.
34 Guildhall MS. 10116.
35 D.N.B.; W. Dodd, Thoughts from Prison (1793), 9.
36 M.R.O., Acc. 938/10 deposit/1; Jackson, Ealing, 98.
37 G. Howson, Macaroni Parson (1973), 73.
38 D.N.B.; Letters of Earl of Chesterfield, ed. B. Dobrée, vi (1932), 2703, 2713, 2717, 2916.
39 Ealing rate bk. (Mar. 1773); D.N.B.
40 Jackson, Ealing, 98; rate bk. (1818).
41 P. Ziegler, Addington (1965), 24-5.
42 D.N.B.; Wilts. R.O. Acc. 1300 (letters of Geo. BruceBrudenell).
43 D.N.B.; Letters of B. C. Roberts (1874), p. xi.
44 D.N.B.
45 Rate bks. (1820, 1832); Pigot, Lond. Dir. (1826-7).
46 Census, 1851 (copy in Ealing libr.).
47 Mason's Dir. Ealing (1853).
48 Jackson, Ealing, 101; O.S. Map 6", Mdx. XV. SE.
49 Jackson, Ealing, 211; Jones, Ealing, 143-4; rate bks. (1783, 1822).
50 Rate bks. (1823, 1828); Pigot, Lond. Dir. (1826-7).
51 Life of Edw. Bulwer Lytton by his Son, i (1883), 130 f.
52 Date in prize bk. of 1875 in Ealing libr.
53 Jackson, Ealing, 172-3; Gtr. Ealing Local Hist. Soc. Local Historian (1961), 30; Pigot, Lond. Dir. (1826-7, 1839).
54 Lysons, Environs (Suppl.), 130; illus. in Jackson, Ealing, 154.
55 H. C. Banister, G. A. MacFarren, Life and Works (1892), 10.
56 T.L.M.A.S. xvii. 107-8.
57 Jackson, Ealing, 174.
58 D.N.B.
59 C. Knight, Passages of a Working Life, i (1864), 54-5.
60 Letters and Diaries of J. H. Newman, ed. I. Ker and T. Gornall, i (1978), 4-28.
61 Banister, MacFarren, 10.
62 Jackson, Ealing, 195. Thackeray, said to have been a pupil, e.g. Jackson, Ealing, 186-8, was at sch. in Chiswick: above, Chiswick, educ.
63 Jackson, Ealing, 161, 175; Ealing As It Was, illus. 9.
64 Census, 1861 (copy in Ealing libr.).
65 Mdx. County Times, 23 May 1868; 29 Aug. 1874.
66 Jewish Chron. 20 Apr. 1917; Jewish Encyclopaedia, 1902, iii. 666.
67 Mdx. County Times, 29 Aug. 1874.
68 Gtr. Ealing Local Hist. Soc. Local Historian (1961), 32.
69 Pigot, Lond. Dir. (1826-7); Census (1871); P.O. Dir. W. Suburbs (1880); Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1900-1); Ealing Blue Bk. (1949-50); Schools (1979).
70 Pigot, Com. Dir. (1832-4); P.O. Dir. Six Home Counties (1845); Kelly's Dir. Mdx. (1890, 1908, 1926). Old Brentford schs., however, were sometimes listed under Ealing, e.g. Educ. Enq. Abstract.
71 Jackson, Ealing, 159.
72 E. C. Mayne, Life and Letters of Lady Noel-Byron (1929), 329.
73 W. A. C. Stewart and W. P. McCann, Educ. Innovators, 1750-1880 (1967), 155.
74 Ibid. 159; Vocational Aspects of Sec. and Further Educ. xv, no. 31 (1963), 135-50.
75 Stewart and McCann, Educ. Innovators, 162; American Annals of Educ. and Instruction, vi (1836), 75-8.
76 Mins. of Educ. Cttee. of Council 1842-3 [520] pp. 141-3, H.C. (1843), xl; D.N.B.
77 Stewart and McCann, Educ. Innovators, 169.
78 Ibid. 167-8; Mdx. County Times, 2 June 1866.
79 Census, 1861.
80 Mdx. County Times, 2 June 1866; Census, 1871.
81 D. J. E. Sykes, Ealing and Its Vicinity (1895), 34.
82 Mdx. County Times, 4 Jan. 1896.
83 Ealing Boro. Official Guide (1912). Brucesmith also had a sch. in Essex: Mdx. County Times, 4 June 1924.
84 Mdx. County Times, 21 July 1917.
85 Ealing Coll. 1820-1970, comp. I. R. Dowse, 19.
86 Pigot, Com. Dir. (1839).
87 Census, 1851.
88 Ealing Coll. 20; Census, 1861, 1871.
89 Ealing Coll. 20-1; Mdx. County Times, 22 April 1876.
90 Ealing Coll. 25, 29, 54.
91 Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1905-6, 1923).
92 Ealing Coll. 35-7.
93 Mdx. County Times, 24 July 1973.
94 Inf. from the headmaster.
95 Mdx. County Times, 29 Aug. 1874.
96 Census, 1851, 1871.
97 Mdx. County Times, 29 Aug. 1874.
98 Cordingley's Dir. (1881); Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1887-8).
99 Mdx. County Times, 4 Jan., 23 Aug. 1890.
1 Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1893-4); Mdx. County Times, 11 Nov. 1893, 29 Sept. 1894.
2 M. E. R. Jones, 'Notes on Bygone Ealing' (TS. 1959, in Ealing libr.), 4-5.
3 Mdx. Chron. 23 Jan. 1864.
4 Ealing Post, 26 Mar., 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Apr., 21 May 1864.
5 Ibid. 27 Aug. 1864.
6 Mdx. County Times, 27 Sept. 1879.
7 M.R.O., D.R.O. 37/D1/2.
8 Mdx. County Times, 3 Nov. 1866.
9 Ibid. 22 Apr. 1876.
10 Ibid. 10 Feb. 1883.
11 Ibid. 6 Oct. 1883.
12 Ibid. 7 Oct. 1908.
13 Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1912, 1913).
14 Ealing Illustrated (1893), 13; Mdx. County Times, 15 July 1882; Ealing As It Was, illus. 12.
15 Mdx. County Times, 24 Dec. 1881.
16 Ibid. 15 July 1882.
17 Ibid. 21 Dec. 1889.
18 Ibid. 25 May, 7 Dec. 1935.
19 J. E. Sayers, Fountain Unsealed (1973), 11.
20 Ibid. 148, 150-1, 161.
21 Prospectus (1976); inf. from the headmistress and pupils.
22 Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1916, 1917).
23 Mdx. County Times, 23 Dec. 1893, 17 Oct. 1908.
24 Sch. Roll for First 45 Years (1886-1930) (1931).
25 Ealing libr., local colln. index.
26 Prospectus (1921) in Ealing libr., local colln.
27 Prospectus (1973) in Ealing libr., local colln.; Public and Prep. Schs. Year Bk. (1979).
28 Inf. from the headmaster.
29 Mdx. County Times, 17 Oct. 1908.
30 Ibid. 24 July 1973.
31 Inf. from the headmaster.
32 Schools (1979), 298.
33 Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1923).
34 Pigot, Com. Dir. (1839); Faulkner, Brentford, Ealing and Chiswick, 248; Mdx. County Times, 2 June 1888; Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1903-4, 1904-5, 1911, 1922).
35 Min. Educ. List 70 (1958); Mdx. County Times, 31 Dec. 1971.
36 Production Engineer, Dec. 1974.
37 Above, Rom. Catholicism; Mdx. County Times, 16 Apr. 1932.
38 Catholic Educ. (1978).
39 Inf. from the headmistress; Catholic Educ. (1978).
40 'Fifty Years: St. Benedict's Sch. 1902-52', Priorian, vi (9), 1-2.
41 Ibid. 6, 8, 10; Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1908).
42 Mdx. County Times, 13 Feb. 1937.
43 Priorian, vi (9), 14, 30-2.
44 Public and Prep. Schs. Year Bk. (1979).
45 Mdx. County Times, 4 Aug. 1888; Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1888-9).
46 Ealing Boro. Official Guide (1912).
47 Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1911, 1938); Kemp's Dir. Ealing (1959).
48 Mdx. County Times, 29 Aug. 1959; Kemp's Dir. Ealing (1969-70).
49 Mdx. County Times, 6 Feb. 1926, 29 May 1954; Kelly's Dir. Ealing (1928).
50 Schools (1979).