House of Commons Journal Volume 7
21 December 1654

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History of Parliament Trust

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 7: 21 December 1654', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 7: 1651-1660 (1802), pp. 405-406. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=24426 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Thursday, the 21st of December, 1654.

Prayers.

Obnoxious Publications.

THE House being informed, That there was one did deliver divers Books at the Door this Day, intituled, "Dissertatio de Pace, &c.; or, A Discourse touching the Peace and Concord of the Church;"

He was, by Command of the House, called in: And, being brought to the Bar, Mr. Speaker, by Command of the House, demanded his Name. He answered, Philip Dancy; that he lived in Lumbard-street, and is a Norwich Factor: And, being shewed one of the said Books, acknowlegeth, That he did deliver some Books of this Sort, and Title, to divers Members of this House. Being demanded, Who was the Author of this Book; he saith, The Author he is ignorant of: And being demanded, Who delivered the Books to him; Saith, He can tell; but craves Pardon for his Silence in it: Saith, He received them this Morning: But, being asked, Where he received them, and who printed them; craves Pardon therein also: And thereupon withdrew.

The House being informed there was another at the Door, who brought those Books;

He was called in: And being come to the Bar; and being demanded his Name; answered, Thomas Carpenter; that he lives in Paul's Church-Yard at Richard Moone's House: Saith, John Danyell, Apprentice to Moone, wished him to deliver them to this Man in the Morning.

He saith, The Books were not printed in his House, because Moone hath no Press there; but knoweth not who did print them, nor who was the Author of them: He was only desired to bring them along.

Resolved, That the said Philip Dancy be committed to the Custody of the Serjeant at Arms attending this House.

Resolved, That this Book be referred to the Consideration of the Committee, to whom Biddle's Books be committed, to examine the Substance thereof; and who were the Authors, Printers, and Publishers; with Power to send for Persons, Papers, Witnesses; and to secure such Persons, as they find Cause, until the House be acquainted therewith.

Resolved, That the Serjeant at Arms be required to enter into the House of Richard Moone and JamesCotterell, or any others, where the said printed Books, intituled, "Dissertatio de Pace, &c.; or, A Discourse touching the Peace and Concord of the Church," or any of them, shall be found; and to seize all the said Books.

Resolved, That the Quorum of the said Committee be Five.

Regulating Printing.

Resolved, That the Bill for regulating Printing be reported on Monday Sevennight next.

Assessment.

The House resumed the Debate upon the Bill for the Assessment.

A Proviso was tendered to this Bill, in these Words; "Provided, that the University shall not be rated for the Sites of their Colleges, Houses, or Halls; nor pay more in the Pound for their Rents, than other Landlords of the same Places respectively:" Which was read.

Resolved, That this Proviso be read the Second time.

The said Proviso was read the Second time accordingly.

Resolved, That this Proviso be Part of the Bill.

Mr. Pury reports, from the Committee to whom the Business touching the Merchants of the Intercourse was referred, The Opinion of the Committee;

1. That so many of the Merchants of the Intercourse in London, as are Natives of the Ten Provinces, or any of them, under the King of Spaine's Dominions, have no Right, by colour of the great Intercourse made in the Time of Henry the Seventh, between that King and Philip Duke of Burgundy, to Exemption from Assessments for the Army:

2. That so many of the Merchants in London, calling themselves, The Merchants of the Intercourse, as are Natives of the Seven United Provinces, or any of them, under the State's Dominion, have no Right by Colour of the great Intercourse made in the Time of Henry the Seventh, between that King and Philip Duke of Burgundy, to Exemption from Assessments of the Army.

The Question being propounded, That the House doth agree with the Committee, That so many of the Merchants of the Intercourse in London, as are Natives of the Ten Provinces, or any of them, under the King of Spaine's Dominions, have no Right, by colour of the great Intercourse made in the Time of Henry the Seventh, between that King and Philip Duke of Burgundy, to Exemption from Assessments for the Army;

And the Question being put, That this Question be now put;

It passed with the Affirmative.

And the main Question being put; It was

Resolved, That the House doth agree with the Committee, that so many of the Merchants of the Intercourse in London, as are Natives of the Ten Provinces, or any of them, under the King of Spaine's Dominions, have no Right, by colour of the great Intercourse made in the Time of Henry the Seventh, between the King and Philip Duke of Burgundy, to Exemption from Assessments for the Army.

The Question being propounded, That this House doth agree with the Committee, That so many of the Merchants in London, calling themselves, The Merchants of the Intercourse, as are Natives of the Seven United Provinces, or any of them, under the State's Dominion, have no Right, by Colour of the great Intercourse made in the Time of Henry the Seventh, between that King and Philip Duke of Burgundy, to Exemption from Assessments for the Army;

And the Question being put, That this Question be now put;

It passed with the Affirmative.

And the main Question being put; It was

Resolved, That the House doth agree with the Committee, That so many of the Merchants in London, calling themselves, The Merchants of the Intercourse, as are Natives of the Seven United Provinces, or any of them, under the State's Dominion, have no Right by colour of the great Intercourse made in the Time of Henry the Seventh, between that King and Philip Duke of Burgundy, to Exemption from Assessments for the Army.

A Clause was tendered to this Bill in these Words: "And be it further Enacted and Declared, by the Authority aforesaid, That the Merchants, commonly calling themselves, Merchants of the Intercourse, residing in London, and elsewhere, within this Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland, shall forthwith pay all Sum and Sums of Money, formerly assessed and taxed upon them by virtue of any Ordinance or Act of Parliament, for the Use of the Army and Navy, or either of them, and yet unpaid: And that the said Merchants shall also pay, and be liable to pay, all such Sum and Sums of Money, as shall be assessed and taxed upon them, or any of them, as other Merchants-Strangers; any Privilege or Exemption, by Colour or Pretence of the great Intercourse made in the Time of King Henry the Seventh and Philip Duke of Burgundy, or otherwise to the contrary notwithstanding:" Which was now read.

And the Question being put, That this Clause be read the Second time;

It passed in the Negative.

And was, upon the Question, rejected.

Another Clause was now tendered to this Bill, in these Words; "And be it further Enacted and Declared, by the Authority aforesaid, That the Merchants, commonly calling themselves, Merchants of the Intercourse, residing in London and elsewhere, within this Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland, shall pay, and be liable to pay, all such Sum and Sums of Money, as shall be assessed and taxed upon them, or any of them, as other Merchants-Strangers; any Privilege of Exemption, by Colour or Pretence of the great Intercourse made in the Time of King Henry the Seventh and Philip Duke of Burgundy, or otherwise, to the contrary notwithstanding:" Which was now read the First and Second time; and, upon the Question, ordered to be Part of the Bill.

Post Meridiem.

Settling the Government.

A PARCHMENT was presented, with the Names of Lord Richard Cromwell, Lord Henry Cromwell, John Cleypooll junior, Esquire, Charles Worsley Esquire, George Manley Esquire, Thomas Milward, to be inserted as Commissioners for Westminster: Which was read; and, upon the Question, rejected.

Resolved, That the Names of John Blackwell the younger, and Richard Dean Esquires, be inserted into this Bill, as Treasurers at War.

A Proviso was tendered to this Bill in these Words: "Provided nevertheless, and it is hereby Declared, That the Laws of this Commonwealth shall not be altered, suspended, abrogated, or repealed, nor any new Law made, nor any Tax, Charge, or Imposition, laid upon the People, but by common Consent of the People assembled in Parliament:" Which was read the First and Second time.

The Question being propounded, That this Proviso be Part of the Bill;

And the Question being put, That this Question be now put;

The House was divided.

The Noes went forth.

Sir Ralph Hare, Tellers for the Yeas: 75.
Sir John Whitterong, With the Yeas,
Lord Lambert, Tellers for the Noes: 95.
Colonel Jones, With the Noes,

So it passed with the Negative.

Resolved, That the Debate upon this Bill be adjourned till To-morrow Sevennight.

Bills to be read.

Resolved, That the Bill for taking away the Court of Wards be read the Second time To-morrow, next after the Bill for the Government: And the Bill for SaltersHall next after it.