Religious History
Churches built since 1800

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Victoria County History

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W.B. Stephens (Editor)

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1964

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379-396

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'Religious History: Churches built since 1800', A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 7: The City of Birmingham (1964), pp. 379-396. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=22976&strquery=Sparkbrook Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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Churches Built since 1800

Separate dates are not given for the building and consecration of a church unless there is a considerable interval between them.

The words 'the bishop' refer unless otherwise stated to the bishop of the diocese in which the church under discussion lay at the time. From 1835 to 1905 the churches within the ancient parishes of Harborne and Handsworth were in the diocese of Lichfield, and all other churches within the modern city boundary were in the diocese of Worcester. In 1905 all the churches within the modern city boundary were included in the new diocese of Birmingham.

Page numbers of diocesan calendars, etc., are given in the footnotes only when the information quoted is otherwise not easily found.

Where no change in patronage is mentioned, it may be assumed that there has been none.

Under the District Church Tithes Amendment Act, 1868 (31 & 32 Vic. c. 117), incumbents of new churches who were authorized to publish banns, to solemnize marriages, churchings and baptisms, and to receive the whole fees for those offices, were to be styled vicars. Therefore where a benefice became a vicarage in 1868 the fact has been stated to indicate that the incumbent was performing the abovenamed offices and receiving the whole fees by that date. Similarly, incumbents who were not performing those offices or receiving the whole fees in 1868 were styled vicars from the date when they first began to do so, and the date from which a benefice was styled a vicarage has been stated to indicate that the incumbent then assumed those functions and benefits.

With a few exceptions, only those missions and mission churches which have been licensed by the bishop for public worship are included. They are given under the parish churches to which they have been attached. Unconsecrated churches which have Conventional Districts attached to them have been given separate entries.

19. ALL SAINTS, Birmingham (All Saints St. and Lodge Rd.), a building of red brick in the Gothic style, with pinnacles and stone dressings, was designed by Rickman and Hutchinson and consecrated in 1833, (fn. 82) and the chancel was rebuilt in 1881. (fn. 83) The living has been a rectory since 1834, when a parish was assigned out of St. Martin's, in the gift of the trustees of St. Martin's. (fn. 84) The following parishes were created out of All Saints' parish: St. Cuthbert's (1872), St. Chrysostom (1890), St. Peter, Birmingham (1902). A large number of mission churches and rooms and other places in the parish have been licensed for public worship: St. Simon's mission church, Heaton St. and Icknield St. (called St. Simon's Mission from 1894 and St. Saviour's Mission, 1907-10), since 1856; Winson Street Mission, 1869-72; Park Road or St. Chrysostom's Mission, opened 1888, consecrated as St. Chrysostom's; St. Michael's Mission, Camden St. (known as St. Michael's from 1894), 1891-1903; Heath Street Mission, opened in a schoolroom 1863, consecrated as St. Cuthbert's; St. John's Mission, Crabtree Rd. (known as Church Army Mission, Prescott St., 1910-16, and St. John's Mission from 1917), 1908-26; Dudley Road Hospital and Western House, (Birmingham Infirmary), since 1924. (fn. 85)

20. ALL SAINTS, Gravelly Hill (George Rd.), was dedicated as a chapel of ease to St. Barnabas's, Erdington, in 1901. (fn. 86) The church, which was consecrated in 1928, (fn. 87) is a simple rectangular building of red brick with stone dressings designed by V. S. Peel of Birmingham (fn. 88) in the Gothic style. The top of the east gable projects to house a bell, and a lowbuilt vestry at the east end and porch at the west end have been added. A Conventional District was attached to the church in 1923. (fn. 89) In 1929 a parish was assigned out of St. Barnabas's and St. Peter and St. Paul's, Aston, and the living became a vicarage in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 90) Part of the parish was taken to form the parish of St. Mark, Stockland Green (1934). (fn. 91)

21. ALL SAINTS, King's Heath (High St.), a stone church designed by F. Preedy in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, and tower with spire, was erected in 1859. (fn. 92) A parish was assigned out of St. Nicolas's, King's Norton, and St. Mary's, Moseley, in 1863, when the living became a perpetual curacy in the gift of the Vicar of St. Mary, Moseley. (fn. 93) The living, declared a vicarage in 1866, (fn. 94) remains in the same patronage. (fn. 95) Parts of the parishes of St. Mary Magdalen, Hazelwell (1932), and Holy Cross, Billesley Common (1937), were taken from this parish. The Bethany Mission House, King's Rd., was opened in 1912, and is perhaps to be associated with the St. Mary Magdalen Mission Hall, licensed for public worship in 1915, (fn. 96) which was replaced by the consecrated church of St. Mary Magdalen, Hazelwell.

22. ALL SAINTS, Shard End (Ownall Rd.), consisting of chancel and nave with passage aisles, was designed by F. J. Osborne. It is of light-brown brick with pantile roofs and tall narrow windows; the east window is in the form of a cross. A short cloister surmounted by a massive rectangular north-east tower with a hipped roof and cupola forms a connecting link between the church and the adjoining church hall. Building was begun in 1954 (fn. 97) and services were held at first in the builders' canteen until the church, the first single church to be built in Birmingham since 1938, (fn. 98) was completed and consecrated in 1955 (fn. 99) as a mission church of Castle Bromwich. The living is a perpetual curacy in the gift of Keble College, Oxford. (fn. 1)

23. ALL SAINTS, Small Heath (Cooksey Rd.), a brick building in the Early English style, consisting of nave, aisles and transepts, was designed by A. E. Dempster, and was erected in 1875 (fn. 2) and consecrated in 1883. (fn. 3) The church was destroyed by enemy action during the Second World War. A parish was assigned out of Holy Trinity, Bordesley, in 1875; the living, in the gift of private trustees, (fn. 4) was a titular vicarage from 1890. (fn. 5) The parish, out of which the parish of St. Aidan, Small Heath (1897), and part of the parish of St. Gregory, Small Heath (1924), had been formed and from which part had been transferred to St. Aidan's, Small Heath, in 1907, (fn. 6) was declared an ecclesiastical reorganization area in 1946. In 1949 the benefice was permanently united to that of St. Aidan, Small Heath, to form a new benefice to be called St. Aidan. (fn. 7) St. Aidan's originated as a mission of All Saints licensed in 1891 and the mission church of the Good Shepherd, opened in 1900, (fn. 8) was in 1916 consecrated as St. Gregory the Great.

24. ALL SAINTS, Stechford (Albert Rd.), was opened as an iron mission church of St. Edburgha's, Yardley, in 1877, (fn. 9) and was known as All Saints church from 1892; (fn. 10) a permanent building, of brick with terracotta facings in the Decorated style and consisting of chancel, nave, lady chapel, aisles and vestries, was dedicated in 1898 (fn. 11) and consecrated in 1932. (fn. 12) A Conventional District was attached to the church in 1905, (fn. 13) and in 1932 a parish was assigned out of St. Edburgha's, Yardley, when the living became a vicarage in the gift of the bishop and the Yardley Trustees alternately. (fn. 14) Stud Lane Mission Hall was licensed for public worship, 1934-8, St. Andrew's mission church from 1938. (fn. 15)

25. ALL SOULS, Witton (Wenlock Rd.), is a building of red brick with stone dressings in the Gothic style, designed by Philip Chatwin. It has a chancel, nave, east and west aisles, and a low central tower with a pyramidal roof. It was consecrated in 1907, (fn. 16) and for a time was served by the clergy of Holy Trinity, Birchfield. (fn. 17) In 1926 a parish was assigned out of Holy Trinity, Birchfield, and St. Peter and St. Paul, Aston; the living was declared a vicarage, in the gift of the Vicar of Holy Trinity, Birchfield, for the first turn only and then of the bishop. (fn. 18)

26. THE ASCENSION, Stirchley (Hazelwell St., Pershore Rd.), is a large rectangular building of red brick in the Decorated style, with a carved timber roof and south-east tower. It was designed by W. Hale and was consecrated as a chapel of ease to St. Mary, Moseley, in 1901. (fn. 19) A parish was assigned out of St. Nicolas's, King's Norton, and St. Mary's, Moseley, in 1912. (fn. 20) In 1913 the living became a vicarage, in the gift of the bishop; (fn. 21) in 1916 it passed into the gift of the Vicar of St. Nicolas's, King's Norton. (fn. 22) Part of the parish of St. Mary Magdalen, Hazelwell (1932), was formed from this parish. The Mission Church of St. Hugh, Bishop of Lincoln, Pineapple Grove, has been licensed for public worship since 1927. (fn. 23)

27. BISHOP LATIMER MEMORIAL CHURCH , Birmingham (Handsworth New Rd.), was built out of funds provided by an anonymous lady, and was consecrated in 1904. It was completely restored in 1938. Designed by W. H. Bidlake, it is a large, roughly rectangular building of red brick with stone dressings and buff brick interior, in the Gothic style. The chancel is surmounted by a flat-topped tower and has north and south chapels, and there are north and south aisles to the nave. A parish was assigned out of St. Chrysostom's, Birmingham, and St. Cuthbert's, Birmingham, in 1904, the living being a vicarage in the gift of the trustees of St. Martin's. (fn. 24) The church contains eight bells of 1776 by Robert Wells, which were formerly in St. John's, Deritend.

28. BISHOP RYDER MEMORIAL CHURCH, Birmingham (Gem St.), was a simple building of red brick and stone designed by Rickman and Hussey in the Gothic style, with a pinnacled tower containing eight bells of 1869 by Blews of Birmingham. It was built to commemorate Henry Ryder, Bishop of Lichfield (d. 1836), and was consecrated in 1838. (fn. 25) The chancel was rebuilt in 1894 by J. A. Chatwin. (fn. 26) The church was demolished in 1960. A parish was assigned out of St. Martin's in 1841, when the living, which has been in the gift of private trustees since 1838, (fn. 27) became a perpetual curacy. (fn. 28) The living became a vicarage in 1868. (fn. 29) In 1925 the parish and benefice of St. Mary, Birmingham, and in 1939 part of the parish and the benefice of St. Bartholomew, Birmingham, were united with those of Bishop Ryder. (fn. 30) Staniforth Street Mission was licensed for public worship, 1869-1907; the chapel in the Maternity Hospital has been licensed since 1922, and the chapel in the General Hospital (in the parish of St. Mary, Birmingham, until 1925) since 1921. (fn. 31)

29. CHRIST CHURCH, Birmingham (Colmore Row), was built by public subscription in 1805, on a site provided by W. P. Inge, and consecrated in 1813. The whole of the ground floor was used for free sittings, only the gallery being reserved, and for many years Christ Church was known as the 'Free Church'. (fn. 32) It was a stone building in the Classical style with a slightly projecting chancel and a west portico of three bays supported on Doric columns. The square west tower was surmounted by an octagonal belfry with Ionic pilasters and a balustraded parapet, above which was an octagonal spire. The church occupied a fine site in the angle between Ann Street (afterwards Colmore Row) and New Street; it was set high above street level and approached by a wide flight of steps. (fn. 33) The design has been attributed to William Hollins (fn. 34) but although he was awarded a premium in a competition held in 1804 the work was afterwards entrusted to Charles Norton, the Birmingham builder and surveyor. The tower, which had originally been designed with a cupola instead of a spire, was not completed until 1814. (fn. 35) A parish was assigned in 1865 from St. Martin's, Birmingham, and St. Philip's, Birmingham. (fn. 36) The prebend of Tachbrooke in Lichfield Cathedral was attached to the living, which was a perpetual curacy in 1813 and a vicarage from 1889. (fn. 37) It was in the gift of the Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, 1813-37, of the Bishop of Worcester, 1837-97. (fn. 38) The building and site were sold in 1897, and the proceeds of the sale used to found St. Agatha's, Sparkbrook; the church was demolished in 1899, and the parish merged with St. Philip's. (fn. 39) A mission in Fleet Street was licensed for several years up to 1890, and one in Pinfold Street was licensed from 1886. (fn. 40)

30. CHRIST CHURCH, The Quinton (Hagley Rd. West), a stone building in the Early English style, with chancel, nave and bell-turret, was built in 1841, and restored in 1890 and 1928. A parish was assigned from Halesowen parish in 1841. (fn. 41) The living, a perpetual curacy in 1841 and a rectory from 1866, was in the gift of the Rector of Halesowen until 1905; since then it has been in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 42) Part of the parish was taken to form part of the parish of St. Faith and St. Laurence, Harborne, in 1933. (fn. 43) St. Lawrence mission hall, Hagley Rd., was licensed for public worship, 1901- 37 (a new building was dedicated to St. Lawrence in 1909); Quinton Hall has been licensed since 1939, and Church Hall, Quinton Rd. West, since 1952. (fn. 44)

31. CHRIST CHURCH, Sparkbrook (Grantham Rd.), a stone building in the Gothic style consisting of chancel, nave, aisles and tower with spire, was consecrated in 1867. The spire was removed in 1918, and the tower was taken down after it had been damaged by blast in the Second World War. A parish was assigned out of St. Peter and St. Paul, Aston, in 1867. (fn. 45) The living, a perpetual curacy in 1867 and a titular vicarage from 1877, has been in the gift of the Aston Trustees since 1867. (fn. 46) Part of the parish of St. Agatha (1902) and the parish of Emmanuel (1928) were formed from this parish. The Diocesan Home for Girls has been licensed for public worship since 1927 (in the parish of St. Mary, Moseley, since 1951). (fn. 47)

32. CHRIST CHURCH, Summerfield (Summerfield Cres. and Gillot Rd.), was built as a memorial to George Lea, Perpetual Curate of St. George's, Edgbaston, 1864-83. It is a building of stone in the Perpendicular style, with apsidal chancel, nave, aisles and transepts, designed by J. A. Chatwin. It was consecrated in 1885, a parish being assigned from St. John's, Ladywood, in the same year. Part of the parish was transferred to St. Augustine's, Edgbaston, in 1906. (fn. 48) The living, a vicarage since 1885, was in the gift of the Vicar of St. John's, Ladywood, for the first turn, and then of the bishop until 1905, when the Rector of Birmingham became patron. (fn. 49) The City Road mission room, opened in 1896, was transferred to the parish of St. Augustine, Edgbaston, in 1906. Old School Hall, Coplow Street, has been licensed for public worship since 1908, and Cavendish Road Hall since 1914. (fn. 50)

33. CHRIST CHURCH, Ward End (Burney Lane), designed by H. W. Hobbiss, (fn. 51) is a brick building with stone dressings, a steeply-pitched tiled roof, small round-headed windows, and a broad western tower; it was consecrated in 1935 as a chapel of ease to St. Margaret's, Ward End. (fn. 52)

34. CHRIST CHURCH, Yardley Wood (School Rd.), was built and endowed by Miss Sarah Taylor of Moor Green, and was consecrated in 1849. Designed by A. E. Perkins, it is a cruciform building of stone, with a western turret and small spire, and contains some 17th-century panelling from a church destroyed in the war. A parish was assigned from St. Edburgha's, Yardley, and St. Nicolas's, King's Norton, in 1849. The living, a perpetual curacy, was in the gift of Miss Taylor and representatives of her family (fn. 53) until it was transferred to the patronage of the bishop in 1916; the living has been styled a vicarage since 1868. (fn. 54) Parts of the parish were taken to form parts of the parishes of St. Agnes, Moseley (1914), Holy Cross, Billesley Common (1937), and Immanuel, Highter's Heath (1938). (fn. 55) In 1952 parts of the parishes of Christ Church and Holy Cross were interchanged. St. Joseph's Mission Church, Alcester Lanes End, was licensed for public worship from 1920 until the Second World War; St. Mary the Virgin's, Billesley, 1923-6. (fn. 56)

35. EMMANUEL, Sparkbrook (Walford Rd.), was consecrated in 1901. It is a building of brick and stone in the Decorated style, consisting of chancel, chancel-aisle and nave. It was a chapel of ease to Christ Church, Sparkbrook, until it had a parish assigned out of Christ Church, Sparkbrook, in 1928. The living, a vicarage since 1929, is in the gift of the Aston Trustees. (fn. 57) The church contains an ancient blank bell from Ullenhall. (fn. 58)

[HALL GREEN CHAPEL, Hall Green (School Rd.); see no. 13, and V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 242, 244.]

36. HOLY CROSS, Billesley Common (Brigfield Rd. and Beauchamp Rd.), is a simple brick building containing a nave and passage aisles and having small pointed windows and a round window at the north end of the nave; provision was made in the design for a future chancel and transept. The church was consecrated in 1937 when a parish was assigned out of Christ Church, Yardley Wood, St. Agnes's, Cotteridge, and All Saints', King's Heath. The living was styled a vicarage and was in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 59)

37. HOLY TRINITY, Birchfield (Birchfield Rd.), was designed by J. A. Chatwin in the Early English style and consecrated in 1864. (fn. 60) It is of red stone with limestone dressings and consists of chancel, nave, aisles, and tower with spire. A parish was assigned out of St. Mary's, Handsworth, in 1865; the living, called a vicarage from 1866, was in the gift of the Rector of Handsworth until 1891 when the patronage passed to the bishop. (fn. 61) Part of the parish was taken to form the parish of All Souls, Witton (1926). There were mission rooms in Wilson Road (1887-94) and at the Finch Road School (1904-26). (fn. 62)

38. HOLY TRINITY, Bordesley (Camp Hill), a rectangular stone building in the Perpendicular style, with octagonal turrets at the angles, pinnacled buttresses along the sides, and a deeply-recessed west doorway under a tall arch, was consecrated in 1823; the design, by Francis Goodwin, (fn. 63) was said to have been modelled on King's College Chapel, Cambridge. A parish was assigned out of St. Peter and St. Paul, Aston, in 1864. (fn. 64) The living, a perpetual curacy in the gift of the Vicar of Aston, was called a vicarage from 1872; the patronage was transferred to the Aston Trustees in 1884. (fn. 65) The parishes of Christ Church, Sparkbrook (1867), St. Alban, Bordesley (1871), and All Saints, Small Heath (1875), were formed out of this parish, and part of it was transferred to the parish of St. Basil, Deritend, in 1896. (fn. 66) There were mission rooms licensed for public worship in Leopold Street (see no. 45), Cooksey Road (1875-1907), Miles Street (1908-39), Moseley Road and Highgate Place (1913-21, when transferred to St. Alban's), and Warwick Street (1928-36). (fn. 67) Richard William Enraght, vicar 1874-83, was an ardent ritualist who achieved some notoriety by suffering brief imprisonment for ignoring a monition from the Court of Arches. (fn. 68)

39. IMMANUEL, Birmingham (Broad St.), originated as a chapel licensed by the bishop and known as Magdalen Chapel, which was opened in 1839. (fn. 69) The new church of Immanuel, on the same site, was consecrated in 1865, and a parish was assigned to it out of St. Thomas's, Birmingham. The building was designed by E. Holmes; (fn. 70) it is in the Decorated style, the west front and small southwest spire being of stone and the rest of the church, which is not visible from the street, of brick. The living, a perpetual curacy until 1874 when it became a vicarage, is in the gift of the trustees of St. Martin's. (fn. 71) In 1939 the parish and in 1946 the benefice were united with those of St. Thomas, Birmingham, the united benefice being known as St. Thomas and Immanuel. (fn. 72)

[JOB MARSTON CHAPEL, Hall Green (School Rd.); see no. 13, and V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 242, 244.]

40. QUEEN'S COLLEGE CHAPEL, Birmingham (Paradise St.), was consecrated in 1844 as the chapel of ST. JAMES, (fn. 73) in the parish of St. Philip. It is a small rectangular building of brick designed by Drury and Bateman in the Decorated style, (fn. 74) abutting Swallow Street. It has not been used as a chapel since 1940, and in 1955 was being used as a warehouse for furniture. The college moved to Somerset Road, Edgbaston, in 1923, and a new chapel was built there, to designs by H. W. Hobbiss, in 1939-40; it was dedicated in 1947. (fn. 75)

41. ST. AGATHA, Sparkbrook (Stratford Rd.), was consecrated in 1901. It was built with funds raised from the sale of Christ Church, Birmingham. (fn. 76) Designed by W. H. Bidlake (fn. 77) in the Gothic style, it is of red and blue brick with stone dressings and buff brick interior. It has chancel and chapels, nave and aisles, and a tower which was severely damaged by bombing in 1940 but has since been restored. A parish was assigned to the church in 1902 out of Christ Church, Sparkbrook, and St. Paul's, Balsall Heath. (fn. 78) Under the Birmingham Churches Act, 1897, the benefice of Christ Church, Birmingham, was transferred to St. Agatha's, the vicarage remaining in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 79) The church hall has been licensed for public worship since 1959. (fn. 80)

42. ST. AGNES, Cotteridge (Pershore Rd.), is a large red brick building, cruciform in shape and Decorated in style, with aisles and a massive northwest tower. A church room at Cotteridge was licensed as a mission of St. Nicolas's, King's Norton, in 1898. (fn. 81) The new church was consecrated in 1903 as a chapel of ease to St. Nicolas's. (fn. 82) A parish was assigned out of St. Nicolas's, King's Norton, in 1916 when the living, in the gift of the Vicar of King's Norton, became a vicarage. (fn. 83) Part of the parish was taken to form part of the parish of Holy Cross, Billesley (1937).

43. ST. AGNES, Moseley (St. Agnes Rd.), a cruciform stone building designed by W. Davis in the early Decorated style, was consecrated in 1884 and enlarged in 1893; the pinnacled tower was completed in 1932. (fn. 84) A parish was assigned out of St. Mary's, Moseley, and Christ Church, Yardley Wood, in 1914. (fn. 85) It was a chapel of ease to St. Mary's until 1914, when the church became a vicarage in the gift of the Vicar of St. Mary's. (fn. 86) Part of the parish was taken to form part of St. Francis's, Bournville (1926).

44. ST. AIDAN, Small Heath (Herbert Rd.), originated as an iron church first licensed as a mission of All Saints, Small Heath, in 1891. (fn. 87) A permanent church designed by F. T. Proud and built of brick in the Perpendicular style, with chancel, two 'guild chapels', nave and aisles, was opened in 1894 and consecrated in 1896. (fn. 88) The font, an ancient one, came from St. Stephen's, Bristol. A parish was assigned out of All Saints, Small Heath, in 1897 (fn. 89) of which part was transferred back again in 1907. (fn. 90) In 1946 the parish, together with those of All Saints, Small Heath, St. Gregory, Small Heath, and St. Oswald, Small Heath, was declared part of an ecclesiastical reorganization area. (fn. 91) The living, a perpetual curacy in 1896, became a vicarage in 1905, in the gift of public trustees. (fn. 92) In 1949 the benefices of St. Aidan and All Saints were united to form the new benefice of St. Aidan. (fn. 93) A mission church in Arthur Street and Dixon Road has been licensed for public worship since 1902. (fn. 94)

45. ST. ALBAN THE MARTYR, Bordesley (Conybere St.), originated as a building in Leopold Street, which was licensed as a mission of Holy Trinity, Bordesley, in 1865. (fn. 95) It was known as St. Alban's from 1871, when a parish was assigned out of Holy Trinity, Bordesley, and an incumbent instituted, the living being in the gift of Keble College, Oxford. (fn. 96) A new church of stone and brick, designed by J. L. Pearson in the 13th-century style, with stone-vaulted roofs, apsidal chancel, clerestoried nave, aisles, transepts and north and south chapels, was opened under licence in Conybere Street in 1881, and consecrated in 1899. (fn. 97) It is considered a very fine example of Pearson's work. (fn. 98) A tower was added in 1938. (fn. 99) The living became a vicarage in 1898. (fn. 1) Part of the parish was taken to form part of the parish of St. Patrick, Bordesley (1900). St. Patrick's School chapel was licensed as a mission in 1873; this mission later became St. Patrick's church, Bordesley. Other missions were licensed for public worship at St. Columba's School, Dymoke St. (1908-13), St. Katherine's mission room, Stanhope St. (1908-25), and St. Alban's mission house, Moseley Road and Highgate Place (since 1921, when it was transferred from Holy Trinity, Bordesley). (fn. 2)

[ST. AMBROSE, see ST. MARY AND ST. AMBROSE, no. 98.]

46. ST. ANDREW, Bordesley (St. Andrew's Rd.), the fifth and last of the churches built by the Birmingham Church Building Society (the Ten Churches Fund), was designed by R. C. Carpenter in the Decorated style and was consecrated in 1846. (fn. 3) It was of red sandstone and comprised chancel, nave, north aisle and tower with spire. The structure was seriously damaged by storm in 1894; the spire was removed and the church restored in 1901. (fn. 4) A parish was assigned out of St. Peter and St. Paul, Aston, in 1846. (fn. 5) The living, which became a vicarage in 1889, is in the gift of the bishop and public trustees alternately. (fn. 6) Part of the parish was transferred to St. Basil's, Deritend, in 1896, and part was taken to form the parish of St. Oswald, Small Heath (1889). In 1907 the parish was enlarged by part of St. Saviour's, Saltley. (fn. 7) An iron chapel licensed for public worship was later consecrated as St. Oswald's, Small Heath. St. Giles's mission church, Green Lane, has been licensed since 1905; St. Matthew's mission church, Garrison St. (formerly a mission of St. Saviour's, Saltley), in Garland Street until 1925, was transferred to St. Andrew's parish in 1907, and was closed during the Second World War. (fn. 8) During the last decade of the 19th century this church's property and morale seem to have been in poor condition. (fn. 9)

47. ST. ANDREW, Handsworth (Oxhill Rd.), originated as the mission church of the Good Shepherd, opened in a temporary building in 1894 as a mission church of St. Mary's, Handsworth. A permanent church was built in 1908, dedicated to St. Andrew in 1910, and consecrated in 1914. (fn. 10) It is built of red and blue brick with stone facings in the Decorated style and consists of nave, chancel, west chapel, east organ chamber and a small central spire. A parish was assigned from St. Mary's, Handsworth, and St. James's, Handsworth, in 1914, when the living, a vicarage, was in the gift of the Rector of Handsworth for the first turn, then of the bishop. (fn. 11)

48. ST. ANNE, Duddeston (Cato St.), a red brick building designed by J. G. Dunn in the Gothic style and consisting of chancel, nave, aisles and bellcot, was consecrated in 1869. (fn. 12) Three of the four bells, dated 1650, 1638 and 1740, were brought from St. Mary's, Moseley, in 1874. (fn. 13) In 1869 a parish was assigned out of St. Matthew's, Duddeston, the living, which became a vicarage in 1874, being in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 14) The church was closed in 1951, and the benefice was united with that of St. Matthew, Duddeston. (fn. 15) A mission room in Great Francis Street was licensed for public worship from 1908 to 1926. (fn. 16)

49. ST. ANNE, Moseley (Park Hill), a stone building designed by F. Preedy and consisting of chancel, nave and tower with spire containing four bells, was consecrated in 1874. A parish was assigned out of St. Mary's, Moseley, in 1875, the living, a vicarage, being in the gift of the Vicar of St. Mary's. (fn. 17)

50. ST. ASAPH, Birmingham (Great Colmore St. and Latimer St.), designed in the Gothic style by Y. Thomason, (fn. 18) was consecrated in 1868. (fn. 19) It is wedge-shaped in plan, to fit the junction of the roads between which it stands; it is of brick and has chancel, nave and aisles. A parish was assigned out of St. Thomas's, Birmingham, in 1869. (fn. 20) The living, a perpetual curacy until declared a vicarage in 1874, was in the gift of public trustees. (fn. 21) The church was closed in 1949 and put in the charge of the Vicar of St. Luke's, Birmingham. (fn. 22) In 1893 a large mission room was reported to be well attended. (fn. 23)

51. ST. AUGUSTINE, Edgbaston (St. Augustine's Rd., Hagley Rd.), a stone building in the late13th-century style designed by J. A. Chatwin and consisting of apsidal chancel, nave, aisles, and north transept, was consecrated in 1868, as a chapel of ease to St. Bartholomew's, Edgbaston. (fn. 24) A tall south tower with a spire was added in 1876. A parish was assigned out of St. Bartholomew's in 1889, the living, a vicarage, being in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 25) Part of the parish was transferred to St. John's, Harborne, in 1906, (fn. 26) and part was taken to form the parish of St. Germain, Edgbaston (1920). The City Road mission room, licensed for public worship from 1896, and transferred from the parish of Christ Church, Summerfield, in 1906, was later consecrated as St. Germain's, Edgbaston. There were other licensed missions at Sandon Road, 1891- 1908, at the Magdalen Home chapel, 1903-18, and at 315, Hagley Road, 1909-13. (fn. 27)

52. ST. BARNABAS, Balsall Heath (Ladypool Rd. and Clifton Rd.), a brick and tile building designed by F. T. Proud in the Gothic style, with chancel, lady chapel, aisle and baptistery, was opened in 1890, as a mission church of St. Paul's, Balsall Heath, enlarged in 1894, and consecrated in 1904. (fn. 28) A parish was assigned out of St. Paul's in 1905, the benefice becoming a vicarage in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 29) St. Luke's mission church was licensed for public worship, 1908-26. (fn. 30)

53. ST. BARNABAS, Birmingham (Ryland St.), a stone building in the Gothic style designed by W. Bourne of Dudley, a simple rectangle in shape with a north-east turret, was consecrated in 1860. (fn. 31) A parish was assigned out of St. Martin's, Birmingham, in 1861. (fn. 32) The living, a perpetual curacy until 1868 when it became a vicarage, is in the gift of the Rectors of St. Martin's, St. George's, Birmingham, St. Thomas's (now St. Thomas and Immanuel), Birmingham, and All Saints', Birmingham (until 1897 the incumbent of Christ Church, Birmingham, was also one of the patrons). (fn. 33) The parish was enlarged in 1901 by part (formerly part of the parish of Christ Church, Birmingham) of St. Philip's, Birmingham. (fn. 34) A mission room in Grosvenor Street West was licensed for public worship, 1908-20. (fn. 35)

54. ST. BARNABAS, Erdington (High St.), is a stone building designed by Rickman (fn. 36) in the Decorated style consisting of chancel, nave, transepts, and tower containing eight bells cast in 1904 by Taylors of Loughborough. It was consecrated in 1824, on a site given by Earl Howe, as a chapel of ease to St. Peter and St. Paul's, Aston, (fn. 37) and was enlarged in 1883. (fn. 38) A parish was assigned out of St. Peter and St. Paul's in 1858, the patronage of the perpetual curacy being vested in the Vicar of St. Peter and St. Paul's. (fn. 39) The living became a vicarage in 1868. (fn. 40) The advowson subsequently passed to the Aston Trustees. (fn. 41) Parts of the parish were taken to form part of the parish of All Saints, Gravelly Hill (1929), and the parish of St. Mary, Pype Hayes (1930). A considerable number of places have been licensed for public worship as missions of this church: All Saints' mission room, from 1901 (see no. 20); Aston Union Workhouse chapel (called Erdington Homes Chapel from 1922), 1906-39; Stockland Green mission room, from 1908 (see no. 91); St. Margaret's mission church, Somerset Rd., since 1909; St. Ethelreda's Mission, 1910-30; Congreaves Lodge Retreat, Kingsbury Rd., 1914-19; St. Chad's mission church, Stoneyhurst Rd. (in Charles St. until 1926), since 1914; Jaffray Hospital, since 1921; Highcroft Hall Mental Hospital, since 1950. (fn. 42)

55. ST. BARTHOLOMEW, Allen's Cross (Hogg's Lane and Allen's Farm Rd.), a red brick building, designed by S. N. Cooke, with roundheaded windows and a north-east tower, was consecrated in 1938. (fn. 43) A parish was assigned out of St. Laurence's, Northfield, and St. Chad's, Rubery, at the same date, the living being a vicarage in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 44)

[ST. BARTHOLOMEW, Birmingham (Masshouse Lane); see no. 1.]

[ST. BARTHOLOMEW, Edgbaston (Church Rd.); see no. 2.]

56. ST. BASIL, Deritend (Heath Mill Lane), originated as a temporary church opened in 1886. A parish was then assigned to it out of St. Peter and St. Paul's, Aston, but it was not consecrated. (fn. 45) The parish was enlarged by parts of Holy Trinity, Bordesley, and St. Andrew's, Bordesley, in 1896. (fn. 46) A new church, designed by A. S. Dixon, was consecrated in 1911: (fn. 47) it is a low rectangular building of red brick with a north-west bellcot, in the Byzantine style. The benefice, a perpetual curacy from 1904, and a vicarage from 1907, was in the gift of the bishop; in 1939 it was joined with that of St. John, Deritend, to form the united benefice of St. John and St. Basil, and the two parishes were merged. (fn. 48) The temporary church in Heath Mill Lane seems to have continued to be licensed for public worship until 1926. (fn. 49)

57. ST. BENEDICT, Bordesley (Hob Moor Rd.), began as a temporary iron church in Holman Road opened in 1898 as a mission church of St. Oswald's, Bordesley. (fn. 50) This iron church was replaced in 1905 by the present building, designed by Nicol & Nicol, of red brick in the Romanesque style, with apsidal chancel, side chapel, nave, north and south aisles and a west bellcot. The new church was consecrated in 1910, (fn. 51) and a parish was assigned out of St. Oswald's in the same year. (fn. 52) The patronage of the living, a vicarage since 1910, passed in 1923 from public trustees to Keble College, Oxford. (fn. 53)

58. ST. BONIFACE, The Quinton (Quinton Rd. West), designed by Bromilow, While, and Smeaton, is built of brick with a steeply-pitched roof and low eaves. A clerestory is provided by dormer windows and there is an octagonal bellturret surmounted by louvred gables. A parish was assigned out of Christ Church, The Quinton, in 1958, and the new church was consecrated in 1959. (fn. 54) The living is a perpetual curacy in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 55)

59. ST. CATHERINE, Nechells (Scholefield St.), a building designed by Osborn and Reading in the Perpendicular style and consisting of nave, aisles and transepts, was consecrated in 1878. (fn. 56) A parish was assigned out of St. Clement's, Nechells, in 1879. (fn. 57) The living, a vicarage, was in the gift of the Aston Trustees. (fn. 58) The church was closed in 1945, the benefice was united in 1951 with that of St. Matthew, Duddeston, (fn. 59) and the church was demolished. A mission room in Cranbury Street was licensed for public worship, 1908-26. (fn. 60)

60. ST. CHRISTOPHER, Springfield (Springfield Rd.), designed by Arthur Harrison in the Decorated style and built of brick with stone dressings, consists of nave, side chapel, baptistery and organ chamber. It was consecrated in 1907, (fn. 61) as a chapel of ease to St. John's, Sparkhill. A parish was assigned out of St. John's in 1911, the living becoming a vicarage in the gift of public trustees. (fn. 62)

61. ST. CHRYSOSTOM, Birmingham (Park Rd.), was opened in 1888 as a mission church of All Saints, Birmingham, and consecrated in 1889. (fn. 63) It is a building of brick with stone facings, designed by John Cotton in the Early English style (fn. 64) and consists of chancel, nave, aisles, transepts, north porch and unfinished tower. A parish was assigned out of All Saints in 1890. (fn. 65) The living, in the gift of the patrons of St. Martin's, became a vicarage in 1900. (fn. 66) Part of the parish was taken to form part of the parish of Bishop Latimer, Birmingham (1904).

62. ST. CLEMENT, Nechells (Nechells Park Rd.), a cruciform building of brick and stone designed by J. A. Chatwin in the Gothic style and consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, transepts, and a turret at the south-east angle of the nave, was consecrated in 1859. (fn. 67) A parish was assigned out of St. Matthew's, Duddeston, in 1860. (fn. 68) The living, a perpetual curacy from 1860 and a vicarage from 1868, is in the gift of the incumbent of St. Matthew's. (fn. 69) Part of the parish was taken to form the parish of St. Catherine, Nechells (1879). A number of missions have been established from St. Clement's: Scholefield Street schoolroom was licensed for public worship, 1866-1907; High Park Street schools, 1908-9; St. Clement's East mission room, Mount St., 1908-26; and St. Clement's South mission room, Long Acre, 1908-26. (fn. 70) St. Clement's North mission church, Cuckoo Rd. (formerly the Cuckoo Road Methodist Chapel), (fn. 71) and St. Clement's South mission hall, High Park St. and Thimble Mill Lane, were each licensed for public worship, 1908-52. (fn. 72)

63. ST. CUTHBERT, Birmingham (Cuthbert Rd. and Winson Green Rd.), began as a mission of All Saints, Birmingham, licensed for public worship from 1863. (fn. 73) In 1872 a new church was consecrated: (fn. 74) it is a building of stone and brick in the Decorated style consisting of apsidal chancel, nave, aisles, vestry, and north-east tower, designed by Bateman and Corser. A parish was assigned out of All Saints' in 1872, (fn. 75) the living, a perpetual curacy which became a vicarage in 1876, being in the gift of the trustees of St. Martin's. (fn. 76) Part of the parish was taken to form part of the parish of Bishop Latimer, Birmingham (1904).

64. ST. CYPRIAN, Hay Mills (The Fordrough, off the Coventry Rd.), originated in the schoolroom (now disused) next to the existing church, which was licensed as a mission of St. Edburgha's, Yardley, from 1864. (fn. 77) The church was erected and endowed in 1873 by J. Horsfall, who owned the near-by mill and had built the school. The church is a building of multi-coloured brick with stone dressings in the Gothic style, with chancel, nave, aisles, vestry and a south-west tower with spire; the architects were Martin and Chamberlain. It was consecrated in 1878, after a parish had been assigned in the same year out of St. Edburgha's. (fn. 78) The parish was enlarged in 1948 by further parts of St. Edburgha's. (fn. 79) The living, a vicarage since 1880, is in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 80) St. Chad's mission, South Yardley, has been licensed for public worship since 1908. (fn. 81)

65. ST. DAVID, Birmingham (Bissell St.), a red brick building with stone facings designed by a Mr. Martin in the Gothic style, consists of chancel, nave, transepts and tower with spire. It was consecrated in 1865 on a site given by John Nicholls. (fn. 82) A parish was assigned out of St. Luke's, Birmingham, in 1866. (fn. 83) The living has been a vicarage since 1868, in the gift of public trustees. (fn. 84) The church was closed in 1947 and put in the charge of the Vicar of St. Luke's. (fn. 85)

[ST. EDBURGHA, Yardley (Church Rd.); see no. 14, and V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 241-4.]

66. ST. EDMUND, Tyseley (Reddings Lane), originated as a mission church in 1895. In 1913 a new iron church was dedicated to St. Edmund as a mission of St. John's, Sparkhill. (fn. 86) This second iron church, which survives as a church hall, was consecrated in 1932, (fn. 87) and was replaced in 1940 by a new church, (fn. 88) a rectangular building of red brick designed by H. W. Hobbiss (fn. 89) with a pantiled roof, round-headed openings, and a large north-west tower. A parish was assigned out of St. John's, Sparkhill, St. Mary's, Acock's Green, and St. Christopher's, Sparkhill, in 1931. (fn. 90) The living was a perpetual curacy in 1931 and a vicarage in 1940, in the gift of the Crown. (fn. 91)

67. ST. EDWARD, Birmingham (New John St. West), a brick building with apsidal chancel, nave, vestries and porch, was built about 1853 as a Presbyterian church. (fn. 92) In 1896 it was bought and presented to the Church of England and was licensed as a mission of St. Stephen's, Birmingham. It was consecrated as an Anglican church in 1898. (fn. 93) A parish was assigned out of St. Stephen's, Birmingham, and St. Matthias's, Birmingham, in 1899; (fn. 94) the living was a vicarage in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 95) The benefice was united with that of St. Nicolas, Birmingham, in 1942 and in 1949 the parish was merged with that of St. George, Birmingham. (fn. 96) St. Edward's church was subsequently closed but was reopened as St. George's church in 1959. A mission hall in Theodore Street was licensed for public worship, 1914-26. (fn. 97)

68. ST. FAITH AND ST. LAURENCE, Harborne (Balden Rd.), originated as a mission room, known as St. Faith's, in Balden Road. From 1906 it was licensed as a mission of St. Peter's, Harborne. (fn. 98) A new church, of plain brick in a simplified Romanesque style with narrow round-headed windows and comprising nave, aisles and low southwest tower with pyramidal roof, was consecrated in 1937. (fn. 99) A parish had been assigned out of St. Peter's, Harborne, and Christ Church, The Quinton, in 1933. (fn. 1) The living, a perpetual curacy in the gift of the Crown and the bishop alternately in 1933, passed into the patronage of the bishop alone in 1935, and became a vicarage in 1949. (fn. 2)

69. ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI, Bournville (Linden Rd.), is a red brick building designed by W. A. Harvey of Birmingham (fn. 3) in the Romanesque style and comprising chancel, nave and baptistery. In 1913 a hall here was dedicated as a mission of St. Mary's, Selly Oak. (fn. 4) A Conventional District was attached to it in 1915, (fn. 5) and in 1926 a parish was assigned out of St. Mary's, Selly Oak, St. Nicolas's, King's Norton, St. Laurence's, Northfield, and St. Agnes's, Moseley. (fn. 6) The present church was consecrated in 1925; (fn. 7) the living has been a vicarage in the gift of the bishop since 1925. (fn. 8) The parish was enlarged in 1933 by the addition of further parts of St. Mary's and St. Laurence's. (fn. 9) A mission room at Woodland Park was transferred from St. Laurence's to St. Francis's in 1929, and remained in use until the Second World War. (fn. 10)

70. ST. GABRIEL, Birmingham (Pickford St. and Barn St.), a building of stone and brick designed in the Early English style by J. A. Chatwin, comprising chancel, nave, aisles, and small tower with spire, was consecrated in 1869. (fn. 11) A parish was assigned out of St. Martin's, Birmingham, and St. Bartholomew's, Birmingham, in 1869, (fn. 12) and enlarged by a further part of St. Bartholomew's in 1939. (fn. 13) The living, a perpetual curacy in 1869, became a vicarage in 1885; it was in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 14) The church, which was badly damaged during the Second World War, was closed in 1945, and was put in the charge of the incumbent of St. John and St. Basil, Deritend. (fn. 15)

71. ST. GABRIEL, Weoley Castle (Shenley Lane), a plain rectangular building of brownish brick with round-headed windows and comprising nave, chapel, chancel, organ gallery and vestries, was consecrated in 1934. (fn. 16) A parish was assigned out of St. Laurence's, Northfield, and St. Mary's, Selly Oak, in 1933. (fn. 17) The living, a vicarage since 1934, was in the gift of the Crown for the first turn, and then of the bishop. (fn. 18)

72. ST. GEORGE, Birmingham (Great Hampton Row and Tower St.), was consecrated in 1822 (fn. 19) and consisted of chancel, nave, aisles, organ chamber, vestry and western embattled tower. It was the first of the Gothic 'Commissioners' churches' designed by Thomas Rickman to be built in Birmingham and its style was described as 'late Middle Pointed'. Although built of stone the cost of the church was considered remarkably low; here, as elsewhere, Rickman used cast-iron tracery for the windows. (fn. 20) The church was enlarged in 1884. (fn. 21) It was demolished in 1960. A parish was assigned out of St. Martin's, Birmingham, in 1830, when a rectory was established in the gift of the patrons of St. Martin's. (fn. 22) Parts of the parish were taken to form the parishes of St. Stephen, Birmingham (1844), and St. Matthias, Birmingham (1856). In 1949 the parish was enlarged by the addition of the parishes of St. Nicolas, Birmingham, St. Edward, Birmingham, and St. Matthias, Birmingham, and in 1950 by part of the parish of St. Stephen. The benefices of St. Matthias and St. Nicolas with St. Edward were joined with the benefice of St. George to form the united benefice of St. George in 1949. (fn. 23) The following places in the parish were licensed for public worship: New Summer Street schoolroom, 1867-90; Smith Street mission hall, 1867-1926; William Street mission hall, 1890-1926. (fn. 24)

73. ST. GEORGE, Edgbaston (Calthorpe Rd.), was built by George Gough-Calthorpe, Lord Calthorpe, in 1838. It is a stone building in the Early English style comprising chancel (added in 1856), nave and aisles, designed by C. Edge. Further enlargements were made in 1885 to the designs of J. A. Chatwin. A parish was assigned out of St. Bartholomew's, Edgbaston, in 1852. (fn. 25) The patronage of the living, a perpetual curacy in 1838 and a vicarage since 1885, was vested in Lord Calthorpe and his heirs, and in 1960 was held by Brig. Sir R. Anstruther-Gough-Calthorpe, Bt. (fn. 26) A mission room in Parker Street was licensed for public worship, 1904-14; St. Michael's Mission, Waterworks Rd. (known as St. George's Institute until 1938), has been licensed since 1915, the chapel of the Children's Hospital, Ladywood Rd., since 1925. (fn. 27)

74. ST. GERMAIN, Edgbaston (City Rd. and Portland Rd.), originated as an iron mission church in the parish of Christ Church, Summerfield, first licensed in 1896 and known as the City Road mission room. It was enlarged in 1899. From 1906 it was in the parish of St. Augustine, Edgbaston, and from 1907 was known as St. Germain's. (fn. 28) In 1956 the iron church was being used as a church hall. A new church built next to it was consecrated in 1917, (fn. 29) a red brick building designed by E. F. Reynolds of Birmingham (fn. 30) in the Byzantine style and consisting of nave and aisles with semi-circular east end enclosing an ambulatory. A parish was assigned out of St. Augustine's in 1920, when the living became a vicarage in the gift of public trustees. (fn. 31)

[ST. GILES, Sheldon (Church Rd.); see no. 15, and V.C.H. Warws. iv. 203-5.]

75. ST. GREGORY THE GREAT, Small Heath (Coventry Rd. and Oldknow Rd.), originated as an iron church known as the church of the Good Shepherd and opened in 1900 as a mission of All Saints', Small Heath. (fn. 32) This iron church was being used as a parish hall in 1956. Beside it a permanent church was begun in 1902, dedicated to St. Gregory the Great in 1912, (fn. 33) and consecrated in 1916. It is a tall, red brick building in the Byzantine style with north and south aisles. In 1916 a Conventional District was attached to it (fn. 34) and in 1924 a parish was assigned out of All Saints', Small Heath, and St. Oswald's, Bordesley. The living then became a vicarage in the gift of the bishop, the Vicar of All Saints' presenting for the first turn only. (fn. 35) The parish was declared part of an ecclesiastical reorganization area in 1946. (fn. 36)

76. ST. JAMES, Aston (Frederick Rd.), originated as a mission church of St. Peter and St. Paul's, Aston, in 1891. (fn. 37) In 1906 a new church, of white brick with stone and red brick dressings in the Gothic style and comprising nave, aisles, chancel and vestry, was consecrated and a parish was assigned out of St. Peter and St. Paul's. (fn. 38) The living, a vicarage since 1907, is in the gift of the Vicar of St. Peter and St. Paul's. (fn. 39) St. James's mission room in Tower Road was licensed for public worship from 1908 to 1937. (fn. 40)

[ST. JAMES, Birmingham; see QUEEN'S COLLEGE CHAPEL, no. 40.]

77. ST. JAMES, Edgbaston (Charlotte Rd. and Packenham Rd.), was built by Frederick GoughCalthorpe, Lord Calthorpe, in 1852. It was designed by S. S. Teulon and is a cruciform building of stone in the French Gothic style, and standing on rising ground it is a prominent feature of the district. In 1852 a parish was assigned out of St. Bartholomew's, Edgbaston. The living was a perpetual curacy until 1885 and thereafter a vicarage, being in the gift of Lord Calthorpe and his heirs. (fn. 41) The patron in 1960 was Brig. Sir R. Anstruther-Gough-Calthorpe, Bt. (fn. 42)

78. ST. JAMES, Handsworth (Crocketts Rd. and St. James's Rd.), was erected 1838-40 on a site given by John Crockett of the New Inn (fn. 43) and was greatly enlarged in 1895. The original church, designed by R. Ebbles, was of stone in the Early English style with a low-pitched roof and consisted of nave and embattled western tower. It was restored in 1878 when a chancel was added. In 1895 a new nave was built south of, but taking in part of, the original nave. The new building, designed by J. A. Chatwin, included a south aisle and chancel, so that the church then consisted of chancel, nave, south aisle, north aisle (the original nave), north chapel (the original chancel), and north-west (originally western) tower. (fn. 44) The additions of 1895 contrast with and dominate the original church: they are of red brick in the Decorated style, the nave has a semi-circular west end projecting beyond the west end of the tower, and the steeply-pitched roof of the new nave is slightly higher than the tower's battlements. A parish was assigned out of St. Mary's, Handsworth, in 1854. (fn. 45) The living was a perpetual curacy until 1868, and thereafter a vicarage, in the gift of the Rector of St. Mary's until 1891 when the patronage passed to the bishop. (fn. 46) Parts of the parish were taken to form parts of the parishes of St. Peter, Handsworth (1907), and St. Andrew, Handsworth (1914). There were missions licensed for public worship at the Boulton Road Board School, 1899-1903, Grove Lane Council School, 1904-6, and the church room, Crocketts Rd., 1908-38. The Archbishop Benson Church Hall, Austin Rd., has been licensed for public worship since 1938. (fn. 47)

[ST. JAMES THE LESS, Ashted (Barrack St. and Great Brook St.); see no. 3.]

[ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST, Deritend (Deritend High St.); see no. 4.]

79. ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST, Harborne (St. John's Rd.), consecrated in 1858, (fn. 48) was a brick building in the Early English style comprising chancel, nave, aisles and a tower with spire. The architect was Y. Thomason. A parish was assigned out of St. Peter's, Harborne, in 1859, and enlarged by part of St. Augustine's, Edgbaston, in 1906. (fn. 49) The living was a perpetual curacy until 1868 when it became a vicarage; (fn. 50) it was in the gift of the Vicar of St. Peter's for the first turn only, and then of the Revd. Thomas Smith (the incumbent). (fn. 51) The executors of Thomas Smith were said to be the patrons in 1894, and the Church Association Trust in 1912. (fn. 52) The Church Society Trust held the patronage in 1960. (fn. 53) A Toc H in Wentworth Park Avenue was licensed for public worship from 1929 to 1930 (fn. 54) and Moor Pool Hall from 1959. (fn. 55) St. John's church itself was destroyed by enemy action in 1941. (fn. 56) In 1960 a new church was consecrated on the site of the church hall (formerly the church school) in High Street. It is a brick building designed by E. M. Marriner (fn. 57) in a simple mid-20th-century style. Internally the nave and chancel are undivided and there are shallow transepts and a gallery. A new church hall stands to the west.

80. ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST, Longbridge (Longbridge Lane and Turves Green), designed by Bromilow, While, and Smeaton, is built of brick and consists of a nave and flanking aisles, not divided by piers, and a chancel with a tower to one side of it. A window which occupies the whole of the gableend above the main entrance is divided by prominent mullions bearing carved wooden figures. A vestibule to the west connects the building to a church hall. The church was consecrated in 1957 and a parish was assigned out of St. Nicolas, King's Norton, in the same year. (fn. 58) The living is a perpetual curacy in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 59)

81. ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST, Ladywood (Monument Rd. and Wood Rd.), consecrated in 1854, was originally a small building of stone in the early Decorated style designed by S. S. Teulon. In 1881 a chancel, aisles and double transepts, designed by J. A. Chatwin in the same style and material, were added. A parish was assigned out of St. Martin's, Birmingham, in 1854. The living, a perpetual curacy until 1869 and thereafter a vicarage, was in the gift of the Rector of St. Martin's. (fn. 60) Parts of the parish were taken to form the parishes of St. Margaret, Ladywood (1876), and Christ Church, Summerfield (1885). Missions licensed for public worship were at Coplow Street, 1868-93, Johnstone Street, 1872-93, and 24, Freeth Street, 1908-26. (fn. 61)

82. ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST, Perry Barr (Church Rd.), a building of stone in the Gothic style consisting of chancel, nave and tower with eight bells, was consecrated in 1833. (fn. 62) A parish was assigned out of St. Mary's, Handsworth, in 1862. (fn. 63) The living was described as a perpetual curacy in 1856, in the gift of Lord Calthorpe, and as a vicarage in 1869. The advowson was held by various members of the Calthorpe family, and in 1960 by Peter Gough-Calthorpe, Lord Calthorpe. (fn. 64) Parts of the parish were taken to form part of the parish of St. Paul, Hamstead (1894), and the parishes of St. Luke, Kingstanding (1933), and St. Matthew, Perry Beeches (1949); parts were transferred in 1948 to St. Luke's, Kingstanding, and St. Michael's, Boldmere. (fn. 65) The following missions were licensed for public worship: Christ Church, Perry Barr, 1866-1926, erected 1862, enlarged 1877; (fn. 66) All Saints', Oscott, 1893-1952, first used in 1886 and transferred to St. Luke's, Kingstanding, in 1948 (a Conventional District was attached to this mission until 1952, when its place was taken by St. Mark's, Kingstanding); (fn. 67) St. Mary Magdalen, Witton, 1900- 26, first used in 1888; (fn. 68) School Room, New Oscott Rd., 1925-6. (fn. 69)

83. ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST, Sparkhill (Stratford Rd.), a building of red brick with terracotta and stone dressings designed by Martin and Chamberlain in the Early English style, comprising chancel, nave, transepts, vestry, and tower containing seven bells, was consecrated in 1889 and enlarged in 1895. (fn. 70) A parish was assigned out of St. Edburgha's, Yardley, in 1894, when the living became a vicarage, in the gift of public trustees. (fn. 71) Parts of the parish were taken to form the parish of St. Christopher, Springfield (1911), and part of the parish of St. Edmund, Tyseley (1931); and part was exchanged with part of the parish of Hall Green in 1907. (fn. 72) St. John's school was licensed for public worship, 1908-26, the Taylor Memorial Home chapel, 1913-26, and St. John's mission room from 1928 until the Second World War; St. Edmund's mission church, Tyseley, licensed from 1913, was consecrated in 1932 (see no. 66); St. Bede's mission church, Greet, has been licensed since 1907, and the chapel of the Women's Hospital since 1914. (fn. 73)

[ST. JOHN AND ST. BASIL, Deritend (Heath Mill Lane), is a united benefice formed in 1939 by the union of the benefices of St. John, Deritend, and St. Basil, Deritend.]

84. ST. JUDE, Birmingham (Hill St.), a building of brick in the Early English style designed by Orford and Nash, and consisting of chancel, nave and aisles, was begun in 1847. (fn. 74) A parish had been assigned out of St. Martin's, Birmingham, and St. Philip's, Birmingham, in 1845. (fn. 75) Services were held in the national school in Pinfold Street until the church was ready; it was consecrated in 1851. (fn. 76) From 1845 the living was a perpetual curacy; it became a vicarage in 1868, and is in the gift of the Crown and the bishop alternately. (fn. 77) The parish was enlarged by a further part of St. Martin's in 1885. (fn. 78) St. Jude's mission hall, Inge St., was licensed for public worship, 1888-1907. (fn. 79)

[ST. LAURENCE, Northfield (Church Rd.); see no. 16, and V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 199-200.]

85. ST. LAWRENCE, Birmingham (Dartmouth St.), a building of red brick with stone facings in the Gothic style designed by J. A. Chatwin, and consisting of chancel, nave, aisles and tower, was erected with the help of a grant of £10,000 made by Miss Louisa Ann Ryland in 1867. It was consecrated in 1868, when a parish was assigned out of St. Matthew's, Duddeston, the living being a vicarage in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 80) There were alterations to the fabric in 1894 and 1895. (fn. 81) The church was closed in 1951, and the benefice united with that of St. Matthew, Duddeston. (fn. 82)

86. ST. LUKE, Birmingham (Bristol St.), the third of the churches built by the Birmingham Church Building Society, was consecrated in 1842. (fn. 83) The first building, designed by H. Eginton in the Norman style, was condemned as unsafe, and demolished in 1899. A new church built in brick and stone, designed by Edward Mansell of Birmingham (fn. 84) in the Norman style and comprising chancel, nave, aisles and south-west tower, was consecrated on the same site in 1903. (fn. 85) A parish was assigned out of St. Martin's, Birmingham, in 1843; (fn. 86) part of it was taken to form the parish of St. David, Birmingham (1866). The living, a perpetual curacy until 1868 when it became a vicarage, is in the gift of public trustees. (fn. 87) St. Luke's mission house in Bromsgrove Street was licensed for public worship, 1902-22. In 1902 Sunday services were held in 'a combined music hall, toffee factory and skating rink'. (fn. 88)

87. ST. LUKE, Kingstanding (Caversham Rd.), designed by P. J. Hunt, is a rectangular building of brown brick in a modern Italianate style with a semi-circular west end and having roundheaded windows and a small north-west tower with a pyramidal roof. It was consecrated in 1937. (fn. 89) A parish was assigned out of St. John's, Perry Barr, in 1933. (fn. 90) Part of St. Luke's (outside the city boundary) was transferred to St. Michael's, Boldmere, and part of St. John's, Perry Barr, to St. Luke's, in 1948. (fn. 91) The living, a perpetual curacy from 1933 and a vicarage from 1939, is in the gift of the Crown and the bishop alternately. (fn. 92) All Saints' mission church, Oscott, was transferred to St. Luke's in 1948 from St. John's, Perry Barr.

88. ST. MARGARET OF ANTIOCH, Ladywood (Ledsam St. and Alston St.), consecrated in 1875, (fn. 93) is of red brick in the Early English style, comprising apsidal chancel, nave, aisles, baptistery, and western porch with an organ gallery over it. The architects were Osborn and Reading. A parish was assigned out of St. John's, Ladywood, in 1876, the living being a perpetual curacy in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 94) The living became a vicarage in 1890. (fn. 95)

[ST. MARGARET, Ward End (St. Margaret's Rd. and Church Walk); see no. 5.]

89. ST. MARK, Birmingham (King Edward's Rd.), a stone building in the Early English style designed by George Gilbert (afterwards Sir Gilbert) Scott and comprising chancel, nave, aisles and tower, was consecrated in 1841. (fn. 96) It was the second of the five churches built by the Birmingham Church Building Society. The church was restored in 1882 and the spire surmounting the tower was removed in 1890. (fn. 97) A parish was assigned out of St. Martin's, Birmingham, in 1843; (fn. 98) part was taken to form part of the parish of St. Peter, Birmingham (1902). The living, a perpetual curacy from 1843 and a vicarage from 1868, was in the gift of public trustees. (fn. 99) In 1947 the church was closed, and the benefice and parish united with those of St. Paul, Birmingham. (fn. 1) The Old School in King Edward's Road was licensed for mission services, 1908-14. (fn. 2)

90. ST. MARK, Kingstanding (Bandywood Cres.), a low-built building of concrete with a flat roof, and with subsidiary buildings of brick at each end and a tall, empty bellcot, was dedicated in 1952; a Conventional District, formerly attached to All Saints', Oscott, was attached to St. Mark's in 1952. (fn. 3)

91. ST. MARK, Stockland Green (Bleakhill Rd. and Hesketh Cres.), was licensed as a mission of St. Barnabas's, Erdington, in 1908: it was then known as Stockland Green mission room, and from 1920 as St. Mark's mission church. (fn. 4) A permanent church, a small, low-built brick building with a steeplypitched roof, was consecrated in 1934, when a parish was assigned out of All Saints', Gravelly Hill, the living being a perpetual curacy in the gift of the Crown. (fn. 5)

92. ST. MARK, Washwood Heath (Washwood Heath Rd.), was licensed for public worship as a chapel of ease of St. Saviour's, Saltley, in 1890. (fn. 6) The church, which is of red brick with stone dressings and consists of chancel, nave, aisles, and stone tower with spire, was consecrated in 1899. (fn. 7) The architect was J. A. Chatwin. A parish was assigned out of St. Saviour's in 1907, when the living became a vicarage in the gift of the Vicar of St. Saviour's. (fn. 8) Part of the parish was taken to form part of the parish of St. Mary and St. John, Shaw Hill (1929).

[ST. MARTIN, Birmingham (Bull Ring); see no. 6.]

93. ST. MARY THE VIRGIN, Acock's Green (Warwick Rd.), is a stone building designed by J. G. Bland in the 13th-century style consisting of a chancel and an aisled and clerestoried nave; it was consecrated in 1866 as a chapel of ease of St. Edburgha's, Yardley. The church was enlarged in 1882, (fn. 9) but was badly damaged by enemy action in 1940. During the 1950s it was restored and the clerestory and roof were rebuilt. In 1867 it became a parish church, the parish being assigned out of St. Edburgha's and enlarged, in 1907, by parts of Hall Green parish. (fn. 10) Part of the parish was taken to form part of that of St. Edmund, Tyseley (1931). The living is in the gift of public trustees: it was a perpetual curacy in 1867 and a vicarage in 1868. (fn. 11) Spring Lane mission room was licensed for public worship from 1881 to 1908, St. Gabriel's mission room, Summer Rd., from 1909 to 1926, and Bishop Westcott Church Hall, Greenwood Avenue, from 1936. (fn. 12)

94. ST. MARY, Aston Brook (Aston Rd. North), a stone and brick building designed by J. Murray in the Decorated style, comprising chancel, nave, aisles, vestry, and west and south porches, was consecrated in 1863; a tower was added in 1882. (fn. 13) A parish was assigned out of the parishes of St. Peter and St. Paul, Aston, St. Silas, Lozells, and St. Matthew, Duddeston, in 1864, the living being a perpetual curacy until 1881 and a vicarage thereafter, in the gift of Josiah Y. Robins (d. 1866) for life, and then of public trustees. (fn. 14) In 1950 the benefice and part of the parish of St. Stephen, Birmingham, were united with those of St. Mary, to form the united benefice of St. Mary, Aston Brook. (fn. 15) St. Andrew's mission room, New John St., was licensed for public worship, 1905-26. (fn. 16)

[ST. MARY, Berwood Manor (Berwood); see V.C.H. Warws. iv. 61.]

[ST. MARY, Birmingham (Whittall St.); see no. 7.]

[ST. MARY, Handsworth (Hamstead Rd.); see no. 8.]

[ST. MARY, Moseley (St. Mary's Row); see no. 17, and V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 189-90.]

95. ST. MARY, Pype Hayes (Tyburn Rd. and Padstow Rd.), a large red-brick building designed by E. F. Reynolds in a simple Romanesque style with round-headed windows and a narrow, opensided turret, was consecrated in 1930 when a parish was assigned out of St. Barnabas's, Erdington. The living, a vicarage since 1930, was in the gift of the Aston Trustees and (until his death in 1951) A. E. Douglas. (fn. 17) In 1960 E. E. Mole was associated with the trustees. (fn. 18) The 18th-century communion plate came from St. Mary's, Birmingham. (fn. 19)

96. ST. MARY, Selly Oak (Bristol Rd.), a building designed by E. Holmes in the Decorated style and comprising chancel, nave, transepts, and tower with spire containing eight bells and a clock, was consecrated in 1861, as a chapel of ease to St. Laurence's, Northfield. (fn. 20) A parish was assigned out of St. Laurence's in 1862; (fn. 21) parts of it were taken to form the parishes of St. Stephen, Selly Hill (1892), and St. Wulstan, Selly Oak (1911), and to be parts of the parishes of St. Francis, Bournville (1926), and St. Gabriel, Weoley Castle (1933); further parts were transferred to St. Francis's in 1933. (fn. 22) The living, a perpetual curacy from 1862 and a vicarage from 1868, is in the gift of public trustees. (fn. 23) St. Wulstan's mission church was consecrated as St. Wulstan's church in 1906 (see no. 125), and the Bournville mission church as St. Francis's church in 1925 (see no. 69); other places licensed for public worship are the Bishop Gore Church Hall (since 1939), St. Brigid's House, Weoley Park (1946-52), the College of Ascension (since 1946), the Selly Oak Hospital (since 1954), and the Industrial Christian Fellowship Training College, Weoley Park Rd. (since 1954). (fn. 24)

97. ST. MARY MAGDALEN, Hazelwell (Vicarage Rd. and Priory Rd.), originated as a mission of All Saints', King's Heath, first licensed in 1906 and known as the St. Mary Magdalen mission church from 1916. (fn. 25) A Conventional District was attached to the church in 1922, (fn. 26) and a parish was assigned to it out of the parishes of All Saints, King's Heath, St. Nicolas, King's Norton, and the Ascension, Stirchley, in 1932. (fn. 27) The church was enlarged to three times its original size and was consecrated in 1936. (fn. 28) It is a low-built building of red brick in a modern style; in plan it is in the shape of a T with the foot pointing east and a tower projecting from the middle of the south wall. The large, square dormer windows are a prominent feature. The living, a perpetual curacy from 1932 and a vicarage from 1939, is in the gift of the Crown and the bishop alternately. (fn. 29)

98. ST. MARY AND ST. AMBROSE, Edgbaston (Pershore Rd.), originated as a mission of St. Bartholomew's, Edgbaston, first licensed in 1885 and called St. Ambrose's mission church from 1889. (fn. 30) A new church, built in brick and terracotta in the Gothic style on a site given by Lord Calthorpe, and comprising chancel with aisle, nave, and aisles, was consecrated in 1898 as the church of St. Mary and St. Ambrose. (fn. 31) A parish was assigned out of St. Bartholomew's in 1903, when a vicarage was created, in the gift of Lord Calthorpe and his heirs. The patrons in 1960 were the bishop and Brig. Sir R. Anstruther-Gough-Calthorpe, Bt. (fn. 32)

99. ST. MARY AND ST. JOHN, Shaw Hill (Alum Rock Rd.), originated as St. John's mission room, Couchman Rd., which was licensed as a mission of St. Saviour's, Saltley, from 1908. (fn. 33) A site was acquired for a permanent church, to be known as St. Mary and St. John's, in 1913, a Conventional District being attached to it. (fn. 34) A parish was assigned out of St. Saviour's, Saltley, St. Mark's, Washwood Heath, and St. Margaret's, Ward End, in 1929. (fn. 35) A new church, built in brown brick in a form resembling a Roman basilica, was consecrated in 1935. (fn. 36) The living was a perpetual curacy from 1929 until 1934, and thereafter a vicarage, in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 37)

100. ST. MATTHEW, Duddeston (Great Lister St.), a red brick and stone building designed by William Thomas in the Gothic style, and comprising chancel, nave, and embattled tower with a slender spire, was consecrated in 1840. It was the first of the five churches built by the Birmingham Church Building Society (the Ten Churches Fund). Galleries were added in 1866, and the church was restored in 1883. (fn. 38) A parish was assigned out of St. Peter and St. Paul's, Aston, in 1842; (fn. 39) parts of the parish were taken to form the parishes of St. Clement, Nechells (1860), St. Lawrence, Birmingham (1868), St. Anne, Duddeston (1869), and part of the parish of St. Mary, Aston Brook (1864). The living was a perpetual curacy from 1842 and a vicarage from 1868, in the gift of public trustees; in 1951 a united benefice was formed by the union of the benefices of St. Anne, Duddeston, St. Catherine, Nechells, and St. Lawrence, Birmingham, with that of St. Matthew. (fn. 40) A mission room in Coleman Street was licensed for public worship, 1908-26. (fn. 41)

101. ST. MATTHEW, Perry Beeches (Aldridge Rd.), a small rectangular brick building, designed for future use as a church hall, was consecrated in 1939 as a chapel of ease to St. John, Perry Barr. A parish was assigned out of St. John's in 1949. The living, a perpetual curacy since 1948, is in the gift of the trustees of St. Martin's; it was endowed with part of the income of St. Thomas's, Birmingham. (fn. 42)

102. ST. MATTHIAS, Birmingham (Wheeler St.), a brick building in the Decorated style, designed by J. L. Pedley and comprising chancel, nave, aisles, and north and south chapels, was consecrated in 1855. (fn. 43) A parish was assigned out of St. George's, Birmingham, in 1856; (fn. 44) parts of it were taken to form the parish of St. Saviour, Birmingham (1874), and part of the parish of St. Edward, Birmingham (1899). The living, a perpetual curacy from 1856 and a vicarage from 1868, was in the gift of the Rectors of St. Martin's, Birmingham, St. George's, Birmingham, St. Thomas's, Birmingham, and All Saints', Birmingham. (fn. 45) In 1948 the church was closed, and in 1949 the benefice and parish were united with those of St. George, Birmingham. (fn. 46)

103. ST. MICHAEL, Handsworth (St. Michael's Rd. off Soho Hill), a stone building designed by W. Bourne in the Gothic style and comprising chancel, nave, aisles, transepts, and tower with spire, was consecrated in 1855 as a chapel of ease to St. Mary's, Handsworth. (fn. 47) A parish was assigned out of St. Mary's in 1861; (fn. 48) part of it was taken to form part of the parish of St. Peter, Handsworth (1907). The living, a perpetual curacy from 1861 to 1868 and a vicarage thereafter, was in the gift of the Rector of St. Mary's until transferred to the patronage of the bishop in 1892. (fn. 49) St. Michael's mission room was licensed for public worship, 1888-93; Church House, Soho Rd., 1908-26. (fn. 50)

104. ST. MICHAEL AND ALL ANGELS, Bartley Green (Field Lane), is a small L-shaped building, of red brick in a simple Gothic style. It was consecrated in 1840 (fn. 51) and enlarged in 1876. (fn. 52) It was a chapel of ease to St. Laurence's, Northfield, until 1933 when it became a chapel of ease to St. Gabriel's, Weoley Castle. (fn. 53) A Conventional District was attached to St. Michael's in 1950, (fn. 54) and this became a parish in 1956. (fn. 55) In 1960 the bishop was patron of the living. (fn. 56)

105. ST. MICHAEL AND ALL ANGELS, Birmingham (Warstone Lane), was consecrated in 1848 but was closed a few years later. It was reopened in 1869 as a chapel of ease to St. Paul's, Birmingham, (fn. 57) and from then or soon after was used only as a cemetery chapel. (fn. 58) The church was badly damaged by bombing in the Second World War, and was demolished about 1953 because it was in a dangerous condition. The cemetery was acquired by the city corporation in 1951, and Key Hill chapel, formerly Methodist but by 1956 non-denominational, was used as the mortuary chapel.

106. ST. MICHAEL AND ALL ANGELS, South Yardley (Rowlands Rd.), a red-brick building with round-headed windows and a projecting gable end to serve as a bellcot, was erected in 1912 and licensed as a mission church of St. Edburgha's, Yardley. A Conventional District was attached to it in 1948, (fn. 59) and a parish assigned out of St. Edburgha's in 1956. (fn. 60) In 1960 the bishop was patron of the living. (fn. 61)

107. ST. NICOLAS, Birmingham (Lower Tower St.), designed by Martin and Chamberlain and comprising chancel, nave, aisles, and baptistery, (fn. 62) was consecrated in 1868. (fn. 63) A parish was assigned to it out of St. Stephen's, Birmingham, in 1869, (fn. 64) when the living became a vicarage in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 65) In 1942 the benefice was united with that of St. Edward, Birmingham, to form the united benefice of St. Nicolas and St. Edward. (fn. 66) The church was closed in 1947 and subsequently demolished.

[ST. NICOLAS, King's Norton (Pershore Rd. South); see no. 18, and V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 187-90.]

[ST. NICOLAS with ST. EDWARD, Birmingham, was a united benefice created in 1942 by the union of the benefices of St. Nicolas, Birmingham, and St. Edward, Birmingham. This united benefice was in turn united with that of St. George, Birmingham, in 1949.]

108. ST. OSWALD OF WORCESTER, Small Heath (Coventry Rd.), began as a temporary iron church licensed, from 1882, as a mission of St. Andrew's, Bordesley. A permanent building of brick and stone, designed by W. H. Bidlake in the Early English style (fn. 67) and comprising chancel, chapel, vestries, and aisled nave, was consecrated in 1893 and enlarged 1899-1900. (fn. 68) A parish was assigned out of St. Andrew's in 1889, (fn. 69) and parts of it were taken to form the parish of St. Benedict, Bordesley (1910), and part of St. Gregory's, Small Heath (1924). The parish was declared part of an ecclesiastical reorganization area in 1946. (fn. 70) The living was described as a donative in 1889, and as a vicarage from 1893, in the gift of the bishop and public trustees alternately. (fn. 71) St. Benedict's mission church, licensed from 1898, was consecrated in 1910 as St. Benedict's, Bordesley. An iron mission church in Whitehall Road was licensed for public worship from 1889 to 1926. (fn. 72)

109. ST. PATRICK, Bordesley (Frank St.), originated as St. Patrick's School chapel, licensed as a mission of St. Alban's, Bordesley, in 1873; a separate chapel was opened in 1889 and a permanent church was opened under the bishop's licence in 1896. The church, which was consecrated in 1889, (fn. 73) is a building of red brick designed by J. L. Pearson in the Early English style and comprises chancel, nave, aisles, and vestry. A parish was assigned out of St. Alban's, Bordesley, St. Paul's, Balsall Heath, and St. Thomas's in the Moors, Balsall Heath, in 1900. (fn. 74) The living, a perpetual curacy from 1900 and a vicarage since 1908, is in the gift of the Vicar of St. Alban's. (fn. 75)

110. ST. PAUL, Balsall Heath (Moseley Rd.), a brick building designed by J. L. Pedley and comprising chancel, nave, aisles, chapel, baptistery, and large embattled western tower, was consecrated in 1853. (fn. 76) A parish was assigned out of St. Nicolas's, King's Norton, in 1853; (fn. 77) parts of it were taken to form the parishes of St. Thomas in the Moors, Balsall Heath (1884), and St. Barnabas, Balsall Heath (1905), and parts of the parishes of St. Patrick, Bordesley (1900), and St. Agatha, Sparkbrook (1902). The living was a perpetual curacy in 1853, and became a vicarage in 1868; the patron was the Vicar of St. Nicolas's, King's Norton, until 1916, and the bishop thereafter. (fn. 78) St. Barnabas's mission church, licensed from 1890, was consecrated in 1904 as St. Barnabas's, Balsall Heath; St. Mark's mission church, Wenman St., was licensed for public worship from 1892 to 1926, the Clifton Road school from 1908 to 1910, and the Sherbourne Road Dispensary from 1910 to 1926. (fn. 79)

[ST. PAUL, Birmingham (St. Paul's Sq.); see no. 9.]

111. ST. PAUL, Bordesley Green (Finnemore Rd.), was licensed as a mission church of St. Margaret's, Ward End, in 1912, (fn. 80) when a small, simple red-brick building, with a bellcot and lit by square windows and dormers, was built. It was consecrated in 1929. (fn. 81) A parish was assigned out of St. Margaret's, Ward End, in 1928. The living, a perpetual curacy, is in the gift of the Crown and the bishop alternately. (fn. 82)

112. ST. PAUL, Hamstead (Walsall Rd.), originated as a mission of St. Mary's, Handsworth, licensed in 1886. A new church of brick and stone in the Gothic style designed by W. Davis and comprising nave, aisles, transepts, and octagonal chancel was consecrated in 1892. (fn. 83) A parish was assigned out of St. Mary's, Handsworth, and St. John's, Perry Barr, in 1894. (fn. 84) The living, a vicarage since 1894, is in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 85) The Hamstead Village Institute (in West Bromwich County Borough) was licensed for public worship, from 1919 to 1926, (fn. 86) and the Tanhouse Estate Community Centre from 1958. (fn. 87)

113. ST. PAUL, Lozells (Lozells Rd.), a building of red brick and stone designed by J. A. Chatwin in the Perpendicular style and comprising chancel, nave, aisles, and north-west tower, was consecrated in 1880. (fn. 88) A parish was assigned out of St. Silas's, Lozells, in 1881. (fn. 89) The living, a vicarage since 1881, is in the gift of the Aston Trustees. (fn. 90) The Porchester Street mission room was licensed for public worship from 1895 until the Second World War, St. Peter's mission, Berners St., from 1908 to 1926, and the Toc H, Clifford St., from 1926 to 1937. (fn. 91)

[ST. PAUL AND ST. MARK, Birmingham (St. Paul's Square, Ludgate Hill), is a united benefice created in 1947 by the union of the benefices of St. Paul, Birmingham and St. Mark, Birmingham.]

114. ST. PETER, Birmingham (Dale End), a Greek Revival building with a cupola and a Doric portico designed by Rickman and Hutchinson (see no. 123), was consecrated in 1827. (fn. 92) It was gutted by fire in 1831 and restored by 1837. (fn. 93) A parish was assigned out of St. Philip's, Birmingham, in 1847. (fn. 94) The living, a perpetual curacy from 1847 and a vicarage from 1868, was in the gift of the Rector of St. Philip's until 1875, and of the bishop thereafter. (fn. 95) The church was closed for demolition in 1899, the endowments transferred to St. Peter's, Birmingham (see no. 115), and the parish merged with that of St. Philip, Birmingham. (fn. 96)

115. ST. PETER, Birmingham (Spring Hill and George St. West), a cruciform building of red brick with stone dressings, designed by F. B. Osborn of Birmingham (fn. 97) in the Perpendicular style, and comprising chancel, nave, transepts, chapel, and west tower, was consecrated in 1902. (fn. 98) A parish was assigned out of All Saints', Birmingham, and St. Mark's, Birmingham, in the same year. (fn. 99) Under the Birmingham Churches Act of 1897 the benefice of St. Peter, Birmingham (see no. 114), a vicarage in the gift of the bishop, was transferred to this church. (fn. 1)

116. ST. PETER, Hall Green (Highfield Rd.), is a temporary building erected in 1922 and licensed by the bishop, as a mission of Christ Church, Yardley Wood, from 1923. It was originally known as St. Cadoc's, Gwynfa Dale; a Conventional District was attached to the mission church in 1954, and the name was changed to St. Peter's. (fn. 2)

117. ST. PETER, Handsworth (Grove Lane), a brick building in the Gothic style designed by F. B. Osborn, and comprising chancel, nave, and transepts, was consecrated in 1907. In the same year a parish was assigned to it out of St. James's, Handsworth, and St. Michael's, Handsworth, the living being a vicarage in the gift of the bishop. (fn. 3)

[ST. PETER, Harborne (Old Church Rd.); see no. 10.]

[ST. PETER AND ST. PAUL, Aston (Witton Lane and Park Rd.); see no. 11.]

[ST. PHILIP, Birmingham (Colmore Row); see no. 12.]

118. ST. SAVIOUR, Birmingham (Villa St.), built of brick in the Gothic style with apsidal chancel, nave, aisles, and west tower with spire, was consecrated in 1874. (fn. 4) The architect was J. A. Chatwin. A parish was assigned out of St. Matthias's, Birmingham, in the same year. (fn. 5) The living, a vicarage, was said in 1876 to be in the gift of the bishop, but appears since then to have been in the gift of the rectors of four Birmingham churches, St. Martin's, St. George's, St. Thomas's and All Saints'. (fn. 6) A mission room in Farm Street was licensed for public worship from 1908 to 1926. (fn. 7)

119. ST. SAVIOUR, Saltley (St. Saviour's Rd.), a brick building in the Perpendicular style, with apsidal chancel, nave, aisles, and west tower, was consecrated in 1850. (fn. 8) The architect was R. C. Hussey; the spire is a later addition. (fn. 9) A parish was assigned out of St. Peter and St. Paul's, Aston, in 1848; (fn. 10) parts of this parish were taken to form the parish of St. Mark, Washwood Heath (1907), and part of the parish of St. Mary and St. John, Shaw Hill (1929). The living, a perpetual curacy in 1848 and a vicarage from 1883, was in the gift of Charles Bowyer Adderley, later Lord Norton, until his death in 1905; the patronage passed to his son, but in 1911 was transferred to public trustees. (fn. 11) The activity of this church in the early 20th century is indicated by the large number of mission and daughter churches founded from it. St. John's mission room, Couchman Rd., licensed as a mission of St. Saviour's from 1908, was consecrated in 1935 as St. Mary and St. John's, Shaw Hill; Washwood Heath Chapel, licensed as a mission of St. Saviour's from 1890, was consecrated in 1899 as St. Mark's, Washwood Heath; St. Luke's mission church, Cherrywood Lane, was licensed for public worship from 1901 until the Second World War; Saltley Training College chapel (formerly Saltley Hall chapel), from 1905; St. Francis's mission church, Arden Rd., from 1906 to 1926; St. Matthew's mission church, Garrison St., from 1906, transferred in 1907 to St. Andrew's, Bordesley; the mission church of the Carpenter of Nazareth, Adderley Rd., from 1907 until the Second World War; Moat House Convent chapel from 1921 to 1926. (fn. 12)

120. ST. SILAS, Lozells (Church St.), a cruciform church designed by J. W. Fiddian and comprising chancel, nave, and transepts, was built of brick in the Gothic style and was consecrated in 1854. (fn. 13) A parish was assigned out of St. Peter and St. Paul's, Aston, in 1854; (fn. 14) parts of it were taken to form the parish of St. Paul, Lozells (1881), and part of the parish of St. Mary, Aston Brook (1864). The patronage of the living, a perpetual curacy in 1854 and a vicarage from 1881, was vested in the Revd. D. N. Walton; in 1868 his executors were named as patrons, and in 1869 the Aston Trustees, who were the patrons in 1960. (fn. 15) The schoolroom in Park Lane was licensed for public worship from 1861 to 1891; St. Silas's mission room, Nursery Rd., from 1908 to 1926. (fn. 16)

121. ST. STEPHEN, Birmingham (New Town Row), a cruciform building of sandstone designed by R. C. Carpenter in the Early English style, comprises chancel, nave, aisles, and transepts, and has a small turret. The cost of the original building was paid by the governors of King Edward's School, through the Birmingham Church Building Society. The church was consecrated in 1844 and extensively rebuilt in 1896 and 1910. (fn. 17) A parish was assigned out of St. George's, Birmingham, in 1844; (fn. 18) parts of it were taken to form the parish of St. Nicolas, Birmingham (1869), and part of the parish of St. Edward, Birmingham (1899). The living, a perpetual curacy in 1844 and a vicarage from 1868, was in the gift of five nominees for the first turn and then of the Crown and the bishop alternately. (fn. 19) In 1950 the church was closed, and the benefice united with that of St. Mary, Aston Brook; part of the parish, including the parish church, was merged with the parish of St. Mary, the remainder with that of St. George, Birmingham. (fn. 20) An iron chapel in New Summer Street was licensed for public worship from 1867 to 1884; (fn. 21) St. Edward's mission room, licensed from 1896, later became the consecrated church of St. Edward, Birmingham.

122. ST. STEPHEN, Selly Hill (Serpentine Rd.), is a building of stone designed by Martin and Chamberlain in the Decorated style, standing on high ground and comprising chancel, nave, and south-west tower with spire. It was consecrated in 1870. (fn. 22) A parish was assigned out of St. Mary's, Selly Oak, in 1892. (fn. 23) The church was described in 1890 as a chapelry, in the gift of trustees; the living became a vicarage in 1892. (fn. 24) St. Stephen's New Hall has been licensed for public worship since 1929. (fn. 25)

123. ST. THOMAS, Birmingham (Bath Row, Holloway Head), was one of the two Greek Revival churches in Birmingham designed by Rickman and Hutchinson (see no. 114). It was built of stone with a tall west tower rising above two quadrant-shaped Ionic porticos. The tower is of three stages, the square middle stage having a pediment supported on Ionic columns to each face, while the highest stage is octagonal, surmounted by a ball and cross. The church was consecrated in 1829. (fn. 26) A parish was assigned out of St. Martin's, Birmingham, in 1834; parts of it were taken to form the parishes of Immanuel, Birmingham (1865), and St. Asaph, Birmingham (1869). A rectory was created in 1834, in the gift of the trustees of St. Martin's, Birmingham. (fn. 27) The church, which had been refitted in 1893, (fn. 28) was largely destroyed by enemy action in 1940, but the tower and the west porticos are still (1961) standing. In 1946 the benefice was joined with that of Immanuel, Birmingham, to form the united benefice of St. Thomas and Immanuel, part of the endowment being transferred to St. Matthew's, Perry Beeches. The two parishes were merged in 1939. (fn. 29) A mission room in Ellis Street was licensed for public worship from 1908 to 1926; the chapel of the Accident (formerly Queen's) Hospital has been licensed since 1908 and the Church Army Hostel, Granville St., since 1958. (fn. 30)

[ST. THOMAS AND IMMANUEL, Birmingham (Broad St.), is a united benefice, in the gift of the trustees of St. Martin's, Birmingham, formed in 1946 from St. Thomas's, Birmingham, and Immanuel, Birmingham.]

124. ST. THOMAS IN THE MOORS, Balsall Heath (Cox Street West), a brick building designed by Bateman and Corser in the Gothic style and comprising chancel, nave, aisles, and north and south porches, was consecrated in 1883. (fn. 31) A parish was assigned out of St. Paul's, Balsall Heath, in 1884; (fn. 32) part of it was taken to form part of the parish of St. Patrick, Bordesley (1900). The living, a vicarage since 1884, is in the gift of public trustees. (fn. 33) A parochial hall in Clevedon Street was licensed for public worship from 1923 until the Second World War. (fn. 34)

125. ST. WULSTAN, Selly Oak (Exeter Rd., Bournbrook), originated as an iron church dedicated to St. Wulstan and opened as a mission church of St. Mary's, Selly Oak, in 1893. (fn. 35) A new church was consecrated in 1906: (fn. 36) it is a rectangular building of red and blue brick in the Decorated style with pinnacles at the four corners and a bellcot. A parish was assigned out of St. Mary's in 1911. (fn. 37) The church remained a chapel of ease until 1911, when it became a vicarage, in the gift of the Vicar of St. Mary's for the first turn and then of public trustees. (fn. 38)

Footnotes

82 Colvin, Dict. of Eng. Architects, 305, 500; Lond. Gaz. 1834, pp. 1526-8.
83 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1882), 198.
84 Lond. Gaz. 1834, pp. 1526-8; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
85 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1867 and later edns.); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906-31); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1933 and later edns.).
86 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1902), 203.
87 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1930); (1929-30), 142.
88 Ex inf. the Librarian, Central Council for the Care of Churches.
89 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1923).
90 Lond. Gaz. 1929, p. 1672.
91 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1935-6), 86.
92 See V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 190.
93 Lond. Gaz. 1863, p. 202; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1864), 88.
94 Lond. Gaz. 1866, p. 6768.
95 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
96 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1913), 199; (1916 and later edns.).
97 Date on foundation stone.
98 The Times, 7 Feb. 1955, 3.
99 All Saints' Ch. Mag. (B.R.L. 660364), Apr., Aug., Oct., 1956.
1 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
2 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 7.
3 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1884), 189.
4 Lond. Gaz. 1875, pp. 3988-9.
5 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1890).
6 Lond. Gaz. 1907, p. 3162.
7 Ex inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
8 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1902), 197.
9 Ibid. (1890).
10 Ibid. (1893).
11 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 349.
12 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1932-3), 78.
13 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906), 106.
14 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1932-3), 36-37; (1934), 82; Lond. Gaz. 1932, p. 1852.
15 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1935-6), (1952).
16 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1908), 160; Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908).
17 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 1113.
18 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1926-7), 134; Lond. Gaz. 1926, p. 2007.
19 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1903), 199; and see V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 190.
20 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1913), 197.
21 Ibid. (1914).
22 Lond. Gaz. 1916, p. 3058.
23 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
24 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1904), 203; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906), 162.
25 Lewis, Topog. Dict. Eng. (1848), i. 261.
26 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1894), 186; Colvin, Dict. of Eng. Architects, 500.
27 Lewis, Topog. Dict. Eng. i. 261; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
28 Ret. of Ch. Districts, H.C. 896, p. 5 (1852-3), lxxviii; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1861).
29 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal (1869).
30 Ex inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
31 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1870); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1908, 1909, 1922, 1926-7); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
32 Gent. Mag. 1805, lxxv (2), 766; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1900); 43 Geo. III, c. 117 (priv. act); Lewis, Topog. Dict. Eng. i. 261.
33 The church is a prominent feature in 19th-cent. views; see plate facing p. 12, and frontispiece.
34 Dix, Dir. Birm. (1858), 3.
35 Colvin, Dict. of Eng. Architects, 420.
36 Lond. Gaz. 1865, p. 3277.
37 43 Geo. III, c. 117 (priv. act); Lewis, Topog. Dict. Eng. i. 261; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1890).
38 43 Geo. III, c. 117 (priv. act); Lond. Gaz. 1837, p. 169.
39 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1898, 1900); 60-61 Vic. c. 211 (local act).
40 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1891), 271; (1893).
41 Ret. of Parishes Divided, H.C. 433, p. 102 (1870), liv; and see V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 151.
42 Lewis, Topog. Dict. Eng. iii. 627; Lond. Gaz. 1866, p. 2216; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1905); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906).
43 Lond. Gaz. 1933, p. 5420; and see V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 151.
44 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1902), 204; (1910), 198; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1938-9).
45 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1868), 172; Ret. of Parishes Divided, p. 101 (1870), liv; Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1954).
46 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1869), 117; (1877); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
47 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1928-9); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
48 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908, 1954); Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1886), 193; Lond. Gaz. 1885, p. 4071; 1906, p. 5213.
49 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1886), 125; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906).
50 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909); (1915), 182.
51 Ex inf. the Dioc. Sec.
52 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1935-6), 88. See plate facing p. 410.
53 Ret. of Ch. Districts, H.C. 896, p. 5 (1852-3), lxxviii; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1867 and later edns.); and see V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 244.
54 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1917); Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1869).
55 Lond. Gaz. 1938, p. 4956. Highter's Heath church is in Worcs. outside Birm. City boundary.
56 For St. Cadoc's, Gwynfa Dale, see no. 116.
57 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1902), 197; Lond. Gaz. 1928, p. 7204; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1930-1), 142; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
58 Walters, Warws. Ch. Bells, 288.
59 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1938-9), 88, 90; Lond. Gaz. 1937, pp. 6594-5.
60 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908); Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1865), 143.
61 Lond. Gaz. 1865, p. 3875; Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1866, 1869, 1891).
62 Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1888 and later edns.); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906 and later edns.).
63 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 7; cf. 2nd Rep. of Commrs. for Building New Churches, H.C. 605, p. 13 (1822), xi.
64 Lond. Gaz. 1864, p. 2046.
65 Lewis, Topog. Dict. Eng. (1831), i. 206; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1872, 1884); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
66 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1897), 202.
67 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909 and later edns.); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1933 and later edns.).
68 The Times, 9 June 1958, 12; see p. 359.
69 Dix, Dir. Birm. (1859), 3-4.
70 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908, 1954); Lond. Gaz. 1865, p. 4394.
71 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1866), 113; (1875); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
72 Lond. Gaz. 1939, p. 3096; 1946, p. 6250.
73 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1938-9), 19.
74 See p. 44.
75 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1954).
76 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1902), 197.
77 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908).
78 Lond. Gaz. 1902, p. 5207.
79 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1900), 204; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
80 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
81 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1903).
82 Ibid. (1904), 210.
83 Lond. Gaz. 1916, p. 1685; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1917); and see V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 190.
84 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1894), 195; V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 189-90.
85 Lond. Gaz. 1914, p. 593.
86 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906, 1915).
87 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1892 and later edns.).
88 T. Edwards, Birm. Treasure Chest, 18; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1895), 194; (1897), 208.
89 Lond. Gaz. 1897, p. 1244.
90 Ibid. 1907, p. 3162.
91 Ex inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
92 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1897), 168; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
93 Ex inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
94 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1905).
95 Ibid. (1867).
96 Ibid. (1872), 76; Lond. Gaz. 1871, p. 3707.
97 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1882), 197; (1901), 193.
98 Daily Telegraph, 10 Apr. 1961, 15.
99 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1954); a projected tower by Pearson was never built but is shown in Pearson's drawing illustrated in plate facing p. 379.
1 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1899).
2 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909 and later edns.); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
3 Ret. of New Parishes, to 1860, H.C. 556, p. 4 (1861), xlviii; White, Dir. Birm. (1850).
4 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1895), 184; (1902), 190; (1904), 216.
5 Lond. Gaz. 1846, p. 3104.
6 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1890); Lond. Gaz. 1846, p. 3104; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
7 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1908), 182.
8 Ibid. (1906), 188; (1909, 1914); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1939-40, 1952).
9 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1901), 193; (1902), 190; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1914), 196.
10 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1907), 185; (1908), 180; (1911).
11 Lond. Gaz. 1914, p. 6783.
12 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 6.
13 Walters, Worcs. Ch. Bells (reprinted from Transactions of the Worcs. Arch. Soc. 1929), 177.
14 Lond. Gaz. 1869, p. 3707.
15 Ex inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
16 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1926-7).
17 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1875), 178; (1876), 120; Lond. Gaz. 1875, p. 472; cf. V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 189.
18 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908).
19 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1870), 167.
20 Lond. Gaz. 1869, p. 3545.
21 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1870), 118; (1875).
22 Ex inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
23 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1894), 208.
24 Ibid. (1869), 167; Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908).
25 Lond. Gaz. 1889, p. 7010; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1891), 274.
26 Lond. Gaz. 1906, p. 5213.
27 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1891 and later edns.); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906 and later edns.).
28 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1891), 271; (1896), 208; (1905), 200.
29 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906), 162; V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 190.
30 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1926-7).
31 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 4.
32 Lond. Gaz. 1861, p. 2679.
33 Ret. of Districts, 1856-61, H.C. 267, p. 8 (1862), xli; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1869).
34 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1902), 199.
35 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1921).
36 M. Port, Six Hundred New Churches, 138-9.
37 5th Rep. of Commrs. for Building New Churches, H.C. 511, p. 4 (1825), xv.
38 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1884), 191.
39 Ret. of Districts, 1856-61, p. 11 (1862), xli.
40 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1869).
41 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
42 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1907 and later edns.); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1939-40, 1952).
43 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1938-9), 90.
44 Lond. Gaz. 1938, p. 5047; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1939-40), 88.
45 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1887), 124; Lond. Gaz. 1886, p. 1.
46 Lond. Gaz. 1896, p. 848.
47 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1912), 202; J. Betjeman, Guide to Eng. Par. Churches, 377.
48 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1905); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1908); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1937-8), 20; (1939-40).
49 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1911, 1926-7). It is not certain whether the information given there about licensed missions is altogether reliable.
50 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1899), 203.
51 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906), 188; (1911), 199.
52 Lond. Gaz. 1910, p. 4368.
53 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1911, 1924).
54 Ex. inf. the Dioc. Sec.
55 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
56 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1879), 181; Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908).
57 Lond. Gaz. 1879, p. 2469.
58 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1900), 121; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1930-1).
59 Ex. inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
60 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1926-7).
61 Ibid. (1908); Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908).
62 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1912), 200.
63 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1889), 193; (1890), 220.
64 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908).
65 Lond. Gaz. 1890, p. 2894.
66 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1901).
67 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 6; (1954).
68 Lond. Gaz. 1860, p. 1886.
69 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1861, 1869); Ret. of Districts, 1856-61, p. 16 (1862), xli.
70 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1868); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1908 and later edns.).
71 See p. 464.
72 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
73 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1867).
74 Ibid. (1873), 176.
75 Lond. Gaz. 1872, p. 4914.
76 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1874), 118; (1877); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
77 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1867).
78 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 349; Lond. Gaz. 1878, pp. 1758-9; V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 244.
79 Lond. Gaz. 1948, pp. 4387, 4565.
80 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1879), 120; (1881); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
81 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
82 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1866), 164; Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908).
83 Lond. Gaz. 1866, p. 4.
84 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1869); Ret. of Parishes, 1863-6, H.C. 529, p. 7 (1867), liv; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
85 Ex. inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
86 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1914), 194.
87 Crockford (1953-4).
88 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1954), 5.
89 Ex. inf. the Dioc. Sec.
90 Lond. Gaz. 1931, p. 7318.
91 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1932-3), 76; (1940-1).
92 See p. 477.
93 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1898, 1899); Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 5.
94 Lond. Gaz. 1899, p. 703.
95 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1901).
96 Lond. Gaz. 1942, p. 1329; 1949, p. 3594.
97 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909 and later edns.).
98 Ibid. (1907).
99 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1938-9), 82.
1 Lond. Gaz. 1933, p. 5420.
2 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
3 Bournville Village Trust, 1900-1955, 16.
4 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1914), 194.
5 Ibid. (1915).
6 Lond. Gaz. 1926, p. 2010.
7 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906-7), 131.
8 Ibid. p. 134.
9 Lond. Gaz. 1933, p. 5028.
10 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1928-9); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1939-40).
11 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1870), 167.
12 Lond. Gaz. 1869, p. 4431.
13 Ibid. 1939, p. 848.
14 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1870), 118; (1886).
15 Ex. inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
16 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1935-6), 88.
17 Lond. Gaz. 1933, p. 3628.
18 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1934), 82; (1935-6).
19 White, Dir. Warws. (1850), 4.
20 Port, Six Hundred New Churches, 70-71; Dent, Making of Birm. 280-1. See also plate facing p. 379.
21 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 3.
22 Lond. Gaz. 1830, p. 1903.
23 Lond. Gaz. 1949, p. 3594; Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1952), 3; ex. inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
24 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1868, 1891); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1926-7).
25 17th Rep. of Commrs. for Building New Churches, H.C. 523, p. 7 (1837), xxi; Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 6.
26 19th Rep. of Commrs. for Building New Churches, H.C. 516, p. 5 (1839), xvi; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1886); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
27 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906 and later edns.); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
28 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1897, 1900), 201; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906, 1908).
29 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1918), 155.
30 J. Betjeman, Guide to Eng. Par. Churches, 377.
31 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1921), 134.
32 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1902), 197.
33 Ibid. (1903), 202; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1913), 198.
34 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1917).
35 Ibid. (1926-7), 134; Lond. Gaz. 1924, p. 7417.
36 Lond. Gaz. 1949, p. 2891.
37 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1892), 219.
38 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1907), 191.
39 Ibid. (1908).
40 Ibid. (1909, 1937-8).
41 Ret. of Parishes Divided, 1818-56, H.C. 557, p. 44 (1861), xlviii.
42 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
43 Hackwood, Handsworth Old and New, 41.
44 Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1896); cf. H. Allen, Story of St. James' Church, Handsworth.
45 Lond. Gaz. 1854, p. 2513.
46 Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1856 and later edns.).
47 Ibid. (1900, 1904, 1905); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1907, 1909); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1939-40, 1952).
48 Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1859), 36.
49 Lond. Gaz. 1859, p. 526; 1906, p. 5213.
50 Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1859), 1869.
51 Ret. of Districts, 1856-61, p. 13 (1862), xli.
52 Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1894); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1912).
53 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
54 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1930-1).
55 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
56 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1954).
57 Ex. inf. the Dioc. Sec.
58 Ex. inf. the Dioc. Sec. For a view see plate facing p. 410.
59 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
60 34th Rep. of Commrs. for Building New Churches, H.C. 478, p. 5 (1854), xix; Lond. Gaz. 1854, p. 1901; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1870).
61 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1870 and later edns.); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1926-7).
62 Lewis, Topog. Dict. Eng. (1848), iii. 557.
63 Ret. of Districts, 1861-3, H.C. 163, p. 14 (1865) xli.
64 Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1856 and later edns.); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
65 Lond. Gaz. 1948, 4961.
66 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1907, 1926-7); Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 342.
67 Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1887); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1907); ex. inf. the incumbent of St. Mark's, Kingstanding.
68 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1907, 1926-7); Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1889).
69 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1926-7).
70 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1890), 226; (1896), 198.
71 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1896), 211; V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 244; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
72 Lond. Gaz. 1907, p. 5776.
73 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1908 and later edns.).
74 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908, 1954).
75 Lond. Gaz. 1845, p. 7242.
76 Lewis, Topog. Dict. Eng. i. 261; Ret. of New Parishes to 1860, H.C. 556, p. 5 (1861), xlviii.
77 2nd Rep. of Eccl. Commrs. [515], p. 23, H.C. (1847), xxxiii; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1869).
78 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1886), 198.
79 Ibid. (1890); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1908).
80 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1869), 166; (1890); Lond. Gaz. 1868, p. 4982.
81 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1895), 183; (1896), 187.
82 Ex. inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
83 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1900), 194; Rep. of Bp. of Worc.'s Spec. Comm. 1898.
84 Ex. inf. the Librarian, Central Council for the Care of Churches.
85 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1904), 203.
86 Ret. of Ch. Districts, H.C. 896, p. 5 (1852-3), lxxviii.
87 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1861, 1869); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
88 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1903), 207; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1923).
89 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1938-9), 90.
90 Lond. Gaz. 1933, p. 5030.
91 Ibid. 1948, p. 4961.
92 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1933, 1940-1).
93 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1876), 181.
94 Lond. Gaz. 1876, p. 1664; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1877), 120.
95 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1891), 272.
96 Lewis, Topog. Dict. Eng. (1848), i. 261.
97 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1891), 260.
98 Ret. of Ch. Districts, p. 5 (1852-3), lxxviii.
99 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1861, 1869).
1 Lond. Gaz. 1947, p. 1628; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1947-8), 5.
2 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1915).
3 Ex. inf. the incumbent of St. Mark's; and see nos. 82, 87.
4 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1921).
5 Lond. Gaz. 1934, p. 130; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1935-6), 86.
6 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1891), 277.
7 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 19.
8 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1908), 160; Lond. Gaz. 1907, p. 2267.
9 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1867), 175; (1883), 192; Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1952), 19.
10 Lond. Gaz. 1857, p. 1442; 1907, p. 5776.
11 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1868), 119; (1869).
12 Ibid. (1889); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1910, 1926-7); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1937-8).
13 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1914), 194; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1883), 192.
14 Ret. of Parishes Divided, 1863-6, H.C. 529, p. 19 (1867), liv; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1867, 1882).
15 Ex. inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
16 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906, 1926-7).
17 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1931-2), 76, 78; (1952); Crockford (1952-3).
18 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
19 See no. 7.
20 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal: (1862), 98, 191; see V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 200.
21 Lond. Gaz. 1862, p. 2969.
22 Ibid. 1933, p. 5028.
23 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1863, 1869).
24 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952, 1955).
25 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1917).
26 Ibid. (1923).
27 Lond. Gaz. 1932, p. 1039.
28 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1937-8), 90.
29 Ibid. (1932-3), 76; (1940-1, 1952).
30 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1889, 1890).
31 Ibid. (1899), 204.
32 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 6; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1904); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
33 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909).
34 Ibid. (1914), 194; (1915), 182.
35 Lond. Gaz. 1929, p. 7202.
36 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1936-7), 88.
37 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1930-1), 142; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1935).
38 Lewis, Topog. Dict. Eng. (1848), ii. 96; Colvin, Dict. Eng. Architects, 609; Rep. of Bp. of Worc.'s Spec. Com. 1898; Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1954).
39 Ret. of Ch. Districts, p. 5 (1852-3), lxxvii.
40 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1869); ex. inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
41 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1926-7).
42 Lond. Gaz. 1944, p. 3239; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1949).
43 Rep. of Bp. of Worc.'s Spec. Com. 1898.
44 Lond. Gaz. 1856, p. 2710.
45 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1861, 1869).
46 Lond. Gaz. 1949, p. 3594.
47 Ex. inf. the Vicar of St. Michael's; Licn. Dioc. Cal. (1857).
48 Lond. Gaz. 1861, p. 5325.
49 Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1861, 1869, 1892).
50 Ibid. (1888, 1893); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1926-7).
51 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1938-9), 19; V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 200.
52 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1877), 181.
53 Ibid. (1861); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1930-1); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1934).
54 Ex. inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
55 Lond. Gaz. 1956, p. 5166.
56 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
57 Ibid. (1938-9), 19; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1870), 169; the date of consecration is given as 1841 in Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1918, 1926-7).
58 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1861), 84; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1918), 104.
59 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1913), 198; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1949- 50).
60 Lond. Gaz. 1956, p. 2466.
61 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
62 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908).
63 Rep. of Bp. of Worc.'s Spec. Com. 1898, 62.
64 Lond. Gaz. 1869, p. 3546.
65 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1870), 118.
66 Lond. Gaz. 1942, p. 1329; 1949, p. 3594.
67 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908).
68 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1889); (1894), 225; (1901), 193.
69 Lond. Gaz. 1889, p. 4596.
70 Ibid. 1949, p. 2891.
71 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1890, 1894).
72 Ibid. (1890); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1926-7).
73 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1889); (1891), 271; (1901), 194.
74 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906), 92n.
75 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1901); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1908).
76 Ex. inf. Revd. C. L. Martineau, formerly Vicar of St. Paul's.
77 Lond. Gaz. 1853, p. 2358; V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 190.
78 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1861, 1869); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1917); Lond. Gaz. 1867, p. 7073; 1916, p. 3058.
79 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906 and later edns.).
80 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1913), 200.
81 Crockford (1953-4).
82 Lond. Gaz. 1928, p. 7299; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1929-30), 140.
83 Lich. Dioc. Cal. (1886, 1893).
84 Ibid. (1896).
85 Ibid. (1895); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
86 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1920, 1926-7).
87 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
88 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1901), 195.
89 Lond. Gaz. 1881, p. 1596.
90 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1882), 133; Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
91 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906 and later edns.); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1937-8, 1939-40).
92 Port, Six Hundred New Churches, 138-9.
93 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1900), 195.
94 Lond. Gaz. 1847, p. 2417.
95 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1861, 1869, 1876).
96 Ibid. (1900), 195; (1903), 190; Birm. Churches Act, 60-61 Vic. c. 211 (local act).
97 J. Betjeman, Guide to Eng. Par. Churches, 376.
98 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1903), 190.
99 Lond. Gaz. 1902, p. 8755.
1 Birm. Churches Act, 60-61 Vict. c. 211 (local act).
2 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952, 1955); Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1954); ex. inf. the Revd. J. L. C. Adlam, priest-in-charge.
3 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1908), 160, 180.
4 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 5.
5 Lond. Gaz. 1874, p. 6004.
6 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1876), 120; (1877); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
7 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1926-7).
8 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1901), 201.
9 Port, Six Hundred New Churches, 164-5.
10 Lond. Gaz. 1848, p. 3067.
11 Ibid.; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1884); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906, 1912).
12 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1906 and later edns.); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1939-40).
13 Rep. of Bp. of Worc.'s Spec. Com. 1898, 66.
14 Ret. of Parishes Divided, 1818-56, p. 42 (1861), xlviii.
15 34th Rep. of Commrs. for Building New Churches, H.C. 478, p. 9 (1854), xix; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1868, 1869, 1882); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1960).
16 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1871, 1897); Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1909, 1926-7).
17 Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908); Rep. of Bp. of Worc.'s Spec. Com. 1898; Lewis, Topog. Dict. Eng. i. 261; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1897), 185; Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1911), 201; (1912), 202; Kelly's Dir. Birm. (1908), 5.
18 Lond. Gaz. 1844, p. 2463.
19 Ibid.; Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1869).
20 Ex. inf. the Registrar, Birm. Dioc.
21 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1871, 1885).
22 Ibid. (1872), 167; see V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 200.
23 Lond. Gaz. 1892, p. 760.
24 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1890, 1893).
25 Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).
26 Rep. of Bp. of Worc.'s Spec. Com. 1898, 62.
27 Lond. Gaz. 1834, p. 1526.
28 Colvin, Dic. Eng. Architects, 500.
29 Lond. Gaz. 1946, p. 6250; 1939, p. 3096.
30 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1908, 1909, 1926-7); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952, 1960).
31 Rep. of Bp. of Worc.'s Spec. Com. 1898, 68; V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 190.
32 Lond. Gaz. 1884, p. 1125.
33 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1885), 125.
34 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1924); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1939-40).
35 Worc. Dioc. Ch. Cal. (1894), 197; V.C.H. Worcs. iii. 200.
36 Birm. Dioc. Cal. (1907), 185.
37 Ibid. (1912), 200.
38 Ibid. (1912); Birm. Dioc. Dir. (1952).